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The Simpsons: Tropes I to M
This page covers tropes found in The Simpsons.

Tropes A to B | Tropes C to D | Tropes E to H | Tropes I To M | Tropes N to R | Tropes S to Z | YMMV

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    I 
  • I Am Big Boned: Homer, Comic Book Guy and even Bart have all used variants of this at different times.
  • I Am One of Those Too: In "Lard of the Dance", Homer runs into Groundskeeper Willie while stealing his grease and pretends that he's from Scotland. The following exchange occurs:
    Homer: We're new foreign exchange students from... uh, um... Scotland!
    Willie: Saints be praised; I'm from Scotland! Where do ya hail from?
    Homer: Uh... North... Kilttown.
    Willie: No foolin'! I'm from North Kilttown! Do you know Angus McCleod?
    Homer: Wait a minute! There's no Angus McCleod in North Kilttown! Why, you're not from Scotland at all!
  • I Ate What?:
    • Subverted in "Missionary Impossible" when Homer is drinking out of what appears to be a coconut, but is really an ox testicle. Homer doesn't mind, though.
    • Played with in the "Connie Appleseed" segment of "Simpsons Tall Tales." Homer happily eats what he thinks are buffalo testicles, and is disgusted when he learns they're apples.
    • Parodied in "Simpsonscalifragilisticexpialad'ohcious":
    Homer: Ooh, I can't get enough of this blood pudding.
    Bart: The secret ingredient is blood.
    Homer: Blood? Ugh! I'll just stick to the brain and kidney pie, thank you.
  • I Can Change My Beloved: Lisa's goal to her crush, Nelson, in "Lisa's Date With Density". Marge thinks she has changed Homer. Lisa is skeptical.
  • I, Noun: The episode "I, D'oh-Bot". Or is it "I, (annoyed grunt)-Bot"?
  • I Coulda Been a Contender:
    • Moe is frustrated by the failure of his once promising boxing career.
    • Homer admired Kennedy and dreamt of being president one day during his childhood. As a middle-aged man he remarks the constant disencouragement and contempt he received from his father turned him into a deadbeat.
    • Marge wanted to be an artist rather than a housewife. She tries to resume that path occassionally.
  • Idiot Hero: Homer.
  • Idiot Houdini: Again, Homer.
    • Bart, to a lesser extent.
  • Idiosyncratic Wipes: In "Alone Again, Natura-Diddly", Lisa and Homer argue over using star wipes on Ned's dating tape. The episode then goes to the next scene with a star wipe.
  • If I Wanted X, I Would Y: In "Marge Be Not Proud", Detective Don Brodka uses this on Bart while interrogating him.
    Brodka: If I wanted smoke blown up my ass, I would be at home with a pack of cigarettes and a short length of hose.
  • If You Kill Him, You Will Be Just Like Him: The episode "Curse of the Flying Hellfish" has Burns sending assassins after Abe, trying to drown his grandson, etc... and yet, when Abe has Burns cornered...
    Burns: Don't kill me!
    Abe: I ain't gonna kill ya. That'd be cowardly. Monty Burns cowardly. I just wanna watch you squirm.
  • Ignored Aesop: Most episodes which appear to have morality lessons end up devolving into this.
    Lisa: Perhaps there is no moral to this story.
    Homer: Exactly! It's just a bunch of stuff that happens.
  • Ignored Epiphany: Burns has had a few of these about treating people better.
  • Ignoring By Singing: In "Simpson Tide", Homer is about to answer a crossed out question on his Naval Reserve application (specifically, if he's a homosexual). The recruiter pleads that he not answer that or he could go to jail. Homer starts to talk again, and the recruiter puts his hands over his ears, shouts "Lalala, I'm not listening!" and leaves. Homer muses to himself, "Nice guy. I wonder if he's gay?"
  • I Have a Family: In "Lost Our Lisa", when Homer is woken up by Bart, Homer assumes it's Mr. Burns before turning around:
    Homer: I'm awake! I'm awake! I'm a productive member of the team! (defiantly) You can't fire me, I quit! (meekly) Please, I have a family!
  • I Have Just One Thing to Say: Said to Moe in "The Love-Matic Grampa" (part of "The Simpsons Spin-off Showcase"):
    Betty: Why, you conniving, devious, monstrous, despicable, (changes tone) sweet little angel!
    Moe: But Betty, if you'd just give me a chance to- WHAAAAAAAAT?
  • I Have No Son:
    • Parodied in "Like Father, Like Clown".
    Rabbi Krustofski: I have no son! (slams door)
    Bart: Oh, great. We came all this way and it's the wrong guy.
    Rabbi Krustofski: (reopens door) I didn't mean that literally! (slams door)
    • Also said by Grampa about Homer in "Old Money".
    • And from Principal and the Pauper
    Agnes Skinner: I have no son!
    Homer: Look, lady, I think it's clear you have at least one son.
    Agnes: No, I have one stranger and one fraud!
  • I Have This Friend: Happens in "The Last Temptation of Homer". Homer tries to tell Moe how he's considering cheating on Marge. He says "I have this friend named... Joey...Joe...Junior...Shabadoo..." When Moe interrupts and says "That's the worst name I've ever heard!". Then a random guy runs out of the bar crying, and Barney goes after him saying "Joey Joe!".
  • I Lied:
    • From "The Bart Wants what it Wants":
    Ranier Wolfcastle (to a pie): "Remember when I said I'd eat you last? I lied!"
    • Also this in the Tracy Ullman shorts:
    Bart: Family therapy? What the hell is this?
    Homer: Well, I lied.
  • I'll Kill You!:
    • "The Shinning":
    Homer: Hmm. Cable's out. Think I'll have a beer. Hmm. Not a drop in the house. What do you know.
    Marge: Homer, I'm impressed! You're taking this quite well.
    Homer: I'LL KILL YOU! I'LL KILL ALL OF YOU!!!
    Quimby's Lawyer: Are you a violent man?
    Quimby's Nephew: [rehearsed lines] Of course not. I love each and every creature on God's green Earth.
    Quimby's Lawyer: Then surely you would never lose your temper over something as trivial as the pronunciation of the word "chowder"?
    Quimby's Nephew: THAT'S CHOW-DAH!! CHOW-DAH!! I'LL KILL YOU!! I'LL KILL ALL OF YOU!! ESPECIALLY THOSE OF YOU IN THE JURY!!
  • I'll Pretend I Didn't Hear That: In "The Springfield Connection", Marge confronts Homer for parking across three handicapped parking spots. Homer tells her to relax and that he'll just be a minute; he's going to buy beer for some underage teens. Marge replies, "I'm going to pretend I didn't hear that, but you have to move your car now!"
  • I'll Tell You When I've Had Enough!:
    • In "'Round Springfield", Bleeding Gums Murphy says this when buying Fabergé eggs in a flashback.
    • "Fear of Flying": While he doesn't quite say the line, Norm from Cheers is denied another beer by Woody, with the excuse that Woody was told by his chiropractor that he can't carry Norm home anymore. To which Norm replies:
    Norm: Just gimme another beer, you brain-dead hick! I'll kill you! I'll kill all of you!
  • Imagine the Audience Naked: Used twice.
  • Imagine Spot: Used frequently among all members of the family and other characters.
  • Improbably Predictable:
    Ned: Can you believe it? It almost seems like those folks were ... were making fun of ol' steady Neddy!
    Maude: Well, you may be a bit cautious. What's wrong with that? Some people like chunky peanut butter, some like smooth!
    Ned: Mmm-hmm, and some people just steer clear of that whole hornet's nest! I'll stick with just plain white bread, thank you very much, maybe with a ...
    Maude, Rod & Todd: "... glass of water on the side for dippin'!"
    Ned: Gosh darn it! Am I that pre-diddly-ictable? sigh I've wasted my whole dang-diddly life.
  • I'm Standing Right Here: In "Mountain of Madness", as the various teams are announced:
    Smithers: (draws a name) Lenny and... (draws another name) Carl.
    Carl: Aw, nuts. (Lenny is standing right next to him, and has a hurt look on his face) I mean... aw, nuts.
  • Irrational Hatred: Homer for Ned.
  • Ironic Echo: Several examples.
    • In "Bart the Murderer", Skinner tells Bart to make a game out of how fast he can lick envelopes, then try to break that record. Later in the episode, while Skinner is explaining his whereabouts in the last couple of weeks, he says that he kept up his stamina by dribbling a basketball... by doing as many reps as he could, then trying to break that record. Bart rolls his eyes.
  • The Immodest Orgasm:
    • The episode "A Hunka Hunka Burns in Love", has one scene in which Homer injects himself with Mr. Burns' aphrodisiac. Then it cuts to Homer rushing up the stairs carrying Marge in a lustful manner. Then cuts to a post-sex scene:
    Marge: Oh, Homie, that was amazing. Oh, I hope the kids didn't hear us.
    [Bart and Lisa in their bedrooms looking shocked with their eyes open]
    Ned: [also shocked with his eyes open] Wow.
    • Happens again in "Homer the Father". Only now Ned, Rod and Todd are affected.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice: Mel Gibson's guest appearance.
  • Impossible Shadow Puppets: This happens a few times. In one episode, Lisa subconsciously makes a hand shadow of a California Condor.
  • Incessant Music Madness: In the early seasons, one of Homer's catch phrases is "Will you cut out that infernal racket?!" directed at Lisa rehearsing her sax. In the episode where he thinks he's dying from having poisonous sushi, he goes to her room as she's playing. "Hi, Dad. Want me to cut out this infernal racket?"
  • Incompatible Orientation: Smithers to Mr Burns.
  • Incredibly Lame Fun: Homer does this a lot. "Bed goes up, bed goes down! Bed goes up, bed goes down!"
  • Indestructible Edible: "Silly customer! You cannot hurt a Twinkie!"
  • I Need a Freaking Drink:
    • The episode "Lisa's Sax" has this from a parody of Michigan J. Frog:
    "We're proud to present on the WB, another bad show that no-one will see-ee-eee! Ugh, I need a drink."
    • In "Marge Gets a Job", Groundskeeper Willie wrestles a wolf which escaped from a shooting of Krusty's show and attacked Bart at school. When they are finished, Willie shares a flask of Scotch with the whipped wolf.
      Willie: Ah, don't feel bad for losing. I was wrestling wolves back when you were at your mother's teat.
    • "A Fish Called Selma": When Troy tries to have sex with Selma to conceive a child (and scotch those pernicious rumours about his fish fetish), he just keeps making suggestive growling noises at the door of their bedroom. Selma wants to break the ice and offers him some wine. He quickly runs to the bed, empties both glasses, and returns to the door to continue growling.
  • Ineffectual Death Threats: In "Monty Can't Buy Me Love", after Moe realizes that his priceless vintage beer tap is now only worth $5 after Homer carved his name into it, he says "I'm gonna kill him! I'm gonna kill him!" and grabs a vintage gun from Skinner, only to have it disintegrate in his hands.
  • Inept Aptitude Test: The premise of "Separate Vocations": Bart suddenly has purpose in his life when he is told he will be a cop, while Lisa gets depressed and rebellious when she realizes she'll be a homemaker.
  • Inertial Impalement: Parodied & Downplayed example when Bart & Lisa get into a fight. Bart is leaving Lisa's room.
    Bart: OK, but on my way, I'm going to be doing this: (windmills arms) If you get hit, it's your own fault.
    Lisa: OK, then I'm going to start kicking air like this. (kicks) And if any part of you should fill that air, it's your own fault.
    (they walk towards each other, then start fighting)
    Marge: (in the kitchen) Oh, I better go check that out. Now Homer, don't you eat this pie!
    Homer: OK...(Marge leaves) All right, pie, I'm just going to do this. (chomps air) And if you get eaten, it's your own fault! (walks towards pie, chomping air, and hits head on range hood) Ow! Oh, my — aw, to hell with this. (grabs pie, eats it)
  • I Never Got Any Letters: Why Homer never got any of his mother's care packages.
  • I Never Told You My Name: Played for laughs in the episode "Lisa's Wedding".
  • Inflationary Dialogue: In "The Squirt and The Whale", Comic Book Guy buys a new girdle and wears it under a Captain Kirk shirt.
    Behold, I am Captain Kirk from Star Trek One! [girdle gives way] Two. [girdle gives way] Five [girdle gives way] Generations [girdle gives way completely] Boston Legal.
  • Inflation Negation: Bart has to do some chores for some old lady, ends up battered and bleeding from all the chores, and only receives two quarters from her.
    • In the same episode, Bart complains to Homer about this, and Homer responds with, "Hey, when I was your age, two quarters was a lot of money." Bart inquires if that's true, and Homer drops the charade: "Nah."
    • Mr. Burns on The Simpsons is a veritable dumping ground for these kinds of tropes.
    Mr. Burns: "Don't poo-poo a nickel, Lisa! A nickel can buy you a steak and kidney pie, a cup of coffee, a slice of cheesecake, and a newsreel with enough change left over to ride the trolley from Battery Park to the Polo Grounds!"
    Lisa: "...There's a can."
  • Informed Attribute: Marge is left-handed. She's just faked it all these years in order to fit in.
  • Informed Judaism: Averted with Dolph; in one episode, he suddenly mentions that he's late for Hebrew school. Before this, there was never any indication that he was Jewish.
    • Krusty before his bar mitzvah.
    • There's a recurring character simply called Old Jewish Man.
  • Informed Self Diagnosis: In "Mr. Spritz Goes to Washington", Senator Horace Wilcox describes in detail his symptoms of a heart attack before keeling over and dying.
  • Inherently Funny Word: The clown college trains students in the various funny words. "Seattle" was one of them.
  • Inner Monologue Conversation: An interesting example where both Principal Skinner and Homer think at Bart; it's not clear that Bart can hear them but it is implied that Homer can hear Skinner.
    Skinner: (I know you can read my thoughts, Bart. Just a little reminder: if I found out you cut class, your ass is mine. Yes, you heard me. I think words I would never say.)
    Homer: (I know you can read my thoughts, boy. sings the "Meow Mix" song in his head)
  • Innocent Swearing: One of the Flanders children swears twice at the dinner table ("Hell, no!" and "I don't want any damn vegetables.") The humour turns heartbreaking after he is scolded and runs from the room crying, not understanding what he has done wrong.
  • Inspirational Insult: Invoked in an I Meant to Do That way in "The PTA Disbands" Mrs. Krabappel and Principal Skinner have a heated discussion in the cafeteria during lunch.
    Mrs. Krabappel: Seymour, you have to think of the children's future.
    Seymour: Oh, Edna. We all know that these children HAVE no future!.
    [everyone stops and stares at Seymour]
    Seymour: nervous laugh Prove me wrong, children. Prove me wrong.
  • Instant Emergency Response: Parodied in "Cape Feare". The Simpsons Thompsons' house boat crashes near a brothel in Springfield, and within seconds the police appear and arrest Sideshow Bob in their bathrobes.
  • Instant Marksman Just Squeeze Trigger: Marge is shown how to shoot by former neighbor Ruth Powers in "Marge on the Lam". Ruth tells Marge to squeeze the trigger, although she does not mention the part about not pulling the trigger. Marge does show immediate skill as a marksman.
    My cans! My precious antique cans! Aw, look what ya done to 'em...
  • Instant Web Hit: The Angry Dad video
  • Instrument of Murder: Julia's blowgun/baton in "Homer of Seville".
  • Instrumental Theme Tune: Aside from the two-word chorus of "The Simpsons!", of course.
  • Insult Backfire: When Ned Flanders snaps in "Hurricane Neddy" and insults everyone, he directs his attention to Homer last:
    Ned: Homer, you are the worst human being I have ever met.
    Homer: Hey, I got off pretty easy.
  • Internal Homage: In "The Food Wife", "Big Super Happy Fun Fun Game" and a "Grand Theft Scratchy" game are seen at E4.
  • Internal Retcon: A highly extreme version of this trope is used in the episode Principal and the Pauper where the entire town, including Skinner's mother, declares that the fake Seymour Skinner is actually the real one and run the actual Skinner out of town on a rail. They further state that anyone who brings up the fact that he isn't will be subject to the penalty of "extreme torture".
  • The Internet Is for Porn: Referenced in "Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo". When Lisa brings up the internet, Bart says he knows a site where monkeys do it.
    Lisa: Bart, the internet is more than a global pornography network. It's-
    Homer: (already in the car with Bart ready to drive to an internet cafe) Come on, Lisa, monkeys!
  • Interspecies Romance: Bart had been trying to get a lizard and a hamster to mate before he caught his teacher and principal making out. Later in the episode, Homer is forced by Mr. Burns to disguise himself as a panda... and gets himself raped by a real one.
    • Used again in the season twenty-one episode, The Squirt and the Whale, where Homer describes a happy ending for the whale family in the story by pairing the whale father with a sexy octopus.
  • Involuntary Dance: A Go-Go Ray in "Duffless" (Dream Sequence), Bart's prank on Skinner in "The Debarted", and Frink's invention in "Last Tap Dance in Springfield".
  • I Resemble That Remark: From "A Tale of Two Springfields":
    Kent Brockman: ...While we speak in a well-educated manner, they [New Springfieldians] tend to use lowbrow expressions like, "Oh, yeah?" and "Come here a minute."
    Homer: Oh yeah? They think they're better than us, huh? Bart, come here a minute!
    Bart: You come here a minute.
    Homer: (threateningly) Oh yeah...?
    • In "Homer Defined", when Milhouse says he can't hang out with Bart anymore because his mom says he's a bad influence:
    Bart: Bad influence, my ass! How many times have I told you: Never listen to your mother!
  • Iron Buttmonkey: Homer falls headlong into this trope. Several jokes have been brief Hand Waves as to why he can survive such things from having accrued a thick beer-based cushioning fluid around his brain from years of drinking to painkillers, lots and lots of painkillers. Interestingly, Homer is actually hurt a great deal after suffering cartoon levels of violence, it's just that he survives that is amazing and this makes it funnier than a pure cartoon like response since you know Homer is really being hurt. As the writer of Planet Simpson said
    He falls like a cartoon but he lands like a real person.
    • Sideshow Bob has moments of this too, like in the "Cape Feare" episode.
  • Ironic Episode Title: Parodied in-universe when the Simpsons went to a film festival. Marge went to movies called "Regularsville" and "Candyland", but was despondent when the titles were non-indicative of their content. By this reverse logic, Marge thought she'd love "Chernobyl Graveyard". But she immediately left the theater depressed, realizing she was duped yet again.
  • Isolation Despondency: In one episode, Milhouse is forbidden from playing with Bart by his mother. In the end, Marge steps in and points out that keeping Milhouse from his best friend leaves him far worse off than any of Bart's antics.
  • I Take Offense to That Last One: From "Hurricane Neddy":
    Ned: You ugly, hate-filled man!
    Moe: Hey, I may be ugly and hate filled, but, uh... what was the third thing you said?
  • I Think You Broke Him: Bart breaks Skinner by handing out candy hearts with offensive messages on them, which triggers a Vietnam flashback of seeing his buddy get shot in Da Nang on Valentine's Day in 1969.
  • It's a Wonderful Plot: The episode "The Last Temptation Of Homer" plays with this for a minute, except Homer sees a world where he was married Mindy instead causes Marge to be living in the White House.
  • It's All My Fault: "I called him a dumb dog".
  • It's Been Done: Invoked by George Harrison when Homer's barbershop quartet puts on a Rooftop Concert.
  • It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time: "The Dad Who Knew Too Little" episode has Lisa question how Homer could be so stupid as to have a adult man spy on her. He says "All the childless drunks at Moe's thought it was a great idea."
  • It Tastes Like Feet: In "Helter Shelter", Lisa remarks that the bread tastes like clothes.
  • Ivy League For Everyone
  • I Want My Beloved to Be Fashionable: In the episode "Lisa's Date with Density," Lisa takes her crush Nelson Muntz shopping for spiffier clothing. "I feel like such a tool," he says, seeing himself in the mirror with a collared shirt and sweater vest.
  • I Want My Jet Pack: The episode "Lisa's Wedding."
  • I Will Show You X:
    Homer: Lisa! Knock off that racket!
    Lisa: But Dad, I'm supposed to practice an hour a day!
    Homer: I'll practice you!
    Lisa: You'll practice me...what does that mean? Is it supposed to be some sort of a threat?
    • And in another episode:
    Judi Dench: Who are you talking to?
    Londoner Squeaky-Voiced Teen: No-one, mum, I swear!
    Judi Dench: I'll Mum you! {starts beating Londoner Squeaky-Voiced Teen}
    • Another Simpsons example, when Homer's mom reappears, Bart asks for retroactive birthday, Christmas, Hannukah and Kwanzaa gifts. Homer responds with "I'll Kwanzaa you!"
    • This is a fairly popular one with The Simpsons. For example, when Homer was yet again passed up for the "Worker of the Week" award for...an inanimate carbon rod. "Inanimate huh? I'll show him inanimate!" He just stands there.
    • "The earring could plug the hole." "I'll plug YOUR hole!"
  • Iwo Jima Pose: There's a send-up of the pose in the episode "New Kids On The Blecch" in which Bart, Milhouse, Nelson, and Ralph form a Boy Band that's being used as a recruitment tool by the US Navy.
    • In "Selma's Choice", among Aunt Gladys' collection of potato chips resembling famous people is one that looks like the flag planting at Iwo Jima. Homer eats them as quickly as they're shown on screen.
    • Also seen in "Large Marge"; Bart and Milhouse accidentally knock over the school flag, and a group of WWII veterans strike this pose when putting the flag back up.

    J 
  • Jack Bauer Interrogation Technique: in the 24 parody episode (aptly enough), Bart does this to Nelson (of all people) by putting a trash can on his head and banging his fists on it. It - as well as the episode itself - is exactly as awesome as it sounds.
  • Jackie Robinson Story: Parodied in "Bart Star". Lisa wants to join the football team for the simple fact that she assumes it will be all males. However, she's caught off guard when Ned tells Lisa that there already are girls on the team. Lisa tries another tactic, of saying she wouldn't play a game where the balls are made out of pig skins. But she's corrected again, since the footballs are made from synthetic materials, and that for every ball bought, a dollar goes to Amnesty International. Lisa gets tears in her eyes, frustrated that she has nothing to protest about, and runs off.
  • Jeopardy! Intelligence Test: Homer fails his in "Simpson And Delilah",
    the capital of North Dakota is named after what German ruler?
    Homer: Hitler!
    Also, the episode "Miracle On Evergreen Terrace" has a brief moment of Marge trying to get the family out of debt by appearing on "Jeopardy!", except she ends up with a negative score at the end of the game.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Homer and Bart are the most prominent, but characters ranging from Moe to Willie to Nelson have all demonstrated this trait at one point or another.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk: Mr. Burns' evil has been deconstructed many times. In a season 22 episode, he gets amnesia and everyone in town borrows him for 15 minutes at a time. At the end, he gets his memories back, and the town reasons that helping everyone made him well. He does more good deeds, which makes him suffer health defects, until he does bad deeds again and starts feeling better again, putting forth the more accurate reasoning that "helping" everyone refuelled his hate for the town, giving him a reason to live again.
    • Don Brodka in "Marge be not Proud" is this, also, what kind of jerk would disrupt a family's Christmas photo?
  • The Jinx: In "Guess Who's Coming to Criticize Dinner", Marge states that her woman's intuition is acting up, and that something bad will happen to Homer if he sets foot into the food fair. Homer states that something bad happens whenever he goes anywhere. Sure enough, he steps in a mud puddle, is hit by a Frisbee, and bitten by a bat in short order.
    Homer: A bat. That's a new one.
    • In "Mother Simpson," Homer is reunited with his mother (who he thought was dead).
      Mona: This is such a beautiful moment.
      Homer: There's something you should know about me, mom. I somehow always manage to ruin the moment. *A pelican flies out of nowhere and drops a fish from its mouth into Homer's pants.* I'm sorry.
  • "Join the Army," They Said: Parodied in "G-I-(Annoyed Grunt)".
  • Juggling Loaded Guns: Homer buys a gun and uses it for such things as opening a can of beer, and turning on his TV (complete with a Mook from a Western falling off a roof at that exact moment). This actually gets him kicked out of the local gun club. In the same episode, Marge gets annoyed when Homer plays with the gun at the breakfast table. Homer puts the safety on, but only manages to accidentally fire the gun, hitting a picture of Marge. He nervously comments that he accidentally turned the safety off, and turns it on... and the gun again discharges, hitting the picture of Marge. Freaked out by now, Homer puts the gun on the table — and after a second, without being touched it fires again, this time hitting a knife which is sent flying into the picture of Marge, right between the eyes.
    Lisa: ... No offense, mom, but that was pretty cool.
    • When Wiggum was young, film of him at a firing range has him looking down the barrel after his gun stops and getting yelled at by his instructor ("What did I say about pointsy-twardsies?"). He then gives the instructor a back massage with the gun and it goes off and shoots the cameraman. He's later shown to have gotten the position of Chief by giving the Mayor a back massage with his gun. Another episode showed Wiggum cleaning his ears with the barrel of his gun, and yet another showed him firing at his TV after forgetting where he left the remote. It was in his gun holster. In a recent episode where he used two gun barrels as earplugs.
    Marge: I don't think the guns are a good idea.
    Homer: Marge! We're responsible adults. And —
    Moe: [shoots] Whoops.
    Homer: And if a group of responsible adults can't handle firearms in a responsible way —
    Sea Captain: [shoots] Sorry.
    Skinner: [shoots] Uh oh.
    Moe: [shoots] Me again.
    Bart: [shoots] Sorry.
  • Jumping Out of a Cake: Mr Smithers has a fantasy of Mr Burns doing this for his birthday.
    • Subverted in "Lady Bouvier's Lover": Some of the senior citizens present Abe with a special cake with a dancer inside. But when nobody pops out from the cake, they look inside, finding the dancer in critical condition.
    Jasper: Uh oh. Better call the nurse.
  • "Jump Off a Bridge" Rebuttal: Parodied a couple times.
    • In "Simpson Tide":
    Marge: What on earth possessed you to get an earring?
    Bart: Milhouse has one.
    Marge: If Milhouse jumped off a cliff...
    Bart: Milhouse jumped off a cliff? I'm there.
    • From "Scenes From the Class Struggle in Springfield":
    Marge: Homer, I don't think you should wear a short-sleeve shirt with a tie.
    Homer: Ohhh, but Sipowicz does it.
    Marge: If Detective Sipowicz jumped off a cliff, would you do that too?
    Homer: Ohhh, I wish I was Sipowicz.
    • From "The Haw-Hawed Couple", when Marge finds out that Bart's planning on not attending Nelson's party:
    Bart: Mom, I can't go! No one else is!
    Marge: Well if no one else jumped off the Empire State Building, would you not jump?
    Bart: (confused) ...Kind of?
  • Jump the Shark :
    • As a sight gag parodying the concept within the show.
    • Seasons 11-13 had several meta-jokes about the show ending soon, running out of ideas, etc. These fell by the wayside as the seasons just kept piling on with no end in sight.
  • Jury of the Damned: Halloween episode "The Devil and Homer Simpson."
  • Just Friends: Torwards the end of "Lisa's Date with Density", Lisa and Nelson eventually broke up and simply became friends. The friendship is sustained later in the end of "Loan-a-Lisa" in which Lisa and Nelson skate with each other.
  • Just Ignore It: Halloween episode "Attack of the 50-Foot Eyesores."

    K 
  • Kangaroo Pouch Ride: During their trip to Australia. Bart and Homer try to ride a kangaroo but the pouch is full of slime.
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes: Fox has overall treated this show very well on DVD so this isn't necessary for the most part, but there's one episode which somehow squeaked through edited: "The Tell-Tale Head". It's missing a brief bit towards the end where Bart says that taking the origins of Springfield for granted was a crime too (though, according to Word of God, that scene was just shoehorned in by the FOX executives who wanted that episode of The Simpsons to have a moral — as if "Don't do something stupid just to impress some bad people" isn't enough of a moral). In a bizarre subversion, this scene is seen in syndication.
    • Another one: the original version of "Marge Gets a Job" where Mrs. Krabappel mentions that Bart faked Tourette Syndrome hasn't been seen since the first airing (as a real viewer with Tourette's threatened to sue the show if they didn't edit the scene). While the syndicated version has the original line, but not the scene of Bart snarling and barking and calling Krabappel a witch, the DVD version has "Tourette Syndrome" replaced with "rabies," but kept in Bart barking and snarling (even though rabies and Tourette Syndrome are not the same thing — plus, if you can lip read, you can tell that Krabappel's original line was "Tourette Syndrome").
    • In the case of digital download sites (like iTunes), this is played somewhat straight in terms of complete season sets. For example, iTunes has up to season 3, then skips ahead to the newer seasons starting from number twenty with full seasons. For episodes inbetween them, they're divided into various different collections based on a certain theme, like "20th anniversary", "Treehouse of Horror (for Halloween)", and "Kiss Me, I'm a Simpson (for St. Patrick's Day)."
  • Keeping the Enemy Close: This is how Homer gains his position at the nuclear power plant. He led a protest against the plant's numerous safety violations, so Mr. Burns placated the protesters by making Homer the head of safety. Burns explained to Smithers afterwards that this allows them to keep a close eye on Homer and punish him in due time. (However, this seems to have completely failed—in subsequent episodes it becomes a running gag that Burns never remembers who Homer is, in spite of how often they interact.)
  • Kick Me Prank:
    • One episode has Bart and Principal Skinner embrace before returning to their old rivalry. Bart attaches a "Kick Me" sign to Skinner, however Skinner also managed to attach a "Teach Me" sign to Bart.
    • In a different episode of The Simpsons Principal Skinner found a Kick Me sign on his back.
      Skinner: Hmm. I thought I was being kicked more often that usual today.
    • In yet another Simpsons, this one parodying The Departed, Bart's prank "Kick Me" signs are changed to ones that read "Kick Me-diocre Study Habits" (which encourages Kearney to stop bullying and read a book).
  • Kick the Dog: Burns has a LOT of these moments. He comes awfully close to literal in "Dog Of Death" when he has Bart's innocent, gentle pet dog strapped to a chair, and Forced to Watch several clips of animal abuse to turn him into an Angry Guard Dog.
    • Later in the same episode, when Smithers says to Burns "A sweet little boy is here to see you" Burns says "Release the hounds." Said little boy is actually Bart.
    • When Homer tried to quit his job at the power plant, but had to retake it after impregnating Marge with Maggie, Burns made a narrow tunnel to his office that Homer had to walk through, and put a sign on Homer's desk that said "don't forget, you're here forever." Almost literally adding insult to injury.
    • Burns also sends a vicious Angry Guard Dog after Bart (who was hungry after running away from home) for trying to steal a pie which was left on the window sill. A pie that Burns would have otherwise disposed of ANYWAY.
    • There was also the time he tried to make clothing out of the fur of a bunch of small puppies. He is implied to own lots of clothing made from the hide of various animals as well.
    • There is also "22 Short Films About Springfield," where Burns' most loyal assistant, Smithers, who has a life-threatening allergy to bee venom, gets stung by a bee, and Burns just yells at him to keep paddling and dishes out a barrage of vicious insults. (They are on a bicycle and Smithers was already doing all the work.)
      • It's strongly hinted that this was the only way Burns could think of to actually help Smithers, seeing as he in no way had the physical strength to operate the bike himself.
    • "Homer vs. Dignity" is a full EPISODE of Burns doing metaphorical dog-kicking. Desperate for money, Homer asks Burns for a raise, and Burns instead decides that it's only under the condition that Homer be Burns' personal "prank monkey." These pranks involve a series of increasingly humiliating circumstances Homer is put in, and culminates in Burns dressing Homer in a panda suit and having another panda rape him. Eventually Homer gets fed up with this and quits, using the money he already had to set up a parade to distribute toys to needy kids; Burns shows up to try to bribe Homer into throwing fish guts instead of presents; Homer is shown contemplating to it, and then it cuts to fish guts being thrown at the kids; but it is revealed that Burns is the one throwing it after all.
    • "Curse of the Flying Hellfish" reveals him and Abe to be the last surviving members of their WW2 unit, and that a deal was made such that the last surviving member would get to keep a case of art stolen from civilians. Not content to leave which of them that is up to chance, Burns hires an assassin to kill Abe, but said assassin is not successful at it. Bart convinces Abe to go get the case anyway, and when Abe and Bart retrieve it, Burns shows up and takes the art at gunpoint. Bart calls Burns a coward, then Burns points the gun at Bart's face. Abe says Burns can take the art as long as he does not hurt the boy. Burns remarks that he would rather do both, then kicks Bart into the empty safe and sinks it into the water (fortunately, Bart survives and Burns gets what he deserves, but that just goes to show how evil Mr. Burns can be, despite that Bart once saved Burns from dying with a blood donation and was even considered his heir because of how destructive he was).
    • He once developed a project to block sunlight from reaching Springfield, to deprive them of one more alternative source of heat and light. His usually-unquestioning assistant Smithers objected to this, and was fired as a result. A town hall meeting was held about this, and Burns showed up JUST when the whole town was being shown what Burns' oil drilling operation did to Bart's pet dog, who was seen using wheels just to walk down the hallway.
    Burns: Oh, those wheels are squeaking a bit. Perhaps I could sell him a little oil.
    • Earlier in the episode Burns commented his oil scheme would be like taking candy from a baby. He then spots a baby with a lollipop in his binoculars and considers trying it.
    • The show is always meant to be mean-spirited from the start but in "The Boys of Bummer" where the whole town mocked and chastised Bart over a ball game to the point where Bart attempts suicide, they still mocked at him.
  • Kids Are Cruel: Two season six episodes had this: "Fear of Flying" (when Marge was talking to her therapist about her childhood, where a little girl mocks Marge for liking The Monkees and telling her that they don't write their own songs or play their own instruments — and, worst of all, Michael Nesmith wasn't wearing his real hat) and "Homer the Great"note  (when Homer remembers when he was excluded from a treehouse club that only let in one person named Homer, and he wasn't it).
    • The show, as a whole, does show how kids (and teens — mostly the three thugs, Dolph, Jimbo, and Kearney) can be mean, like when Sherri and Terri made fun of Lisa's butt in "Sleeping With the Enemy," Nelson bullying Bart and other kids in various episodes, and Maggie being bullied by babies in "Eeny, Teeny, Maya, Moe." Even Bart and Lisa can be mean if the writers want to do that.
    Marge: Oh poor Homer. Kids can be so cruel.
    Bart: (walking past and overhearing) We can! Thanks mum.
    He runs into lisa's room and they are heard fighting.
  • Kids Prefer Boxes: One time, Homer attempts to persuade Maggie to give up Mr Burns' beloved teddy bear by giving her a box to play with instead. However, Homer becomes enthralled with the box and keeps it for himself despite Maggie's enthusiasm for it.
  • Kids Shouldn't Watch Horror Films:
    • Homer takes Bart and Lisa to see a horror film about a possessed doll. All three end up terrified that there's a monster in their attic which leads into the episode's real plot about Artie Ziff living in their attic.
    • Another episode has the neighborhood kids sneak out after curfew to a drive-in to watch a Children of the Corn-style horror film called The Bloodening.
  • Killed Off for Real: Bleedin' Gums Murphy (who died of an unknown illness during his stay at the hospital), Frank Grimes (killed when he went insane and electrocuted himself), Maude Flanders (got hit with T-shirts from a T-shirt cannon and fell over the bleachers at a car race), Mona Simpson (died of natural causes while staying with The Simpsons — though, given the plot behind her last requests, some viewers are claiming that Mona killed herself so she can instigate the plan), and Poochie (who was hastily written off the show after people protested that Poochie was a horrible addition to The Itchy and Scratchy Show)
    • Subverted with Dr. Nick Riviera, killed in the movie, got better in the 20th season.
    • Marvin Monroe was killed off because of a visual gag about a memorial hospital and has a tombstone in the episode Maude dies in. Many years later he resurfaced at a book signing and vanished promptly.
    • In Donnie Fatso Fat Tony dies of a heart attack. Then his cousin, Fit Tony (who is identical to Fat Tony in every way except waist size), shows up and takes over the Springfield Mob. He then eats a lot and becomes known as Fat Tony (as in nothing actually changed).
    • Even though Poochie was killed off in the episode he appeared in, he would be seen yet again in an "Itchy and Scratchy" short that parodied the issues surrounding cloning, as one of the attendees of Itchy's funeral (and on the "Treehouse of Horror" story where Bart and Lisa are sucked into the TV and try to escape Itchy and Scratchy). He's also treated as still part of the ensemble, appearing in an ice show known as "Matrix Poochie".
  • Killing For A Tissue Sample: In a Treehouse of Horror episode it's discovered that Bart is immune to the Zombie Plague, so a bunch of other (non-zombie) people plan to eat him in order to become immune. Eventually he just swims in the soup they all eat.
  • "King Kong" Climb: In "Revenge Is a Dish Best Served Three Times", Bart's story of revenge, "Bartman Begins", takes place in 1930s Gotham City. In a Funny Background Event, Kong can be seen atop a skyscraper waving to paparazzi taking his picture.
    • Parodied in the Treehouse of Horror short "King Homer", in which the titular King Homer, Marge in hand, starts climbing a skyscraper... And barely gets off the ground before becoming exhausted and falling onto his back.
  • Kingpin in His Gym: Spoofed when Mr. Burns makes Smithers work out on his behalf.
  • Kiss of Death: Fat Tony is given one of these by a rival mob leader in "Bart the Murderer" after Louie makes a substandard Manhattan drink.
  • Kissing In A Tree: Bart Simpson does a sinister version in the episode "Bart's Friend Falls in Love":
    Bart: Samantha and Milhouse sitting in a tree, about to lose their privacy. He-he-he!
    • Bart and Homer attempts it in "Lisa the Treehugger":
    Homer: Bor-ing! [changes the channel] Ah, the Luftwaffe — the Washington Generals of the History Channel.
    Lisa: Dad, change it back!
    Marge: Yeah, that was the boy Lisa likes.
    Lisa: No I don't.
    Bart: [sings:] Lisa and Jesse sittin' in a tree, K-I-S-S-I-N-G.
    Lisa: Shut up!
    Homer: First comes love, then comes ... um ... dammit, I know this!
  • Kitschy Local Commercial: Homer's first "Mr. Plow" ad, which aired at 3:17 AM and starred Grandpa as "Old Man Winter."
    • There's also the one Homer made to (unsuccessfully) combat the anti-child proposition.
  • Knife-Throwing Act: Krusty does one of these acts with axes. He doesn't miss.
    • The couch gag for the episode "Marge vs. Seniors, Singles, Childless Couples, Teens, and Gays" showed knives being thrown at The Simpsons' heads as they sit down on the couch.
  • Know-Nothing Know-It-All: Homer calls Lisa this in "Lisa the Vegetarian".
  • Know Your Vines: In a three story episode about history, Lisa as Sacagawea is giving Lewis and Clark's expedition party quick advice, and tells one soldier that he's holding poison oak.
  • Knuckle Tattoos: In "Cape Feare", Sideshow Bob has "LUV" and "HAT" tattooed on his fingers.
    • Which makes sense. What Sideshow Bob actually has tattooed on his fingers are the phonetic spellings of the words "love" and "hate" (the phonetic spelling of "hate" has a line over the "a" to signify that it's a long vowel sound and not a short one), because, unlike real people, he has 3 non-thumb fingers instead of 4, and can't spell the whole words on them.

    L 
  • Laborious Laziness: Bart and Lisa have been tasked to clean the back yard but they're too lazy to do so.
    Bart: Man, look at all this stuff... pull weeds, mow lawn, scoop and bag dog business. There's gotta be a way out of this. Lisa! Chop off my hands!
    Lisa: No! Then who'd chop off my hands?
    Bart: All right, you chop my hands halfway off, and then, I'll still have enough strength to chop-
    Marge: Get to work!
  • Lab Pet: Averted in one episode, when Bart cons his way into a school for the gifted he is told not to get attached to the class hamsters as they are scheduled for dissection.
  • Ladyella: Booberella, a Captain Ersatz of Elvira.
  • Lame Pun Reaction:
    • In the episode "Pokey Mom" involving Homer, a prison warden, and a painting of a unicorn in outer space, there's this exchange:
      Warden: I mean, look at this! It's a unicorn in outer space! I mean, what's it breathin'?
      Homer: Air?
      Warden: Ain't no air 'n space!
      Homer: There's an Air 'n' Space Museum. *grins like an idiot, and then is thrown out of the prison*
    • Also, there was one emitted by Homer when commencing a roast against Mr. Burns for his birthday (and in case you're wondering why it fits, its because shortly afterwards, he drops his pants and proceeds to moon Mr. Burns and the audience, a caricature of Burns' face is on his butt, and he tries to quote Mr. Burns).
      Homer: Now here's an impression of Mr. Burns that is incredibly... cheeky.
    • And then there was the one where the Mayor Quimby's nephew gets put on trial for beating the living daylights out of a waiter. Intrepid Reporter Kent Brockman wanted to call the incident "Waitergate", but was shouted down at the Press Club.
  • Lampshaded the Obscure Reference:
    Grandpa Simpson: "I was lonelier than Estes Kefauver at a meeting of Murder Incorporated! <beat> That actually makes sense. Look it up!"
    • "They Saved Lisa's Brain:"
    Lisa: [reading Comic Book Guy's shirt] "C:/DOS C:/DOS/RUN RUN/DOS/RUN". [laughs] Oh, only one person in a million would find that funny.
    Frink: Yes, we call that the, "Dennis Miller Ratio."
  • Lampshade Hanging: Two in Homer Scissorhands:
    Homer: "(really pissed over all the ramblings from his clients) I'm committing barbacide! (drinks a beaker of liquid from the counter) Oh, why doesn't anything kill me?
    • Later:
    Milhouse:"(performing a love song for Lisa) Teacher said, 'Don't eat the paste', or it'll make you spew, I ate the paste and liked the taste, passed out and dreamed of you.
    Lisa:"Fist of all, it's never wise to use the word 'spew' in a love song.
  • Language Barrier:
    • When the Simpsons are lost in the jungle without their tour guide Kitenge, sailing down a river, they encounter two ominous sounding tribesmen, so Homer tries to hit them with a spear. However, they were actually saying very nice things, at least according to the subtitles.
    • In "The Real Housewives of Fat Tony", Fat Tony marries Selma. He tricks her, though, because she doesn't speak Italian and the wedding is officiated in Italian. Selma was asked to be Tony's mistress, not his wife.
  • Last Day to Live: When Homer was believed to have eaten a poisoned fish at a Japanese restaurant.
    • Parodied in "C. E. D'oh". A seminar on success inspires Homer to, among other things, live each day like it's his last... which entails sitting on the curb and crying his eyes out.
  • Last Disrespects: When Mr. Burns is thought to be dead, various dignitaries come to his funeral just to spit in his grave. So many in fact, that the grave has to be drained afterwards.
  • Last Name Basis: Homer rarely calls Ned Flanders by his first name. As revealed in "Lisa's First Word", it was like this from the start:
    Flanders: Buenos Dias, neighboritos! The handle is Flanders, but my friends call me Ned.
    Homer: (annoyed) Hi, Flanders.
  • Last-Second Word Swap: Occurs in The Mook, The Chef, The Wife and her Homer when Otto accidentally drops his tape, yelling "Fuuuuu...nk.
    • Also in To Surveil With Love, when Jimbo spray paints FU on an incomplete brick wall, then adds an N to make it FUN when everyone acts legal.
    • In one episode Homer and Bart and some sailors are caught in a giant storm. As a huge wave is about to destroy the ship, everyone yells, "SHIIIIIIIIIIIIII—PWREEEEEEEEEECK!"
  • Late To The Realization: Homer was frequently subject to this trope from seasons 1-11. A most notable example is from the episode "Bart Gets An Elephant", when, knee-deep in money troubles because of Stampy, a group of kids offer Homer money to ride and/or see the elephant. Homer, being the usual Idiot Hero he is, turns the children away, and on the second and third try, he hammers down a sign that says Please go away. Still content that his plan will work, Homer is too elated to hear the full details of Bart's plan, when Bart arrives carrying a new sign offering prices to see and ride Stampy.
  • Laxative Prank:
    • Dr. Nick Rivera has an Infomercial about a suntan lotion that's also a laxative.
    • One episode had Homer sabotaging a youth group's candy sales by adding laxative to the candy. The youth group still managed to the sell the most candy, by selling it to the constipated residents of the old folks home.
  • Leaving Audience: Springfield just built a new performing arts center. The place is packed. The Springfield Philharmonic Orchestra starts into Beethoven's 5th Symphony...and after eight notes are played, everyone simultaneously stands up and makes for the door. Aside from Marge horrified to learn that the town is uncultured, Lenny declares they already have the song as a ring tone. Exaggerated when even the orchestra leaves after Marge announces that the next piece is by Phillip Glass.
  • Left It In: In "Radio Bart", Kent Brockman attempts to interview Homer on the air...
    Homer: Uh, you can edit out that part, right?
    Kent: Homer, we're live from coast to coast.
  • Leitmotif:
    • Sideshow Bob has his own Cape Fear inspired theme music most anytime he appears on-screen, and the show also features two commonly-used musical motifs for town riots. (for reference, the first "riot theme" is heard during the soccer riot in "The Cartridge Family", while the other is heard in "Brake My Wife, Please" when Bart's and Milhouse's Peruvian fighting frogs battle each other)
    • Whenever villain Charles Montgomery Burns is in his mansion or is planning another evil scheme, you can bet you will hear that sinister music reminiscent of Citizen Kane's opening sequence. Release the sounds!
  • Lesbian Jock:
    • During the episode where Homer became a gay-marriage minister, Marge's sister's lesbian fiance was a pro-golfer. Then it turns out that "she" is really a "he".
    • When Lisa is tempted by a full-ride scholarship to any one of the "Seven Sisters" womens' colleges, she has a dream sequence where an avatar of each of them speaks to her. Smith College is represented by a Butch Lesbian in a Lacrosse uniform that tells her "Come to Smith... and experiment."
  • Lethally Stupid: Homer. Problems he causes can be disastrous depending on the writer.
  • Let Me Tell You a Story: Parodied in "The Heartbroke Kid", when Bart is sent to a fat camp and Tab Spangler, the camp owner, catches him pigging out:
    Tab: Son, I'm gonna tell you a story about a young man who came here and failed. Well, that is the story. I shouldn't call a sentence a story. Anyway, it's you!
  • Let's Have Another Baby: When Lisa shows her parents a video of a Brazilian orphan she sponsors, Marge finds him so cute that she says she wants another kid. Homer refuses because he hasn't lost all the weight he gained with Maggie's birth.
    • "Adventures in Baby-Getting" focused on this.
  • Let The Past Burn: In the episode "Grandpa vs Sexual Inadequacy", Homer and Abe begin arguing after visiting the farmhouse where they lived before moving to Springfield. They resolve the feud at the end of the episode, as the farmhouse burns to the ground.
    • In another episode where Homer decides to stop going to church his house burns down and Springfieldianites of various religions help him out: his next door neighbor Ned (Chirstian) pulls him from the burning fire while volunteer firemen Krusty (Jewish) and Apu ("Miscellaneous") put the fire out. This convinces Homer to start attending church again.
  • Let Us Never Speak of This Again: Marge says this about the vacation in "Itchy & Scratchy Land", despite that she agreed it was the best vacation ever.
    • Mentioning Armin Tamzarian (Principal Skinner's real name) is a torturable offense (even though Lisa said it on the episode where she gets a replacement for Snowball II and decides not to change her new cat's name after Skinner called her decision to name her new cat Snowball II a cop-out).
  • Level Ate: Homer's Land of Chocolate fantasy.
  • Life Imitates Art: The Albuquerque Isotopes AAA baseball team.
    • Inverted with this real-life story, contrasted against the episode where Homer purposely gains weight so he can file for disability and work from home.
  • Lighter and Softer: Compared to Family Guy and South Park, despite that the later episodes have been accused of aping South Park and Family Guy in terms of shocking, pop culture-laden humor.
    • Also, most recent episodes aren't nearly as dark as the series was back in it's heyday.
  • Line-of-Sight Name:
    • Parodied in a Halloween episode, when a witch gave the name of her boyfriend as "George Cauldron" after doing this. Bart and Lisa both laugh at that... and then, at the end of the segment, George shows up at the door. note 
    • When writing a fake love letter to Miss Krabappel while in detention, Bart sees a picture of US president Woodrow Wilson hanging on the wall and signs the letter "Woodrow", then attaches to the letter a photo of hockey star Gordie Howe.
    • After Homer is embarrassed at a bumbling TV character sharing his name, he changes it to the decidedly more respectable "Max Power." When complimented on his new name, he replies "Thanks, I got it off a hair dryer."
    • Though not a personal name, Homer, at Moe's Tavern, calls in absent to work because he's observing the "Festival of (sees "Maximum Occupancy" sign behind the counter)...Maximum Occupancy."
    • At one point, Bart pretends his turtle is lost to sneak inside a woman's house. When she asks him what the turtle's name is, he says "Apron Boobs-face" and later gives his own name as "Shoes Butt-back."
    • When Lisa has to do an essay about her heritage for a class project, she decides to write about Native Americans and chooses a made-up tribe calling it "Hitachi" after her microwave.
    • When Bart is trying to come up with a comic book character. He sees a bat hanging in the window and exclaims "Batman!" before he realizes that it's taken. He looks around a little more and sees a Green Lantern, but realizes it's taken too. He eventually comes up with the character of Angry Dad after watching Homer's buffoonish antics through the window.
    • In one episode, Bart applies for a credit card under the false name "Santa's Little Helper" (the family dog). He has horrible handwriting, though, and the card comes back issued to Santos L. Halper.
  • Listing The Forms Of Degenerates: The Simpsons references the Sweeney Todd example (see "Other" folder) in the Affectionate Parody episode "A Streetcar Named Marge."
    Cast: New Orleeeans... Home of pirates, drunks, and whores! New Orleeeans... Tacky, overpriced, souvenir stores!
    • Also on The Simpsons, Mr. Burns refers to his employees as "jackanapes ... LOLLIGAGGERS ... NOODLEHEADS!" Or "goldbrickers ... LAYABOUTS ... SLUGABEDS!"
  • Literal Ass Kicking: When the Simpsons go to Australia, "Booting" (administered by an angry-looking man wearing an over-sized boot) is a form of corporal punishment. It's even on the country's flag (shown atop this page). Also, disparaging the boot is a bootable offense.
    • "Lisa's Date with Density" has this:
    Lisa: Why do you have to be such a pain all the time? Don't you realize you're getting a bad reputation?
    Nelson: Don't you realize your butt sticks out?
    Lisa: It does not!
    [Nelson kicks Lisa in the butt]
    Lisa: Hey!
    Nelson: Ha ha!
  • Literal-Minded: From "Fear of Flying", after Bart and Lisa get selected for first class seats:
    Lisa: Come on, Bart, they're gonna pamper us!
    Bart: Eew...
    Lisa: Not literally, of course.
  • Little Miss Badass: Maggie Simpson. See Badass Adorable for examples.
  • Little Miss Snarker: Lisa and Maggie alike, though Maggie is more specifically of the Silent Snarker variety.
  • Live-Action Adaptation: A live version of the opening credits was created in 2006 as a promotional short in the UK.
    • It later aired as a special opening to the show. In the US, all the driving footage was mirrored so it looked like they were driving on the right side of the road.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: Over one hundred and counting.
    • Cletus's family is rather large, and that's putting it mildly:
    Cletus: Hey, kids! We're eatin' dinner tonight! Come on out, Tiffany, Heather, Cody, Dylan, Dermot, Jordan, Taylor, Brittany, Wesley, Rumor, Scout, Cassidy, Zoe, Chloe, Max, Hunter, Kendall, Caitlin, Noah, Sascha, Morgan, Kyra, Ian, Lauren, Q-bert, Phil!
  • The Simpsons:
    • In one Halloween episode, Ned Flanders is the overlord and he has all people have part of their brain removed. They feel relaxed.
    • Lobotomy procedure was a part of Imagine Spot by Bart in the Michael Jackson episode.
  • London England Syndrome: Parodied Trope. In "The Falcon and the D'ohman", the subtitles misspell the name of Kiev, Ukraine twice in a row before reading something along the lines of, "Come on, how many Kievs do you know about anyway?".
  • Long List: In "Papa's Got a Brand New Badge", Homer lists all of his former one-episode jobs in rapid succession.
    • In "Girls Just Want to Have Sums", Homer lists all the inventions men made to prove why he considers men superior to women. These include paper, cars, rocket ships, suspension bridges, constitutional government, snow shoes, brass knuckles, pinball machines, and The Renaissance.
  • Long-Lost Uncle Aesop: Cecil Terwilliger appears as Sideshow Bob's brother, (Voiced by David Hyde Pierce, the actor who plays Dr. Frasier Crane's brother) ultimately to illustrate himself as the more evil of the pair, allowing Bob an opportunity for redemption. He saves Bart and Lisa Simpson's lives, then the entire city of Springfield from being flooded.
  • Long Runners: Has passed such shows as The Flintstones, Ozzy and Harriet, and Gunsmoke, but still has a long way to go to pass shows like Sesame Street (which has been on since 1968) and Saturday Night Live (which has been on since 1975).
    • Has such an enormous back catalog that Fox considered devoting an entire channel to the show.
    • The Krusty the Klown Show has been on television since the fifties; early on it was apparently a serious talk show but later became the slapstick kid-oriented variety show it is today.
  • Long Runner Tech Marches On: Evident when you compare the 90s episodes with the modern day ones.
  • Long Speech Tea Time: Marge just gets ready for bed while Homer rambles off all the jobs he had before his bodyguard gig, including "hippie," "Smithers," and "homophobe."
    • It should be noted that Marge getting ready for bed involves putting rollers in her two and a half feet of hair.
    I’ve had a lot of jobs in my life: boxer, mascot, astronaut, baby proofer, imitation Krusty, truck driver, hippie, plow driver, food critic, conceptual artist, grease salesman, carny, mayor, grifter, body guard for the mayor, country western manager, garbage commissioner, mountain climber, farmer, inventor, Smithers, Poochie, celebrity assistant, power plant worker, fortune cookie writer, beer baron, Kwik-E-Mart clerk, homophobe, and missionary, but protecting people, that gives me the best feeling of all.
  • Look Alike Lovers: Look at Milhouse's parents - they look rather similar... too similar.
  • Lopsided Dichotomy: See Bat Signal.
  • Losing Horns: In "Hungry Hungry Homer", Homer attmepts to prove to the media that the Springfield Isotopes were secretly being moved to Albuquerque. However, the team's owner, Henry K. Duff VIII, is one step ahead of Homer and replaced the Albuquerque Isotopes memorabilia with a guy who gives Homer this trope.
  • Lost Aesop: The episode "Blood Feud" ended with the Simpsons trying to determine that the moral is either "a good deed is its own reward", "no good deed goes unrewarded", and "the squeaky wheel gets the grease", before ultimately dismissing the whole ordeal as a Random Events Plot and indulge in an Everybody Laughs Ending.
  • Lost The TV Remote:
    Homer: Bart! This is your father! Do you know... where the remote is? I've looked all over for it.
    Bart: Did you check your pocket? (sure enough, it was in his pocket)
  • Loud of War: In one episode, Skinner, Krabappel and Bart have sealed themselves inside the school. Chief Wiggum tries playing romantic music to try and get them to snap and leave, but Skinner and Krabappel merely begin enjoying a romantic dance. This causes Bart to snap and scream "Turn it off!", which only convinces Wiggum to turn it up louder.
  • Love at First Sight: In "Principla Charming", Homer attempts to introduce Skinner to Selma, but accidentally introduces him to Patty instead.
    Skinner: (dreamily) Patty...
    Homer: D'oh!! Wrong one!
    • Homer pretty much falls in love with Marge the first moment he sees her.
  • Love Triangle: "Bart's Friend Falls in Love" involves Milhouse falling for a girl and Bart getting jealous that he's spending all his time with her instead of him. Similarly, "The Good, The Sad, and the Drugly" has Bart falling for a girl, and Milhouse striving to break them up because Bart never came to visit him while he was suspended (since he was spending all his time with the new girlfriend).
  • Lowered Recruiting Standards: NASA decides to let an average person be an astronaut to better its image, which is how Homer ends up on the space shuttle.
  • Low-Speed Chase:
    • Sideshow Bob trying to make an escape in the Wright Brothers' plane, while police cars drive slowly behind him trying to catch him with nets.
    • Chief Wiggum chasing the duck who took his badge.
    • Grandpa Simpson chasing a tortoise that has his false teeth.
  • Lying Finger Cross: Happens in "Lisa's Wedding", when Lisa and Marge talk through a video phone:
    Lisa: Mom, remember when I was little, we'd always planned my dream wedding and you always promised to... you know, well, keep Dad from ruining it?
    Marge: (crossing her fingers) Oh, don't worry, honey, I guarantee your father will behave.
    Lisa: Mom, it's a picture phone.
    Marge: (looking at her fingers) This? This? Oh, no, I've just got a touch of the rheumatiz.
  • Lying on a Hillside: Seen in "The Telltale Head" when Bart, Jimbo, Kearney, and Dolph look at the clouds.

    M 
  • Made of Explodium: Man has always loved his buildings. But what happens when the buildings say 'No more'?
  • Made Out to Be a Jerkass: When Gill loses his job on Christmas Eve, the family lets him stay with them. Unfortunately, Gill overstays his welcome for almost a year. Marge, who didn't have it in her to say no, finally has her fill. By then, Gill had gotten a new job and left. Determined to get her newfound gumption out, Marge takes the family to Gill's new workplace and tells him off. When Gill shows weakness in front of Marge's tirade, his workers stop respecting him and his boss fires him. Out of guilt, Marge and the family buy a vacation house from Gill.
  • Magic Brakes: Marge experienced this in "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Marge".
    Marge: The "brakes cut" light!
  • Magic Pants: Referenced in "I Am Furious Yellow." After a series of incidents give Homer the appearance of the Hulk, Bart comments, "Thank God his pants stayed on."
  • Male Frontal Nudity: Subverted mostly in a few episodes such as "Brother From the Same Planet" and "Natural Born Kissers". However, in The Simpsons Movie, Bart Simpson skates nude around Springfield until for a brief moment we literally see his "you know what".
  • Man in White: Gabriel from the episode "Brawl in the Family", who claims to be a social worker, but Homer sees him as an angel.
  • Man Made House Flood: In the episode where Lisa has to contend with being the authority figure of the house when Marge ended up injured from a clock falling on her, Lisa is calling Marge, and it's revealed after briefly talking to Marge that Lisa is currently on a stool in a flooded house, with Homer and Bart playing Marco Polo. It's strongly implied that Bart and Homer caused the flood.
  • Man of a Thousand Voices: Dan Castellaneta, Harry Shearer and Hank Azaria qualify for that trope from their work on this show alone.
  • Make a Wish: The wishbone in the Leftorium episode.
  • Make-Out Point: Springfield being what it is, it overlooks the nuclear plant.
  • Make Room For The New Plot: Appears every so often as a way of forcing the Halfway Plot Switch.
  • Malignant Plot Tumor: It's the standard plot format.
  • Mama Bear: You dont want to threaten Bart while in a cage wrestling match with Marge.
  • Manatee Gag: Oddly enough, Simpsons used it do a lot but then stopped for no real reason. Then Family Guy came along and used them constantly. Then when Simpsons tried to use them again, people accused them of ripping off Family Guy.
  • Mandatory Line: In "Simpson Safari", Bart says an out-of-character and out-of-nowhere line after it's revealed that Bushwell has been using chimps to work in her diamond mine: "I think we should look at her research before we condemn her entirely. (everyone stares at him) I haven't said anything in a while."
  • Manipulative Editing:
    • In "So It's Come to This: A Simpsons Clip Show", Bart admits to a comatose Homer that he often made him angry, and what follows is a long string of brief clips where Homer says "D'oh!" However, in some of the episodes that these clips come from, it wasn't Bart who was making him say "D'oh!", but somebody or something else entirely.
    • In "Homer Bad Man", a sensationalist news show blatantly edits an interview with Homer.
  • Marilyn Maneuver:
    • In "Gone Maggie Gone", a nun named Sister Marilyn standing on an air vent gets a draft under her dress and she enjoys it, blowing it up and as she's holding the front of it down, it lifts at leg level.
    • A parody of this trope appears in "Home Away from Homer", in a scene with Ned standing on a wind vent in the street. The air blows up his mustache and his shirt, as he's holding the bottom of it down from the front.
  • Marijuana Is LSD:
    • Homer is given medical marijuana for his eye injuries. He sees a number of Beatles-esque hallucinations, mostly everything smiling at him (including his razor) and any flowing liquid (like his blood from cutting himself shaving) as rainbows.
    • In another episode, Lisa becomes completely stoned and begins hallucinating smiley faces everywhere, culminating in her almost making out with an electric fan. Her drug of choice? Anti-depressants.
  • Matryoshka Object: A couch gag in Season 9 has Homer run in front of the TV alone and the top half of his body pops off to reveal Marge. Inside Marge is Bart, inside him is Lisa and inside her is Maggie.
  • May-December Romance: The Simpsons did it as one episode shows that Apu is significantly older than Manjula. Also, Mr. Burns fell in love with Marge at one point. Then there's Bart and his older babysitter Laura Powers, and Homer + Mindy, and Sideshow Bob + his Italian wife Francesca, and probably a few others.
    • Mr. Burns also fell in love with a girlfriend of Snake's...she appears to be in her late twenties to early thirties.
    • Apu and Manjula were shown to be relatively the same in age in The Two Mrs. Nahasapeemapetilons. The Simpsons is notorious with its regard to continuity. Apart from that one flashback, Manjula generally seems to be younger than Apu (who is slightly greying).
    • A recent episode had Krusty and his new co-star, Princess Penelope. Their exact ages are uncertain, but Penelope is "under thirty-three," and was a fan of Krusty's show when she was a little girl.
    • Comic Book Guy and Agnes Skinner.
  • Mayan Doomsday: Referenced in the Blackboard Gag for "Once Upon a Time in Springfield" ("The world may end in 2012, but this show won't").
    • Also parodied in the intro to season 24's "Treehouse of Horror" where a botched sacrifice during the Mayan empire brings to life three stone Mayan gods who destroy the world (and according to Mayor Quimby's Mayan ancestor, everything that happened will be Obama's fault).
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: When Bart sells his soul in the eponymous episode, things start becoming a bit odd for him, such as not being able to open automatic doors, his pets hissing wildly at him and...not being able to breathe on glass...but it's never firmly established if he diegetically lost his soul.
  • McLeaned: Maggie Roswell/"Maude Flanders". Maggie eventually came back, but Maude Flanders is still dead.
  • Medium Blending: The 3D CGI Homer and live action bits in "Treehouse of Horror VI." It was done by Pacific Data Images (which would later become a little company called DreamWorks Animation).
    • 3D, CGI, and claymation are also used when the characters watch parodies of Pixar, Davey and Goliath, the California Raisins, Wallace & Gromit, etc.
    • Homer lands in live action L.A. at the end of "Homer 3" (part of "Treehouse of Horror VI"). Similarly, in "The Terror of Tiny Toon" (part of "Treehouse of Horror IX"), Bart, Lisa, Itchy and Scratchy fall into the live action "Live With Regis & Kathie Lee" (as it was then titled) show. Regis Philbin and Kathie Lee Gifford both appear as themselves.
    • The Robot Chicken couch gag had The Simpsons in stop-motion
  • Meet Your Early Installment Weirdness: In one of the couch gags, the Simpsons run in and their Tracey Ullman-era selves are already sitting on the couch. Both pairs scream in terror and run out.
    • Another couch gag had Homer walking onto a parody of The Beatles album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, where the Tracey Ullman Simpsons are part of the crowd.
  • Memetic Mutation: Parodied in-universe in "Bart Gets Famous", where we see people laughing at uses of the phrase "I didn't do it" during inappropriate moments (during a hold up at the Kwik-E-Mart after Apu sounds an alarm, Diamond Joe Quimby getting caught in bed with another woman by his wife, and during a fire when Patty and Selma are suspected to have caused it).
  • Men Can't Keep House: In the episode "Little Big Mom", Marge is recovering in the hospital, so the family maintains the house. The lazy males Bart and Homer turn the place into a filthy sack in minutes, much to the dismay of Lisa who is the only one trying to introduce some order and cleanliness, but with no success. She later tricks them into thinking they got leprosy from living in very dirty conditions so they would clean the house, again with no good results.
    • Also seen in "Marge in Chains", when the house becomes a dump in ten minutes due to Marge being in jail. Grampa even fights off a wily toilet croc.
    • A less extreme version occurs in "Take My Wife, Sleaze" when, after Marge is kidnapped by the Hell's Satans, Homer is baffled why the breakfast isn't made and why Bart and Lisa aren't at school.
  • Meta Guy: Comic Book Guy.
  • Metaphorgotten: From "A Star is Born-Again":
    Flanders: Why would that Twinkie want to go out with a ding-dong like me?
    Homer: Flanders, I mix Twinkies and Ding-Dongs all the time. In Europe, they call it a Dinkie!
    • In "Secrets of a Successful Marriage":
    Homer: For you see, marriage... is a lot like an orange. First, you have the skin... (lustfully) then the sweet, sweet innards. (devours orange)
    • In "The New Kid on the Block":
    Homer: Son, a woman is a lot like a... a refrigerator! They're about six feet tall, 300 pounds. They make ice, and... um... Oh, wait a minute. Actually, a woman is more like a beer. They smell good, they look good, you'd step over your own mother just to get one! (drinks a beer) But you can't stop at one. You wanna drink another woman! (Cut ahead to several cans later, and Homer is well and truly drunk) ...so I says yeah, if you want that money come and find it, cuz I don't know where it is you baloney! You make me wanna retch! (passes out)
    • In "Homer the Heretic":
    Homer: Kids, let me tell you about another so-called "wicked" guy. He had long hair and some wild ideas, and he didn't always do what other people thought was right. And that man's name was... I forget. But the point is... I forget that, too. Marge, you know who I'm talking about. He used to drive that blue car?
  • Metaphor Is My Middle Name: In one episode, a man working at the License Bureau refuses to help people until he finishes his crossword puzzle. When the clue asks for Franklin Roosevelt’s middle name, he guesses "Excitement."
  • Mickey Mousing: Occurs on occasion.
  • Midnight Snack: A favorite habit of Homer.
  • Mighty Lumberjack: In the episode, The Blunder Years, Marge becomes infatuated with the lumberjack that is the mascot for a brand of paper towels.
  • Military Moonshiner: Referenced in "Brother from Another Series" after Sideshow Bob is released from prison:
    Cecil Terwilliger: Now make yourself at home. Perhaps a glass of Bordeaux? I have the '82 Chateau Latour and a rather indifferent Rausan-Segla.
    Sideshow Bob: I've been in prison, Cecil. I'll be happy just as long as it doesn't taste like orange drink fermented under a radiator.
    Cecil Terwilliger: ...that would be the Latour, then.
  • Missed The Bus: A recurring occurrence is for Bart & Lisa to miss the school bus. Once Bart's missing the bus eventually led to him being tried as the head of the Springfield Mafia.
    • Another example: The early version of the series' intro had Bart steal the sign from a bus stop while riding by on his skateboard, resulting in the bus passing right by the waiting crowd of people standing there, forcing them all to chase after it in a humorous manner.
  • Missing Trailer Scene: A commercial for "Homer at the Bat" depicts Barney and Wade Boggs engaging in a burping contest.
    • Also from Season 3, a commercial for "Colonel Homer" has this scene when Bart and Lisa are in Lurleen Lumpkin's recording studio (this promo can be viewed on the Season 3 DVD as a special feature through the episode menu):
    Lisa: I never thought I'd see another woman in Dad's life.
    Bart: What are you talking about? There's Sara Lee, Aunt Jemima, Betty Crocker...
    • A commercial for the S14 episode "Mr. Spritz Goes to Washington" has Homer being arrested for saying North Dakota doesn't exist.
  • Mistaken For Exhibit: In "Mom and Pop Art," Mr. Burns mistakes Homer's failed attempts at D.I.Y. crafting for fine art and buys them for large amounts of money.
  • Mistaken for Gay: "Homer's Phobia", in which Homer thinks Bart is gay.
    • In "Glorious Grampa", Marge finds Abe's old wrestling wig and thinks comes to the conclusion that he is gay, and starts attempting to set him up on dates with men.
  • Mistaken for Masturbating: In "Like Father Like Clown", it is implied that Krusty's father thinks he is masturbating in the bathroom, it turns out he was doing a comedy routine with a seltzer bottle.
  • Mistaken for Profound: "Bart's Inner Child" has this as a plot point.
  • Mistaken for Terrorist: "Mypods and Boomsticks."
    • Also that one time when Apu started yowling after having his tongue scalded with hot coffee, and then put a wet towel on his head (that looked like a turban)... It was in the S16 episode "Midnight Rx". That was after Apu was caught at the Canadian border after Homer, Grampa, Flanders and Apu were smuggling (illegal) Canadian prescription drugs from Winnipeg.
  • Mr. Seahorse: Arthur Fortune (a parody of Richard Branson) gets the two male pandas he donated to the zoo to mate in the episode "Monty Can't Buy Me Love".
  • Model Planning: A few episodes, such as when they try to use a rocket to stop the comet in "Bart's Comet". Each time, the model ends with Moe's Bar destroyed in flames.
  • Mondegreen: Invoked in "Homer Loves Flanders":
    Flanders: (upon seeing Lenny and Carl) Oh, looks like it's time for me to duck again.
    Homer: No, I want everyone to know that (yelling out the car window) this is Ned Flanders, my friend!
    Lenny: What did he say??
    Carl: I dunno, something about bein' gay.
  • Money, Dear Boy: Harry Shearer is the only voice actor on the show who has admitted that it's gone downhill. But he'll still gladly take those paychecks.
    • Also invoked in-universe with Krusty, who frequently puts his name and image on all kinds of low-quality merchandise for money.
  • Monkeys on a Typewriter:
    Burns: It was the best of times, it was the blurst of times!?!" You stupid monkey!
  • Monster Fangirl: In "Pranksta Rap", Kirk Von Houton is arrested for kidnapping Bart. Even though he is innocent, Kirk is happy to be in jail because he has a cleaner home, three meals a day and single women cheering for him.
  • Moral Dilemma: "Homer vs. Dignity": Burns tempting Homer to throw fish guts at the crowd for $1 million. Homer is torn between staying lower-middle class and being hated by the entire town. Ultimately, though, he chooses the right path.
  • Motivational Lie: When Bart gets super glue all over him, Dr. Hibbert tells him about the painful in jections Bart will have to get in his spine. Bart begins sweating in terror, causing the glue to come off.
    Dr. Hibbert: Nothing dissolves glue better than human sweat. I knew Bart would panic and start perspiring at the sight of this button applicator!
    Bart: Couldn't you have just turned the heat up a little?
    Dr. Hibbert: [sinister] Oh, heavens no! It had to be terror sweat!
  • Motorcycle Jousting: A bizarre variant - when Homer fights the leader of the Hell's Satans, they act out a classic sword fight from The Adventures of Robin Hood using motorcycles as foils.
  • Mountain of Food: In one of the Halloween episodes, Homer Simpson's Ironic Hell punishment was being forcefed "all the donuts in the world" and was surrounded by piles and piles of them. He successfully ate them all and was disappointed there weren't any more.
  • Mouth Flaps: The Simpsons was revolutionary for TV animation in that there were upwards of 30 different mouth positions used to correspond to the dialog. On many shows, you're lucky if you get half that.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Tabitha Vixx from "Marge and Homer Turn a Couple Play".
    • Mayor Quimby's fling in "Whacking Day" and "Bart's Inner Child".
  • Multi-Armed Multitasking: A cutaway shot of the Earth shows a vaguely Hindu-esque being frantically pressing buttons in the core, apparently to keep the world working. He pauses briefly to wipe his forehead with one of his hands and sigh with exhaustion.
  • Multiple Choice Past: The details of Grandpa's war service change depending on the telling: on "Whacking Day," he was separated from his platoon during a parachute attack into Dusseldorf, Germany, and hid out by posing as a female cabaret singer (but got outed when he flirted with Hitler), in "Raging Abe Simpson and His Grumbling Grandson in: Curse of the Flying Hellfish," he was the head of a platoon that included Principal Skinner's father, Barney Gumble's grandfather, and Mr. Burns, and sometimes he wasn't even there at all (in "Marge and Homer Turn a Couple Play," Grampa once again dressed as a woman to get out of being drafted).
  • Mundane Utility: In "Cape Feare", Ned Flanders wears Freddy Krueger's glove... to trim hedges.
    Ned: Maude, these new finger razors make hedge trimming as much fun as sitting through church.
  • Murder by Cremation: "Funeral for a Fiend" had Bart locked in a coffin about to be sent into a cremation oven.
  • Mushroom Samba: The most well known are:
    • Lisa's tainted water freak-out on "Selma's Choice"
    • Bart and Milhouse's Squishee bender on "Boy Scoutz 'n The Hood."
    • Apu staying up for three days and believing he's a hummingbird on "Homer and Apu."
    • Homer's insanity pepper trip on "El Viaje Misterioso de Nuestro Jomer."
    • The town-wide peyote drink trip from "D'oh-in in the Wind."
  • Musical Episode: "Simpsoncalifragilisticexpiala(Annoyed Grunt)cious"note , "The President Wore Pearls"note , "My Fair Laddy"note , and "Yokel Chords"note . "All Singing, All Dancing" combines this with a Clip Show episode.
  • Musicalis Interruptus: In "Mommie Beerest", Marge and Moe begin a song, but soon into it, Moe shuts it down.
    Moe: (singing) Oh, my bar could be British / instead of arm-pittish / So why don't we all- (speaking) Aw, screw it, let's get remodeling.
  • Mutilation Conga: frequently heaped upon Homer.
  • The Mutiny: "Simpson Tide" although it is more-or-less unintentional.
  • My Card: Malloy again.
    • Also Lionel Hutz in his debut appearance.
  • My Eyes Are Up Here: Demonstrated in "The Frying Game" when Homer is talking to Carmen Electra.
    Carmen Electra: Uh, Homer, my eyes are up here.
    Homer: I've made my choice. (continues to stare at her breasts)
  • My Grandma Can Do Better Than You: Bart and Lisa used a variant of this on the players when they were at a minor league baseball game:
    Bart: You throw like my sister!
    Lisa: Yeah! You throw like me!
  • My Little Panzer: Many Krusty brand products aren't safe for children (or any sane human being, for that matter. Even his home pregnancy test is dangerous)
  • Myopic Architecture: Played for Laughs. One scene in the nuke plant involved going through several layers of increasing security to reach a control room, which was seen to also feature an ill-fitting, flapping screen door leading directly to the parking lot.
  • Mysterious Informant: Smithers, in "Sideshow Bob Roberts".
  • Mysterious Middle Initial: Not only lampshaded, but an initial driving force for the plot of "D'oh-in in the Wind".
    Bart: Hey, what the heck is your middle name, anyway?
    Homer: You know, I have no idea!
  • Mystery Box: What Mr. Burns tries to bribe some safety inspectors with in "Homer Goes to College."
  • Mystery Meat: One episode has the cafeteria lady grabbing something from a barrel that says something like "Grade F Organ Meat".
    • That was due to budget cuts in a Treehouse Of Horror (Nightmare Cafeteria). Grade F meat was labelled as "Mostly circus animals, some filler."
    • Also done in "Lisa The Vegetarian", when she was imagining all the animal parts involved in making the dinner on her plate - the sheep part for the lamb chop, the chicken part in the chicken breast, and the rat tail, raccoon foot, pigeon head and part of a boot in the hot dog.
      • In the same episode, there's this exchange as Lisa searches for a vegetarian option during lunch:
    Lisa: "Doesn't this school serve anything that doesn't contain meat?"
    Lunchlady: "Possibly the meatloaf."
    • In "Sweet Seymour Skinner's Basasssssss Song", Lunchlady Doris gets her ingredients from a barrel labelled "Assorted Horse Parts - Now With More Testicles" ("More testicles mean more iron!"). And in The PTA Disbands, she's pushing gym mats into a meat grinder, while Principal Skinner insists that shredded newspaper provides "much needed roughage and essential inks".
      Lunchlady Doris: There's very little meat in these gym mats!
    • When Krusty Burger created the Ribwich, it created hordes of devotees who followed it around to selected restaurants like Grateful Dead fans (including Homer of course). Krusty has to announce that they had to stop making it since the animal they used was driven extinct.
    Homer: Cows? Pigs?
    Krusty: Think smaller, with more legs.
    • Frequent offender Lunch Lady Dorris gets another one preparing the Valentine Day Heart special. Which was actual beef hearts, one of them visibly still beating. (hey, beating means it's still fresh!)
    Delivery man: Where do you want them?
    Dorris: Right here.
    Delivery man: On the floor?
    Dorris: I don't tell you how to do your job!
    *Delivery man unloads the hearts, which stick in a congealed clump inside the truck a few seconds before plopping out*
  • Mythology Gag: In "Simpsons Spinoff Showcase" Troy McClure mentions season 9 will have an alien only Homer can see. Kang and Kodos were envisioned as aliens only Homer could see but this concept was deemed too surreal and they were kept only to the Halloween episodes.
    • Marge has originally to be revealed to be a Life in Hell rabbit in the series finale with ears under her hair. This was dropped and appears in the arcade game.
      • Homer and Krusty were imagined as the same person before the series began and the episode "Homie the Clown" pays homage to this trope.


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