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Just For Fun: Inherently Funny Words
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    Animal Names 

    Food Names 

    Given Names 

    Place Names 
  • Abitibi Temiscamingue, Canada
    • The pronunciation is important: Ah-bee-tee-bee Teh-miss-kah-meng.
  • Albuquerque, NM
    • Not only Weird Al, Bugs Bunny knew it was funny ("I knew I should've taken a left turn at Albuquerque.") Made funnier by his Brooklyn accent that toined it into Albecoikie.
      • It even shows up in a Halo fanfic, of all places, narrated by a Covenant Elite: "...we had landed on the UNSCDF orbital platform Albuquerque. I had no idea which was more bizarre: The platform's name, which tied my mandibles in knots..."
  • Aloha, Oregon (whether you pronounce it as A-lo-wa as the city's name is supposed to be pronounced or as A-low-ha as the word "aloha" is pronounced otherwise)
  • Altoona, PA
  • Antananarivo, Madagascar
  • Antwerp, Belgium
  • Attawapiskat, ON, Canada
  • Assawoman, VA. Perfectly paired with Manassas, VA.
  • Assawompset Pond, MA
  • Azerbaijan
  • Baden-Baden, Baden-Württemberg, Germany.
    • Even funnier when you know that "Baden" means "Baths."
      • So it's German for "tub-tub"?
      • Actually, no. "Baden" is a German verb which translates to "to have a bath" and "to bathe". The correct German word for "Baths" would be "Bäder".
  • Bald Knob, AR/WV/VA
    • "Knob" here is a dialect word for "hill/mountain", which explains why there are not one but three cities named after a nearby summit with exposed rock.
  • Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei
  • Bangor, Maine-ey
  • Bangkok, Thailand
  • Batman, Turkey. Apparently they've tried to sue Warner Bros.
  • Beaver County, PA. With two boroughs called Beaver and Big Beaver and a city called Beaver Falls...
  • Belchertown, MA
  • Belgium
  • Bend, Oregon
  • Big Bone Lick State Park, Kentucky
    • Located near the towns of Beaver Lick and Rabbit Hash...
    • Heck, "Kentucky" itself becomes somewhat funny after saying it enough times.
  • Bird-in-Hand, PA
  • Blue Ball Lane, Surrey
  • Blue Ball, PA
  • Bong Recreation Area (I-94, Exit 340 in Wisconsin)
  • Boring, OR. Whenever a resident makes the newspapers, the headline always reads something like: "Boring man arrested for..."
    • One freeway sign in Clackamas says "Boring Sandy"
  • Boogardie, WA, Australia
  • Booger Hollow, Arkansas. Look it up.
  • Booger Mountain, North Carolina. Known for Christmas trees; their marketing campaign is "Always Pick a Booger!"
  • Botswana
    • Bophuthatswana
  • Bora Bora
  • Bruce Rock, WA, Australia
  • Bundaberg, QLD, Australia
  • Buttzville, NJ
  • Camas, Washington
  • Caniapiscau, Quebec, Canada.
  • Cape Foulwind, New Zealand
  • Cape Horn. If you don't get it, just yell "I really like Cape Horn!" really loudly and quickly in front of all your friends.
    • ... K-porn? Oh dear. Ain't the same thing as K-pop, is it?
  • Chattahoochee River
    • Chattahoochee, Florida
  • Chattanooga, Tennessee
  • Chappaquiddick, MA
  • Cheesequake State Park, New Jersey
  • Chicken, AK
    • So named because they couldn't spell Ptarmigan.
  • Chicken Rock, Isle of Mann
  • Chittagong, Bangladesh.
  • Clackamas, Oregon
  • Cleveland.
  • Climax. One in Michigan, one in North Carolina.
  • Clitheroe, Lancashire, England (the middle syllable is pronounced like "the", but still)
  • Cockalofty, Hereford, England
  • Cockburn Town, capital city of the Turks and Caicos Islands.
  • Cockermouth, Cumbria, England
  • Cockfield, County Durham, England
  • Cockfosters (a Piccadilly Line destination)
  • Cocklebiddy, WA, Australia
  • Condom, France. Where you can find the Condom Cathedral. No, it's not made of rubber.
  • Cooma, NSW, Australia
  • Cox Bight, TAS, Australia
  • Cuba, Missouri
  • Cucamonga, CA (Animated characters are required by law to pronounce it "KOOK... aMUNga!")
    • The full name is "Rancho Cucamonga", which might be even funnier.
  • Cut and Shoot, TX. No, really.
  • Czechoslovakia
  • Darjeeling, India
  • Denial Bay, SA, Australia (I have no idea why)
  • Dike Access Road, Washington (if you've ever driven north on I-5 from Portland to Seattle, you couldn't have missed the sign)
  • Dildo, Newfoundland, Canada
  • Dingle Peninsula, Kerry, Ireland
  • Diss, Norfolk, England
  • Djibouti (congratulations, you just laughed at thousands of starving people.)
    • Sheik sheik sheik, sheik sheik sheik, sheik djibouti...oh yeah!
  • Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine
  • Dookie, Australia.
  • Dooomadgee, QLD, Australia (yes, with three o's, I checked)
  • Dubbo, Australia
  • East Taphouse, Middle Taphouse and West Taphouse, Cornwall, UK
    • The same county has the village of Greenbottom
  • Embarrass, Minnesota, USA
  • Eromanga Basin, Australia. Hope they like hentai!
  • Fazakerley
  • Fernando Poo (see entry above on "poo")
  • Fingringhoe
  • Fishkill, New York, a place that PETA actually protested ("kill" is Dutch for stream)
  • Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada
  • Floyds Knobs, Indiana, USA
    • And in the same state, French Lick.
  • Flippin, Arkansas, USA
  • Fort Gay, West Virginia
    • Microsoft didn't think it was funny (that, plus they didn't know there really was such a place). An Xbox Live user from there got banned for it. The user had to fight to keep his account. Even the mayor got involved, and MS only reinstated his account when it started making national news.
  • French Lick, Indiana.
  • Fucking, Austria; which has problems with British tourists stealing their signs.
    • Same country: Oberfucking, Unterfucking, and Fuckersberg.
  • Great Cockup and Little Cockup. These are the genuine names of two hills in England.
    • Both are near the town of Cockermouth, which itself belongs on the list.
  • Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
  • The Gliese 581 System
  • Going Street and Failing Street, Portland, Oregon
  • Gosh, Armenia
  • Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico (this is funnier to Spanish speakers than English, mind you.)
  • Guam
  • Guggenheim. Also fun to say.
  • Hackensack, NJ (mentioned in many Joisey jokes)
  • Hahatonka State Park (in the Ozarks in Missouri)
  • Ha Ha Road, London
  • Hamtramck, Michigan
  • Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador, Canada
  • Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump, Alberta, Canada
    • So called because First Nations hunters used to chase buffalo off the cliff.
    • Dave Barry: "I have called the centre, and when they answer the phone, they say, very politely—I absolutely swear this is true—'Head-Smashed-In, may I help you?'"
  • Hell, Michigan (which does tend to freeze over in the winter)
  • Hialeah, Florida (Bells Are Ringing has Handel's Hialeah Chorus)
  • Hoboken, NJ. "Yeah, but that's Hoboken."
  • Hohokus, NJ
  • Hooker County, Nebraska
  • Hot Coffee, Mississippi
  • Humptulips, WA. (Yes, it's said like you think.)
  • Humpybong, QLD, Australia
  • Ii, Finland
  • Illibilli, Sudan (which is also the longest palindromic place name)
  • Intercourse, Pennsylvania, right around Amish country.
    • When the town was named it referred to a rail road crossing.
    • In case you didn't know, Intercourse is right near some other towns named Gap, Bird-in-Hand, Paradise, and Blue Ball. I'll let your dirty mind fill in the rest.
      • Though, sadly, there appears to be no Foreplay.
      • Don't forget Virginville, PA!
  • Idaho
  • Inaloo, WA, Australia
  • Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Jackson Hole, Wyoming
  • Jalalabad, Afghanistan
  • Kalamazoo, Michigan (that "zoo" is the crucial syllable is ably demonstrated by the song "I've Got A Gal In Kalamazoo")
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kapuskasing, ON Canada
    • Robert Munsch even wrote a story about a girl who just wanted to go to Kapuskasing because the name was so awesome.
  • Kennebunkport, Maine
  • Keokuk, Iowa
  • Kiek in de Kök, Tallinn, Estonia
  • Kokomo, Indiana. Sadly, nothing like the Beach Boys song.
  • Kola Superdeep Borehole, Russia (which happens to be in the Murmansk Oblast)
  • Kush (now known as the less funny but still so "Sudan")
  • Lahaina, Hawaii
  • Lackawanna, New York
  • Lajitas, Texas (La-HE-tahs) and its neighbor Terlingua.
  • Lake Merrimu
  • Lake Minnetonka (where you have to purify yourself)
  • Lake Okeechobee
  • Lake Titicaca
    • To the point where Animaniacs had an entire song about it - just because, as the Warners put it "we really like saying its name!"
    • "The 'Uranus' of Lakes!"
      • The best part is that it crosses many language barriers, as "caca" means the same thing in most Romance languages. So the Spanish conquistadors much have just kept the name because it was so funny. It's actually for this reason that chocolate took awhile to catch on (not great marketing when something brown comes from the cacao plant. Hey there! Try this tasty liquidy brown stuff! It comes from the poop plant!)
  • Lake Winnipesaukee (What About Bob?)
    • Lake Made-Of-Winnipesaukee!
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lizard Lick, North Carolina
  • Ljubljana, capital of Slovenia
  • Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch, Wales
  • Loachapoka, Alabama (another real place, pronounced "low-cha-POKE-ah")
  • Los Banos, California
    • From the same place, Los Gatos. Yes, "The Cats" (probably from the local mountain lions). Spanish missionaries were creative ones.
  • Lucky Slap, Angus, Scotland
  • Luxembourg
  • Medicine Hat, AB Canada
  • Meat Camp, North Carolina
  • Mill Plain Boulevard, Vancouver, Washington
  • Minnehaha Falls, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Mississippi
    • Pascagoula, Mississippi
  • Monkey Mia, WA, Australia
  • Moose Factory, ON Canada
  • Moose Lake, Minnesota
  • Muff, County Donegal, Ireland
  • Nagorno-Karabakh, Azerbaijan Republic of Artsakh It's Complicated...
    • Oh, come on, it's only recognized by Russia anyway.
  • Nempnett Thrubwell, England
  • Nicaragua
  • Nizny-Novgorod, Russia
    • And for that matter Novgorod.
  • Ngorongoro, Tanzania
  • Nob End, Lancashire, England
  • Nome, Alaska
  • Normal, Illinois
    • Oblong, Illinois (hence the headline "Normal man marries oblong woman")
  • Norway, or is that just me?
  • Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia
  • Oktemberyan, Armenia
  • Olongapo, Philippines (Known to anyone who's served in the US Navy's Pacific Fleet as the host city of U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay)
  • Oonadatta, SA, Australia
  • Orlando, Florida.
  • Orly, France ("NO WAI!")
  • Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
    • In fact, Burkina Faso itself is a pretty funny name.
  • Pahrump, Nevada
  • Relating back to funny animals, Penguin, TAS, Australia
  • Peculiar, Missouri
    • Allegedly named because the first two or three names submitted for the town were already in use elsewhere in the state; they were reportedly told to "choose something peculiar".
  • Pee-Pee Town
  • Penistone, Yorkshire, England. Not pronounced how it looks, but with a short E. Suffers from the Scunthorpe Problem nevertheless.
  • Perm, Perm Kial, Russia
  • Petaluma, California
  • The River Piddle, England, near the towns of Puddletown, Tolpuddle, Piddlehinton, Piddletrenthide, Affpuddle, Briantspuddle and Turnerspuddle. How I love being British.
    • And the demonym, Liverpudlian! (from Liverpool)
  • Pimperne, Dorset, England. Just let that imagery simmer for a little while.
  • Pismo Beach, CA.
  • Pollepel Island, New York.
  • Pratts Bottom, London
  • Primm, Nevada
  • Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania
    • Gobbler's Knob
      • Knob means penis in English slang, which makes it even funnier.
  • Qatar. Looks strange enough to English-speakers because it violates the q-u rule, but it's pronounced like "cutter".
    • Made all the funnier by the fact that it also sounds like "catarrh".
  • Qikiqtarjuaq, Nunavut, Canada.
    • How the heck do you pronounce that?
      • Badly.
  • Ramsbottom, Lancashire, England.
  • Regina, SK, Canada. Innocent enough if you don't know how to pronounce it (rhymes with 'vagina').
  • Ringarooma, TAS, Australia
  • Romanshorn, Switzerland (recently featured in Irregular Webcomic!)
  • Santa Claus, Indiana
  • Saratoga Springs, NY
  • Saskatchewan, Canada, but that may be because of this song.
    • Also, nothing rhymes with Saskatchewan.
    • Not to mention its biggest city, Saskatoon.
  • Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire, England. (Possibly even funnier when rendered as "S!!!!horpe" by internet censorware.)
    • If pages related to it are not just blocked.
  • Seattle, WA
  • Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha! PQ, Canada. Exclamation points and all.
  • Sexmoan, Pampanga, Philippines (sadly, nerfed)
  • Sheboygan, Wisconsin
  • Shitterton, Dorset, England. The village that dare not speak its name.
  • Six Mile Bottom, Cambridgeshire, England (this is honestly a real place)
  • Smackover, Arkansas [2]
  • Snohomish County, Washington
  • South Kumminin, WA, Australia
  • Sparta (or SPAAAAAAAAARRTAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!)
  • Stampersgat ("stomper's hole"), the Netherlands.
  • Swadlincote, Derbyshire, England
  • Tallahassee, Florida.
  • Termonfeckin, County Louth, Ireland. "Feck" means "fuck" in Irish slang.
  • Tierp, Sweden
  • Timbuktu, Mali, Africa
    • Which inspired the name of the One-Hit Wonder group Timbuk3 (of "The Future's So Bright, I Gotta Wear Shades" fame)
  • Tippecanoe, Indiana
    • "Tippecanoe and Tyler too"
  • Tittybong, Vic, Australia
  • Tlaquepaque, Mexico
  • Toad Suck Ferry (near Conway), Arkansas
  • Toast, North Carolina
  • Togo. Formerly the European colony Togoland.
  • Truth Or Consequences, New Mexico
  • Tuckahoe, Pennsylvania
  • Truckee, California
  • Tumbarumba, NSW, Australia
  • Turkey Scratch, Arkansas (birthplace of The Band's Levon Helm)
  • Tuskaloosa, Alabama
  • Tuzigoot, Arizona (pronounced too-see-goot)
  • Twatt, Shetland, Scotland
  • Two Egg, Florida
  • Upper Volta
  • Ur (not related to Ur Example) and Uruk
  • Uraguay (which is most certainly NOT pronounced "You are gay")
  • Uryupinsk, Volgograd Oblast, Russia
  • Useless Loop, WA, Australia
  • Versailles, MO doesn't look so funny, but it's pronounced "versaylz".
  • Vulcan, Alberta, Canada
  • Wagga Wagga, Australia
  • Wahoo, Nebraska
  • Walla Walla, WA.
  • Wanglik (AKA Hengli,) China
  • Wankdorf Stadium, Bern, Switzerland, Home of the Young Boys.
  • Wanker's Corner, Oregon.
  • Waterloo, either because of the -oo or the bathroom implications. Or both.
  • Wawa, ON Canada
  • Westward Ho!, Devon, England.
  • Weed, CA. Mentioned earlier, but too briefly. They like to lampshade it, too: one of the town's mottoes is "Try legal Weed!"
  • Wetwang, England
  • Whakatane, New Zealand
  • What Cheer, Iowa.
  • Windpassing, Austria.
  • Winnipeg, MB Canada
  • Wolverhampton, England. It doesn't seem like it'd be that funny, but believe me, it is.
  • Wooloomooloo, Sydney, Australia. Yep, eight O's! And it's pronounced like "Woolly Mulloo", to boot.
  • Woonsocket, Rhode Island (and South Dakota)
  • Wooster, Ohio
  • Wonthaggi, Australia (known locally as Wonni or The Thag, often depending on your opinion of the place)
  • Worms, Germany (famous in history for the Diet of Worms)
  • Yazoo City, Mississippi
  • Yeehaw Junction, Florida
    • Former name was Jackass Junction, Florida
  • Yemen
  • Yonkers, New York ("What are Yonkers?")
  • Yreka, California
  • Zanzibar (and its fictional counterpart Zanzibar Land, home of deadly poisionous Zanzibar hamsters).
  • Zimbabwe
  • It'd probably be easier to list the British hamlets whose names don't qualify.
  • Äteritsiputeritsipuolilautatsijänkä, Finland

    General 

By language

    Celtic languages 

    Yiddish 
  • Anything in Yiddish, or sounding like Yiddish, even (Note that about half of the examples are either Hebrew and German words, or very close to them. Yiddish practically mishes the rediculoucy of those two languages and takes it aup to eleven):
    • Alter Kocker
    • blech (a metal sheet you place on your heated stove to keep food warm, especially during Shabbos)
    • bupkis
    • cockamamie
    • —dik, a common suffix which turns certain words into humorous ones. It's the Yiddish version of the German —dig, and it means "of a kind". For instance, food that is Kosher for Passover is pesachdik, which sounds filthy when you say it.
    • ferkokter
    • fershlugginer
    • hoohah,
    • veeblefetzer
    • ganef
    • gefilte fish
    • gevalt
    • kabosh
    • kreplach
    • kvetch
    • matsess
    • meshuggenah
    • paskudnyik
    • nogoodnik
    • plotz
    • putz
    • schlemiel
    • schlemazel
    • schlepp
    • schmaltz
    • schmegege
    • schmuck
    • schnook
    • schnorer
    • schvitz
    • shmooze
    • shpilkis
    • tuchus
    • verklempt
    • vershpuket
    • The classic and incredibly useful "Oy vey!"
    • The word "Yiddish" itself.

    other Germanic languages (minus English) 
  • Afrikaans:
    • Aardvark- literally "earth pig"
    • (my personal favorite) Free Sample= Gratis Monster (Gratis pronounced Hratis)
    • Hell, "Afrikaans" itself is pretty funny.
    • Trying listening to someone with an Afrikaans accent speak English. They sound like some sort of mutant who bounces between Australia, the UK, and some alternate dimension on business regularly.
    • For other examples, see the entire of the film District 9.
      • For a further, greater example, see Lethal Weapon: "But... You're blick!"
    • Klipspringer

  • Dutch:
    • tentoonstelling
    • sokken
    • pannekoek
    • daarna
    • zeehond
    • varken
    • telefoon
    • nieuw
    • kinnesinne

  • German:
    • Achtung
      • !
      • !!!
      • Gesundheit!
    • Arschgeige
    • Dummkopf
    • Lederhosen
      • funny word for a funny garment
    • Flammenwerfer
    • Pritschenwagen ("pickup truck", which is pretty funny itself)
    • Wolpertinger, a mythical creature that is itself meant to be frightening but, seeing as it's a bunny rabbit with large antlers, ends up as adorable
    • Kaninchen. In other words, a li'l fluffy bunneh!
      • Karnickel, a regional term for the same li'l bunneh! (But it is better because it has more k's!)
    • Gegenüber
    • Kampfflugzeug
    • Kofferraumdeckel
    • Kugelschlepper
    • Mannschaft (which is simply the word for "team" but sounds dirty)
      • "Ich spiele gern mit meinen Mannschaft, jeden tag."
    • Schwanz ("tail"; in slang it can mean what you think Mannschaft means)
    • Ochsenschwanzsuppe (ox tail soup, but considering what the word above can mean...)
    • Schnurrbart
    • Dick (it means "thick" in the measurement-and-body-shape-senses)
    • Schlange ("snake")
      • By extension, the English slang term "schlong".
      • And a rattlesnake is a Klapperschlange! Which actually means basically the same thing, but is funnier.
    • Siebenfacher Sonnenkreis (OK, so it's two words, but this phrase from The Magic Flute never fails to crack me up)
    • Spinnenfinger ("spider fingers", unattactively long (often cold) fingers, that look like spiderlegs; especially funny if spoken in a Hessian dialect)
    • Ausfahrt (highway exit)
    • Gegengegangen
    • Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft. Longest-published word in the language, at 79~80 letters (nowadays, it would be written with a triple F).
    • Ananas (pineapple, not bananas)
    • Schmetterling (Butterfly. Interestingly, "schmettern" means to strike hard/violently)
    • Schnauzer
    • Schwippschwager (The brother in law of your brother or sister in law)
    • Und (and), if said in the right way.
    • Wienerschnitzel
    • Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung ("speed limit")
    • Pferdefedern (literally, "horse feathers")
    • Dirndl
    • packen
    • kaputt (which has been loaned to English)
    • Mumpitz (which means something along the line of "balderdash")
    • Ach!
    • Vergnügt (pronounced "fair-gnyct." go ahead, try and say it without giggling.)
    • Dudelsack, pronounced "doodle-zock". It means "bagpipe".
    • Schmaltz
    • Büstenhalter
    • Pfannkuchen
    • rumspringen
    • Oddly enough, schadenfreude. It means receiving pleasure at the pain of others.
    • Fünfundfünfzig (Foonf-oont-foonf-zic. It means 55.)
    • Walpurgisnacht
    • Schnupfen
    • Besteckschublade
    • vollgepfropft ("choked up")
    • Spargel (Asparagus) (Pronounced "schpargel")
    • Schweinhund
    • hauptbahnhof
    • jodeln ("to yodel" — remember that J is pronounced as Y)
    • Eichhörnchen (squirrel. This word is very hard to pronounce correctly if German isn't your first language. Try to say it several times in a row and not laugh.)
    • Fagott (bassoon — the accent goes on the second syllable)
      • Fagott?! Mein Gott!
    • Zweitterion, a type of organic molecule.
    • Kartofflewaffle

  • Swedish
    • Basically, anything at IKEA. One particular example, appleflarn, an oat cookie with apple pieces baked in.
    • Another one is Malm. You can't say it without lapsing into meditation speak. Mallllllmmmmmmm
    • 'Fart' means 'speed', as in 'velocity'. There are roadsigns in Sweden with words such as 'Infart', 'Utfart', 'Påfart' and 'Avfart'. In = In. Ut = Out. På = On. Av = Off. Also, 'Cruise control' is 'Fartkontroll'.
    • slut ("end"; pronounced "sloot")
    • Rymdkapsel (space capsule)

    Italic and Romance languages 
  • Latin:
    • The pronoun hic, haec (pronounce [haik]), hoc. Also works if you're a Francophone, as "hic" is the onomatopoeia for hiccups in both French and English.
      • The Astérix comics went to town with this — every time they showed a drunk Roman, they'd use all three pronouns for his hiccups.
    • Not to mention, the verb 'facio'. (And to go with imperatives- 'Dic me! Dic me!' It ought to have some indicators for long vowels, but not in our textbook...)
    • ambulabamus ("We were walking")
      • In fact, any verb ending in -bimus, -bamus, -bimini or -bamini is funny.
    • desideraverant ("They had desired")
    • plumbum (lead)
    • Mutunus Tutunus, a phallic marriage deity.
    • superbum (superb)

  • French:
    • bibliothèque (library)
    • ennui
    • escargot (snail)
    • fromage (cheese)
    • ménage
    • caoutchouc, especially in the song Ça Plane Pour Moi
    • pamplemousse (used as a running gag in the webcomic Bob the Angry Flower)
      • Used incorrectly, nonetheless; "pamplemousse" actually means "grapefruit".
      • There's even a band that derives it's name from this word, though they change the spelling to Pomplamoose.
    • poisson (fish), especially because of its closeness in spelling to "poison" (the French word for which is spelled identically to the English—and, yes, the pun is exploited in French editions of Astérix)
      • "Who poisoned the poisson?"
    • poubelle
      • plus belle qu'une poubelle
    • merde, even better because it means poop (as well as made famous by Monty Python).
    • phoque, pronounced like a certain English F word (elementary school French class was never the same when they came up with that silly zoo program where you clicked on the animals, and all you could hear was "phoque", "phoque"...)
    • quinze
    • harpe, and since the h is silent, it makes someone saying sound as if they are trying some strange seal bark. Try continually saying "arp arp arp arp" with a French accent and not laugh.
    • hockey, especially when "au" is used before it.
    • calculatrice
    • le fromage est mort parce que le chat est dans l'aspirateur or: the cheese is dead because the cat is in the vacuum cleaner.
    • agrafeuse, the lovely word for stapler
    • affiche, or "poster" used in the same way with a French accent
    • concombre, or cucumber
    • raplapla, meaning tired
    • roploplo, usually used as plural, roploplos
    • Nimportequi
    • Beau tchoc (means "pretty bird" in Cajun French)
    • Tractopelle (backhoe)
    • feuille (Means leaf and is pronounced like an "f" with the "oo" from "good" combined with a "y" sound").
      • Actually, any word with an "euille" sound is funny. �il, �illeton, feuille, fauteuil...
    • grenouille (frog). As with the former, any word that ends with "ouille" is funny. The fact that a common French vulgar word ends with this probably doesn't help.

  • Spanish:
    • chimichanga (a Mexican dish)
    • chicharrón (fried pork rinds)
    • hablaba (I/he/she/it spoke)
    • trabajaba (I/he/she/it worked)
      • And by association, trabajábamos (we worked)
      • Any past imperfect conjugation of any verb ending in -ar really...
      • jugaba (I/he/she/it played)
      • Except the irregulars
    • mundo (world)
    • Me Puse (I have) When you pronounce it correctly, it sounds like a cat.
    • mofongo (a Puerto Rican dish)
    • bufanda (scarf)
    • jipijapa (Panama hat)
    • galimatías (gobbledygook)
    • Perú, emú, cebú, anticucho (according to the -oo phonetics)
      • Ñandú. Seriously, try to say it with a straight face.
    • marmota (groundhog)
    • panza (belly)
    • salchichas (sausages)
    • By extension, most words with the suffix "-ito" and "-ita" as a diminutive ("pancita")
      • Not to mention you can repeat the diminutive as many times as you like for emphasis, thus something extremely small could be ''chiquitititititito" or "chiquitiquitiquitico"
    • pie (foot) (pronounced PEE-eh)
    • sacapuntas (pencil sharpener)
    • equipaje (baggage). Say it out loud.
    • catorce (fourteen)
    • yuxtaponer (to juxtapose) and all its conjugations: yuxtapusiste, yuxtapuesto, yuxtaponga...
    • cacahuate (Mexican Spanish for peanut)
    • marmita (cooking pot)
    • limpiaparabrisas (windshield wipers)
    • poner, pongo (to put, I put)
      • And puse ("I put" in the past)!!! Meow, meow...
    • pescado (fish)
    • atún (tuna)
    • pez globo (blowfish)
    • facón (a sword carried by Argentinian cowboys)
    • quizás (perhaps)... again, say it out loud.
    • desafortunadamente (unfortunately)
    • guacamolè (avocado-based dip)

  • Italian:
    • squillante
    • Adverbs which are formed by adding the suffix "-mente" to present participles ending in "-ente". Particularly the word indipendentemente ("independently"). More so if you still haven't grasped its proper pronunciation.
    • words ending in -otto: salsicciotto, bambolotto, orsacchiotto...
    • words ending in -one: bombolone, provolone, polpettone...basically, most Italian word endings are inherently funny
    • aiuola (flowerbed)
    • arzigogolato (tortuous)
    • sghiribizzo (whim)
    • scarabocchio (scribble)
    • pisello (pea, but also means "willy")
    • patata (potato, but also a nickname for a certain female part)
    • pappa (pap, baby food)
    • pupù (poop)
    • rimbambito (senile)
    • trottolino (lively child)
    • marmotta (groundhog)
    • culetto (little butt)
    • dondolo (swing)
    • cuculo (cuckoo)
    • abbiocco (fit of drowsiness)
    • abitabilità (habitability)
    • cocomero (watermelon)
    • patatrac (a crashing sound)
    • chiappe (butt cheeks)
    • stronzio (strontium, but it sounds almost identical to an Italian insult. EVERYBODY will giggle if you mention it)
    • coccoloso (cuddly)
    • acciaccatura (a musical ornament)

  • Romanian:

    Japanese 
  • Japanese has a good bit of reduplication, usually used to indicate some degree of vagueness; there's even a character used to indicate repetition of the previous kanji (々). As such, you end up with words like 時々 "tokidoki" (sometimes, "time-time"), 黙々 "mokumoku" (mute, "silence-silence"), 中々 "nakanaka" (rather) or 我々 "wareware" (we "I-I").
  • desu - if you don't think it's funny, say it five times fast without giggling.
  • Chikatetsu (subway)
  • koko/soko/asoko (here/there/over there)
  • demo (but)
  • eeto (erh...), n, and other stopgaps and fillers
  • In particular, "ano...," meaning "that..." is popular as well, sounds slightly dirty in English and IS dirty in Spanish.
  • moshimoshi
  • haha (mother) and chichi (father)
  • aso, because if you say it the right way...
  • chin - while still a body part, it's not in the same region as the english one.
    • Try below the belt. Actually, almost any euphemism for a penis is Japanese is hilarious. There's at least twelve.
  • Nobuatsu Aoki.
  • baka (largely thanks to Akane Tendo)
  • bukkake (the smart bomb of dirty words. First off, few people know what it is - those who don't go home and look it up..."AAAAAAAAAAGH!" It also has a totally clean alternate meaning as a style of noodle preparation. Plus, it's ridiculously fun to say). And it can also be easily confused with "Bokukko".
  • Moshi moshi
  • Yoshi
  • Oppai
  • bonkura
  • "Cake" is pronounced as "ke-ki", or, coincidentally, "KE KE KE KE".
  • Itadakimasu (somewhat appropriately, sounds like "Eat a duck, we must")
  • Nani?! Standard for any moe-blob.
  • Dango
  • No da!/Na no da!
  • Gyūnyu (cow's milk)
  • Washi (how old men say "I" or "me"). Try saying it in an old man's voice.
  • -tachi, a collectivizing suffix for all the various gender- and age- specific ways to say "I" (ore/boku/atashi/watashi/etc.), which can add a humorous nuance beyond the meaning of "we" ("Ore-tachi"="we [tough guys]...")
    • The word "tomodachi" was originally made by applying the collectivizing "-tachi" to the word "tomo" (friend), but nowadays this word also means a single friend. How to make a noun which explicitly means "a group of friends"? Well, of course, add the same suffix once more: "tomodachitachi"!
  • Seieki.
  • 若干 (jakkan), despite being more or less synonymous with ちょっと (chotto) or 少し (sukoshi), is considered more inherently funny.
  • Atatakai - warmish
    • Even more fun in past tense, "Atatakakatta"
  • Uso. It means "Lie".
    • Uso da! (Liar!)
  • Midori means green and is insanely fun to say (though not as much as tokidoki)
  • Wagamama (selfishness)
  • Hikikomori, but probably not funny if you are one.
  • Hito is 'person', while hitobito is 'people'.
  • mimikaki
  • Ninki (popular)
  • Nonki (easy going. Trying it and the above in rapid succession.)
  • Shishunki (puberty). Especially funny for Russian speakers when transliterated (using the Polivanov system) as "сисюнки", which is dangerously close to the Russian word for "titties".
  • konichiwa
  • shiitake (as in the mushrooms)
  • Basically any by itself, especally "Pu" (see "Poo" above), and any other symbols ending in "U" (for the same reasons of he "oo" words).
  • The sequence of numbers, 8-8-7-1 (hachi hachi nana ichi)
    • Using the slightly less popular Japanese variation for "seven", the same sequence is "Hachi-Hachi-Shichi-Ichi.
  • geso (squid tentacles for eating)note 
  • sumo (a funny name for a funny sport)
  • ninja
  • Unputenpu (trusting something to chance). Fans of Kaiji will be familiar with this one.
  • Kuuki versus Kukki: the first means "air," the second is the Japanese pronunciation of "cookie." You will get them mixed up.
    • Similarly: chizu (map) vs. chiizu (cheese)
  • Many Japanese Pokémon names qualify as this, with many of them being portmanteaus of existing words:
    • Pikachu ("Pick a chew, any chew!")
    • Fushigisou (Ivysaur)
    • Shizarigā/Shizariger (Crawdaunt)
    • Roobushin/Roopushin (Conkeldurr)
    • Būbā/Boober (Magmar)
    • Matadogasu (Weezing)
    • Ragurāji (Swampert)
    • Kekkingu (Slaking)
    • Bosugodora/Bossgodora (Aggron)
    • Mukuhōku (Staraptor)
    • Rejigigasu (Regigigas; fun to say in English as well)
    • Gigaiasu (Gigalith)
    • Gamageroge (Seismitoad)
    • Darumakka
    • Hihidaruma (Darmanitan)
    • Rankurusu (Reuniclus)
    • Baibanira (Vanilluxe)
    • Shikijika (Deerling)
    • Mebukijika (Sawsbuck)
    • Tamagetake (Foongus)
    • Gigigiaru (Klinklang)
    • Shibishirasu (Tynamo)
    • Shibibīru (Eelektrik)
    • Ononokusu (Haxorus)
    • Genosekuto (Genesect)
  • wakuwaku
  • ojama
  • mushi
    • Even better for Germans, because "Muschi" (pronounced the same) means "pussy" (in both the cat and the... non-cat sense). I once had to translate a threat along the lines of "from what stone did you crawl, worm" - growled in the best Yakuza voice the teacher could manage, of course - and the moment he said "mushi", there was no holding back.
  • Mushishi
  • Sata Andagi!
  • okonomiyaki
  • Tokyo and Kyoto, especially if close together. ("Tokyo and Kyoto" itself can be pretty funny in Japanese - the Japanese word for "and" is "to")
  • kabuki

    Other Languages 
  • Aboriginal Australian languages:
    • kookaburra
    • Woop Woop. Yes, it's a place.
    • kangaroo
    • wallaby
    • Toowoomba
    • Woomera
    • Coonamble
    • Wagga Wagga
    • Goondiwindi
    • didgeridoo
    • Wollongong
    • Wombat
    • Bundanoon
    • Tubbarubba

  • Arabic:
    • dhimmi ("people of the book", the term used in the Abbasid Caliphate to refer to followers of other Abrahamic religions)

  • Armenian:
    • apoosh (meaning fool)
    • chezarmanak (meaning "don't be suprised")
    • duduk
    • saganakagoyn (brown)

  • Finnish:
    • saippuakuppinippukauppias (the world's longest palindrome, 'meaning' "soap cup bunch merchant")
    • Kalevala
    • höpö-höpö! (meaning "nonsense!")
    • lämpimämpi (meaning "warmer")
    • saarikaari (meaning "arch of islands")
    • hihhuli (meaning "fanatic" and also the only Finnish word with a geminate "h")

  • Hungarian:

  • Korean
    • bibimbap (rice, vegetables, egg, chili paste, and sometimes meat mixed in a hot bowl)
    • hakmun/hangmun (One means "schoolwork" the other means "anus." Due to quirks of Korean pronunciation they end up sounding identical.)
    • hojumeoni (pocket, sounds like "Hold you(r) money.")
    • oksusu (corn)
    • uyu (cow's milk, from the same Chinese root as Japanese "gyūnyu" listed above)

  • Polish:
    • fart ((good) luck)
    • pies (dog, mostly funny due to the false friend)
    • potrzebie

  • Russian
    • бутерброд (sandwich) pronounced "booterbrod". Comes from the German word "Butterbrot" (Butter bread, aka Bread with Butter)
    • глупый (stupid) pronounced "gloopyi"
    • Phobos-Grunt (Фобос-Грунт), where "Grunt" is pronounced "groont".
    • гофрированный (like, wrinkly metal. Damn, it got funnier) pronounced "gophrirovannyi"
    • грымза (old hag, borrowed from Polish) pronounced "gryimza".
    • кукуруза, pronounced "koo-koo-roo-za," emphasis on the "roo." It means "corn," and sounds a lot like "кукурику," (koo-koo-ree-koo), the Russian name for the cry of the animal who probably eats кукуруза, the rooster.
    • бричка (chaise, again borrowed from Polish), pronounced "breechka".

  • Turkish:
    • Bashi-Bazouk
      • Along with the rest of Captain Haddock's vocabulary. Captain Archibald Haddock, to give his full name...
    • Ali Baba
    • babaganoush
    • sesame
    • baklava
    • Constantinople
      • Istanbul
    • elele
    • Fark etmez (means, "It doesn't matter.")

  • Hebrew

  • Chinese
    • Bōluó (pineapple)
    • Moo Goo Gai Pan

  • Indonesian
    • Kerbau (water buffalo), or its phonetic simplifying Kebo.
    • Kuda (horse)
    • Burung (literally means bird, but it can earn you a few chuckles as it is basically the equivalent to 'cock' in every way)
      • The 'low' Javanese/Sundanese word manuk also applies.
    • Dodol (a type of sticky sweets similar to toffee)
    • Javanese-derived Peyang or Peyot (slanted/dented surface)
    • And many more, exarcebated by the many and varied languages of Indonesia. Most often, an innocent-meaning word in one regional language can turn one-eighty in meaning in another.
      • To name an language pair example: Javanese (spoken in Java) and Banjarese (spoken in South Kalimantan). Kaputing in Banjarese means 'death', while in Javanese (and Indonesian in general) it roughly means 'to the nipples'. Hancik in Javanese means 'footstool', in Banjarese it means 'to have sex'. You get the point.

  • Marathi
    • dabbawala (someone who delivers lunchboxes)


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