Kneel, Push, Trip

A classic physical comedy bit, sometimes known as a 'table top'. Alice is having an argument with Bob. Charlie comes up behind Bob and gets down on his hands and knees. Alice then pushes Bob who takes a step backwards and trips over Charlie.

If done in actual fight rather than as a prank, this often indicates that the pranksters are out to humiliate their opponent rather than seriously hurt them. In a serious context, it's actually a common street-fighting technique ... when you outnumber your opponent, obviously.

Do Not Try This at Home: The victim could land on the back of their head, potentially leading to serious head injury.


Examples:

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    Comic Books 
  • Happens to the central character in the Chick Tract The Loser. Apparently this is what happens on the mean streets in Chick's world where no one has heard of Jesus.
  • A potential variation in an old Superman comic — a Daily Planet employee called Jimbo Jones pretends to fall in front of a crook to trip him, whereupon Jimmy Olsen hits him, finishing the job.
  • In The Lone Ranger/Green Hornet #5, the Lone Ranger and Elliot Ness do this to defeat Black Bart (Ness does the kneeling, the Ranger does the pushing).

    Comic Strips 
  • According to this cartoon, the prank was invented by Albert Einstein.

    Films — Animation 

    Films — Live-Action 
  • In Safety Last!, Harold Lloyd's character meets a policeman who happens to come from his hometown. While this cop is making a phone call, Harold boasts to his friend Bill about the "pull" he has with the police and sets up this trick. Unbeknownst to Harold, his buddy finished his call while Harold was talking to Bill and a second cop is now on the phone and takes the fall. He winds up pursuing our heroes for the rest of the film.

    Literature 
  • This prank is described in James Edward Alexander's Transatlantic Sketches published in 1833, making it Older Than Radio.
  • In Dr. Seuss' book One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish, a pair of fish do this to another fish while all three of them are underwater. The two doing the pushing are described as "very, very bad".
  • Joe Pickett: During the alien scare in Trophy Hunt, the sixth-graders in Lucy's school start doing this to the younger kids; saying "Don't look up" and then, when the kid does, pushing them over an accomplice kneeling behind them.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Frontier Circus: Done by Ben and Tony when they get in argument with a mine owner in "Winter Quarters".
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000: The film Pod People opens with a scene of some unpleasant poachers. When one of them crouches down behind the leader, Joel gets excited and stands up so he can pretend to push the leader over.
  • In one The Whitest Kids U' Know sketch, this prank is parodied by one coworker getting down on his hands and knees behind his boss while the boss is talking to another coworker, and silently mouthing to the coworker to push the boss. The coworker just doesn't get it, though. This goes on for several minutes.
  • A sketch from The Carol Burnett Show had Carol playing Queen Elizabeth II trying to reward a very picky soldier. He didn't want a medal, he wanted a pony. When he specified he wanted a blue pony, Elizabeth (after having a royal fit) whispered something to Prince Philip, who then casually walked behind the soldier while whistling "Rule Brittania". Philip then knelt so Elizabeth could push the annoying soldier.
  • Voyagers!: In "Created Equal", Bogg knocks a large gladiator backwards over Jeff.

    Music Videos 
  • The music video "Right Now" by Van Halen features an animation of three figures pulling this stunt with the subtitle "Right now, our government is doing things we think only other countries do."

    Pro Wrestling 
  • The Road Warrior's Finishing Move, "The Doomsday Device", has Animal raise their opponent on his shoulders and then Hawk performs a flying clothesline off the top rope. Other teams, including The Hardy Boys and London and Kendrick, would perform a variation where, their opponent being trapped in a corner, Adam would get on his hands and knees in the ring while Bob would take a running start, jump off of Adams back for extra lift, and then splash or kick the cornered guy.

    Video Games 

    Web Comics 
  • In Homestuck, after Vriska is retconned back to life, her montage shows her do it behind Gamzee so Terezi can push him.
  • In Girl Genius, Agatha and Krosp do a variation on this with Othar, pushing him out of their small airship.

    Western Animation 
  • In the SpongeBob SquarePants episode "Grandma's Kisses", SpongeBob is practicing what he's going to tell his grandmother about being a grownup. Patrick then adds, "Then you get behind her and I'll push," to which SpongeBob responds that they didn't agree on that.
  • On The Simpsons episode "Bart Sells His Soul", Bart dreams that the other kids are playing with their souls and he's all alone. Nelson at first appears to sympathize with Bart, but he's really playing this prank with his own soul.
  • Family Guy: In "Stewie B. Goode", Peter gets Meg to crouch behind Brian so he [Peter] can push him into the pool. However, Brian walks out of the way before Peter runs over to him, and Peter ends up hurting himself and Meg.
  • Young Justice: The boys do this to Blockbuster in "Fireworks". Kid Flash runs at Blockbuster and dives between his legs (at superspeed), then kneels behind him. The confused Blockbuster turns to look at Kid Flash and then turns back just in time to see Aqualad and Superboy flying at him. They punch him in the jaw and he falls backwards over Kid Flash. Kid Flash then remarks that he "learned that one in kindergarten".
  • The Penguins of Madagascar: The Penguins do this to the exterminator in "Stop Bugging Me", in a technique called 'The Harder They Fall'.
  • Dragons: Riders of Berk: In "Portrait of Hiccup as a Buff Young Man", Ruffnut and Tuffnut do this to Snoutlout when he tells them to kiss his pointy shoes.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/KneelPushTrip