Vocal Evolution

Space Ghost: Man, Zorak, what was with your voice back then?
Zorak: Yeah, well, what's up with your voice?
Space Ghost Coast to Coast (revisiting their first meeting)note 

Actors are only human, which includes voice actors. Voice actors don't have to worry about makeup or costumes, so it can be easy to assume that their job is much easier than that of actors visible on the screen. It may or may not be, but the unique challenge they face is breathing life into an animated character with their voice alone and no other props. And like with new artists, it can take novice voice actors some time to grow into their character and develop distinctive voices for them.

On the flip side, lending one's voice to a show over multiple months or years can cause a voice actor to get lazy and begin slacking off on the nuances of their character's voice, or even age to the point where they find it impossible to sustain the original voice and have to make compromises. This decline in quality can also manifest itself in shows with large casts when all characters' voices begin to sound the same or monotonous. This doesn't tend to lead to lost jobs, because a decline in timbre quality is often less noticeable than a decline in acting or art quality. With child voice actors, whether a fan will like it or not, this is going to happen when they hit puberty, although some shows switch into The Other Darrin at that point.

This trope can also apply to any other medium requiring the voice for varied reasons: live-action actors may change a character's voice or just downgrade to their original voice as they grow more comfortable (or complacent) with the character; singers may change their singing styles to achieve a different artistic style; and so on. Other factors in this trope may include age (whether prepubescent actors dealing with the voice changes inherent in puberty, or more mature actors changing with increasing age) and health (vocal cord injury/strain, smoking, etc.).

In cases involving Talking to Himself, this can sometimes lead to characters sounding more or less like each other.

Contrast with The Other Darrin, in which the entire actor is replaced (or, in the case of voiceover work, the voice change is because an actor was replaced, not because the actor changed the voice).


Examples

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    Fan Works 
  • LittleKuriboh, the sole cast member of Yu-Gi-Oh! The Abridged Series, has got much better at coming up with distinct voices for his characters (and at speaking distinctly while doing those voices) between the first episode and the time the series hit double digits. He has also gotten over his cases of Ooh, Me Accent's Slipping. Compare this to This.
  • Amy's voice on Sailor Moon Abridged started as a hoarse whisper. It gradually became more of a high-pitched warble, which you can begin to hear around episode 12.
  • Jaleel White, who played the role of Sonic in three animated shows, reprises his role in a Sonic fanfilm, with his voice sounding somewhat more like the modern incarnations.

    Film - Animation 
  • Sunset Shimmer from My Little Pony: Equestria Girls has a softer and lighter voice in My Little Pony: Equestria Girls Rainbow Rocks, presumably to indicate her more heroic character. Her singing voice gets deeper in My Little Pony: Equestria Girls Friendship Games to differentiate from Twilight's singing voice which is done by the same voice actress.
  • In the first Brother Bear movie, Koda was voiced by a young child star Jeremy Suarez. In Brother Bear 2, Suarez reprises his role, but his voice sounds like it's clearly breaking and going through adolescence.
  • It happened with Fievel's voice between the first two movies and the television show of the An American Tail series. Fievel's voice actor was getting older.
  • When Miss Bianca's voice actress Eva Gabor reprised her role in The Rescuers Down Under, her voice for the character sounded more quieter and not as energetic as the previous film, likely due to her being much older than she was back when The Rescuers was released (which was back in 1977).

    Film - Live Action 
  • Harry Potter:
    • Helena Bonham-Carter started off playing Bellatrix Lestrange with a posh accent, which gradually evolved to become more Cockney-sounding. Carter's explanation is that Bellatrix is just so weird that she transcends accents.
    • Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint's voices broke between the first and second movies. In fact, pretty much every child actor aside from Matthew Lewis (Neville Longbottom) and Alfie Enoch (Dean Thomas) underwent a voice change in between the first and second films note .
      Steve Kloves: Well, the first thing that you notice when you see the movie [Chamber of Secrets] is that Harry and Ron's voice dropped a good two octaves. That's just really... bizarre.
  • Al Pacino had a youthful, almost nasal, voice from The Godfather to Dog Day Afternoon to Scarface (1983). Eventually tobacco started to take its toll. By the time Donnie Brasco rolled around, wow. This was one of the reasons he didn't return for The Godfather video game. He also tried voicing Tony Montana again in Scarface: The World is Yours, but just found it impossible to sustain the same voice twenty years later.
    • Same goes for Mickey Rourke, although it's been overshadowed by the change in his physical appearance.
  • Happened to the extended cut of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, which was Re Cut some thirty years after it was originally released. Since sync-sound was not recorded during filming (the various actors hailed from different countries and they all spoke in their native languages), the new scenes were never dubbed during the original cut's post production process, the original actors were brought back to dub the new lines. Problem was... they're all thirty years older the second time around (Eli Wallach was pushing on 90 when he dubbed his lines, and therefore his voice was even raspier than it was some forty years ago), and it shows.
  • Star Wars:
    • An interesting case with Yoda. When he first appears to Luke Skywalker in The Empire Strikes Back, he seems to be a funny, eccentric creature with a higher pitched voice similar to Grover, one of puppeteer Frank Oz's other characters. Later when he reveals himself to be the powerful Jedi master Luke was searching for, he drops the goofy act and also an octave. He then speaks in a deeper, voice for the rest of the movie. When he next appears in Return of the Jedi he goes back to the higher voice from when we first met him playing an oddball. It's as if Oz and the filmmakers only remembered his voice from his memorable first appearance. Yoda would continue to speak in the higher voice in The Phantom Menace before returning to the deep voice in the next two films, going really deep in Revenge of the Sith.
    • Carrie Fisher's voice is noticeably huskier in Return of the Jedi than it is in the previous two movies.
    • Also from Return of the Jedi: Luke's manner of speaking is far more formal and refined compared to the previous two films, tying nicely into his Character Development and his taking a level in badass.
    • James Earl Jones' voice for Darth Vader in A New Hope was a bit higher-pitched and more emotive, before becoming deeper and monotonous in The Empire Strikes Back. His Vader voice in Return Of The Jedi seemed to be a mix of the two.
    • Hayden Christensen's Anakin Skywalker spoke in a deeper, quieter voice in Revenge Of The Sith.
    • Anthony Daniels' voice for C-3PO got a bit higher pitched following A New Hope.
  • Sean Connery's deep voice got raspier and his lisp and Scottish accent got thicker over the years after he did his last official James Bond movie in 1971.
  • Marlon Brando's voice as Vito Corleone in The Godfather becomes raspier in the later scenes when the character is older and more frail.
  • In X-Men, Halle Berry gave Storm an African accent. In every other film, Storm speaks with an American accent.
  • Eva Green naturally started out with a very thick French accent but years of working outside French cinema has left her sounding slightly British. Her voice in Kingdom of Heaven is in-between - where her voice just sounds ambiguously exotic.
  • Forms a plot point in Shakespeare in Love, when the boy player in Lord Chamberlain's Men suffers an ill-timed attack of puberty just before curtain in Will Shakespeare's new play, leaving no one to play the female lead in Romeo and Ethel, The Pirate's Daughter. Cue Viola and a fabulous round of Recursive Crossdressing...

    Professional Wrestling 
  • Ten years and a nose condition turned Stephanie McMahon's voice from young and innocent during her debut and bratty in her first heel turn, to raspier during the Invasion and divorce angles (with the occasional high-pitch scream), to deeper, richer and more authoritative from her GM days on. Despite the vocal changes over the years, she's still widely remembered for that screechy, raspy, Harpy-like voice.
  • Compare snooty-accented Hunter Hearst Helmsley and the nasal Degenerate to the guttoral Game, Triple H.
  • Paul E. Dangerously's smooth tones at age 21 are a far cry from the high-pitched Paul Heyman of today.
  • Vince McMahon's has also evolved similarly going from cheerful and bold as an announcer to menacing as the evil chairman to increasingly cartoony to mellow post-haircut. Of course, when the time comes to let his infamous delivery of "YOOOOOOOOOUUU'RE FIIIIIIIIIIIIIRED!" rip, he really digs in and that menacing circa-2000 snarl comes right back.
  • In an inversion of Heyman, Good Ol' J.R. went from higher pitched to much lower over the years, due to a combination of aging and Bell's Palsy.
  • Kofi Kingston ditched the fake-Jamaican accent before his brief feud with Randy Orton in 2009.
  • During his heel turn in 2008, Chris Jericho became increasingly monotone week by week. Currently post-"End Of the World", it's lower but more emotive.
  • Bret Hart's voice has taken a noticeably raspy, hoarse sound compared to his youth.
  • Dwayne Johnson started out smooth and slow, became increasingly hammier during his Nation and Corporation stints, became more high pitch during the "Hollywood" Rock era and switching back and forth after his 2011 return.
  • Randy Orton has gone from suave and smooth to a sinister monotone after forming Legacy during his true main event rise.
  • Like his rival Bret Hart, Shawn Michaels' voice has gotten gruffer with age.
  • X-Pac's voice has become lower and more raspy over the years.
  • Shane McMahon's voice has deepened during his seven year hiatus from WWE.
  • Ric Flair's lisp has gotten worse as he's aged.
  • Tammy Lynn Sytch's voice has deepened considerably as she's aged, and she's not even that old. Drug use may also have factored into it.

    Puppet Shows 
  • The Muppets:
    • Not counting Muppets who have gotten different puppeteers, Gonzo is probably the most notable. His voice has gradually gotten deeper and less scratchy over the years. Just watch the first episode of The Muppet Show and then one of the post-Henson films.
    • When Kermit the Frog was in the first 20 years of his career (1955-1975), his voice sounded deeper, softer, quieter and somewhat stuffy and dull. Beginning in 1976, his voice became louder, more rubbery and less stuffy.
    • Once Kermit got taken over by Steve Whitmire (Rizzo, Wembly Fraggle), his voice went through some changes. At first, Kermit sounded almost exactly like he did when Jim Henson performed him, but by the time The Muppets came out, Kermit started sounding more like Whitmire's Ernie voice, mixed with Henson's Kermit voice.
    • Kevin Clash's performance of Elmo changed a couple of times throughout the years, first it was very nasally like Baby Sinclair from Dinosaurs, later it was higher and scratchier, then his voice became a few octaves higher and softer. Around 2003, the voice started to gradually get a bit deeper, probably due to the performer aging.

    Radio 
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. In the liner notes for the Tertiary-Quintessential scriptbook, Simon Jones (the voice of Arthur Dent) notes that everybody sounded the same, even if they looked a bit different. However, he adds, "Dirk [the producer] says he applied some arcane electronic test that proves my voice has dropped a semitone in the intervening twenty-five years; funny, I always thought men's voices became higher as they grew older."
  • This kind of change is also obvious in Elwood's voice in the House of Blues Radio Hour. He does sound maybe a bit higher-pitched than he did in the movies.
  • Tony Hancock started out quite plummy before dropping into the lugubrious tones he's better known for. The change started before Hancock's Half Hour, but there's still a very noticeable shift over the course of the series.
  • Surprisingly averted with Paul Harvey. Even though he was doing the show up until shortly before his death at age 90, the only time he sounded any different than in the sixties was during a spell of pneumonia which resulted in him sounding very rough.
  • American Top 40: Compare the Casey Kasem of 1970 (the show's earliest days) to his retirement from radio in 2009. His delivery was much different during the early shows (1970-early 1972), before changing into the form that fans know him best for (c. 1973-the late 1990s). By the early 2000s, age began taking its toll, and although he was definitely still Casey, his voice had grown much weaker. Despite the changes in his voice, Casey was still sharp as ever and — approaching his late 70s by the time of his retirement, was still able to show enthusiasm and sell the music that listeners more than 50 (and sometimes 60) years his junior were avidly listening to.
  • Most of the voices in The Goon Show are pretty consistent, but there were a few changes over the years. Peter Sellers originally played Henry Crun with a higher-pitched voice; the change was probably intended to make Crun distinguishable from Spike Milligan's Minnie Bannister. In some of the later episodes, after being temporarily sidelined with laryngitis, Sellers plays Bluebottle with far less falsetto. The most dramatic change involves Milligan's Count Moriarty. He goes from being a competent schemer in series 5 (1954) to a cringing dustbin-dweller in series 9 (1959), accompanied by an astonishing vocal evolution from a deep baritone to a snivelling whine. When the Goons were persuaded to remake some earlier episodes for transcription purposes, the new Moriarty voice didn't fit the old character.
  • Big Finish Doctor Who:
    • All the Doctors have rather different voices now, due to age:
      • Tom Baker used his older-sounding normal voice for the Fourth Doctor Adventures BBC box set, and then experimented a bit over his first season of Big Finish Fourth Doctor Adventures while attempting to reach the Fourth Doctor's smoother and more resonant vocal tone, leading to a handful of early stories where he neither sounds like his normal out-of-character voice nor like the Doctor. By his third season he nailed it and sounds virtually no different to his younger self.
      • Peter Davison has picked up quite a bit of gravel in his voice, but claims he feels more comfortable playing the character sounding like that than how he felt playing him the first time around. A lot of fans say the older-sounding voice fits Five's character better.
      • Colin Baker's voice got gravellier, as well as softer and breathier, which goes quite nicely with how much warmer and kinder a character he is in the Big Finish stories than in the show.
      • Sylvester McCoy barely sounds different at all apart from being more confident with the character.
      • Paul McGann sounds quite a lot deeper and more sensual in the audios than he sounded in the TV Movie. Part of this is due to the scripts bringing out darker and subtler notes in the character and his performance evolving to fit, and part of this is due to the bizarre region coding mixup that led to the movie being sped up slightly (slightly raising the pitch of his voice).
    • Nicola Bryant's Peri is a bit older-sounding, but has a more convincing American accent than on television.
    • Bonnie Langford's Mel is lower-pitched, softer and much less squeaky due to the actress ageing. Since part of the reason Mel was The Scrappy was because a lot of fans found her bright vocal tone painful to listen to, this is part of what helped get her Rescued from the Scrappy Heap.
  • Bob Kingsley (of Bob Kingsley's Country Top 40 and formerly of American Country Countdown) has gotten gradually deeper over the years. The change can be particularly noticeable in markets where an affiliate plays both Country Top 40 and an older ACC episode through the ACC Rewind feature.

    Sports 
  • Mixed Martial Arts
    • Lenne Hardt earned quite a following as the English announcer for Pride events with her wild, screeching pronunciations of each fighter's name, usually coupled with long trilled Rs. This style developed over time, with her first few appearances being completely sedate and unremarkable.
    • Bruce Buffer's early appearances as the ringside announcer for UFC events were much more sedate and conversational, with none of the animated shouting and spinning in place that he displays nowadays.
    • Longtime UFC commentator Mike Goldberg's voice sounded a lot different in his early days. After a few years on the job, his voice became deeper and more blustery.

    Stand-Up Comedy 
  • Comedian Larry The Cable Guy is known for the exaggerated Southern accent in which he speaks while in-character (he's actually from Nebraska). Over time, smoking has given him a lower, raspier voice.
  • Bill Engvall was a major Motor Mouth on his first two albums before slowing down the delivery. Strangely, the slower delivery has coincided with him becoming more of a Large Ham.
  • George Carlin's voice changing is also pretty obvious.
  • Paul Reubens' Pee-Wee Herman character originally had a higher, more nasal voice when he debuted in the late 1970's up until the end of the second season of Pee-Wee's Playhouse. After Playhouse moved to Los Angeles, Pee-Wee's voice dropped slightly, and Paul Reubens' characterization became a lot more abrasive.

    Theater 
  • In Vanities, in addition to the characters' voices maturing, Kathy and Mary progressively lose their Deep South accents.

    Web Animation 
  • Nearly all of the voices for the various characters on Homestar Runner have evolved over the years. To name just two examples, Homestar's voice became lower-pitched and less childish, while Strong Bad lost his Mexican accent in favour of a more gruff American one.. The latter was lampshaded in the bonus email "accent" on the "strongbad_email.exe" DVD, where Strong Bad started to worry about the softening of his accent, and tried to get his old voice back.
    • In fact, in one Strong Bad Email, they parody the very first Homestar toon they made by reverting to the old style, having a hatless Homestar, overusing the expression, "Holy crap!", and using Strong Bad's Mexican voice.
    • Bubs originally had a low, gruff voice. Starting from 2004, his voice became a bit more high pitched. Whereas he used to sound somewhat like Louis Armstrong, it was noted that he now sounds like Larry from Limozeen (the Fake Band in the same series; both characters are voiced by Matt Chapman) without the falsetto.
    • Strong Sad is especially notable, as his voice went from nasal to a soft falsetto. He also typically sounds much more upbeat today, possibly because his character has expanded beyond just being The Eeyore. It was gradual, but a modern Strong Sad sounds absolutely nothing like the Strong Sad heard in In Search of the Yellow Dello.
  • The Most Popular Girls in School: Everyone's voices gradually grew higher in pitch, and their dialogue became much more fluent.
  • In the beginning of Red vs. Blue Caboose sounds completely different than how he does now. At first he sounds normal, but due to textbook Flanderization he has gotten more idiotic sounding, halting and slow. It has happened to nearly every character to a minor extent, but Caboose is so different, it's disorienting..
    • Caboose's idiocy is explained that his mind was broken beyond repair when the evil AI controlling him at the time was ripped from his head. In addition to this, dvd extras suggest, if not state outright, that, when Caboose's mental image of Church was killed, he lost all the knowledge he'd ever been taught by Church.... which the extras go on to say was quite a lot, apparently.
    • The combination of Vocal Evolution and Flanderization was so pronounced in Caboose that one of the alternate endings to episode 100 had every episode since episode 9 revealed to be All Just a Dream, returning Caboose to his original voice and characterization.
    • Also, the original Sarge voice was based off of R. Lee Ermey. The voice actor, Matt Hullum, decided that the voice was too hard to keep reproducing, and came up with the current style. During the Season 4 DVD commentary he manages to find the old voice and then repeats the "Simmons is in charge of confetti" line from the very beginning of season one and then does the same line in the current voice. The difference is night and day.
  • The voices of the characters of A Day With Bowser Jr who were voiced by its author, Dannywaving, underwent an evolution as Dannywaving himself matured over the years. The most notable example of this is Bowser Jr, whose voice starts from almost unbearably raspy and high-pitched in the first videos to more mature in the latest ones.
  • RWBY goes through this a lot due to the fact that most of the cast are not professional voice artists and are learning the craft as they go:
    • Blake started off sounding very timid and unsure, which seems to be the result of her VA, Arryn Zech, not being fully prepared for the role initially. She started sounding a lot more confident and snarky as the show got rolling. As of volume 3, her voice is now sometimes losing a little of its deep, husky quality and slipping more towards Arryn's natural speaking voice (you can hear this best when she gets upset that Weiss might not be able to buy her lunch in "Round One").
      • Arryn's voice as Blake has changed even more in Grimm Eclipse and RWBY Chibi. It's entirely possible this could be related to the studio being used, as she now lives in L.A. and does her work outside of RT's studios. Either way, it's worth noting.
    • Weiss's voice is a little higher-pitched and youthful in Volume 3 than it was before, best heard when she gets mad at Neptune for flirting with all four members of Team NDGO. It's possible that this is being done to create more contrast between her and her older sister Winter.
    • Katie Newville's performance as Emerald sounds a little older and harsher than it did in Volume 3 than in Volume 2 (ironically, this caused viewers to speculate that she had a different VA and completely miss that her partner, Mercury, did get a new VA).
    • As of Volume 3, Miles Luna is sticking more to his natural voice for Jaune, no longer laying on the squeaks and vocal cracks like before.
    • In general, the quality of the voice acting for nearly every major character has been steadily improving throughout the series so far, even if their voices themselves haven't changed.

    Web Original 
  • Ever since he started doing short videos about video games and talking really fast in them, Yahtzee has refined his British yelling voice a fair bit. In fact, going back to some of the very first videos he ever made will near-inevitably make his former self come across as extremely mumbly in comparison to later videos.
    • He also speaks much more slowly and calmly in his earlier videos when compared to his more later ones. Try watching his two separate Tomb Raider videos he made two years apart; he sounds very different.
  • YouTube video maker PyramidHead87 has changed his "Pyramid Head" voice from a whiny rasp to a deep growl over time (in part caused by his change in recording equipment). This received a Lampshade Hanging at the beginning of his review of the RoboCop NES game, when he opens with the original voice and then clears his throat before going into the new voice.
  • YouTube Let's Play maker Sir Ron Lionheart can attribute some of his popularity to his dramatic change in voice and speech patterns. Compare his first video to basically any video after his Super Mario 64 Let's Play, and you won't believe it's the same person. If you watch his Super Mario 64 Let's Play from the beginning, you can more or less pinpoint exactly where he was driven insane.
  • On early episodes of Atop the Fourth Wall, Lewis "Linkara" Lovhaug had a noticeably calmer, quieter, slower delivery. Similarly, the first appearances of 90's Kid had Lovhaug using a slightly deeper and less hammy voice.
  • And for that matter, Doug Walker's voice for The Nostalgia Critic was originally his regular voice, instead of the more dynamic and broader tone he uses in-character. He also never used to scream like a little girl, instead seeming like he was genuinely angry.
  • Ditto with The Cinema Snob, who had a snobbish monotone in earlier episodes. In a later one, he reminisced about a previous review and briefly adopted an impression of his contemporaneous voice (and vocabulary, for that matter):
    Snob: I guess it wasn't "Kafka" enough for me.
  • Mathew Buck (aka Film Brain) was originally somewhat monotone on early episodes of Bad Movie Beatdown, but in 2013, he started using a much higher-pitched, more energetic delivery. The high pitch later slid back down to his normal range while keeping the newfound energy. According to his Twitter, this was because he wanted to counter criticism of his monotone delivery, but he reined it in a little because he felt he was overcompensating.
  • Dax Flame's voice was a lot calmer in his earlier videos.
  • ForrestFire101, most commonly known for his "LEGO Batman" series, has, along with the quality of his videos, dramatically changed his voice over three years. In his first video, and several afterward, every character sounded exactly the same. However, watching this video, you can notice, aside from the slew of other "famous" YouTube voice actors, that his Batman and Robin voices are severely different from each other, let alone themselves in his earlier works. The scary part is, if you watch all of his LEGO Batman videos in order of release date, you'll barely notice the changes between videos.
  • raocow started off with a much mellower voice and thicker French Canadian accent. As he developed his Talkative Loon personality for his Let's Play videos, he began using a higher-pitched, crazier tone of voice to match. He also became more fluent in English, to the point that it's hard to tell he's French Canadian. Even when he does a video out-of-character, his voice sounds nothing like it did on his early Let's Plays.
  • Back when Chuggaaconroy started doing Let's Plays in 2008, he sounded very sedate and somewhat low-pitched, making him seem on the vapid side. Come The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, he gradually starts to pick up in energy with each succeeding playthrough, eventually becoming the hamtastic Keet we know him as today during his Video Game/Okami playthrough.
  • The Nostalgia Chick originally had Lindsay's own Tennessee-tinged, typically feminine, quite lilty voice. Now she has a much lower sound, growlier and fitting her "ladette alcoholic who stopped caring" personality.
  • Phelous has gotten a bit more energy and sped up a bit more compared to his first couple of outings where he was more monotone and slowpaced.
  • In Glove and Boots' early videos, Mario had a higher voice and an almost Canadian-sounding accent - later on his voice got lower and the accent got more ambiguous - compare this early video to a more recent one.
  • The Angry Video Game Nerd's actual voice has stayed pretty consistent throughout the series' run, but you can definitely hear a gradual improvement in his public speaking skills over the years. Strangely, in 2011, he spoke in a much lower and mellower tone than usual, which made him sound more irritated than angry (Word of God suggests that this is because his heart was not really into making AVGN videos at the time, being that he wanted to begin work on the AVGN movie). Fortunately, in 2012, he returned to his normal pitch/aggression and now sounds pretty much the same as he did six years ago (except more relaxed and confident).
  • Cecil, The Narrator of Welcome to Night Vale, is always NPR smooth and sonorous, but as his character develops throughout the series he becomes more emotionally dynamic. This is especially obvious in the first anniversary episode "One Year Later", which begins with an Ironic Echo of the intro from the pilot. The words are almost identical but the reading has changed drastically.
  • Arin and Ross have both discussed this on Game Grumps and Steam Train respectively, the two not realizing how much their voices have changed over the years until they looked at their older works, with Arin's voice deepening and Ross's voice becoming significantly higher and losing his Australian accent. Arin attributes it to a combination of age and straining his voice due to how much he has to record, while Ross attributes it to living in America.
  • In Dragon Ball Z Abridged, Vegeta's voice was much lower and growlier in the first series. It's still raspy, but a little less like Christopher Sabat's performance. Krillin's voice also got higher and goofier as the series went on.
  • Video game reviewer Caddicarus has taken a deeper, more mature delivery as of the 2014 episodes, likely because he started the show in his late teens.
  • Let's Play creator Markiplier has gone through a bit of a vocal evolution. While he's currently known for having a Badass Baritone, compare to his slightly higher-pitched voice in his very first Let's Play video of Amnesia: The Dark Descent.
  • Sonichu creator Christian Weston Chandler made several videos throughout his life, many of which began circulating when the comic gained notoriety. Strangely, a video done at age 16 has him sounding somewhat relaxed and deeper, while later videos have him coming in with a louder, more nasal monotone. This is likely due to a lack of human interaction and his own autism.


Alternative Title(s): Vocal Decay

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/VocalEvolution