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Anti-Magic
Ysalamir: 1 Dark Jedi: 0

Well, at least all that arm-waving and arcane babbling you did was impressive.

The ability to completely negate magic or other supernatural effects. The power is not absorbed or reflected, it simply ceases to be when it comes within the radius of effect. This will usually be an extremely rare, nigh-unheard of, game-breaking power: the greatest of wards become undone with incredible ease, with unforeseen effects.

It can be Blessed with Suck if this means White Magic doesn't work on you either. No magical healing or protection in this case. If the world runs on Magic, this person may be a pariah; especially if it's a power that they can't control.

Fridge Logic kicks in when you consider that it should be trivial for a sufficiently capable magic-user to cause harm to a magic-proof target simply by manipulating the environment — for example, causing the ground to disappear from underneath them, moving a heavy object directly above them, or heating the air around them to several thousand degrees. Indeed, this is often the strategy used when fighting someone with this ability.

For keeping the enemy from using their abilities for a period of time, see Power Nullifier. For stopping a specific spell while it's being cast with another spell, see Counterspell. Similarly, the Kryptonite-Proof Suit can be used to resist the Kryptonite Factor. Compare Walking Techbane, where someone has this effect on scientific technology. Contrast No Sell, when characters can ignore (not nullify) the powers of others or their defenses. Mage Killers often weaponize this ability. Un Sorcerers often have this; in fact, that might be why their own powers don't work.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

Inherent Traits

    Anime & Manga 
  • A Certain Magical Index: Touma has the "Imagine Breaker", a right hand that can completely cancel any esper or magic power it touches. The suck comes in the fact that it also cancels his luck — turning him into a Cosmic Plaything — and leaves plenty of loopholes, like hitting any other part of his body or even cancelling out healing magic (though somewhat mitigated by a generous hospital and Healing Factor. No-one in the city has ever heard of such a thing because the ruler of Academy City keeps the information about his power as top secret; Touma acquires a lightning-wielding Unknown Rival who is convinced that his ability to shrug off her attacks is a sign of some spectacular ability that he's holding back. Meanwhile, all the people in the magic side are well aware of him and are terrified of him. Additional 'suck' comes in as this status doesn't stop people from wanting to use him, kill him, or both.
  • Mahou Sensei Negima!:
    • Asuna's Magic Cancel ability. It is initially somewhat spotty and unpredictable, but she eventually gets control of this and can extend it as a field, punching out 100% unbreakable seals and dispelling giant falling pillars with a wave of her sword. Not to mention that in the past her power caused a Floating Continent to fall out of the sky, destroying one of the most powerful nations in the world in the process. At least one Big Bad is after her so he can use her Magic Cancel to erase the magic world from existence.
    • Later on, Negi gets this power as well after forming a pactio with Princess Theo on top of All Your Powers Combined, although his is much more limited (he can only use it while holding the BFS, and even then, it only affects what is touching the BFS). Although the pactio is officially omitted after the fight with Rakan.
  • Kubera: The Chaos clan of the asura ("demons") can nullify any magic or transcendentals with their eyes. This isn't common knowledge among the humans as their existence is apocrypha, and not all members of the chaos clan even have eyes, but it certainly serves to make them dangerous.
  • YuYu Hakusho: Yomi has this capability (to a degree), as he is capable of putting up a barrier that shields him from all demon energy. However, in the ultimate tournament to decide the ruler of the demon world, Yusuke is able to get around this because as a half-human, half-demon hybrid, he can use spirit energy. In effect, then, Yomi has very specific Anti-Magic.
  • Tsukuyomi Moon Phase: Kohei passes through ghosts with complete obliviousness and breaks up magic without trying, though for some reason this doesn't stop him from being knocked around anyway....
  • Gakuen Alice: Mikan, though it only works when she really needs it. Also Izumi Yukihara Who turns out to be her father.
  • One Piece:
    • Blackbeard has the power of the Dark-Dark Fruit, which uses darkness to nullify all other Devil Fruit abilities. This is especially brutal towards formerly intangible Logia users like Ace, or towards those whose powers would normally soften physical blows like Luffy.
    • There's also Haki, which can nullify the ability of anyone the user makes physical contact with (or if they imbue it in an object, like arrows), which again is significantly powerful against the examples above.
  • Surprisingly averted in the manga Antimagia. Antimagia is the name of the type of magic the main character uses.
  • Saber of Fate/stay night has such high Magic Resistance that while it's theoretically possible for magic to damage her, in practice no magus can touch her.
  • Tsukihime / Melty Blood:
    • Word of God states that Satsuki has a Reality Marble called "Depletion Garden" that she isn't even aware of, that just causes mana in her general area to vanish into the air. This doesn't affect stored mana, but active spells being cast. Too bad nobody has actually cast a spell in her presence.
    • More notably, Shiki Tohno of the same game series and Shiki Ryougi of Kara no Kyoukai have the Mystic Eyes of Death Perception which allow them to "kill" the existence of things, including spells and other phenomena, by slashing at their "death lines". The ability is often key to breaking some Big Bad's Immortality or simply surviving an enemy's magical assault. Although they aren't specifically immune to magic; this ability works on anything such as poison, vampire blood, and HALLWAYS.
  • Princess Oboro from Basilisk is the only one with no fighting skills in her clan, except that she can negate any ninja power that she looks in the eye to. This power turns out to be the deadliest in the series and it's vital in killing the Big Bad by nullifying his Immortality right when he's reviving himself.
  • Magician's Academy: Suzuho has the ability to drain any magic out of the area around her, earning her the name of "The Midnight Blue Vampire". It's only her Split Personality Suzuka that can do this; the normal Suzuho is powerless. Also, it doesn't work against weapons like Falce or Psychic Powers.
  • The manga Code:Breaker has Sakura Sakurakouji with implied Anti-Magic abilities. All Code Breakers' abilities have been shown to be ineffective against her, and she's even displayed the ability to cancel out the effects of those powers on others. Canceling out their power's effects may or may not require full body contact, since she seems to hug people every time she does it, causing her friends to name it her "rare power hug attack."
  • Umineko no Naku Koro ni:
    • Endless Nine is Battler's magical resistance level. Basically, he refuses so much to believe in witches that magic doesn't affect him at all. To explain how powerful his Anti-Magic is, the rating of anti-magic normally goes from 1-9 digits, with 9 being Physical God immunity and rare on its own. Battler's has filled every digit with 9s. His rating currently provides the image for Readings Are Off the Scale in relation to his magic resistance and it should be noted that it only shows that number because that's the limit of the scale.
    • His sister Ange doesn't believe in magic herself, yet she is the type of person who allows it to work for other people. She's referred to as the "Witch of Resurrection".
  • In the second season of Code Geass, Jeremiah Gottwald (a.k.a. Orange-kun) gets the Geass Canceller, the power to completely negate Geass. Not only is he immune from such effects, but he can create spheres with huge radii that strip anyone caught in the bubble of any Geass effects they're currently affected by. For Lelouch's Geass, it even resets the "once per person" counter, allowing the victim to be Geassed again.
  • Occasionally in Fairy Tail, one of the characters will go up against an anti-mage. So far there's been one who can send out waves that negate magic, and one that can produce rope that temporarily robs one's powers while they're tied up.
  • The hero of Mahoutsukai To Deshi No Futekisetsu Na Kankei owns the sin of gluttony which absorbs all magic in the next environment.
  • Rave Master:
    • White Magician Girl Belnika has this ability, though she only uses it once.
    • This is also essentially the function of the Rune Save form of Haru's sword. It allows him to "cut what can not be cut", making it the ideal counter to magic users. The non-magical nature of the sword's BFS base form also works against magic.
    • Sieg Hart, the opponent Haru first used the above tricks on, is able to make use of the latter idea when he's in a wizard duel against a powerful archmage. He breaks a stalemate between them by impaling the enemy with a plain, non-magical, wooden staff.
  • Bandit Keith's machine-type monsters were immune to magic in the Duelist Kingdom arc of Yu-Gi-Oh!
  • In Iris Zero Kuga has the ability to erase other Irises. However, it was revealed that instead of being a magical ability, it was a psychological trick. If you are able to make someone fear what their Iris lets them see they will subconsciously turn their Iris off
  • Chikahito from Gate 7 is described as "Not" and therefore "Everythings is cleared out" meaning that magic can't affect him directly but even so he can see Onis and can enter to the battle spaces. This serves to differentiate him as much as associate him to Hana who is "Not" as well
  • Aria Rozenburg from Hiiro No Kakera is capable of neutralizing all magical attacks. It is part of the reason Logos thinks she is the sacred maiden blessed by God.
  • In Campione!, a Campione cannot be affected by regular magic unless it is inserted directly into his body, like if he drinks enchanted tea or receives a Magic Kiss. They can be affected by the powers of other Campione and Gods.
  • In InuYasha, Myoga the Flea has an odd version of this; he can break binding spells on people because if he bites you, no amount of magic will prevent you from swatting him.
  • Kagerou Project: This is the power of the Wide-Open Eyes Snake, aka the snake that resides in Kenjirou (and later, Konoha). This is why, every time Kuroha shows up he is able to see straight through/shrug off all of the gang's powers.

    Card Games 
  • Magic: The Gathering:
    • Creatures with Shroud can't be targeted with magic or semi-magical abilities. Effects that are sufficiently indiscriminate can still get them, however.
    • A particular variation of Shroud (keyworded as "Hexproof" with the Magic 2012 set) specifically averts the Blessed with Suck aspect by only stopping your opponent's spells and effects from targeting the creature, allowing you to lavish it with helpful magic as you please. (Before it was keyworded, many players called it "trollshroud" after its most famous possessors.)
    • Creatures with protection from an attribute can't be targeted with spells or abilities of that attribute, can't be blocked by creatures of that attribute, and prevent all damage to themselves from sources with that attribute.
    • Teferi severely negates or limit magic use in general, much to the great annoyance of his player's opponents.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh!:
    • The presence of Jinzo and/or his Up to Eleven version, Jinzo-Lord, on the field renders all trap cards useless.
    • Spell Canceller does the same, but for spell cards.

    Comic Books 
  • In The Books of Magic, it is stated that Dr. Thirteen has this ability, which is why it is next to impossible to prove to him that magic exists, as it will disappear before he gets close enough to see it.
  • Lord Joshua Coldrake from The DCU has the ability to outright negate any form of magic he enters contact with in a rather wide radius. Unfortunately, he's been banished to a cold, barren landscape... because of certain incidents in his youth.
  • Venka from ElfQuest has this power. It makes her extremely useful in battle... against other elves, anyway.
  • Nth metal from DC has the ability to negate magical powers and hurt ethereal creatures.
  • X-Men comic books have two examples of mutants that disupt/disable abilities:
    • The mutant Scrambler has the ability to disrupt any system with physical contact, including machines, energy fields, powers, the nervous system, or even a living body itself, making his power a functional death touch.
    • Leech negates superhuman powers by his proximity, which makes rescuing him from mutant-hating thugs a very difficult prospect. It's not just mutants — he's shut down Spider-Man, the Power Pack, and The Inhumans as well at different times, though there's one instance of his presence not affecting the Fantastic Four. These days he can restrain his powers with effort, though you'll still be temporarily depowered if you touch him.
  • Cameron Chase from DC's Chase was a DEO agent who could negate metahuman powers.
  • In the New 52, the Ravagers are immune to telekinesis. Superboy can still fight them with telekinetically thrown objects. At one point, Superboy notes that only their organic bodies are protected from telekinesis and defeats a Ravager by ripping his surgical implants out of his body.

    Fan Works 
  • In the My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic fanfic Black Queen, Red King, Catherine and two of her companions get rings that do this. The catch is that it also nullifies Catherine's own magic, robbing her of the ability to fly.
  • Dungeon Keeper Ami features this as one of the abilities Dark Gods (and presumably Light Gods) possess. They cannot be scried in the normal manner, and their places of worship are similarly protected from foreign magic. However, should a spellcaster, or a keeper looking through the eyes of a minion, physically see the location in question, they are still capable of casting a spell there.
  • In the Firefly fanfic Forward, there is a special type of psychic known as a "blank" that is immune to the effects of other psychics. The Hands of Blue are stated to be blanks, as is the character of John Garis. All of them are specialists in either containing or hunting down psychics.
  • In the Warcraft fic Gift of the Dark Ancestor, the heroine has this, in that anyone she touches cannot access mana, including her magically-powerful true love.
  • A common trope in "HiE"s (Human in Equestria, a popular kind of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic fanfic) is to have the human either be resistant/immune to, or actively nullify, magic.
    • In Arrow 18 Mission Logs, Randy is seemingly immune to a cockatrice's stare due to being nonmagical himself, but because he has eaten some food in Equestria, trace amounts of magic entered his body, and solidified in response, causing him serious pain after the fact.
    • In Article 2, Major Shane T. Doran shows traits of this when he touches the quill Twilight Sparkle is levitating and the energy field she's using flickers. When he keeps his finger in contact with the quill, the spell is undone completely. The backstory of his medical internment, as explained by Celestia, confirms that magic works very peculiarly on him, always having unusual (and sometimes dangerous) side effects.
    • In Over The Edge And Through The Wood, it's noted that magic is a fundamental law of the universe, just like gravity... And Troy's touch destroys it completely. The revelation almost befuddles Twilight enough for her not to be able to save him from plummeting to his death when she witnesses it. Even pegasus magic isn't immune, since Rainbow Dash is completely helpless while holding him. It doesn't come without drawbacks, however: all magic that comes into contact with Troy hurts him in a wayexamples .
    • In The Last Human: A Tale of the Pre-Classical Era, the Human (and, it's implied, all his kind) are not only resistant to magic, they can completely nullify magic and enchantments with their presence.
    • In Misunderstandings, Peter is transported to Equestria, where he shown to seemingly absorb unicorn magic, and like Over the Edge can take away a Pegasus' flight abilities an earth pony's strength. Pinkie Pie's own Reality Warper powers don't have any effect on him, and Discord's own chaos magic burns him and Peter. In response, his metabolism rises, making him much more agile, but also uses his energy up much faster, and his mind becomes much more erratic. In turns out he doesn't absorb magic, but rather has been sucking it to Earth, which means he'll be able to find a way home.
  • In Burning Black, the Dark Spires and smaller nullifier devices do this to any fairies in their area of effect. It's getting to the point where they even nullify mana. Their designers are immune, but surprisingly so are anti-fairies. Extended exposure can kill a fairy, making them a major threat in Dimmsdale.
  • In Helper Monkey Magic acts... Weird in regards to the main character. A potion that has only suppose to help him find his way back to Zecora's hut winds up mind controlling him and doing a zombie walk until he gets back. Luna manages to go into his dream to explain all this. Even then she had trouble doing so.
  • Xander apparently disrupts magic that he interacts with in I Am What I Am. Willow even notes that he has less magic than anyone else (the only thing keeping him from having no magic is that a soul is inherently magical). According to her, this is largely why his standing in the path of a spell she cast negated it. Oddly, being the most Muggle person in the world also makes him the best at making magical weapons (which is easier the less magic a person has)

    Films — Live-Action 

    Gamebooks 
  • In the Sorcery! series, the Minimites are small sprites with an aura that prevents the use of magic at short range. It is quite problematic in the first book where one such creature, Jann, takes a liking to the protagonist and follow him around, refusing to leave even when asked to. Worst, the aura doesn't protect against hostile magic cast from outside it, only preventing spellcasting. Plus, spells in this gamebook are Cast from Hit Points, and you don't find out about the aura until the first try, costing you Endurance, as the little twit never bothered to warn you.

    Literature 
  • Xanth's Magician Bink, whose power is that he cannot be harmed by magic, directly or indirectly. However, this power only protects his life, not his dignity, so he primarily escapes magical harm through a series of embarrassing accidents. Bink's ability cancels out Fridge Logic to a frightening extent. It keeps itself secret, through increasingly unlikely coincidence if necessary, just so no-one can think up a way around it; he's widely regarded as being talentless. It's even defended him, indirectly, against the Demon whose ambient magic created Xanth in the first place.

    Bink's talent is even better than most versions of this. Healing spells and other benign forms of magic still work on him, as will neutral magic which doesn't harm him. It can even at times twist potentially harmful magic, such as the magic of a love spring, into benefitting him by having the woman he falls in love with as a result feel sorry for him and help him, even though she might not have felt such loyalty otherwise. This is also why his talent goes to such lengths to keep itself secret: if his enemies knew he couldn't be harmed by magic, they would just try to kill him in other ways, which would create the paradox of Bink's talent itself causing him harm. In fact the man who first figured it out immediately attacked him with a sword.

    The true depth of the power of his talent is difficult to determine, however; Bink was promptly saved from the swordsman by the intervention of his girlfriend, who took the hit for him and caused the man to have a Heroic BSOD and give up. There is speculation from other magicians in-world that his talent may have indirectly caused the death of the previous king, who had exiled Bink, and caused Magician Trent, Bink's friend, to become king to make Bink's life easier. Indeed, due to the Fridge Logic of his talent, it may be that anyone who has ever benefited from magic at all, ever, may have difficulty harming Bink due to his protection from magic.

    This means that whenever he tries to tell someone what his talent is, or someone uses some means of divination to do the same, it gets "coincidentally" interrupted by some emergency, unless that person knowing Bink's talent will help him. His talent also has a tendency to slip out of the minds of those who know it, despite how important and powerful it is, to help preserve his secret. It also means his talent can be somewhat unreliably contagious; if the simplest way to protect Bink from magic is through your own actions, you'll be at least protected just enough to protect him in turn. Others have (rarely) been able to intentionally take advantage of this.
  • Tilja, the main character of Peter Dickinson's The Ropemaker, has this power... anti-power... whatever you want to call it. At first she's disappointed that she didn't inherit the family magic, but this ability turns out to be much more useful to her.
  • The "pristinely ungifted" of the Sword of Truth series are not only unaffected by additive magic and some subtractive magic, but magic doesn't exist to them or they to it. A blind sorceress who sees with her magic can't see them, and they can't interact with the magic necessary to keep their world functioning. The same lack of interaction makes them partially Immune to Fate, though prophecies can touch on them circumspectly. No matter what, the children of any of these pristinely ungifted will have this trait. They, like almost everything else in the series, were the result of a wizard experimenting in the great war three thousand years previously.
  • The "muties" from Sheri S. Tepper's The True Game series suppress the gifts of all nearby Gamesmen.
  • In Magic Steps, "unmagic" soaks up all kinds of regular magic like a cleaning agent, and can also be used for invisibility and intangibility. Experiencing it from a mage's point of view is literally nightmare-inducing. It also eats the user.
  • In the later Dune books, Siona Atreides and all who carry her genes nullify prescience, allowing them to hide in The Scattering. Their version is a weaker version of Paul's original power, which is to be able to consider so many different courses of action at once using his prescience that it creates a cloud of futures too diverse for anyone else to parse, essentially eliminating any other prophet's powers related to any of his past, present, or future decisions and indirectly rendering half the galactic empire essentially a null zone for any prediction but navigation.
  • The Bartimaeus Trilogy:
    • Kitty Jones is "Resilient" to magic, meaning that weaker magic fails to affect her and more powerful spells are less effective or wear off. Other Resilients have the ability to see through illusions or to sense when magic is present. Unfortunately, resilience can be overcome by very strong magic, as one of Kitty's resilient friends get killed by a strong demon.
    • Golems also cancel out the magic of demons they touch. This is explained as being because it's a creature of earth, while demons are creatures of air and fire. Oddly enough, this creates an entire potential system of magic, antithesis to the dominant one, that is never really used. Of course, given magicians reluctance to explore any form of magic other than standard Summon Magicnote  and willingness to off the competition this isn't that surprising.
  • Wraith in Holly Lisle's novel Vincalis the Agitator is completely unaffected by all magic in a world where magic is pervasive and advanced. He is also forced to major in Theoretical Magic so that his inability to cast spells doesn't get noticed.
  • In Year of the Griffin by Diana Wynne Jones, the sequel to Dark Lord of Derkholm, this is subverted: A powerful mage is attacked by magically-immune griffins. Her solution? Cast spells that affect the area directly AROUND them rather than hitting them directly, such as hitting them with blasts of super-heated air.
  • The Black Company series features a Chosen One whose power is magic nullification. Interestingly, just like regular magic it can be nullified by someone who knows the user's true name, but we never get any real elaboration on its exact nature.
  • Star Wars Expanded Universe:
    • The Thrawn Trilogy has Grand Admiral Thrawn using creatures called the Ysalamiri, which project Force-nullifying fields, against his Jedi opponents. While the Ysalamiri prevent the use of Force from inside the field or from the Force affecting anything inside, the laws of physics still apply, so if a Jedi (or a crazed Jedi Master) throws a rock at you with the Force at an incredible speed while standing outside the field, the Ysalamiri won't stop it.
    • In the New Jedi Order series, the Yuuzhan Vong exist outside the Force thanks to a punishment inflicted on them by their homeworld's Genius Loci for becoming too agressive and warlike; as such, they're completely impervious to being sensed or affected mentally by Force-users, and physical powers like lightning or telekinesis are less effective. However, it's possible for a Jedi who has been directly affected by the Vong's Organic Technology (such as Jacen and Anakin Solo or Tahiri Veila) to develop "Vongsense", a Force-like ability that lets them detect Vong, albeit somewhat imprecisely.
  • Bella from Twilight is immune to many vampire powers; she's the only person whose mind Edward can't read at all.
  • Katie Chandler in Enchanted, Inc. and its sequels.
  • In Harry Potter, many magical creatures, most notably dragons, acromantulas, and giants including half-giants like Hagrid, are strongly resistant to magic. This makes enchanted items fail to work on them, and causes most spells to literally bounce off them. Though this can be subverted if multiple casters conjure spells on them at once. Others can be defeated by certain specific types of magic (Viktor Krum defeats a dragon in one hit by putting a curse on its eyes).
  • Ixia and Sitia:
    • In Poison Study by Maria V Snyder, Valek is naturally immune to magic. Spells directed at him will slide away and attach to the nearest object, such as his sword. As magic is illegal and it's Valek's job to kill all magic users, his ability gets a fair amount of use. Later Valek learns that he wasn't born special, but is a magic user just like anyone else. However, his hatred of magic is so strong that his own magic nullifies everyone else's.
    • Then, in Spy Glass, Opal gains the same ability by absorbing a Null Shield, and finds out that in the presence of large amounts of magic, this ability makes it almost impossible to move.
  • In Naím y el mago fugitivo (Naím and the Runaway Magician), by argentine author Sebastián Lalaurette, there are magicians (called Rumotim) and antimagicians who can nullify all magic in a given radius with center on them. Magic in Belisla is a Magitek: magicians have to extract it from nature before they can use it, and every spell requires a certain quantity of magic. But when Rumotim Ramiro Grimor discovers a way to make magic grow, allowing every magician to dispose of virtually unlimited quantities of it, antimagicians suddenly become more important than magicians: they are the only way to control magic and stop all the world to collapse under the influence of warring spells.
  • Orem, in Hart's Hope by Orson Scott Card, is a "Sink"; he gets the full Blessed with Suck implications (Power Incontinence, et cetera) until he's properly trained in it, but afterwards he's able to negate the Big Bad's entire power-up ritual by duplicating it as she goes along.
  • In The Belgariad and Malloreon, Dragons (well, the dragon, as there's only one left) are immune to sorcery thanks to the tinkering of the God of Evil Torak.
  • From Counselors and Kings, the Jordaini are a specialized caste of humans in The Magocracy Halruaa who are bred to be impervious to magic. They're trained to act as counselors to the wizard-lords, who appreciate having an advisor a rival wizard cannot subvert.
  • The Wheel of Time:
    • Mat receives an amulet that makes him immune to the One Power. An Aes Sedai quickly discovers that she can still throw rocks at him.
    • Gholam, protean horrors designed by the villains as Mage Killers are similarly immune — the Power just melts away when it gets close — and throwing rocks at one is not a viable strategy (their physical form is amorphous, such that they can slip through even the tiniest cracks). Interestingly the only weapon proven effective against them so far is hitting them with Mat's amulet.
  • Jurgen's status as a blank cancels all warp-based phenomena in the area in which other people can smell his (admittedly spectacular) body odor (Sometimes it resumes when he gets out of range). This is the reason why his superior Ciaphas Cain managed to live long enough to become a Hero of the Imperium.
  • Pretty much the core mechanic of The Darksword Trilogy, though it can be argued that the protagonist has the additional magical power to render opponents that know full well he's magic immune stupid enough to attack him directly anyway, instead of just setting a fire around him that kills him with smoke, etc. That particular problem is likely a side-effect of the mindset which renders the very concept of tool use an abomination of thought. Any indirect manipulation, whether through your body or magic, is considered necromancy — transfusing your Life (life, magic, and good are synonyms in this language) through something else to make it act as if it were alive.
  • In Elantris, Dilaf is completely immune to AonDor as a result of being the leader of the Dakhor monks (by the same token, he's also something of an Implacable Man). Also overlaps with the "spells" type, as he can destroy Aons even if they aren't actually affecting him, though this takes deliberate action.
  • In Doctrine of Labyrinths, the Grevillian wizards created a space called the Nullity where magic doesn't work.
  • Madison Moss of The Heir Chronicles doesn't negate magic so much as absorb it; Any wizard who tries a charm on her is likely to wind up flat on his back while she sucks the magic right out of him. Individuals with this ability are referred to as Elicitors, but only Madison is shown to posess it until her sister comes under attack.
  • The Dresden Files:
    • In the novel Blood Rites, Lord Raith is completely immune to direct magical attack thanks to a pact with He Who Walks Behind. Fortunately for our heroes, he is not immune to bullets, beatings, or repeatedly getting hit with telekinetically-controlled keys.
    • Outsiders are known for being nearly perfectly Anti-Magic, where the power of the strongest wizards throughout history barely sticks to any of them. Harry has the unusual ability to make his magic stick to them, and has defeated two Outsider champions, the Walkers. It's speculated that the circumstances of his birth, including Halloween's relation to Mantles and his own "Starborn" Mantle, give him this ability.
  • In E. D. Baker's The Wide-Awake Princess, Annie is immune to magic. Be Careful What You Wish For. (Though sometimes she reflects spells — sometimes she doesn't.)
  • Kern Desanea, the protagonist of the Forgotten Realms novel Pool of Twilight, is "unmagic" because his wizard mother was forced to engage in heavy magical combat while pregnant with him (in the previous book, in fact). The trait isn't applied very consistently — Kern is barely enough in control of it to let a magical healing salve work on him at least somewhat with considerable effort, yet at other times magic seemingly effortlessly affects him as needed by the plot anyway —, and is in fact handwaved as potentially unreliable when it's first explained, but it's nonetheless relevant to the story and an occasional lifesaver.
  • In Andre Norton's Dread Companion, the notus blooms revert Kilda's Baleful Polymorph to a certain extent.
  • The main protagonists of Philip K. Dick's Ubik all work for a "prudence organization" which employs their Anti-Psychic abilities to protect the privacy of their customers from psychics.
  • Negatus Mysterium in The Lost Years of Merlin series, though it only works if you believe it does.
  • In Stephanie Burgis's A Most Improper Magick, Kat finds she can spontaneously break spells by verbally denying them.
  • In Rogue Sorcerer, Lyr recieves an enchanted sword from Vumi which makes him immune to magic.
  • In Spectral Shadows, belief is what gives magic its power. So it is actually possible to dispel magic with enough disbelief.
  • In The Zombie Knight, very old reaper servants begin to project "soul pressure", which prevents weaker abilities from being used in their personal space at all. Objects won't materialize, destruction or alteration beams won't progress or lose their power, etc. It's possible to attack such a servant by launching or dropping things from outside their pressure radius, but honestly if you weren't strong enough to defeat their soul pressure you probably won't be able to defeat their resilience either.

    Live-Action TV 

    Tabletop Games 
  • Negapsychics from the Palladium RPG Beyond the Supernatural. They, like almost everything else in Palladium's vault of IP, wound up in Rifts. In the original, a "real-world" psychic investigation/horror title, they were people with latent psychic powers who were avowed atheists or skeptics about the supernatural, causing their powers to develop into an anti-magic field. Even if they subsequently come to believe, they keep the ability. In Rifts, not believing in the supernatural isn't really an option given its ubiquity. In this world, the Negapsychics just don't think it'll work on them.
  • Zed talents and contests of Will in Godlike. Talents are inherently harder to attack with miracles, requiring a contest of will to either refute the power or force it to work. This doesn't affect indirect miracles, though, like being shot in the head by an invisible assassin... Zed talents can shut off enemy superpowers entirely by altering the environment around the talent—e.g. if a super-strong talent lifts a tank, the Zed makes the tank much heavier — without getting into a contest of wills. Will contests are out the window in the sequel Wild Talents, though, and it's implied there are no more Zeds either.
  • In Warhammer 40,000, there are actually two different forms of this, though the terminology is sometimes quite confusing.
    • The "Soulless", who have no souls, are largely immune to the Warp, and are really uncomfortable for people to be around.
    • The "Blanks" or "Paraiahs", have negatively psychic souls which actively cancel psychic abilities around them and physically harm psykers and Daemons with their mere presence. Blanks are incredibly rare and greatly valued by the Inquisition. Blanks have variable levels of power, and they use the same scale (I.E the greek alphabet) as Psykers do. Sigma is the weakest level for a blank, and these blanks will have a small field that can be overwhelmed by a psyker of decent power, while Omega is the strongest. There is no concrete evidence for how powerful they are, it's probable that they could shut down even Alpha level psykers and cause Greater Daemons and Daemon princes to undergo critical existence failure across an entire continent. It is also possible that there is a Omega-minus level of blanks much like there is an Alpha-plus level for psykers. It's almost certain that such a powerful blank/pariah would end up being killed at a very young age due to the sheer levels of revulsion that everyone will feel for him/her, and if they somehow survive to grow up, all he/she can look forward to is the inquisition and the necrons racing to get their hands on him/her.
      • Ferik Jurgen from the Ciaphas Cain novels is a Blank.
      • Eisenhorn books display Alizebeth Bequin discovering her limits as a blank.
      • So does Wystan Frauka from Ravenor. He gets burned out and possessed by a powerful psyker.
      • An Omega-Minus embryo turns up in Atlas Infernal. The effect on psychic individuals is somewhat horrifying. When we first see it, it kills GREY KNIGHTS dead. Immediately. It then manages to outright destroy a powerful Thousand Sons Sorcerer AND give Azhek Ahriaman (one of the most powerful psykers in the galaxy) a physic fit from sectors away.
      • Spear, a Black Pariah from the novel Nemesis is probably down there. Though he comes across are more of a unique entity.
  • GURPS
    • Some "worlds" have the advantage/disadvantage of Mundane. A basic Mundane is immune to magic, psy, and super-tech; a high grade Mundane turns aliens into Rubber-Forehead Aliens in his presence. This is most often seen in comedic settings such as IOU.
    • GURPS actually has a lot of these. Static prevents a specific power type (magic, psi, "super") from working on the target. "Magic Resistance" makes resisting magic easier and also makes spells cast on the target more likely to go horribly wrong. "Mana Damper" reduces the amount of mana in the environment making magic harder to use.
  • The Unknown Armies Sourcebook Postmodern Magic provides a character named Eustace Crane, who negates any magic around him. He is an investigator uncovering frauds which otherwise would be seen as evidence for magic or divine wonders (like ghosts haunting a house, blood-weeping statues and the like). Every magical incident around him either doesn't work or can suddenly be explained by science — whatever the case, magic simply does not exist in his vicinity. However, deep inside behind his skepticism he longs for a proof that magic exist, what makes him quite a tragic figure since he can never be witness to anything magical.

    Well, almost anything. The rules about his anti-magic powers explicitly allow clever use of at least some varieties of major charge to get around them, and his reaction to such proof are detailed — namely, warmly thanking the prover (assuming he makes his Sanity Check) and giving them their prize money.
  • There's a similar character in Over the Edge, a grouchy stage magician who's a professional paranomal debunker. In a setting where there's psychics, wizards, aliens, ghosts, and other weirdness on every streetcorner, he'd be experiencing massive Skepticism Failure if not for his (completely unconscious) weirdness-cancellation power.
    • He's also an Expy of the stage-magician and skeptic James Randi. Some Real Life "psychics" claim that having people with the wrong mindset around makes their powers malfunction, which Randi's eyes for trickery seem to do for a lot of self-proclaimed psychics.
  • Dungeons & Dragons:
    • There are plenty creatures with a magic resistance, which mechanic is a percentage of failure for any spell directed at them. Those with the highest scores make offensive spells plain and simply a loss of time and energy against them. Any magic-user worth his pointy hat must learn how to circumvent this resistance.
    • Beholders project a cone of Anti-Magic from their central eye which negates all spells cast at them from the front. This also prevents them from using their own spells directly from the front without first turning off the Anti-Magic cone, leaving them briefly vulnerable.
    • This also applies to some races to a certain limited extent, such as elves, which are resistant or immune to various enchantments.
    • Golems are universally immune to magic, save for a few spells. Demiliches are also immune to hostile magic. Certain epic golem-like monsters can project huge areas-of-effect Anti-Magic auras.
    • In Dungeons & Dragons 3.0, there is a prestige class called "Forsaker". The Forsaker has essentially forsaken magic, so all magic done to him has a reduced effect, and he destroys magic items to become even more powerful. Also, he gets Spell Resistance, which is the only spell resistance that stacks with others in the game.
    • Then there is the Puritan prestige class from one version of Dungeons & Dragons, who is of the belief that the use of magic leads down an apparently very slippery slope to evil. Thereby they refuse absolutely any use of magic on themselves and disdain any magic whatsoever that is not used by clerics of their own religion, and sparingly at that. Their unwavering devotion to this grants them the ability to detect the presence of unnatural effects and beings, to shut off a spellcaster's magic, and to generally be immune to magical effects.
  • Nephilim in Witchcraft cannot be affected directly by magic. Incarnates with the Magic Domain and Divinely Inspired Humans can spend Essence to counter opponents magical attacks.
  • One of the low-grade magician types in Shadowrun is the nega-mage, who can counterspell other magicians' sorcery but otherwise lacks paranatural power.
  • In Changeling The Dreaming, Mage: The Ascension and Demon The Fallen, the sheer mundanity of normal "sleeper" humans causes difficulty for the changelings, mages and demons to manifest their powers. For changelings and demons, the presence of unbelievers simply causes the powers to not work, including manifesting their True Form (changelings also get a splitting headache if seriously "boring" people are present); for mages, this tends to cause Paradox backlash, as Reality strikes at mages who try the "impossible". On the one hand, this has caused Bygones (e.g. dragons, unicorns) to go extinct because people stopped believing. On the other hand, certain areas of the world have different beliefs, and would cause e.g. flying carpets to be perfectly normal, and airplanes to cause paradox as an impossibility.
    • Werewolves and vampires do not have this problem, which is Hand Waved because many people subconsciously believe in them. Still, the Technocracy would like to change that.
    • Mages with Prime 2 may actually use a type of counter-spell called "anti-magick". Granted, it is quite hard to pull off properly, but with enough successes on the dice roll and appropriate Quintessence spending, a mage can pretty much cancel any magickal effect. And unlike basic counter-magick, the mage doesn't need to know the Spheres involved in the effect.
  • Some such effects carry on to the New World of Darkness. Counterspells exist in Mage: The Awakening, and anyone with Prime 2 can just create "mage armor," an inherent defense that only works on spells, but reduces the success rate of ALL magic. Most other supernaturals do not have this problem, but suffer their own ill effects from people observing them at work, like triggering Disquiet for Prometheans.
    • In Genius The Transgression, Geniuses can use their Wonders in front of mortals all they want (though, as above, there are dangers involved in that). However, letting the mere mortal touch it will inevitably result in a Phlebotinum Breakdown. There are also Clockstoppers, who at the most basic level cause Wonders to fail by their presence, and at the highest become truly nightmarish Walking Techbanes.
    • Second Sight, a book dealing with Psychic Powers, mentions that doubt does tend to throw off the ability to manifest said powers... and the more doubters there are, the harder it is to manifest them. There's even a Merit, Anti-Psi, that allows a character to actively suppress psychic powers.
  • Nobles in Nobilis have a small field around them called an Auctoritas. Other Nobles' miracles don't affect anything within the field unless they specifically allocate some of the miracle's power to penetration.
  • In Witch Girl Adventures, one of the Heritages available at character creation (each character gets only one) is Mystic Void, which not only serves to make them more magically resistant, but makes spells cast in their presence more likely to fail in the first place, a counter to the old "if I can't zap you I'll zap the floor" work around. They can also sacrifice their own mystic energy to negate the energy inside others or enchanted objects, letting them drain others of their own spellcasting abilities even before the difficulty in casting at her. The downside is that Mystic Voids and their alies have trouble casting spells as well, but it's a price some are wiling to pay. The Hex Breaker Heratige is a lesser example, increasing the witch's magic resistance and letting her dispell things more easily, at the cost of friendly spells not automatically affecting her. Affecting those around her or her environment is still a valid work around in this case.

    Video Games 
  • In Tales of Maj'Eyal the player can join the Ziguranth faction and gain the antimagic skill tree, but can no longer use any magic, runes, or arcane items. Oozemancers start as members of the faction.
    • In the older version, the Unbeliever class (and, users of the Unbelief skill) can't use magic, even wands and scrolls (which even Warriors can use). In exchange for this, they get a large bonus to their saving throws, and can disrupt magic being cast around them.
  • In Enchanted Arms, the main character Atsuma has the ability to negate various magics because of his right arm (Best seen in the hopeless fight against the Ice Queen Devil Golem). However early in the game has no control of this power.
  • In Final Fantasy Tactics, there is a "Faith" statistic. The higher a character's faith, the more potent his magic, but the more susceptible he is to the enemy's magic. There's also a status effect called "Innocent" or "Atheist" (depending on the version) which causes your effective Faith to be zero for a while. One hidden character (a robot) has zero faith AND (in case you try to boost his Faith) permanent "Atheist" status. Note that Faith is a percentile multiplier, so with 0 Faith one is literally immune to all magic. This also makes you immune to beneficial magic as well, though. "Mind Shield" protects the mind from being attacked properly by anything, even magic.
  • Mother Maya in Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey has an especially vicious form of this. She doesn't only negate magic, she instantly kills the caster. Oddly, her weakness is bullets (or other Gun-type attacks).
  • In Vagrant Story, one minor antagonist is completely immune to magic (so you can't hurt him with any during a boss fight), and other sorcerers aren't able to sway him. He's not immune to a giant animated statue stepping on him, though.
  • Arcanum: Of Steamworks & Magick Obscura has a Technical to Magical spectrum. The more skills you learn of each, the more ineffective (and possibly dangerous) the other becomes for you to use or to use against you. (e.g. magic armor won't give benefits to engineers, and guns will blow up when used against mages). Characters with a high technological aptitude have this effect around magical items and have a high resistance to magic. Even the good kind.
    • One of the spell colleges is a magic nullification discipline. Among the available spells is one to make yourself immune to magic, and even reflect hostile magic back. It is easily the most useless college in the game, a fact the game itself lampshades in conversation with a mage that specializes in it.
  • Bloodline Champions has a few effects called silence and spell block which various sources, but thematically seems to be this trope.
  • Fire Emblem: The Blazing Sword has Kishuna, an enigmatic entity of the "Magic Seal" class, who serves as an optional boss. Kishuna's presence negates every spell in a set radius (which extends over more than half of the battlefield usually), rendering magic users of every side completely useless. magic cast outside the barrier can still affect those inside, though.
    • In the first and third games, Mage Dragons, who are the only kind of dragons that attack using the Magic stat instead of physical Strength, also have absurdly high magic resistance. In the remakes they flat-out nullify all magical attacks against them.
  • The Disgaea series has some examples of this. The Alaraune monsters take halved damage from magic attacks in Disgaea 2, and the Healer class halves magic damage dealt to adjacent allies in Disgaea 3. Also in 3, the Holy Dragon can halve any magic damage it takes with its Mist Cloak ability (Which it can also teach to any other unit).
  • Antimagic clouds in the Exile/Avernum series prevent any spells from being cast within (or directly into) them. "Null bugs" are insects that perpetually generate such a field as a defense mechanism.
    • Exile III allows characters to chose the "Magically Inept" character trait. It does not allow the character to use magic, but makes them less vulnerable to it.
  • In Eschalon you can choose that your character is an atheist, which makes you immune to curses and healing. It's completely separate from being agnostic, in which case you get no divine bonuses or penalties. Made curious by the fact that the player could presumably see divine magic working on other people, so one has to wonder how he keeps up that suspension of (dis?)belief.
  • Heroes of Might and Magic features all three of these. There's Anti-Magic ground that makes any hero on top of it unable to cast any sort of magic, most dragons are immune to magic to some degree and there's an Anti-Magic spell that makes any unit immune to magic for a couple of turns.
    • In the fifth game, barbarians' unique skill is severely weakening enemy's magic. They themselves also cannot learn it and get war cries instead.
  • Shinja from Battle Realms has a passive ability called "Ye of little faith" that makes him nigh-immune to magic attacks. It's implied that his inherent pragmatism, skepticism and belief in material things (and his lack of faith in fantasy concepts like magic and dragons) is so powerful that it simply makes magic stop working on him.
  • Blue spirits put into a support role work like this in Eien no Aselia. The Ice Banisher skill stops any healing or offensive magic from being cast.
  • The Pokémon Rayquaza has the power to nullify weather effects by being on the field due to serving as a balancing factor between Groudon and Kyogre, who cause eternal droughts and downpours, respectively, just by existing.
    • And now Zygarde, a balancing factor between Xerneas, who emits a constant fairy aura, and Yveltal, who is followed by a dark aura, dispels all aura effects in its general area. One would have to wonder how this would affect a battle with a Lucario, a species that has an aura-detecting sixth sense. (Not at all, it appears.)
  • Defense Of The Ancients (and its sequel Dota 2) has a character literally called Anti-Mage who has skills that correspond appropriately to his name - a passive which drains mana on each attack, a passive which increases his magic resistance, and an ultimate which deals damage to a hero based on the mana points they are currently missing.
    • There's also another hero called Silencer, whose main gimmick is silencing other heroes. He can also permanently steal their Intelligence when they die, reducing their mana while bolstering his own damage.
  • Warcraft III has a umber of units, such as the Dryad or Priest, that have the ability to dispel magical effects.
  • Some boss characters in Final Fantasy XII can use "palings", an ability that nullifies damage done to them for a while. Some bosses can use this ability to block all physical damage, but some can also use the magical version, which blocks all magic cast on them. There's also bosses that can use ''both'' kinds at once.

    Web Comics 
  • Digger is immune to the manipulations and prophesying of gods, and seems to be resistant to magic in general. This is eventually revealed to be because she's a descendant of Descending Helix, who built a prison for a god on the condition that his posterity couldn't be dragged into a similar situation. Unfortunately, she can still be affected by oracular slugs, plus someone figured out how to rope her into the plot by enchanting a nearby object.
    • Some of this isn't immunity to magic so much as a simple level-headed refusal to deal with superstitious nonsense. When a god responds to a question with a mysterious and rhetorical "but who knows how ancient are the stones beneath our feet?" she immediately points out that they're 4.5 billion years, give or take, and demands a real answer.
  • In Dominic Deegan, there are people called "Resistants" that are pretty much immune to all magic, positive or negative. Dex Garrit is the only one to appear as a character. Recently, though, it's been hinted that they're not "immune" so much as just ridiculously resistant: TIM's energy blasts, for example, while destroying the landscape, seem to bounce harmlessly off of Dex's chest, until his inner monologue reveals that, however he looks on the outside, taking the shot hurt like hell.
  • The Fancy Adventures of Jack Cannon: Jack Cannon has this power, but it only works against Reality Warping.
  • Gunnerkrigg Court:
    • Antimony Carver can cancel out certain kinds of illusion magic. This is not a conscious ability — it just happens when she's around. For example, she has been able to see ghosts and similar beings from a young age.
    • Gamma has a similar ability, although it seems more powerful. Its unclear if this is because she's linked with Zimmy, or if she's just more powerful, period.
  • Harry Potter Comics has Sheriff Ned, a Muggle who is immune to mind spells. Other types of magic work, but his memory of magical events can't be erased or altered, leading to an alliance with Harry Potter and the other aurors.
  • Opossums in Poppy O'Possum are, by-and-large, immune to magic, and incapable of using it as well. This is part of their status as the pariahs of the world they inhabit, which uses magic extremely liberally. For Poppy, in particular, this becomes an issue when looking for a healer for her daughter's injured eye, as only non-magic ones will do.
  • The webcomic Yosh has its main character be the inheritor of the title "Null". It, of course, is exactly as it sounds: no magic can affect him, ill or good. Additionally, he's also immune to physical damage, though it's unrelated: it's stated that the previous Null didn't have this trait.

    Web Original 
  • In the Academy of Superheroes universe, Anchors negate the powers of those around them. Weaker ones are merely immune to superpowers, stronger ones have a radius of effect that extends around them. The most effective can reshape their area of effect at will.
  • Kazuo Divinas from Phaeton can create a skin tight field that does this with most magic, or a field that absorbs most kinds, he has to have one or the other active at all times to stay alive as he is always under the influence of a countdown curse.

    Western Animation 
  • An early episode of The Fairly OddParents reveals dragons are completely unaffected by magic. As well as cockroaches, ((Superfriends knock-offs, Butterfly Nets and crazy sentient motor bikes. A lot of things in The Fairly OddParents can be Anti-Magic when it's dramatically inconvenient.
  • Ben 10: Ultimate Alien: Geochelone Aeros like Terraspin are naturally immune to mana (the source of magic in this continuity).
  • In the Adventure Time episode "Betty", Bella Noche, a being from another dimension that is described as "a being of pure anti-magic," is summoned into Ooo. He has the power to negate any magic around him, which removes the power from any nearby wizards and disables the Ice King's crown.

    Real Life 
  • The portion of the population who are resistant or immune to hypnosis (leaving aside, for the moment, the definition of "hypnosis"). Illusionists generally have a few tricks to weed those people out went they ask for volunteers.
    • Hypnosis only works if you willingly allow it to control you, you generally have to try hard to not be immune to it. This was also tested on Mythbusters and confirmed.
    • It is quite easy to block out hypnotic suggestion, just do something to take your mind off the hypnotist. However, suggestibility is highly individual, and can be tested.
    • Except very few people who go to shows like this don't want to be hypnotized. Trances can be quite pleasurable and relaxing. People can put themselves in this sort of state. For a quick example, just relax and stare at a random spot with your vision unfocused for a few seconds. Then see how difficult it is to pull yourself away.
  • Psychics, dowsers, and other paranormalists who fail to perform in controlled settings (which prevent cheating) often accuse their testers of this. Extreme versions are that the act of testing itself, or even the presence of someone who doesn't already believe, has this effect.
    • Harry Houdini, who spent much of his last years debunking alleged mediums was accused of having this ability by his former friend Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes, who believed in them (apparently Houdini took up his debunking campaign precisely because he was appalled by Doyle's belief in what he, as a professional magician, felt were blatant frauds).
    • Indian skeptic Sanal Edamaraku faced a similar accusation from a tantric guru who was challenged to kill him using only magic powers.

Artifacts/Environments

    Anime & Manga 
  • While it oddly never gets mentioned anymore, there's a type of stone in Bleach in the Soul Society that can greatly weaken spiritual power called Sekiseki stone. It's used for the prison tower Rukia was in during the SS arc, and was used partly to break through the SS barrier by Ichigo and friends. It's basically Soul Reaper kryptonite... yet completely disappears from the series after the arc it first appeared in. Did it not occur to anyone that maybe finding a way to weaponize that, like with a gun weapon, could effectively create the ultimate weapon to use against any spiritual being?
  • Fate/stay night:
    • Fate Stay Night gives us the Rule Breaker, which is a dagger that can sever magical contracts including the one between Master and Servant.
    • Similarly, Fate/Zero's Lancer has a Noble Phantasm called "Gae Dearg", a spear that can penetrate any magical defenses and disrupt thaumaturgy as long as it is in contact with the source of the spell.
  • While at first Taikoubou from Houshin Engi is armed with a wind-power wand Dashinben, he gets an amazing upgrade late in the story that cancels out any paopei (read, magical weapons) effects. This means that not only it stops paopeis from functioning, physical wounds and status ailments from paopeis can be reversed. On the other hand, this also affects friendly paopeis, and this particularly sucks since one of his Ax-Crazy but powerful allies, Nataku, is essentially a human-paopei. Then again, Taikoubou rarely fights head-to-head with any enemy, being the typical lazy-ass strategist that he is.
  • The Lyrical Nanoha series has two flavors of anti-magic:
    • Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha Striker S introduced the Anti-Magilink Fields, which are emitted by certain magic-technology and nullifies all magic within the area it covers. While a mage can undergo training under AMF conditions to fight the effects, they will still find their magic greatly reduced, and even they will find their magic gone if the AMF is strong enough. As explained by Nanoha in one of the source mangas, spells cast from the outside have their power reduced or completely dispelled upon hitting an AMF, while a mage casting from inside an AMF will find themselves struggling to even muster enough mana for it. A mage caught unprepared inside a large-area AMF without boosters and/or having his/her Power Limiter still on is basically screwed.
    • The Magical Record Lyrical Nanoha Force manga introduced the Dividers, artifact weapons that aggressively break the magical links (magic is basically magical energy linked to a usable form in this setting) thus negating any magic they hit as well as any magical effects aimed at the wielder. As such, Dividers are extremely dangerous to mages and commonly referred to as Mage Killers. Coupled withe the Eclipse-based powers of the manga's villains, it borders on Story-Breaker Power.
  • Mahou Sensei Negima! There's a valley in the Magic World in which magic doesn't function. It's filled with monsters and is used for executions. One of which fails, because removing Nagi Springfield's ability to use magic just makes him a Badass Normal, which still lets him rescue his future wife Arika who was thrown in there.
  • Horacle in Mamoru-kun ni Megami no Shukufuku wo!, which can negate any Beatrice powers in the area. Ayako being Brought Down to Normal by one makes the last arc of the series, and also serves as a way to free her from the "Return to the Origin" beast rampaging about.
  • Mx0: Taiga eventually trades in his dummy magic card for one whose sole ability is to use up the points stored on it to create an anti-magic field. After sufficient training, Taiga is able to control the size/shape/location of the field, such as just within his mouth.
  • One Piece also has Sea Stone, which can render a Devil Fruit user weak and unable to so much as stand or robs them of all their power. They aren't extensively used due to their rarity by the world government however.
  • In Rave Master, Haru Glory's fourth sword, "Runesave", can negate magic and cut intangible things like smoke and lightning, but it passes through solid matter like a ghost.
  • Shakugan no Shana: Shana's katana and Yuji's flame ring have limited power-canceling abilities; the former is also indestructible, and the latter only cancels fire/heat.
  • Slayers:
    • A Magitek train runs on an artifact that absorbed magic from the surrounding area, causing spells such as "Dragon Slave" or "Fireball" to become about as effective as a toy squib.
    • There is also a rare and highly durable metal called Orihalcon that can basically negate most spells, although Fantastic Nukes like the Dragon Slave are beyond it.
  • The Shenshou Jing mirror in Senki Zesshou Symphogear can project a light that erases other relics and any effects related to them. The antagonists of season 2 can't power it with technology alone, so it's not much of a threat until Miku gets Brainwashed and Crazy and uses it to make a Symphogear with the same properties.

    Card Games 

    Fan Works 
  • Past Sins introduces an anti-magic collar for unicorns.
  • In "Metal Ripper", when "Back In Control" is sung by Joakim Bróden, it instantly disables all enchantments or spells placed on him.
  • In general, a common piece of Fanon for fan works of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic is a ring placed on a unicorn's horn in order to stop them from casting spells.
  • Pony POV Series:
    • The Element of Freewill (the purified version of Dark World!Rainbow Dash's Element of Chaos), which renders its bearer immune to any form of mind control magic or magic that would otherwise influence their actions against their will. Rainbow Dash even seems able to bypass Nightmare Paradox's Glamour and ask questions pertaining to her identity, which likely explains why Paradox cuts off communication with her completely once the Element is purified. However, this only applies to the purified Element, in its corrupted state, as shown by the corrupted version offering no protection against Discord's brainwashing.
    • Depending on the type of magic, the other Elements of both sets may act as Anti-Magic to certain spells. Dark World!Derpy's Element of Loyalty allowed her to No Sell Traitor Dash's Pony Puppets power, and Apple Pie's Element of Laughter can disrupt magic by her invoking paradoxes. Dark World!Applejack's Element of Deceit can allow her to trick her mind into bypassing certain types of magic as well while the Element of Honesty, when its Personality Powers kick in, generally allows the user to No Sell illusion magic.
  • Nav eventually finds an artifact of Discord's that does this in Diaries of a Madman, which proves to be exceptionally useful. It is double-edged though, since it prevents him from flying, and it also blocks beneficial spells.
  • In the Bleach fanfic Chasing the Moon and its prequel Phases of the Moon this is Kurosaki Karin's hidden zanpakuto ability, and was instrumental to winning fourth seat of her Division from Yumichika. Used passively, she can cut through magic. Used actively, any magical attack used against her pretty much No Sells.

    Gamebooks 

    Literature 
  • In The Quest of the Unaligned, Tonzimmiel's energy shield, which strips anyone crossing it of magical power, is a large part of why nobody in the city believes in magic.
  • In Orlando Furioso, this is what the Ring of Angelica does when worn on a finger (it doubles as a Ring of Gyges if you put it on your tongue).
  • In Sword of Truth, the Radahan collars also take away the magic of anyone wearing them. Oddly enough, at least in the television version, they aren't immune to magic themselves. In the books the collars could be taken off by magic, but only the Sisters of Light could do it, except for Zed, who was so incredibly badass that he not only was able to take one off despite not being a Sister, he took it off of himself while it was suppressing his magic.
  • The Wheel of Time: Mat gets an amulet that destroys any weaves of the One Power that directly touch him (whether this applies to True Power weaves is unknown); he ends up having a miserable time when one Aes Sedai sets out to see just what the loopholes are (indirect effects like lightning, sparks, and objects thrown by the One Power). Gholam are Nigh Invulnerable creatures who do the same; Mat's amulet burns them on contact, implying that perhaps they are composed of weaves. Steddings (and the city of Far Madding) are not examples of this, however — they are places that block access to the Source but do nothing against the One Power itself, if the channeler happens to have a battery-like ter'angreal on them in which they have stored weaves of the Power.
  • Gold and Black Phoenix Stone in Dragaera do this with sorcery and psionics respectively. Vlad has several items that make use of this, notably a pair of amulets that stops anyone from finding him with magic of any kind (though they also prevent him from using magic of any kind) and Spellbreaker, a very odd gold chain that appears to have a bit of a mind of its own and does exactly what you'd expect given the name. Later, Spellbreaker gets incorporated into the Great Weapon God Slayer (or, as Vlad calls her, Lady Teldra), which can do this to an even more impressive degree.
  • The Darksword from The Darksword Trilogy. When exposed to magic, it nullifies all magic in the surrounding area. Because the setting is a place where magic is regarded as Life itself, this is considered to be particularly horrifying.
  • Similarly, Marcus' and Viridovix' swords in Harry Turtledove's Videssos cycle are of magical Druidic origin, and one of their two effects is to repel and negate any magic aimed at whoever wields them. Because they were magical even in our own unmagical world, they become so powerful in the magical-fantasy world of Videssos that even the greatest sorcerer in Videssian history is unable to overcome them.
  • Second Apocalypse:
    • The chorae are small beads that protect their wearer from magic and turn sorcerers to salt on contact. This makes them extremely valuable in a setting where sorcerers would be otherwise practically unstoppable. Very good archers are entrusted with chorae-tipped arrows. Some sorcerers are smart enough to use indirect attacks such as dropping buildings on chorae-wielders.
    • In the same series, the city of Atrithau is built on "anarcane ground" where magic does not function.
  • In the novel Grunts!, a group of orcs, who have gotten their hands on modern weapons in what was previously a completely generic fantasy setting, find themselves having trouble when their new guns keep getting hit with "fail weapons" spells. To solve this problem, they steal some experimental "Nullity Talismans", which prevent all magic from working within their effective radius.
  • In Gordon R. Dickson's The Dragon Knight series, magic doesn't work on consecrated ground. Magic immunity is very common in this setting, based on an underlying rule which effectively says that if a magical effect could on a sufficiently large scale disrupt the way various orders of beings relate to each other, it can't be used on any scale. For example, no human magician should be able to paralyze any animal, while other humans are fair targets. This is just as debatable and political as it sounds, there are lots of ways to weasel it (for example, humans don't necessary use human magic), and Rule of Drama seems to be the underlying reality.
  • In Larry Niven's The Magic Goes Away series, the Warlock's Wheel is a simple enchanted artifact created by the Warlock; a simple brass disc with a spell to always make it spin faster, and a second spell to keep it from tearing itself apart. Nearly any mage can build one if they know how. When you turn it on it will spin until it's sucked all the mana from the area, killing enchantments, magic creatures, and anything else dependent on mana. When the magic runs out, the disc explodes from an overload of kinetic energy, and the area remains magically-dead for the rest of eternity. No wonder Warlock kept it a secret for years.
  • In Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen, a substance called otataral, found only in one place in the Malazan empire, has the effect of not only negating magic cast into its radius, but actually draining the power out of any mages standing within its area of effect. The mages do recover their powers after a period of time outside its influence. The Adjunct of the Empress is issued with an otataral sword as a symbol of her office. It's implied that Karsa Orlong's resistance to magic is due to the "blood oil" his people anoint themselves with before a battle. Otataral is what gives the stuff its red color.
  • The Dresden Files:
    • Running water grounds magical energy; with faster the water, a given spell needs more energy to overcome it. This has both served Harry well (he destroyed a magical darkness by activating a sprinkler system) and bit him in the ass (such as when a villain had him strung up under running water so that he was completely helpless).
    • The silver swords carried by the Wardens also qualify, as their entire purpose is to undo magical enchantments and thus penetrate the magical defenses of warlocks. Has an added bonus in that enchantments store energy, so when a Warden's sword cuts through an enchantment, it will set the item ablaze; thus, the more powerful your defensive gear, the bigger the backlash of magical energy.
    • The Swords of the Cross have this as one their abilities — they can shut down hostile magic and effectively level the playing field between a Knight and their opponent. This effect is so potent that it is able to shut down the raw psychic willpower of the Red King and his entire court.
    • Madrigal Raith had a pair of anti-magic gauntlets for his duel with Harry and Ramirez. Ramirez helps kill him by destroying the ground underneath him and then destroys his gauntlets with his Warden sword unleashing the results stated above.They are not pretty
    • The rising sun in theory dissolves most spells or magical beings. In keeping with the author's preferences, all of the above are generalities: just as there's no such thing in this setting as a perfect defense against the nonmagical, there's no form of antimagic that stops everything.
  • Discworld:
    • In the book The Last Hero, Cohen and his Silver Horde are trying to bring a huge keg of gunpowder to the gods, to return fire to them. This would dispel all magic on the entire, completely magic-dependent Discworld for 2 years, causing The End of the World as We Know It.
    • Also, in the Discworld novel The Light Fantastic, the sinister red star that keeps growing in size seems to be stripping all magic from the world. On a smaller scale, this causes wizards to be unable to cast spells. On a larger scale, since the Discworld is highly magical, and relies completely on it, this threatens the existence of the entire Disc.
    • Sapient Pearwood, an extremely rare material taken from a tree that grows in highly magical areas, is nearly indestructible and completely immune to spells. The fact that The Luggage is made from Sapient Pearwood makes it all the more terrifying.
  • In Tim Powers' The Anubis Gates, magicians renounce the earth, quite literally. They cannot bear touching the ground and dirt negates their magic altogether. The Antaeus Brotherhood, founded to fight magical treason, protect themselves from magical attack by linking themselves to the ground with the magical equivalent of an earth wire.
  • In The Steerswoman and its sequels, steerswomen and sailors are said to have some immunity to wizards' protective spells; the protagonist eventually figures out that it comes from the shoes they wear. They're rubber-soled, insulating their wearers from electric shock.
  • Spellbound, the second book of The Grimnoir Chronicles, introduces the Dymaxion Nullifier, an as-yet-undescribed object that shuts down any use of superpowers in its vicinity.
  • In The Alloy of Law, aluminum is allomantically inert and can't be Pushed or Pulled allomantically as other metal can, also wearing an aluminum foil hat (or just one lined with aluminum) protects one against allomantic Emotion Control.
  • Mercedes Lackey's Heralds of Valdemar universe has Need, a magical sword that complements its bearer's skills; fighters who wield it are immune to magical attacks.
  • In Stories Of Nypre there is dragon metal, a type of metal completely immune to magic. Soldiers of Lumin wear armor forged from the material. The books do note that only creation magic(magic drawn directly from the elemental layers) is negated.

    Live-Action TV 
  • In Charmed, there are special anti-witch talismans that can make a witch powerless if they are in the same area.
  • Once Upon a Time:
    • Rumplestilskin is imprisoned in a cell that prevents him from using his powers. However, it's later revealed that he could have escaped at any time he wanted.
    • Later on, we meet an organization of Witch Hunters who "scientifically" nullify magic by injecting people with metals and nanomachines. Although it's later revealed that Peter Pan was stringing them along, and their tools weren't really the Weird Science they thought they were. So it was actually magical Anti-Magic at work.

    Myths & Religion 
  • In The Odyssey, Hermes gives Odysseus moly, an herb that can protect him from Circe's magic.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Dungeons & Dragons:
    • The Rod of Cancellation, which among other things is one of the only magic capable of destroying the dreaded Sphere of Annihilation.
    • The expensive item, anti-magic shackles, for restraining magic-users.
    • Dead magic zones exist in the Forgotten Realms, particularly right after the Time of Troubles.
    • In the Mystara setting, the halflings' homeland of Five Shires allows the residents to try to "deny" hostile magic simply by shouting "No!" Doing it is risky and exhausting, though.
  • In Fate of the Norns: Ragnarok, two identical runes of power used too close to each other have their effects nullified.
  • All of reality has this problem in Mage: The Awakening. When the Exarchs took up room upstairs, their ascension cut off humanity from the Supernal Realms, and the Abyss quickly moved in. As a result, any non-subtle spell risks Paradox, which can make magic go... wrong. And when an area is heavily tainted by the Abyss, the last thing you want to do is try throwing fireballs.
  • Shadowrun:
    • A strain of magic-draining bacteria is cultivated by certain Megas and anti-magic hate groups and used to "magic-proof" chosen locations, as well as kill spirits.
    • In addition, space has no mana. Trying to cast spells in space is futile; Astral Projection is a bad, bad idea.
  • Warhammer 40,000:
    • A universal special rule called "Deny The Witch!" grants everyone a limited form of Anti Magic. Psychic powers come from the Warp, and the Warp is fueled by emotions/belief and then channeled by one's willpower; as such, it can also be blocked by willpower. Granted psykers are two to three times better at this than non-psykers, but it's better than nothing.
    • The Inquisition also has various anti-psyker weapons designed to suppress psychic powers, including the Null Rod (which generates a short-range anti-psychic field) and Psych-Out grenades (which are loaded with powder that disrupts Warp-based powers).
    • There is also a specially treated steel called Phase Iron, which is used to make lining for psi-shielded equipment, such as holding cells and Daemon cages.
    • Warriors of Khorne wear Collars of Khorne which protects from psychic powers. Similar to Deny The Witch! above, this is because Khorne himself despises psykers.

    Video Games 
  • Asherons Call has low-grade Chorizite which can be made into weapons that ignore magically modified armor and protection values.
  • NetHack and related Roguelikes:
    • The Wand of Cancellation. As the name implies, it cancels magic. The actual range of effects is quite broad and listing them all would be a spoiler. Suffice to say that, as always, The Dev Team Thinks of Everything.
    • Then there's items which grant magic resistance when worn, cloaks of magic resistance and grey dragon scale mail, plus the wizard quest artifact which grants it just be it being held in the player's inventory. This protects against force bolts, magic missiles, polymorphing, teleport other, and death rays. The fact that the wizard quest nemesis picks up the wizard quest artifact on his first turn after waking up, thus gaining magic resistance, makes him a hard kill for wizards who depend on force bolts and magic missiles.
  • In Archon: The Light and the Dark, units that are stationed on Power Points are immune to Wizard or Sorceress magic.
  • Final Fantasy:
    • In Final Fantasy VI, the petrified remains of the Warring Triad create an anti-magic field that nullifies all spells cast within it.
    • Final Fantasy VIII has the heroes locked up in a prison with their weapons taken away, and their magic abilities nullified by a nearby Anti-Magic Field.
    • In Final Fantasy IX, Oeilvert is protected by an anti-magic field, meaning that you should probably send your physical fighters there. The problem is that the magic-users left behind will have to get through a dungeon on their own too...
    • Final Fantasy X has one boss with an object called a Negator that disables all magic and summoning. You have two choices: destroy the Negator, to temporarily allow magic, but risk the boss using its magical attack; or the Brute Force and Healing Items method.
    • Final Fantasy XII has nethicite, both manufacted (man-made) and deifacted (naturally occurring), which both absorb the magical substance called mist which is used to power magicks.
  • In Vagrant Story, the power of Lea Monde gives Jan Rosencrantz this ability. Unfortunately it only works against direct magic and not, say, a magically-animated 20-foot stone statue.
  • Null Crystals from zOMG! are said to negate g'hi Energy. Any Animated that gets too close to one instantly reverts to an inanimate state, and any Gaian (player) that touches one of the crystals is transported to a special "Null Chamber" that negates the soulbinding effects of their rings, allowing them to be safely removed. Though for whatever reason, no one has considered actually using these crystals to ''instantly kill'' any Animated they get close too, they use use them for transportation, recovering from death, and Item Crafting.
  • Ultima:
    • Lord British's Crown in Ultima V dispels any hostile magic used against you while letting you cast your own. It's ridiculously useful (except in the final dungeon, where it doesn't work).
    • Likewise, the Storm Cloak and ditto spell from Ultima VI, and blackrock in Ultima VII.
  • The Empire of Overlord II protects it's capital city with an anti-magic shield. Most of the latter half of the game is spent implementing a plan to bring it down.
  • Subverted in Moraff's World. There is an Anti-Magic ring, but since no enemy in the game uses spells, as the in-game guide says, it does nothing.
  • Baldur's Gate:
    • Carsomyr in Baldur's Gate 2 is a +5 (and can be upgraded to +6 in the expansion) greatsword that grants its wielder 50% magic resistance, allows its wielder to cast Dispel Magic three times a day, and dispels magic on opponents with each hit. There's also the Cloak of Reflection which confers complete immunity to all direct damage spells, and pre-nerfing bounced the damage back to the caster too.
    • At the end of Shadows of Amn, Jon Irenicus is trapped in a region of the Abyss that renders his magic useless, leaving him completely defenseless as hungry chittering demons surround him...
    • Mages are actually the most resistant to magic in this game. What makes mages so powerful is not their damage, as physical attackers are much better at that, but their ability to gain protection from all magic, including magical weapons, so pretty much EVERYTHING. The only way to nullify or repel the protections is with another mage or through the powerful Dispel Magic of the Inquisitor and is the sole reason why the Inquisitor kit was so powerful.
  • EarthBound:
    • The Shield Killer, which destroys physical and PSI shields, and the Neutralizer, which completely nullifies PSI buffs and debuffs, including shields. Also included is the Counter-PSI Unit, which prevents the target from using PSI altogether.
    • And in the sequel, Mother 3, you can get the Shield Snatcher, which acts like the Shield Killer from EarthBound.
  • Slave Bracers in Morrowind. They drain Magicka from anyone who wears them. Fine if you rely upon weapons, not so much if you need magic to survive. Of course, you can still casts spells just fine — if you have other items that grant enough bonuses to Magicka regeneration to balance out the effect. The intended wearers of the bracers being slaves, who generally wouldn't be allowed to have such items if they aren't trusted enough for the bracers to not have to be used, this is not much of a design flaw.
  • The Staff of Magnus in The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim drains Magicka from its target at an astonishing rate and drains health when the target runs out of Magicka. It's also the only artifact powerful enough to temporarily suppress the Eye of Magnus' power.
  • The Wizardry games have anti-magic fields in certain rooms of the dungeon that prevent all magic from being cast.
  • The low-tier item in League of Legends that provides magic resistance (the stat that calculates damage from magic abilities) is called Null-Magic Mantle, evoking the idea of this trope.
  • In Divine Divinity, magic is unusable in the prison where Zandalor and the third Marked One is kept. There's also a death knight and substantial number of orcs between you and them. If you're playing a wizard, you're out of luck. (Although you can sneak by them using invisibility potions.)

    Web Comics 
  • When fighting wizards, Axe Cop would coat his axe with anti magic.
  • Dominic Deegan has the character of Urban Eddie, whose trump card is a necklace that nullifies any magic directed towards him. He even shows another practical use for it by strangling a spellcaster with it, rendering them helpless.
  • Inanire grenades from Errant Story dispel all magic in a small area and render casters caught in the blast unable to use magic for about a minute. They were created at the tail end of the Errant War, a genocidal war between elves and half-elves that led to the fall of the old elven empire and the virtual annihilation of the half-elves as a people, but due to their indiscriminate nature and late introduction never saw much use. Following the war's end they were tucked away in a vault in the last elven city left standing and mostly forgotten about until the arrival of an insane half-elf mage named Ian who was bent on exterminating the elves, at which point they were used to defend the city.
  • Crowbar, a member of The Felt from Homestuck wields a crowbar that negates and reverses any time-manipulation ability or effect. Since nearly every member of The Felt has some kind of time-related ability, this can be quite useful.
  • The "reality zone" in Sinfest is of unknown origin, but nothing supernatural can exist in it. This is bad news for characters like Squigley and L'il E (who fall out of the sky if they fly into it, and in Squigley's case revert to animal form), and worse news for full-blooded devils (who're affected as if by fire).
  • In The Phoenix Requiem spirits and shades cannot enter Hyde Asylum , which makes Jonas feel safe there, however horrible that place is.

    Web Original 
  • The substance Thunderstone in the play-by-post game Adylheim negates any magic that touches it, but it's very rare. More commonly, iron (but not steel!) destroys elves' illusions or Faerie magic when it touches them, bends or wards away certain sorts of magic, and (though this last one is more of a Power Nullifier) if embedded in the body of a High Mage, prevents them from using their magic at all.
  • Norium in Deucalion Chronicles works to negate any magic it comes in contact with, though magic users can attune themselves to a given piece to bypass the effect.
  • The Spoony Experiment features Dr. Insano's Anti-Magic Field Generator Kit (which has crossed over to Atop the Fourth Wall) and Spoony's new Anti-Magic Gun.

    Western Animation 
  • Justice League:
    • Hawkgirl's energy mace (and Thanagarian Nth Metal in general, as we find out in Unlimited) negates magic. She can use it to break through magic force fields, blast through spells, beat Dr. Fate into submission, and even kill an evil god.
    • Lex Luthor later buys an object that similarly reflects away all magic, at an apparently ludicrous price.
  • In Wakfu season 2 episode 8, the Justice Knight's prison feature a device that inhibit the magic of the prisoners. Looking like a sphere with three mechanical eyes, it isn't too hard to neutralize: a piece of cloth covering it will do the trick.
  • Disney's Aladdin: The Series faced one obvious problem: How do you keep Genie from solving every problem with just a magical (and literal) Hand Wave? The explanation was usually either that a) Genie got distracted easily (which makes sense, considering his personality) or b) that the villain of the week conveniently happened to have access to a powerful anti-magic device or spell. Of course, being significantly weaker after he was released from the lamp also cut back on his potential to solve problems.
  • In The Saga of Noggin the Nog, Olaf the Lofty has an artifact that grants him immunity to the effects of magic.
  • In Sabrina: The Animated Series Tim, a Muggle Born of Mages Witch Hunter uses something called a "Spell Scrambler" which scrambles a witch's spells making them useless.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic: Season 4 episode "Equestria Games" shows that, for the duration of said games, unicorn spectators have to go through gates (looking like metal-detector walkthroughs) that neutralize the magic of their horns. This is in order to avoid any cheating.

    Real Life 
  • Evil Eye charms, consisting of round beads with blue eyes painted onto them said to ward off the effects of the evil eye, have been popular in Armenia, Turkey, and countries in the Middle East since ancient times. The "evil eye" is said to be a sort of Death Glare stemmed from jealousy or just malice that could bring harm to whoever it is given to. Some people tend to see the charms more like a lightning rod. That is, they don't necessarily ward off the "evil eye" but absorb it. There are stories of the charms shattering for no reason, which is attributed to the charm absorbing a particularly potent ill will.

Spells

    Anime & Manga 
  • Mahou Sensei Negima! again: a limited version of Magic Cancel is the "Dispulso" spell. The author notes this a "paradoxical" spell, being a magic that disperses magic.
  • Zero no Tsukaima:
    • Louise's first controlled void spell. Earlier on, she also accidentally damages the defense wards on a storeroom for magical artifacts.
    • In the third season, Louise's void spell is the only reason the heroes are able to defeat the square golem.
  • The Spell "Flow Break" from Slayers causes all long-term spells (for example, "animate golem" or whatever it's called) to stop working and the Golem or Animated Armor will collapse. If used on a mage, it causes harm.
  • Wedding Peach has the power to negate devil powers: possession, illusion, mind control etc will be dispelled with her "Lovely Operation Tempete".

    Comic Books 
  • Le Collčge Invisible has Néga-mages, mages who focus on a short-ranged anti-magic spell that they usually maintain permanently around them. The Rival is an apprentice Néga-mage, which has proven useful on occasions. Another secondary character is a master Néga-mage (who inspired The Rival to take the course). He still keeps his anti-magic field up even after the events of the second book broke his mind.

    Card Games 
  • Insert Magic: The Gathering spell here.
    • The granddaddy of all countermagic is the iconic Counterspell, the card upon which so many others are based. The thing proved to be too overpowered; thus, it is no longer printed. We have a selection of weaker, fairer replacements like Cancel and Counterbore. However, development teams have occasionally misjudged a card, giving us more powerful variants like Mana Drain and Pact of Negation.
    • Because of the tendency for counterspells to be countered (and those spells to be countered, and those...) a favorite is Last Word. That can, amusingly, be countered by Time Stop. Which can itself be countered....
    • Anti-magic for enchantments and artifacts come in a great variety of flavors, mostly white and green: there're Disenchant, Tranquility, and their many descendants.
  • Several Yu-Gi-Oh! Monster Cards, such as "Spell Canceller" and "Horus the Black Flame Dragon LV8", have the ability to negate the activation or effect of any Spell Cards. Several Trap Cards, such as "Imperial Order", also fulfill this role.
    • Trap and Monster Card effects are just as easily negated with similar effects; "Royal Decree" is a Trap that renders other Traps useless, and "Skill Drain" is crucial in bringing down to normal both some troublesome powerhousesnote  and a certain variety of defensive walls.
    • One of the most potent, and readily achieved, means of accomplishing this involve a combination of "Anti-Spell Fragrance" and "[1]". The former prevents players from using Spells without setting them face-down for a turn first (Traps naturally have this restriction)...the latter prevents your opponent from setting anything face-down, rendering Spells and Traps unplayable.
  • The Star Wars Customizable Card Game has Sense and Alter. Sense cancels interrupts; Alter cancels effects and utinni effects (effects which give you something good or take something bad away when reached by the target). They're both canceled by Control, which also cancels immediate effects and mobile effects.

    Literature 
  • The Doppleganger duology by Marie Brennan presents its own void magic. Completely unknown until Mirage and Miryo become Mirei, it is exactly this trope, able to completely negate the spells of other witches.
  • Within Lawrence Watt-Evans's The Legends of Ethshar series, there exists a spell that permanently cancels wizard's magic in a large area. Forever. Since the majority of the world operates by magic, the spell has been cast exactly thrice in the history of the world: once on discovery, once as a Deadly Prank against a wizard in a flying castle, and once to negate a universal solvent that was likely to destroy the entire world if unchecked. (Note, however, that it only applies to wizardry - the other half-dozen or so forms of magic are fundamentally different, though less powerful, and so are unaffected.)
  • Some spells in Harry Potter, such as anti-apparition, seem to work this way. Certainly, it makes catching those slippery Death Eaters much easier for Dumbledore.
  • The Wheel of Time:
    • Similarly to "Spellstrike" of D&D (below), there is balefire. While not specifically anti-magic, it has the effect of retroactively countering a person's effects on the universe, including spells, at sufficient power.
    • It's also possible to use the one power to cut weaves from another channeler effectively dispelling their spell. This is much easier if the opposing channeler is the same gender since channelers cannot see weaves used by the other gender.
  • In the Incarnations of Immortality novel For the Love of Evil, Jolie attempts to use mesmerism to mind control a knight who is about to rape her. Unfortunately, he is wearing an amulet he believes protects him. Since mesmerism relies on the target's belief, this cancels out the spell unless she is able to remove his amulet.
  • The Dresden Files:
    • More than a few badguys — particularly powerful Sidhe, grendelkin, and the Fallen — are adept at countering magic, to the point that Dresden himself is rendered unable to use his magic against them. Fortunately, he's adept at adaptation and dirty fighting. For example, when faced with a cavalry charge of Sidhe nobility, rather than bring his will into direct conflict with 20-odd counterspells, he just trips their horses.
    • The literal Queen of anti-magic must be Old Lady Winter, as seen in Cold Days. She has the Unraveling, which permanently dispels ANY magic, including the curse which makes vampires, turning them into normal humans.
    • A wizard with a thaumaturgic focus and link to another magic-user can also completely lock down another wizard's magic. Very old and skilled wizards can pull it off without any link at all, but they have to be the tip of the mountain in terms of magical skill and power.
  • In The Black Company series, a wizard who knows another wizard's true name can basically Depower them permanently. It also works on The White Rose's inherent Anti-Magic.
  • Septimus Heap: The Darke Vortex is a spell that can temporarily drain people of their Magykal powers. It is used by the Big Bad to trap Marcia Overstrand.
  • The Lost Years of Merlin has Negatus Mysterium, created by a group that wanted to destroy magic and those which use it, but it only works if you believe it does.
  • In Sukhinov's Emerald City decalogy, the ancient wizard Thorn left three books with spells. First two books are choke fill with different spells. The third contains exactly two: how to make yourself immune to magic (all, or only some kind), and how to block somebody else's ability to use magic. Using the latter, the heroine easily defeats the Dis One Final Boss.
  • There are two ways to disrupt magic in Shadow Ops:
    • Nullification via Suppression, which is something anyone with the talent for magic can do, by effectively entangling the flow of someone else's magic with your own. This requires constant focus to do, and particularly powerful magic users (like Scylla) require multiple people Suppressing them to lock them down.
    • The second method is a specific school of magic (restricted to Colonel Bookbinder only thus far), and involves directly harnessing a person's magical ability and temporarily removing it completely and "enchanting" something with that power. This allows one to, for example, extract the magic from a Hydromancer to enchant a machinegun's bullets with intense frost, allowing it to hurt and kill fire-based creatures.

    Live-Action TV 
  • In Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the Anti-Magic spell has to be constantly chanted and prevents only direct damage by magic. Other things done by magic, however, are unaffected. So, while Willow couldn't fry somebody with energy blasts while the spell was being chanted, she could still amplify her own physical strength and kick their asses.
  • It's apparently supposed to be sufficiently advanced technology that works like magic in some respects, but in Kamen Rider Dragon Knight, Thrust's "Confine Vent" card causes any attack used against him to simply disappear. This extends to attacks that are assisted by an opponent's Advent Beast — the beast fades away as well. How this works, and how it is that the beast can always be summoned again just as easily, isn't made clear.
  • There's a spell in Charmed that can depower a witch for as long as the caster lives, though it was never used by the protagonists due to being very dark magic (the main ingredient is a fresh human heart).
  • In Once Upon a Time, Rumplestiltskin gives Regina a shapeshifting spell so that she can mingle with her subjects and learn what they think of her. The disguise prevents her from using magic and cannot be removed by anyone but Rumplestiltskin.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Dungeons & Dragons has several of various potency.
    • The basic dispel magic is practically required for any spellcaster able to learn it. Later break enchantment, dispel evil and greater dispelling perform the same job but affect more powerful spells than the basic dispel magic.
    • At higher levels, there's the antimagic shell spell and its psionic equivalent, null psionics field: these are area-effecting, pre-emptive dispelling zones. Notable for it being possible to render them permanent, making playing a "pure" caster with no non-magical combat or utility abilities something of a gamble even when dungeon-diving. Getting arrested at a high enough level by a protagonist faction pretty much guaranteed antimagic in your cell.
    • At the very highest levels, there's Mordenkainen's disjunction (later renamed mage's disjunction for reasons too complicated to go into here), which is a near-epic version of dispel magic: it can remove multiple spells and undo ordinarily-permanent enchantments such as those inherent in magic armor, rings and such. The spell can even be used in an attempt to annihilate major artifacts (which are ordinarily indestructible) or divinely generated effects, although there are severe risks involved in both cases.
    • Other variants of Anti-Magic can also be found in various sourcebooks. One of the more efficient is certainly "Spellstrike" from the Forgotten Realms. It entirely negates the effect of a spell cast previously — retroactively. Meaning that if some devastating magic had killed several people the previous round, a Spellstrike can bring them back to life by erasing the effects; or if somebody has teleported away, the Spellstrike can bring them back.
    • The fourth edition of Dungeons & Dragons has a Dispel Magic spell, too: however, that edition lacked most of the long-term and/or permanent spells that made Anti-Magic so vital in the third edition.
  • Similarly, the Anti-magic Circle from Rifts.
  • Exalted:
    • The sorcerous Emerald/Sapphire/Adamant Countermagic series, listed in order of increasing strength. They even have necromantic counterparts, called (again, in order of increasing strength) Iron/Onyx/Obsidian Countermagic. Spells targeted by these counters have a tendency to... explode.
    • There are also the Solar Charm Magic-Shattering Strike and the Sidereal Martial Arts Charm Spell-Shattering Palm, both of which do pretty much what you'd think they do.
  • In Robo Rally, the option damping field disables all other options within its range.
  • In Ars Magica, the Parma Magica (and the magic resistance it grants) is the primary reason for the ascendancy of the Order of Hermes.
  • GURPS features a "Drain Mana" spell which can permanently rid an area of ambient mana — neither spells nor magic items will work in that area, and powerstones won't recharge. It's an expensive and risky spell (a critical failure costs the caster 1 level of magical aptitude), but useful in designing jails and fortresses.
  • Earthdawn Wizards have a 5th circle spell called "Counterspell" which allows them to raise the magic defense of a target to ridiculous levels.

    Video Games 
  • In Asherons Call medium grade Chorizite must be used as a spell component in spells that have this effect.
  • Final Fantasy:
    • Celes of Final Fantasy VI has the ability to convert all magic cast into her MP for one turn at a time. Fairly useless, magic is usually your best offense.
    • Certain specific bosses (particularly bosses that use 90% magic attacks but are vulnerable to physical attacks) are rendered entirely impotent by the Runic ability. The problem is finding those bosses at a time when Celes is in the party.
    • In some Final Fantasy games, spells that protect a party member from magic attacks will also block friendly spells, such as Cure. This can be quite annoying.
    • Silence is one of the Final Fantasy series' Standard Status Effects, and prevents magic and other MP-using skills from being used when it's in effect. Several spells and items have the ability to silence an enemy, including the Mute spell from the original Final Fantasy, which is a must-use on Astos to keep him from using his insta-death Rub spell on you or taking you out with his other high-damage spells.
    • Also, there is the spell Dispel, which can cancel out any active magic spells such as Reflect, Haste and so on.
  • Dragon Quest:
    • A particularly annoying tendency for late-game bosses in the games (starting with Dragon Quest III) is to use a "wave of ice" to wipe out all of your party's Status Buffs. These are also usually the type to come at you with powerful weapons or magic, so if they use this attack instead, that means less damage against you... until your next turn. However, this attack can be exploited by having one party member cast a single buff spell every turn, meaning the bosses will only ever attempt to remove them.
    • Stopspell/Fizzle, in the series from the beginning, keeps your opponent from casting spells. It can be a lifesaver when facing spellcasting monsters, particularly those who can put you to sleep, heal themselves, put serious hurt on you or try to block your spells.
  • In The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion there are two spells, Dispel, which removes all non-constant magical affects on the player or enemy, and Mute, which takes away the victim's ability to use magic.
  • In Skies of Arcadia, Aika's Delta Shield prevents all magic from working on the party — even beneficial magic. This is easily circumvented with items, though.
  • World of Warcraft:
    • The game has various dispel (removes a magic effect from target) and counterspell (cancels the spellcast and prevents magic from that school from being cast) abilities, but the most straight-up example of this trope is a Death Knight talent that creates an Anti-Magic zone. The zone doesn't prevent spellcasting, but it greatly reduces magic damage taken by party members inside it. Death Knights also have a self-cast anti-magic shell, which has the same effect as the zone but also stops them from being afflicted with curse-like spell effects, and can actually absorb the power of the spells to throw back at the attacker.
    • Warcraft III also had several times of magic canceling. There were some like resistant skin that merely blocked most enemy spells, but also pure magic immunity meaning no heals or buffs either.
    • Mountain Giants in The Frozen Throne had a research that made them take less damage from spells as well as outright ignore weaker ones. Then there's the Mana Burn spell on Demon Hunters and some demonic units that causes the target's mana to "combust", consuming the target's mana and dealing them damage equal to the amount of mana burned. Spell Breakers have this as a passive ability: they fry mana with every hit and since non-hero mages usually have mana equal or higher than their health... Oh, and said anti-mana attacks deal extra damage to summoned creatures.
  • The Dragon Age series has a plethora of anti-magic abilities:
    • Dwarves get a 10% chance of resisting hostile magic and cannot be mages, "thanks" to the resistance they developed from living around deposits of the magical substance known as lyrium.
    • Mages can learn the Glyph of Neutralization, which dispels all spell effects, drains all mana, and negates all magic, both incoming and outgoing, within the radius of the glyph. The spell Mana Clash drains the mana from any enemy mage in its target radius and deals damage proportional to the mana lost, often killing them immediately.
    • Warriors with the Templar specialization have access to several abilities, besides their passive damage bonus against mages, and draining their mana with each attack: Templars can cleanse an area of all magical effects (unfortunately including friendly magic buffs) and get a Smite Evil-like ability that works just like the aforementioned Mana Clash, while at the same time, stunning and/or knocking back, and inflicting spirit damage, on mage and non-mage enemies alike. Dragon Age II additionally Templars two abilities to "silence" the enemies, halting and/or preventing enemy use of abilities, both magic and mundane. The latter three abilities de facto turn the Templars into Magic Knights, in spite of the Order's Beware the Superman Fantastic Racism.
    • In Dragon Age: Origins – Awakening, rogues can get an ability in the Legion Scout specialization that makes them immune to damage for a time. At higher levels of this ability, all magic effects are negated during this mode, including healing magic.
  • In Golden Sun, there is a spell called Bind which stops magical abilities. However, when used against you this mostly just hinders your healer, as you can still use Djinn and Summons. And most enemies have "Monster Abilities" which can look like magic and function like magic, but are not considered magic.
  • Guild Wars features several such spells: Obsidian Flesh (slows the user down, boosts armour, all targeted spells fail), Spell Breaker (all targeted spells fail), and Shadow Form (all targeted spells fail, all attacks against user miss, and yes, it's exactly as imbalanced as it sounds). There's also Spell Shield, which prevents targeted spells while the user is casting, and Shroud of Silence, which prevents spellcasting in the first place.
  • Magicka's "Nullify" Magick. Casting it will eliminate all status effects from the caster, and most currently-active magicks and spells on the battlefield. Shields? Gone. Summoned minions? Gone. Given that it's mostly for removing debuffs from yourself (of which there are not many) you'd think it's not much use, until... Grimnír's Mirror Image in the Mind Duel sequences? Also gone. It's also very easy to cast rapidly and has a short animation, unlike some of the other Magicks. Not much of a Useless Useful Spell any more, huh?
  • Demons Souls has the miracle Anti-Magic Field, which for a short period of time prevents all magic from being used within a certain radius of the user. Miracles, which are kinda-sorta White Magic, can still be used however.
  • Its spiritual sequel, Dark Souls, has the miracle Vow of Silence, which prevents casting of spells, miracles, and even pyromancy by all players, including the caster. While the Demon's Souls example wasn't used very often due to lag problems and not being able to nullify miracles, Vow of Silence isn't used much because it occupies two slots and has only two uses, coupled with a measly 30-second duration. The fact that it requires a stat-investment that would only make sense on a caster and that it can screw over your own allies doesn't help either.
  • Orc in The Elder Scrolls get this, to a very low degree. Also, taking the sign of the atronach occasionally lets you absorb magic, although it's quite uncommon. Equally, there are lots of spells that let you absorb magic or ignore its effects, and potions can also do this.
  • The Anti-Magic spell in Seiken Densetsu 3 removes all magical effects from its target.
  • Luminous Arc 2 has Silver Magic, which nullifies the far more common Elemental Magic, though is a completely lost art (the one human who can do it is four thousand years old). Notably, Silver Magic has no problem nullifying other Silver Magic, either.
  • In the Star Wars Dark Forces Saga game series, the Force Absorb ability, as the name suggests, absorbs any pure Force ability directed at the player. This comes at the cost of not being able to regenerate Force energy normally, and the AI is smart enough not to use Force abilities on the player as long as it's up.
  • Pokémon has the move Safeguard, which protects the user's party against all status conditions, such as Poison or Burn.
  • Shin Megami Tensei: Strange Journey brings us the boss Maya, who inflicts a One-Hit Kill anyone who uses magic attacks on her. This includes your gun skills, not counting the zero-MP basic Gun attack, and this being a game where your death means Game Over even if you still have demons summoned, stay the hell away from those skills.
  • The Eye of the Beholder series features the D&D Dispel Magic spell. However, beyond some very specific Guide Dang It instances, it's actually more detrimental than anything because you can't direct it at all, and thus any use will also wipe the whole party of their Status Buff spells.
  • Downplayed in Shadowrun Returns. There are no total magic nullifiers, but Adepts can learn Magic Resistance, which offers increasing levels of Cover against magic attacks.

    Web Comics 
  • In Endstone, the power of the Endstone. Also, characters who are not stoners can nullify the over-stones by taking them.
  • The Order of the Stick:
  • TwoKinds has "Dispel", which "Shuts off" Mana flow. No Mana, no magic. Less effective on highly trained enemies, because they can absorb Mana from the ground for just such a contingency. Trace can apparently do it instinctively. May lead to an Oh, Crap if the enemy knows how to cast shadow magic by way of "Dark Mana" which works by using the life-force of the earth as magic once all surface mana is drained off. Insanely powerful and insanity-inducing.

    Western Animation 


Animal-Themed SuperbeingStock SuperpowersAstral Projection
Touch of DeathAntagonist AbilitiesAttack Reflector
Animate DeadMagic and PowersArmor and Magic Don't Mix
The Thrawn TrilogyImageSource/Star WarsX-Wing Series
Field Power EffectCharacters/Witch Hunter Other CharactersPower Copying
Anthropomorphic PersonificationManga/Trinity SevenBalanced Harem

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