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Various figures released of the Mighty Morphin Red Ranger (Top) and original Megazord (Bottom) over the decades by Bandai and Hasbro.

"It's the Mighty Morphin Power Rangers - Teenage defenders of Earth! The Power Rangers are driven by the power of the ancient dinosaurs! Lately, Evil Space Aliens have become a real safety hazard. Earth's only hope: the Power Rangers!"
Narrator from the very first Power Rangers toy commercial
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Being a Merchandise-Driven franchise, it's only natural that Power Rangers would have had many, many toylines over the years. Thanks to the show getting new Humongous Mecha and (after Season 3) new suits every season (every two seasons from Power Rangers Samurai onward), there have always been ample opportunity to refresh the line every year.

Typically, the average Power Rangers toyline for any given season will include the following:

  • Basic Figures - The backbone of the toyline. Exactly What It Says on the Tin. These figures typically provide standard articulation, the Ranger's signature weapon, and a Deluxe Morpher gimmick if there is one. If a Ranger gets some kind of secondary mode (such as a Battilizer or Super form), those will show up here. Many of the early figures included some kind of gimmick (usually some kind of action attack or electronic sounds), but eventually this was dropped in order to provide more articulation.
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  • Deluxe Zords - How the Humongous Mecha are typically depicted. These toys tend to be significantly larger than the Basic Figures and can combine with other Deluxe Zords in order to form that season's Megazord or various other combinations. Bandai used to just import the same molds Japan used for their Super Sentai mecha, but starting with Operation Overdrive, Bandai would start to make all new molds for the Western market. These would typically be of lower quality, much smaller, and be missing features from the Sentai version. From the Mighty Morphin recut until Ninja Steel, all Zords incorporated the Zord Builder gimmick, where you could combine Zords from one season with another, since all the plugs and ports were the same. These are typically the most scrutinized toys in any given line. Bandai usually packaged the main Megazord in one big package, before selling auxiliary Zords separately, but Hasbro has instead split the Zords up, typically having the Red Ranger's Zord by itself and the rest in 2-packs.
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  • Role Play Items - These include that season's Morpher, main melee weapon (typically a sword), main ranged weapon if separate from their melee weapon, individual weapons (though not every season has them), Sixth Ranger Morpher, and the Sixth Ranger's primary weapon. Morphers include various lights and sounds, with later releases including full speech phrases. Starting with Megaforce, Morphers now incorporate little trinkets (included with other toys in the line) that can generate different sounds and phrases when entered. This line also includes face masks modeled after the Rangers' helmets for kids to wear, especially around Halloween, along with a set with smaller weapons.
  • Bike Figures - Usually a Basic Figure paired with some kind of vehicle, typically a motorcycle. Whether these cycles actually appear in the show tends to vary from season to season. Some seasons simply reuse the Basic Figures completely, but other seasons either slightly change the molds (typically by giving the Ranger permanent "handle holding" hands) or include significantly less paint than the standard line. Note that these sets don't necessarily have to be motorcycles, as some have includes personal helicopters or jets, but bikes are the most common release. Bandai loved making these when they had the license, but Hasbro has only had one or two per line thus far.
  • Auto-Morphin Figures - These figures are of a similar size to Basic Figures, but incorporate a gimmick where the Ranger's head can flip inside the chest and reveal their civilian head. This is done either by pushing the Ranger's belt buckle or by squeezing their legs together. They will also have fewer accessories than Basic Figures, and what weapons they do have will have less paint than their mainline counterparts. Not every season will have this line of figures.

When Saban regained the rights to the franchise, a higher quality toyline was introduced aimed at older fans.

  • Legacy Collection - Bandai's deluxe line included figures, Zords, and role play items. The figures typically had much more articulation than the Basic Figures, more accurate paint applications, accessories, and were almost twice as tall as the Basic line. The figures also included a Build-A-Zord line where a piece of a Megazord related to that Ranger would be included, and completing the entire team would get you a Megazord figure. The deluxe Zords used packaging similar to the original Mighty Morphin packaging, often included die cast metal parts, and had more articulation than their original molds. These Zords were also Zord Builder compatible, so you could mix and match them with the standard Zord toys. The role play items made heavy use of die cast metal, were often of a 1:1 scale (or bigger, in terms of the Morpher) and were extremely screen-accurate.
  • Lightning Collection - Hasbro's replacement after they bought the franchise. Thus far, the line has concentrated mostly on the Rangers themselves, providing even more articulation than Bandai's Legacy line, civilian heads when applicable, special effect parts, and exchanging the Build-a-Zord gimmick for more accessories relevant to the Ranger in question. Hasbro has also started a separate Deluxe line that includes either monsters or a set of a Ranger with some kind of vehicle. After dipping their toes with a non-transforming Zeo Megazord, Hasbro would eventually announce the Zord Ascension Project, which aims to have combiner Megazords with lots of detail, paint applications, and articulation, sort of their equivalent to the Soul of Chogokin line in Japan.
  • Power Rangers Ultimates - By Super 7, the figures in this line are slightly taller than the Lightning Collection figures, are a bit more accurate to their Sentai proportions, have different articulation, and include vastly more accessories. However, because of this, the line is more expensive than Hasbro's line and, as of this writing, only includes figures from Mighty Morphin.
  • FigZero - 1/6th scale figures by Threezero, featuring the Season 1-2 lineup. These figures have excellent articulation, cloth outfits to mimic the spandex and hide the joints, and every possible weapon variation each Ranger had, but are very expensive.

There have been other lines over the years, such as Happy Meal toys, preschool-aged toylines, miniature statues, blind box toys, and more, but this page will mostly concentrate on the central toylines by Bandai and Hasbro.


It's Toy-phin time!:

  • Awesome Personnel Carrier: Many late-season Zords serve this function.
    • Titanus would be the first, being able to carry the Megazord in the famous Ultrazord formation. He would be re-introduced in Mighty Morphin Season 3 to carry the Ninja and Shogun Megazords and be retooled for the In Space toyline.
    • Season 2 of Mighty Morphin brought about Tor the Shuttlezord, which could hold either the Red Dragon Thunderzord (only in its Warrior mode) or the White Tigerzord (in either mode) inside of its shell.
    • Pyramidas from Zeo could hold either the Zeo Zords or the Super Zeo Zords after transforming.
    • Turbo included the Artillatron, a massive carrier that could hold either the Turbo Zords or the Rescue Zords.
    • The Supertrain Zords from Lightspeed Rescue could actually hold the original Lightspeed Zords inside.
    • Averted with the Brachio Zord in Dino Thunder. In the show, the Zord carried all of the other Bio Zords inside it, but the toy version is too small to carry any of the Deluxe Zords. Instead, smaller single-colored versions of the Zords were included to give the same effect.
    • The Battlefleet Carrier from Operation Overdrive has a spot where one of the Megazords can stand, although it's not a strict carrier Zord like previous examples.
    • Also averted with the Titano Zord from Dino Charge. The Japanese toy allowed you to store a bunch of Dino Batteries, but the American toy was made too small to hold the Dino Chargers, only including a molded piece of fake Chargers instead.
  • Blind Bag Collectables: The franchise has had various lines of these over the years, though it really started to ramp up with the Neo Saban era. Hasbro would continue the line with the Mini Morphin figures.
  • The Board Game: Of course, there was one released during Season 1. There wouldn't be another one until Samurai, and then a version of Monopoly for the 20th Anniversary. A tabletop figure game, Heroes of the Grid, would be released near the end of the Neo Saban era, but Hasbro would allow it to continue making expansion packs.
  • Built with LEGO:
    • When Bandai had the license, there was a brief line of Mega Bloks toys based on Season 1 of Mighty Morphin, Ninja Storm, Dino Thunder, SPD, Samurai, Megaforce, and Super Megaforce.
    • The Dino Fury Deluxe Zords can be disassembled completely and re-attached in almost any combination using a variety of 2x2 LEGO-esque connector ports.
  • By the Power of Grayskull!: The Beast Morphers Deluxe Morpher had a microphone that could pick up sounds. When you push the main button, the visor pops up and a voice says "Are you ready? Say 'It's Morphin Time'!," and then plays a jingle when it detects speech. The sensor can't actually detect what you are saying, so any phrase will work.
  • Breaking Old Trends:
    • Turbo was the first (and only, until Hasbro) season not to give the Rangers any bikes, instead going exclusively for cars, for obvious reasons. The Blue Senturion did get a bike, but he's technically not a Ranger.
    • Ninja Steel was the first line since Season 3 not to have any non-transforming Megazords in the Basic Figure line. There were versions of the Blue Dragon and Rumble Tusk Zords released with removable armor, but none of the Ninja Steel Megazord or Bull Rider Megazord.
    • Hasbro's Beast Morphers line breaks a few trends in regards to the Basic Figures and Deluxe Zords.
      • The male Rangers have more screen-accurate builds rather than the muscular Heroic Build previous Rangers had.
      • Female Rangers no longer have Boobs of Steel.
      • The Basic Figures have painted weapons again for the first time since Ninja Storm.
      • For the first time, there were no Bike Figure sets, or any kind of vehicle set. The Cruise figure could transform into a bike, but it was sold as another figure in the line rather than a traditional bike.
      • The Deluxe Zords were sold in multiple packs rather than in one big package.
      • For the first time since the first half of Megaforce, there were no toy-exclusive Zords.
      • First set of Zords to not include the Zord Builder mechanic since RPM.
  • Chariot Pulled by Cats:
    • Both Zeo Zord I and II had pull cords that could be attached to Zeo Zords III and IV so the latter could pull the former.
    • Dino Thunder had two toys of this effect. The first, which was in the show, is the Mesodon Megazord, where the alt mode is a red triceratops pulling a large wagon. The second, which was toyline-exclusive, has the Triassic Ranger in a chariot being pulled by a red raptor.
    • Samurai included the Bullzord, which had the alt mode of a bull pulling a wagon.
  • Chest Insignia: For whatever reason, all of the Mighty Morphin Rangers back during the franchise's first few years had their Power Coin emblem on their chest, despite never having that in the actual show (outside of the White Ranger). This eventually led to it being somewhat canonized with the Ranger suits in the first movie having their emblems on their suits, but this never bled into the show even in Season 3 when they were exclusively using US footage. When Bandai started making figures of the team again starting with Operation Overdrive, they removed the insignias completely from then on, except for when they re-issued their old Auto Morphin figures. Hasbro's figures do not have any chest insignia, including their Retro Morphin line.
  • Chrome Champion:
    • These were first introduced with the main toyline for the first movie, which reissued the Auto-Morphin toys in metallic chrome paint alongside metallic versions of the original Power Coins. These were re-released for Season 3 as the Rangers wearing "Metallic Armor."
    • Many of the toylines from In Space onward included "Metallic" variants that were the same as the regular figures, just cast in chrome paint.
    • The Super Legends line included re-releases of all the previous Red Rangers, but oddly enough, only with metallic chests, not arms or legs.
    • Both the 2010 Mighty Morphin Red and White Rangers got re-releases for Super Megaforce but coated in metallic paint.
    • There was a set of metallic Mega Mode Super Samurai Rangers made exclusively for Comi-Con. This was actually the only way to get the Super Mega Mode versions of Pink and Gold.
    • The Megaforce Rangers not only had metallic re-releases of the regular figures, but also for the Ultra Mode figures, in a line known as Metallic Force.
    • Bandai's Legacy line included variants of the Mighty Morphin Rangers in their Metallic Armor. This release also gave the Rangers their white belts (which were mistakenly painted silver in the original release) and their individual weapons.
    • Hasbro released their own variants of the Metallic Armor Mighty Morphin Rangers in their Lightning Collection line, this time also adding glitter like the actual suits and using this as an opportunity to include civilian heads for Rocky, Adam, Aisha, and Katherine.
  • Collectible Card Game: The Megaforce line included cards that could not only be used in the Deluxe Gosei Morpher, but also in the Action Card Game. These cards would include not just the Megaforce Rangers, but ones from most past seasons.
  • Collection Sidequest:
    • Every toyline since Megaforce has included some kind of collectible trinkets packaged with the figures (and sometimes Zords) for fans to collect them all. Typically, these could go into that season's Deluxe Morpher to activate various phrases, lights, and sounds. The most prolific versions of these were the Ranger Keys for Super Megaforce and the Dino Chargers for Dino Charge. Megaforce, Super Megaforce, and Dino Charge included companion smartphone apps to keep track of your collection.
    • Dino Thunder included a build-a-figure piece with each Basic Figure, which could combine to become a toyline-exclusive Phantom Ranger, though not the one from Turbo.
    • Bandai's Legacy line of figures included a Build-a-Zord piece, which could be collected and combined into a Megazord figure related to that team of Rangers.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: For the most part, played as straight as it is in the show. However, there are a few exceptions.
    • Pink Ranger Zords are very rarely ever fully pink. Typically, they are mostly white, black, and/or red, with a couple pink stripes to indicate the Zord's owner. The Firebird Thunderzord even had its pink stripes replaced with black during the original release. Discarding the Pink Shogunzord, which was repainted from the original white, it isn't until Dino Charge that we actually get a fully pink Zord.
    • Secondary and auxiliary Zords rarely match the color of their respective Ranger. Except, of course, for ones owned by that season's Red Ranger.
    • While most vehicle sets will have the specific Ranger colors on them, the vehicle sets from Dino Charge and Ninja Steel are clad in more generic colors.
    • A number of the various Powered Armor sets are clad in grey, unpainted plastic, with maybe some chrome or a splash of color mixed in, not counting repaints down the line. If there is a Ranger color added in, it's usually Red.
  • Combining Mecha: Just like in the show, the various Zords of each season can combine into larger Megazords. Certain seasons allow for all the Zords to combine into one giant Ultrazord.
    • The Zord Builder-compatible toys can combine with any other toy in the line, even if their release dates are years apart.
  • Cool Bike:
    • Mighty Morphin had three, the first being based on the Zyuranger cycles but only ever seen in-show once in the background. Season 2 had reworked Dairanger bike toys called "Thunder Bikes," but were never seen even in the background. Season 3 would eventually have the Shark Cycles, which were featured in the show.
    • Every season from Zeo onward (with a handful of exceptions) included motorcycles packed with their specific Ranger (hence the Bike Figure category above). Some lines even got two different lines of bikes! A few even got three!
    • Beast Morphers only included one, that being Cruise, the Red Ranger's personal Beast Bot. Unlike other bikes, he was included in the Basic Figure line, since he could transfrom into a robot mode.
    • During the second half of Dino Fury, Hasbro finally decided to get into the Bike Figure game, this time including an armored versions of the Red Ranger along with Void Knight.
  • Cool Board:
    • The Galaxy Gliders from In Space were depicted this way, with a pull-back motor and wheels in the glider.
    • During Lightspeed Rescue, the Lost Galaxy Rangers got a re-release with finger boards included as a bonus.
    • The Rapid Pursuit RPM Rangers each included a skateboard for them to ride.
  • Cool Car:
    • Both Turbo and RPM, being car-focused seasons, included these for the Rangers to drive instead of motorcycles.
    • The Red, Blue, Black, and Silver In Space Rangers also had the Galactic Rovers, though only Silver's appeared in the show.
    • Lightspeed Rescue included a wave of "Rescue Speeder" cars that, oddly enough, excluded both Pink and Titanium.
    • Both Ninja Storm and Dino Thunder included the Mobile Command Center, which was a big tractor trailer that unfolded into a playset.
    • SPD had the S.W.A.T. Command Truck, which was basically the franchise's version of an armored police van.
    • Mystic Force had the Legendary Tracker, which was a brightly colored dune buggy, and the Legendary Command Truck, which was a repainted version of the Dino Thunder version.
    • RPM had a set of Zords that could transform into a Toyota Camry, Prius, and Tundra.
    • Megaforce included a line of Hot Wheels cars based on the core group and Vrak, as well as a second wave based on Red Rangers from previous seasons.
    • This also applies to every car-based Zord featured in the franchise.
  • Cool Guns:
    • Virtually every season gives the Rangers a sidearm that becomes one of the main early roleplay toys.
    • Most, but not all, Sixth Rangers from In Space onwards had one of these as their primary weapon.
    • Mighty Morphin's Power Axe could transform into a gun mode, typically used when combining all the weapons to form the Power Blaster. Season 2 included the Power Cannon, a massive cannon (borrowed from Dairanger) that shot balls colored like the Rangers.
    • Zeo had the Zeo Cannon, which was modeled after the Red Battlezord and included five "Power Cells" modeled after the shapes on the Rangers' helmets.
    • Dino Thunder Red Ranger's standalone Tyranno Staff had a toy-exclusive gun mode that could be made by folding up the staff.
    • Being a season with a police theme, SPD featured many, many different kinds of roleplay gun toys, including a robot dog that could turn into a gun!
    • Super Megaforce included not just the standard sidearm, but also the Super Mega Cannon. Much like the Zeo Cannon, this was modeled after a Zord (the Red Ranger's Skyship) and was powered by inserting trinkets modeled after the Rangers (this time Ranger Keys) on the top of the weapon.
    • While not the first season to do this, Dino Charge took the concept up to eleven by having the Cool Gun be the Rangers morpher as well! As a result, the gun toy was one of the most popular toys of that line. There was also one during Super Charge made to go with the Red Ranger's Super Mode.
    • Beast Morphers included the US-exclusive Cheetah Beast Blaster, which the Red Ranger called upon in-show when it was time to finish off the giant monster.
  • Cool Starship:
    • The most triumphant example is, of course, In Space's Astro Megaship, which could transform into the Astro Megazord.
    • Lost Galaxy included both the Jet Jammers and the Galactic Speeders, though the latter were toy-only.
    • The Skyship from Super Megaforce is also one of these, despite looking more like a Cool Boat, though unlike the show, it can't store the other four Zords inside.
  • Cool Sword:
    • If the Red Ranger of a specific season has a sword as their individual weapon, there will usually be a toy of it in the role play line.
    • If a Sixth Ranger had a sword as their primary weapon (such as In Space or Dino Charge), that would typically get a toy version as well.
    • Certain seasons, such as Samurai and Ninja Steel, feature swords as the Rangers' primary weapons, all having the same design. If they were simply the Rangers' sidearm, like in Zeo, they would just be made of regular plastic and nothing else, but if they are heavily focused on in-show, expect them to have all kinds of electronic features.
    • Most seasons give the Rangers sidearms that can transform into a melee weapon, usually a sword or baton.
    • Samurai, Dino Charge, and Ninja Steel all had sword weapons used exclusively with their Megazord Armor forms, which were then made into toys.
    • Dino Super Charge included the US-exclusive Super Drive Saber toy, which could launch Dino Chargers out of its Gatling Good-esque launcher. There was also the Dino Spike Sword, which is the combined form of the Rangers' individual weapons that season, but acts more like a claw grip weapon than a sword.
    • Bandai's Legacy line included a 1:1 scale replica of both Mighty Morphin Red's Power Sword and the White Ranger's Saba.
    • The only roleplay weapon for the 2017 movie was the Red Ranger's Power Sword, which was designed to resemble a Blade Below the Shoulder rather than a traditional sword.
    • Beast Morphers included the Cheetah Blade and while it did appear in the show, it was only used in a couple episodes. The mask set also included two minature Cheetah Daggers.
  • Cool Train:
    • The Supertrain Zords from Lightspeed Rescue, of course. They could even store the Lightspeed Zords inside the wagons!
    • Mystic Force had the Solar Streak Zords, a set of six train Zords that could combine to form the Solar Streak Megazord.
    • The Pink Ranger's Zord from Ninja Steel was based on a bullet train and made up the legs of the Ninja Steel Megazord.
  • Crippling Overspecialization: Many Ranger lines have had sub-lines focusing on some kind of action feature, but the Zeo versions had this as the initial wave. All six Rangers had a special attacking action which ended up extremely restricting articulation. Zeo Ranger I got the worst of it, as her feature has her right arm permanently outstretched to her side and holding her shield weapon.
  • Crossover:
    • In Space had the short-lived Heroes from Space line, where three of the Rangers were packaged with figures of real life astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., Alan Bean, and Charles Duke.
    • RPM had a weird line where Toyota vehicles (Camary, Prius, and Tundra) transformed into Zords. Even weirder, of the three animals they turned into, only one (Eagle) was actually used by one of the Rangers that season. The other two (Tiger and Elephant) were not used by any of the RPM Rangers.
    • My Little Pony had a special edition Mighty Morphin Pink Ranger pony during the Beast Morphers seasons.
    • The Lightning Collection included a sub-line based on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, specifically the morphed versions of Leo, Don, Raph, Mikey, April, and Shredder, along with Foot Soldier Tommy, from the first comic book crossover series. Later on other crossover lines were released, such as a Street Fighter one featuring Ryu, Chun-Li, Ken and Cammy as rangers and one based on Cobra Kai.
  • Early Draft Tie-In: Wave 1 of the Dino Charge Basic Figures used the beta names for the Red and Green Rangers, Lucas and Quinn respectively, instead of their final names, Tyler and Riley.
  • Early-Installment Weirdness:
    • The original Mighty Morphin toys were giant 8" figures and only ever came with their Blade Blasters in gun mode as weapons, including the Green Ranger.
    • Any figures of the civilian forms of the original five Mighty Morphin Rangers feature them in outfits and hairstyles from the unaired-at-the-time pilot but never had in the series proper. It's most noticeable with Billy, who had a completely different hairdo and glasses in the series proper.
    • The early Megazords replaced all of the Sentai-specific emblems with lightning bolts from the logos.
    • Bandai repainted both the Ninja Crane and the Crane Shogun Zords pink, which they would never do again.
    • The Legacy figures based on the first movie had largely different size and articulation than what Bandai would use later on down the line.
  • Easter Egg: The toy Power Keys used with the Dino Fury Zords can have the back half of the head removed to reveal a sculpted image of the respective Ranger in an action pose.
  • Environment-Specific Action Figure: Despite having new suits and Zords every year, the toyline still played this straight, somewhat. There would never be anything as crazy as the Batman or Spider-man toys got, but you usually still had three or four different versions of the same Ranger every year.
    • The original figures for The Movie were reused the molds from the older figures, just with the main gimmick removed and given a metallic chrome paint job. Those figures got re-released a few months later during Season 3 as "Metallic Armor".
    • From In Space until Operation Overdrive, at least one of the Rangers (usually just Red, but sometimes Blue, Green, or the Sixth Rangers get one) would receive a Battilizer Mode. In Space required a brand new mold due to the increased bulk of the suit, but all the others simply used the base figure with fancy armor attached. Jungle Fury and RPM didn't specifically have Battilizers, but they did have other armored versions, though only one (for Jungle Fury) actually appeared in the show itself.
    • Speaking of which, both Jungle Fury and RPM had three extra Rangers created for the toyline, based off auxiliary Zords in the show. Jungle Fury would eventually introduce the Rangers into the show itself, but RPM did not.
    • Lost Galaxy, SPD, Mystic Force, Operation Overdrive, and the first half of Megaforce would have a second wave of figures based on their teams' respective power-up modes.
    • The Bike Figures mentioned in the intro would also fall into here.
    • The toyline for the 2010 Mighty Morphin recut had figures that came with weird motorcycles and other vehicles that had Zord Builder ports built in, so they could be attached to the Megazord as new arms and legs.
    • Samurai had three different versions in the Basic line. The regular outfits, the Mega Mode outfits (used only when piloting the Megazord), and the Super outfits for the second half. Funny enough, unlike other iterations of this trope, the two female Rangers actually got versions of all three toys! There was also an additional version known as the Shogun Mode, also used only in the Megazord (sans the finale), but only Red, Blue, and Gold had their toys released.
    • Both Dino Charge and Ninja Steel employed the same "Megazord cockpit-only armor" variation that Samurai did, mostly in the second half of their respective shows.
    • Both Mighty Morphin Season 3 and Ninja Steel included figures of the Rangers in their unmorphed ninja outfits.
    • Beast Morphers had the Beast-X Mode figures for their second half, which gave Red, Blue, and Yellow new chestplate armor. Since this was a lot more understated than normal, the figures also came with brand new weapons, based on the various US-exclusive weapons introduced in the role play line. The Red Ranger also gained an entirely separate "Fury Mode" figure that was only used twice in the show, as well as the Beast-X King armor (based on the equivalent Zord) that was not used in the show.
  • Fire, Ice, Lightning: The Dino Knight Morpher has different sounds and lights depending on if it's pointed straight (ice), upwards (fire), or downwards (lightning).
  • Freud Was Right: The T-Rex Champion Zord (from Dino Fury) has a different connector for the crotch plate when used as the Dino Fury Megazord, presumably in order to prevent kids from sticking certain other parts of the Zords there and making the toy a lot more vulgar.
  • Fun Size:
    • The various lines made for preschoolers (Playskool, Imaginext, etc.) had the Rangers and monsters give this effect. There have also been a variety of blind box SD figure lines over the past few years.
    • All three seasons of Mighty Morphin had miniature figure statues of not just the Rangers, but their civilian forms, allies, and various villains. Notably, this was the only line of the original toys that had screen-accurate figures from the first movie as well as the only figures Bulk and Skull ever received.
    • Seasons 1 and 2 included lines of Micro Machine toys. The sets would feature one of two lineups: One had the Ranger, their civilian form, their individual Zord, and the respective bike from Zyuranger, while the other had a Ranger in a different pose, a Putty in different poses, a giant alien, and either a Megazord or one of the larger secondary Zords (such as Titanus or the Tigerzord).
    • Season 2 through Lightspeed Rescue had small playsets with miniature figurines, modeled after the success of Polly Pocket and Mighty Max.
    • Operation Overdrive, Jungle Fury, and RPM all featured smaller Zords that could be combined into a Megazord about the same size as the Basic Figures of that season's line. Originally it was known as the Transmax Vehicles, but the line was eventually re-classified as Micro Zords.
    • Dino Charge had all the Dino Charger triple packs bundled with a small, stylized, non-transformable figure of one of the Zords from that season.
  • Heroic Build: As noted throughout this page, when Bandai had the toyline, all of the male Rangers had these as their default body type, regardless of the actor in question. Some series emphasized it so much that the Rangers looked straight out of Dragon Ball Z! Averted with the Jungle Fury, RPM, and Samurai lines, which used builds closer to the actual Rangers.
  • Horse of a Different Color: Dino Thunder included the Raptor Riders, which were large raptors the Rangers rode into battle, though both the toyline and show soon dropped these in favor of traditional bikes, though the Triassic Ranger had a Chariot Pulled by Cats set with a raptor. Funny enough, the White Ranger also had a Raptor Rider, but his wasn't actually based off a raptor, instead his Ptera Zord.
  • Impossible Hourglass Figure: The female Rangers often had large busts, but they didn't start to become this until the 2010 Mighty Morphin recut line, getting worse every year until Hasbro bought the franchise. Dino Charge and the Legacy line were the biggest offenders.
  • Insistent Terminology: Certain seasons had the Rangers with very specific names rather than just the standard "(Season Name) (Color) Ranger."
    • Most of the Sixth Rangers from Lightspeed Rescue onwards have unique names that are not just their color followed by the word "Ranger." For example, Lightspeed Rescue had their sixth named Titanium Ranger, while Wild Force was called Lunar Wolf Ranger.
    • All of the Zeo Rangers are known as Zeo Ranger (Roman Numeral). For example, Zeo Red is called Zeo Ranger V. The only exception is Gold, who follows the standard.
    • Jungle Fury had all the Rangers named after their animals instead of color (i.e. Tiger Ranger instead of Red Ranger).
    • RPM went back and forth between calling them "(Animal) Ranger" and "Ranger (Color)." Oddly enough, none of the toys ever included Dr K.'s "Ranger Operator Series" name.
    • Samurai had all the Rangers named after their element (i.e. "Samurai Ranger Fire" instead of "Red Samurai Ranger"), which was never actually used in the show.
    • The figures for Blaze and Roxy in Beast Morphers call them "Cybervillain," which is different from the series (which called them "Avatar forms").
  • Law of Chromatic Superiority:
    • As shown during the anniversary releases below, if a past Ranger is going to be featured in the current season's toyline, it will most likely be the Red Ranger from that older team. The 15th and 20th Anniversary lines played this extremely straight, and the only new figure in the Basic line to celebrate the 25th Anniversary was an evil version of Mighty Morphin Red.
      • Slightly averted in that many of these celebrations will also include Mighty Morphin White, since he was the leader during the second half of Season 2 and all of Season 3.
      • Also slightly averted with the Dino Team-Up figures in the Beast Morphers line. While the pack did include Mighty Morphin Red, it also included Dino Thunder Blue and Dino Charge Pink rather than the Red Rangers of those seasons.
    • If there is a new wave of figures with some kind of gimmick, such as an action movement or snap-on armor or coming with some kind of battle vehicle, that line will always be led by the Red Ranger of that season. If only one Ranger is going to be a part of said line, the Red Ranger will be the one chosen.
      • This also goes for their Zords. If the Red Ranger's Zord is an animal or can turn into its own standalone robot, expect extra toys based on their Zords. They won't be able to combine with the Deluxe Zords, but they have added features for extra playability as a standalone product.
  • Limited Special Collector's Ultimate Edition: Once Saban regained control of the franchise, Bandai started to emphasize this with their special Comic-Con exclusive figures and repaints. The Legacy line positively adored this trope, as various exclusives would include special accessories,note  special paint jobs,note  or collect multiple connected figures together.note  Some items, such as Psycho Green & Silver and the Gold Ranger's Zeonizer, were never sold in regular shops. Hasbro would continue the tradition with their themed Lightning Collection sets (the first being both Mighty Morphin Red and Zeo Gold with two different Jason heads), but those figures would eventually be made available in general stores afterwards.
  • Mecha Expansion Pack: While earlier lines included a handful of extra Zords that could combine with the main Megazord (such as the Dragonzord or Tigerzord), starting with Wild Force these were phased out in favor of giving the Rangers a fleet of auxiliary Zords. These either acted as weapons for that season's Megazord or full on replaced limbs (usually the arms). If enough were gathered, those auxiliary Zords could combine into a second Megazord of their own. The only exceptions were SPD, RPM,note  and Beast Morphers.note 
  • Milestone Celebration: The franchise didn't really start participating in this until the 15th Anniversary, during Operation Overdrive.
    • The 15th Anniversary line included new larger figures of all of the Red Rangers up to that point, with special metallic versions available later on. There were also multipacks of static statues that were more show accurate.
    • That soon gave way to the Super Legends line, which included figures of the Red and any Sixth Rangers from most of the seasons up to RPM. There was also a Retrofire line that consisted of 5" stylized, non-transformable Megazords.
    • For the 20th Anniversary, Bandai created the Legacy line, starting with the Power Morpher, Legacy Megazord, and a line of collectible mini-helmets based on the Season 1 cast.
    • In the regular toyline, a new set of Mighty Morphin figures were released, but the Red Ranger was only available wearing the Dragon Armor while the Green Ranger had the silver stripe from the Dino Thunder episode "Fighting Spirit."
    • For the 20th anniversary of The Movie, Bandai released a line of figures based on the armored movie designs, the first time screen-accurate versions of those figures had been made, alongside Ivan Ooze.
    • Given that Super Megaforce is meant to celebrate the franchise's 20th Anniversary, there were plenty of these going around.
      • The Megaforce toyline included cards which depicted past Rangers and teams and could be placed in the Gosei Morpher or used in an online TCG game.
      • Super Megaforce revolved around the Ranger Keys, which included almost every past Ranger, including Sixth Rangers, Ranger-like allies, and even US-original Rangers like the Titanium Ranger.
      • The Armored Might line included large, muscle-bound figures of Mighty Morphin Red, Green, and White, Super Megaforce Red and Silver, and Dino Charge Red.
      • Released around the same time was the Metallic Might line, which were metallic repaints of the 2010 Mighty Morphin figures.
      • The Action Heroes line had brand new figures for all the previous Red Rangers and most of the Sixth Rangers.
    • The 25th Anniversary saw a reissue of the Action Heroes line of the Mighty Morphin Rangers paired with their counterparts in the 2017 movie.
    • For the 20th Anniversary of In Space, Bandai finally made figures of the Psycho Rangers for their Legacy line.
    • The Ninja Steel line didn't really embrace this trope, only having various past Rangers and Megazords on their collectible Power Star toys. There was also an Evil Robot Red Ranger toy from the "Dimensions in Danger" Anniversary special.
  • Mini Dress Of Power: Female Rangers that had skirts in the show also have skirts on their figures. Most of the skirts are typically an extra plastic piece attached at the waist, sometimes with a cut in the sides to aid in leg articulation. A few seasons, however, have had the skirts molded into the legs themselves, giving the girls the same leg articualtion the guys do, at the cost of looking very odd whenever the legs move.
  • Mix and Match:
    • Once the franchise started embracing fleets of auxiliary Zords, any Zord from that season could be interchanged with another equivalent one of that season.
    • From the 2010 Mighty Morphin line until Ninja Steel, all of the Deluxe Zords incorporated the Zord Builder port system, allowing one to attach any Zord from one line to another counterpart Zord from a different season.note 
    • The 2010 Mighty Morphin line had a Mix-and-Morph line which allowed one to disassemble the head, arms, and legs from any miniature Ranger or Megazord and combine them with each other. The line (which was based on the similar "Alien Creation" line from the Ben 10: Alien Force toyline) included Rangers and Megazords from Mighty Morphin, Mystic Force, Operation Overdrive, Jungle Fury, and RPM.
    • Dino Charge included a line called "Mixx-N-Morph," which allowed you to completely disassemble the figures and combine them in whatever way one desired. These not only included the Rangers for that season, but also the Dino Charge Megazord and several past Rangers and Zords from Mighty Morphinnote , Samurai, and Super Megaforce.
    • Dino Charge also included the ability to split apart the bike toys and mix them with each other.
    • For Dino Fury, the entire combination system for the Deluxe Zords allows you to disassemble the non-Red Zords and attach them to the T-Rex Champion Zord in any way one wishes.
  • Morph Weapon:
    • Many Rangers have had sidearms that also transform into melee weapons, which was incorporated into their respective roleplay toy. Examples include the Blade Blaster from Mighty Morphin, the Rescue Blaster from Lightspeed Rescue, and the Thundermax Saber from Dino Thunder.
    • Most Sixth Rangers' weapons transform in some way. Some, like Zeo Gold or Dino Thunder White, simply pop open or extend the blade, but others, such as the Wild Force Lunar Ranger's or the Super Megaforce Silver Ranger's, could transform into completely different weapons.
    • Some seasons had a late-season weapon addition, usually for the Red Ranger, that could transform modes, such as the Falcon Summoner from Wild Force.
    • Dino Thunder included a stand-alone Tyranno Staff toy that transformed from staff to blaster.
    • The Ninja Battle Morphers from Ninja Steel could transform into a sword or a claw weapon. Unlike the Japanese equivalent, it cannot transform into a bow. There were also toy-exclusive roleplay toys that could transform from a sword and an axe respectively into bows.
    • While Go-Busters had the Rangers' weapons transform into a camera and binoculars, the Beast Morphers versions actually avert this, only coming in their standard weapon form and not being able to transform at all.
  • Multiple Demographic Appeal: When the franchise first started out, there were as many girls watching as boys. Bandai capitalized on this by creating several girl-targeted dolls of Kimberly and Trini. As the initial fad waned, girls still tuned in, but the toyline catered almost exclusively to boys, with female Rangers typically only getting Basic Figures. Some seasons didn't even give them that much.
  • Ninja: Mighty Morphin Season 3 and Ninja Steel both included a wave of figures of the Rangers in their ninja outfits, in addition to the various ninja-themed Rangers and Ninjor. Strangely, Ninja Storm, the only other ninja season, did not include any such line. Hasbro would eventually start making their own version of the Ninjetti outfits for their Lightning Collection line.
  • Official Cosplay Gear:
    • Every season includes toys of the main Morpher, main melee weapon, and variants for the Sixth Ranger.
    • Bandai would often make "role play" sets, which included a face mask, a lower quality version of one of the Rangers' weapons, a non-electronic Morpher, and some other accessory if available.
    • Halloween costumes typically include that Rangers' melee weapon, typically of better quality than the official toyline.
    • Bandai's Legacy line included not only the Season 1 Morpher, but also the Blade Blaster, Jason's Power Sword, Tommy's Dragon Dagger and Saba, the Movie Morphers, the Zeonizers, and the Gold Ranger's staff.
    • Hasbro's Lightning Collection thus far has included the Dragon Dagger and the Power Morpher, with a variant of the latter modeled after the Pink Ranger's movie version.
    • Both Bandai and Hasbro have created life-size helmets, though they are usually too small for most adult heads.
  • Off-Model:
    • As has been stated multiple times on this page, the male Rangers tended to have large, muscular chests even when the Ranger in question had a lean and athletic build.
    • Many Rangers have had misshapen helmets. Some would have the visor too squished, others would lack outlines, while others would be missing details. This has even happened in the higher-priced lines.
    • In regards to the original Mighty Morphin lines:
      • All of them in the first few years had a Chest Insignia of their Power Coin symbol, which wasn't the case in the show. The White Ranger toys also sometimes gave him gold diamonds underneath his armor to make him look more like the Zyuranger suits.
      • Aside from the really high-end figures/statues, like the ones by Threezero, none of the figures include the black piping on the belts.
      • In the show, the Black Ranger's Power Ax has a black circle with a gold Mastadon emblem inside. Virtually every figure that includes a painted version of the weapon either has the emblem fully gold or fully silver, but never actually how it looks on the show.
      • The original Blade Blaster toy repainted all the white parts black and added "Power Rangers" to the side in place of "Zyurangers."
      • Bandai released a playset known as the "Power Dome," which was ostensibly based on the Command Center in Seasons 1-3. However, aside from having a circular control console, the Viewing Globe, and Zordon's tube, the rest of the set looked absolutely nothing like the Command Center.
      • All of the remade combiner versions of the original Megazord have pegs on the Tyrannosaurus' knees to connect to the legs, which means that when the Megazord is formed, the knees are shown on the legs, rather than inside the Saber-Toothed Tiger and Triceratops toys.
      • The Ranger toys for the first movie included toys of the Power Coins for use in the regular Power Morpher, but they were colored in each Ranger's respective color rather than the gold they were in the movie/show.
      • The McDonald's Happy Meal toys of the Movie Rangers emulated the armored look of the movie Rangers, but were painted similarly to the show Rangers. They lacked the stripe on their boots, still had the side diamonds on their chest (the Movie versions only had the center diamond) and despite coming with the Ninja Zords, all of the emblems were of their original Season 1-2 emblems. The Black Ranger also had a silver visor, for some reason, while the Pink Ranger has her entire helmet filled in (instead of being mostly white with the pink Pterodactyl surrounding the visor).
    • The Mighty Morphin through Turbo toylines used the same mold for the female Rangers as they did the male Rangers.
    • The initial wave of Lost Galaxy figures reused voice samples from the In Space figures, including the soundbite "Let's Rocket!," which was the morphing call for the Space Rangers.
    • Mystic Force Mystic Sound Blue Ranger's toy had the same butterfly symbol on her chest armor as Pink does, rather than the dolphin fin her visor has.
    • The 2010 Mighty Morphin line had the Rangers in more stylized proportions, with large hands and small heads.
    • The Samurai Megazord toy could not fold up into their respective origami modes, which caused this when forming the Samurai Gigazord.
    • The Bike Figures from Megaforce until Ninja Steel included less and less paint as the line went on. Dino Charge and Ninja Steel infamously refused to paint anything on the actual Ranger toy except for the visor.
    • Ninja Steel had the Ninja Blaster, which was much sharper than the in-show version. The auxiliary Zords were also packaged with repaints of the other Ninja Steel Zords, which not only never appeared in the show itself, but were also missing pieces from their individual modes (most notably the Dragon's wings and tail).
    • The original Legacy releases of the five Mighty Morphin Rangers gave four of the five (only Red was spared) silver belts instead of white. This was fixed in the Metallic Armor variants.
    • Zeo Gold Ranger's Legacy figure was infamous for his armor not actually being painted gold.
    • The Power Stars in the Ninja Steel line did not resemble the show versions in the slightest, being thin plastic with cheap foam for the blades and could not be used as helmets for the Megazord.
    • Hasbro's Lightning Collection:
      • In general, there has been a consistent problem where the shade of paint used for a Ranger's body is different than the shade used for their arms and legs. This tends to happen most often with various Red Rangers. The Dino Charge Rangers are a partial exception, as their arms canonically have a darker shade than the body of the suit.
      • The original release for Mighty Morphin Red featured a significant number of missing paint applications and had a very small visor. Every time an MMPR Red Ranger toy would be released afterward, the first thing people would ask is if they can take the helmet off and put on their Lightning Collection figure. Much like the Legacy line, the Metallic Armor version mostly fixed the visor.
      • The first release of Dino Thunder White lacked any black paint or the red eyes on the helmet as well as having a very small visor, angering a lot of people. Hasbro eventually released a replacement helmet which reworked the proportions and included missing paint.
      • All of the Zeo Rangers include the extended baton sword weapon, but not the closed version. Therefore, a holstered baton would have this effect.
      • Time Force Red's arrow chest emblem is much thinner than the actual suit.
      • A-Squad Pink's figure used the Red In Space Ranger's helmet as a base instead of the Pink Ranger's. Similarly, Blue has a white outline on his visor (like the Space Rangers the suit was based on) instead of silver (which they had in SPD).
      • Speaking of which, the SPD Rangers themselves have been very inconsistent regarding the outlines of their visors. Blue's is correct, but Pink only has a partial outline while Red doesn't have one at all.
      • Dino Charge Gold has a gold neck rather than a white one.
    • Both Dino Fury Blue and Gold's Basic Figures have paint mistakes during their first run. Blue has missing blue paint from the top of his helemt, while Gold has a gold outline on his chest zigzag design rather than silver. Gold also has a standard morpher on his left wrist, due to re-using the mold of the other male Rangers, when the version in the show uses his main weapon as his Morpher.
  • Only One Female Mold: While each line would have a new female mold for that season's suit, said mold would be used for all female Rangers in that line, regardless of how much it differs from the actress' proportions.
  • Powered Armor:
    • Almost every line from In Space onwards included at least one wave of toys that had some of the Rangers (Red always, usually the Sixth, and possibly the other male Rangers) gain this, regardless of whether it was on the show or not. Most of these would take the form of that season's Battilizer, but not always. Some seasons, like RPM, had as much as three or four different kinds of armor the Rangers could equip!
    • Dino Charge included "Dino Armor" that could go from robot armor to dinosaur mode. Unlike some of the other types of this toy, the armor is ridden by the Ranger like one of the bikes.
    • Ninja Steel had versions of the figures with removable Ninja Master armor. This wave included not just the male Rangers, but, strangely, also the the Dragon and Elephant Zords (the latter in robot mode). Said armor also transforms into a giant shuriken. The line also included standalone releases with stealth versions of the Red and Blue Rangers with giant weapons (a buzzsaw shuriken and a dragon flamethrower, respectively).
    • Beast Morphers included a wave where the Red, Blue, and Yellow Rangers came paired with their Beast Bots, which could transform into a removable armor.
  • Prop Recycling:
    • Every Deluxe Zord (save for the US-exclusive toys) recycled the mold from their Japanese counterparts through SPD, though sometimes with different stickers or missing paint details. Operation Overdrive and Jungle Fury would feature a mix of Japanese molds and US-original, but it wouldn't be until RPM that the Japanese molds would be discarded entirely.
    • Titanus was reused not just for the Season 3 line, but also for the In Space toyline. That line also included a re-release of the Rescue Megazord from Turbo.
    • Lost Galaxy included re-issues of the Super Zeo Megazord, Turbo Morpher, Astro Megazord, and Astro Blaster, just with the word "Galactic" added to the name. There was also a re-issue of the In Space Silver Ranger 8" figure, with his morpher included, despite him not showing up in the crossover that season.
    • For whatever reason, Lightspeed Rescue included multiple re-issues of the Lost Galaxy figures, including one which gave them chrome-painted torsos. And these were well before the crossover was made.
    • Dino Thunder had an Ultimate Weapon pack that included the Battilizer gadget from In Space and the Magna Defender's sword and sheath from Lost Galaxy.
    • Perhaps to tie into the crossover episodes, SPD had some playsets released that came with various Dino Thunder Rangers and villains as well as the SPD toys. There were also two figure sets that came with, for whatever reason, a Lightspeed Rescue figure and their cycle, though of opposite colors.note 
    • A Disney Store-exclusive Mystic Force set included the standard SPD sidearms repainted to match the Red Ranger for this season. Some of the Mega Figure Sets also, for some reason, came with some repackaged Dino Thunder villain figures.
    • The Mystic Saber Max set from Mystic Force was re-painted for the Operation Overdrive Overdrive Saber Max set.
    • Samurai had the Samurai Transporter toy, which was recycled from the Transtek Armor toy from Operaiton Overdrive.
    • The Mighty Morphin recut Megazord was recycled for the Legacy Megazord, but with additional diecast metal and shiny stickers added.
  • Reused Character Design:
    • All of the Zords reused the Japanese molds when brought over to the States up until Operation Overdrive, when Bandai would start making their own molds.
    • In any given season, including the higher end Legacy, Lightning, and Ultimates lines, there would be two Ranger molds, one for the male Rangers and one for the female Rangers. This despite most of the male Rangers having leaner builds and the female Rangers having wildly different figures.
    • The original toyline really emphasized this due to both the male and female Rangers using the same male Ranger build. It wasn't until In Space that Bandai started making female molds for their female Rangers.
    • The mold for the 2010 Mighty Morphin Megazord toy was reused for the Legacy Megazord toy a few years later.
  • Retractable Weapon: Discounting any weapon that would fall into Morph Weapon above, there were a handful of roleplay toys that had pop-out or extendable blades, such as Saba from Mighty Morphin and the Triassic Shield from Dino Thunder.
  • Retraux:
    • Bandai's Legacy line of toys reused packaging style based on either Seasons 1-2 or the first movie.
    • Bandai would eventually begin to reissue the original Season 1 Auto-Morphin toys, complete with original accessories and packaging, for the 25th Anniversary.
    • When Hasbro gained the license, they created a Retro-Morphin line that emulated Bandai's Mighty Morphin Auto-Morphin figures. The first wave were the standard Mighty Morphin Rangers, but after that they expanded into other Ranger allies (such as Ninjor) and even modern characters (such as Ranger Slayer), but all of them use packaging which heavily emulates Bandai's old Season 1-2 packaging.
    • Super 7's Reaction line, while using their own molds for the figures and weapons, has packaging design based on the original toyline.
    • Of a sort with the Retro Megazord line by Hasbro. These are designed to appeal to nostalgia fans, especially with them all coming in a box designed to look like two VHS tapes stacked together, but are brand new figures with limited articulation. The line also weirdly includes Ninjakon, a retool of Ninjor made exclusviely for the Ninja Storm toyline that never actually appeared on the show.
  • Sensual Spandex: In addition to the Heroic Build for the males and Boobs of Steel for the females, the Bandai molds also have the costumes be impossibly form fitted, essentially painted on and showing off the characters' muscles or physiques. Once Hasbro got the license, the figures became far more realistic in that there were no longer visible six-packs on display.
  • Show Accuracy/Toy Accuracy: Varies depending on the season.
    • When Bandai was in charge, all of the male Rangers had beefy Heroic Build designs, despite the actual show depicting all the male Rangers with leaner builds. They grew out of this towards the end of the Disney era, but rocketed straight back into this starting with Megaforce.
    • The original Mighty Morphin line weirdly had each Rangers' personal symbol plastered on their chest, which was never done on the show. They also used the same male Ranger mold for everyone, including the girls, for both the main figure line and the Auto-Morphin' line. The latter also had the Rangers' gloves extending well past their elbows, whereas the show versions stopped mid-tricep.
    • Most of the Mighty Morphin Zords had all the Sentai-specific stickers removed and replaced with the lightning bolt from the show's logo. The Thunder Megazord also painted the Lion Thunderzord's green parts black and silver parts gold.
    • The toys made for the first movie were simply the Auto-Morphin figures with the gimmick taken out and giving metallic chrome paint, rather than the PVC "armored" look actually employed in the movie. Likewise, the Zords resembled their in-show versions rather than the movie ones.
    • Both the Crane Zords from Season 3 were repainted to look closer to the Pink Ranger. While the Ninjazord version isn't too bad (going from dark red to pink and only affecting the crane's neck), the Shogun Zord is far more noticable, as all of the white was changed to pink, which ended up giving it infamy when Season 3 used in-show for the Shogun Ultrazord.
    • The Metallic Armor in Season 3 used sparkly glitter paint to achieve the metalllic look, but every figure that attempted to imitate the figures simply used standard chrome or metallic paint. It wouldn't be until Hasbro's Lightning Collection that glitter was used.
    • Neither the Bear or Dragon Samurai Zords have their kanji symbols painted in. Dragon also has a very different alt mode design from its Japanese counterpart.
    • The Wheeler Zord from Beast Morphers has an additional torso piece that is not found in the show design or in the original toy from Go-Busters, which messes up the gorilla mode's proportions, forcing it to stand upright instead of leaning on all fours while also adding an extra step for the Megazord mode.
    • Dino Fury has two different versions of the Dino Keys. The first type come with the Basic Figures and has one side with a holofoil sticker of the knight-like Rangers, while the other side has a lightly painted, and smaller, Megazord head. The second type comes with the Deluxe Zords and includes a larger Megazord head, on a swivel for head articulation, and a back cover for the head instead of the knighted Ranger design. Neither of these are show-accurate, as the keys in the show have the Ranger design molded in and still there when combined. The in-show keys also transform into a dino head design for use in the sabers, which none of the US toys can do.
  • Shown Their Work:
    • The Lightning Collection line often includes a secondary accessory that most fans would normally not think about, such as the Trans Daggers for the Lost Galaxy Rangers.
    • The Lightning Collection silver stripe version of the Mighty Morphin Green Ranger includes a white holster on the figure's right side, rather than a black holster on the left side like the original version, which is what the actual suit had during the suit's sole appearance in the episode "Fighting Spirit."
    • Hooded Andros from the Lightning Collection includes an all-black In Space helmet in order to recreate his opening scenes where his face is entirely covered in shadow.
    • The Super 7 Ultimates line not only includes show-accurate weapons, and the different forms of said weapons, but also the original 90's toy version of said weapons! Goldar and the Putties instead include one-off accessories, such as the chest containing the Power Coins for the former and the football jerseys they wore for one episode for the latter.
    • The Zord Ascension Project line includes not just fine detailing from the suits used in the show, but from the original concept art designs. For example, the Mighty Morphin Megazord features solar panels on the "teeth" of the chest plate.
  • Spy Catsuit: The Training Mode wave of figures from Ninja Steel give off this vibe, though the headgear seems to be inspired by the various ninjas from Mortal Kombat instead.
  • Toyless Toyline Character:
    • Outside of Alpha 5 and Zordon, none of the non-fighting ally characters (especially fully human ones) get figures in the toyline.
    • Many of the human-esque enemies, such as Rita Repulsa, Astronema, Vypra, and Elsa, never received figures during their season's run. If they had some kind of monster form, that would eventually appear, but their human forms never did until Hasbro's Lightning Collection.
    • Seasons with an army of auxiliary Zords would sometimes have one or two missing near the end of that season's line, meaning kids could never form the big mega combination of all the Zords into one.
    • Despite being the Big Bad of Season 1, Rita Repulsa didn't get any figure until the Samurai line almost 20 years later.
    • While she was always in the various mainline figures, a lot of spinoff collectible lines tended to omit the Mighty Morphin Yellow Ranger from their lineup.
    • Dulcea, from the first movie, never got a figure, either in the original toyline or the Legacy line.
    • While all the other Rangers from that season had their toys released, the In Space Red Ranger's signature weapon, the Spiral Saber, was missing from the toyline. There was a listing solisited, but for whatever reason it was cancelled.
    • Scott's Coupe, Dillon's Mustang, and the GO-ONGER bus never received toys during RPM, despite being perfectly suited for the line.
    • While Zoey and Avatar!Roxy from Beast Morphers received Basic Figures, they are the only ones from that season not to have Lightning Collection counterparts. Roxy's Season 2 form (called "Cybervillain Robo Roxy") also never received even a Basic Figure.
    • For whatever reason, the Beast-X King Zord, despite being the central Zord in Season 2 of Beast Morphers, never had a toy released.
  • Toyline-Exclusive Character:
    • If repaints count, Bandai often made toyline-exclusive repaints of various Megazords, especially once Saban regained the show. The Dino Charge Megazord alone received a half-dozen different recolors.
    • Pythor was a monster that got a toy but was never seen in either Power Rangers or Super Sentai.
    • The toylines for Mighty Morphin Season 3, Turbo, and In Space included monsters that were in the Super Sentai source material, but not in the Power Rangers adaptation.
    • Titanus was recycled for use in the In Space toyline as Space Titanus, but was a no-show during the actual season.
    • The Titanium Ranger from Lightspeed Rescue (who did not exist in Rescue Sentai GoGoFive) had a toy-exclusive Zord called the Titanium Land Crawler, which did not appear in either TV show.
    • Ninja Storm had a figure called "Ninjakon" that never appeared on the show. It was simply a red retool of Ninjor from Mighty Morphin Season 3. Ninjakon was later rereleased in the Jungle Fury toyline and renamed "Ninja Storm Megazord"
    • Dino Thunder has the Phantom Ranger (not to be confused with the character of the same name from Turbo), whose body parts came with the figures of the main Rangers, giving you an incentive to collect them all.
    • RPM featured three toyline-only Rangers, based on the Paleo Zords used in the show, special animal-themed armor for the male Rangers, and a Micro Megazord toy featuring the Engine Shogun from Go-Onger as well as the toy-exclusive Panther, Fox, Swallow, and Cat Zords.
    • There was a wave of figures in the Mighty Morphin recut line which had all of the Rangers wearing Green's Dragon Armor, when only Red and Black wore it in the show. That line also had figures of Lord Zedd and the White Ranger, when that version stopped long before getting to Season 2.
    • The Samurai toyline featured the Scorpion Creature, a retooled version of a shrunk down version of the Gold Ranger's Clawzord that belongs to Deker, which was never used in the show.
    • The Super Megaforce line had a Zord called the Zeo Racer Zord, a retool of the Delta Runner Zord, that did not appear in the show.
    • Dino Charge included several auxiliary Zords that never appeared in the show towards the end of the run.
    • Ninja Steel had the Stegosawrus, Tigercannon, and Gorilla Blast Zords, though only the first two could attach to the Megazord, and none of them could transform.
    • Beast Morphers was pretty good about including all of the made-for-the-US-toyline weapons in the show, but they never got around to including the Beast-X King armor for the Red Ranger, nor the included lion-themed gun and sword accessories.
    • Moreso weapons rather than figures, but the Basic Figures for Dino Fury include a Ranger-specific weapon not seen on the show instead of their default Dino Saber or any of the armor variants.
    • Dino Fury also includes extra pieces in the Green/Pink and Blue/Black Zord two-packs to form mecha just using the pieces in that set, in case the kid doesn't have the Red Ranger's Zord.
  • Transforming Mecha: Not as often as one might think, given all the giant robots running about. Mostly they go from animal to "Warrior Mode."
    • Season 2 had the Red Dragon Thunderzord, White Tigerzord, and Tor the Shuttle Zord.
    • Zeo had both Pyramidas and the Warrior Wheel.
    • Turbo's Rescue Zords could transform from vehicle to robot.
    • In Space had the Astro Megazord, which transformed from its spaceship mode into a robot; the Mega Winger, which became the Silver Ranger's default Zord; and the Delta Megazord, though that one was rarely used by its lonesome.
    • Lightspeed Rescue had the Max Solarzord, a solar-powered space shuttle that turned into a robot.
    • Time Force had the Time Shadow Megazord as well as the Quantum Ranger's Q-Rex Megazord.
    • Ninja Storm's Green Samurai Ranger had the Samurai Star Megazord, which went from attack helicopter to giant robot.
    • SPD had the Omegamax Cycle transform into Omegamax Megazord, as well as the Delta Command Megazord, which transforms from SPD's headquarters.
    • RPM had three toy-exclusive Zords (Eagle, Tiger, and Elephant), that could transform into a Toyota Camry, Prius, and Tundra respectively.
    • Ninja Steel had the Lion Fire Fortress Zord, which could not only transform into a Warrior mode, but had additional features to transform into a playset.
    • Beast Morphers had the main three Rangers' Zords, which could transform into not just vehicle and animal forms, but also into vehicle modes with animal heads.
    • Dino Fury has the T-Rex Champion Zord, which goes from T-Rex to fighter and serves as the base of the various Megazord combinations.
  • Transforming Vehicle:
    • The Lightning Cruiser from Turbo had fold-out wings so that it could be a Cool Ship.
    • The Galaxy Cycles from In Space could fold out to become makeshift Galaxy Gliders.
    • The Trans-Armor Cycles from Lightspeed Rescue could transform into Red, Green, Blue, and Titanium's Battilizer armors.
    • In Wild Force, the male Rangers got a second bike called the "Wild Force Rider," which could transform into a flight mode. Only Red's actually appeared on the show.
    • Ninja Storm gave the Rangers Ninja Glider Cycles, where the sides could fold out to become a hang glider.
    • Dino Thunder had the Hovercraft Cycles, where the wheels could pop down, turn horizontal, and spin. While only the Blue Ranger got one in the show, the toyline gave one to everyone but Yellow.
    • Operation Overdrive had the Transtek Armor, which could transform from futuristic car to minature mecha. The toy would get re-released during the Samurai line later on.
    • The Turbo Falconzord from Super Megaforce had a US-exclusive robot mode the toy could turn into.
    • The cycles from Ninja Steel could also fold out to become giant throwing stars.
    • Beast Morphers included Cruise in the Basic Figure line, which could transform into his bike mode.
  • Unintentional Uncanny Valley: Many of the attempts at making realistic civilian heads come off like this.
  • Utility Weapon: The Beast Morphers Basic Figures came with keys to unlock various sounds in the Deluxe Morpher. They can also be attached to the figure's arms and used as a makeshift shield/energy sword weapon.
  • Virtual Pet: Both In Space and Lost Galaxy had Digizords, which were based on the also-owned-by-Bandai Digimon toys in a shell made to look like a 5" Megazord figure.
  • Wolverine Claws: Beast Morphers included the US-exclusive Cheetah Claws, which functioned like this. There main focus was on the role play version, but there was one included in the Fury Mode Red Ranger figure, though that figure only had one claw while the in-show version had two.
  • World of Buxom: When Bandai had the license, most of the female Rangers (that weren't simply reusing male Ranger molds) gained very large busts. This got especially corny when female Rangers who had small chests (such as Trini) gained massive D-Cups when put into figure form.

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