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  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • In episode 5's climax, Lady Arkham (aka Vicki Vale) uses this to rationalize how the egocentric Bruce Wayne could be the selfless Batman - he just wants to pick on people weaker than himself, not protect them.
    • The player can also do this, as they can make Batman be an example of Dark Is Not Evil or the embodiment of Good Is Not Nice.
    • Just like with other versions of the Joker it can be argued that Villain!Joker's claims of Batman and himself having intertwined destinies is either a case of Psychological Projection of his obsession onto Batman or its a case of Villain Has a Point.
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  • Anti-Climax Boss: Victor Zsasz, once again, ends up becoming an unsatisfyingly, easy-to-defeat encounter in a Batman story. When Batman confronts Zsasz in the finale, the deranged killer goes down exactly like every generic thug fought in the game.
  • Ass Pull: John Doe being completely well aware of all the events that've transpired in the game so far, including the identity of Bruce Wayne being Batman (possibly), Vicki Vale being Lady Arkham, the Vale and Arkham family history, every Arkham patients psychological profile, and the entire complex plot that the Children of Arkham are planning, all through the use of keeping up with Gotham's news feed; which most Batman fans know is usually biased in all their reporting.
  • Awesome Art: Telltale's signature cel-shaded style is very effective, making the story look more like a comic book.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
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    • The Joker, once he shows up in Arkham Asylum in episode 4. Fans feel a little conflicted over whether he's an intriguing, complex character setting up a future relationship with Batman or just a walking Deus ex Machina who gives Bruce all the missing information he needed to solve the mystery. His appearances in Season 2 further divided the base. Is his Adaptational Nice Guy treatment a refreshing take on the Batman/Joker relationship or a travesty for turning one of the most terrifying comic book villains of all time into an Adaptational Wimp? Though fans turned around at the end of Episode 4 and Episode 5, which saw more involvement from him.
    • Harvey Dent/Two-Face. While Two-Face as a villain is generally well-received, how his descent into villainy and Sanity Slippage is handled is a major point of contention. The main sore point for a lot of players is that he always becomes Two-Face, regardless of your choices. Depending on how you treated him, his reasons for becoming evil can come off as extremely flimsy or are awkwardly Hand Waved as brought on by the Children of Arkham's drugs, resulting in a perfectly decent man and supportive friend suddenly becoming a monstrous Knight Templar out of nowhere. On the other hand, the right combination of choices makes him a well-executed Fallen Hero. Essentially how well-written he is depends on how you play.
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    • Fans are divided on Alfred's actions and arguments following the Season 2 finale. He claims that Batman is doing more harm than good, that he’s creating his own villains, that the mission is too stressful to continue, and that Bruce could better serve Gotham using his other resources. Many think Alfred is being whiny and selfish (it's made clear that his guilt over enabling Thomas Wayne plays a large part in his decision to leave) and emotionally abusive for abandoning his foster son. Others believe Alfred has a right to leave as he is an old man and the stress of working as Bruce's support and having been kidnapped have taken their toll. Furthermore, Alfred's points — that Bruce will end up dead like his father and that Batman just makes things worse — do have arguable merit: Bruce comes seriously close to dying in both the Vigilante and Villain routes, and Two-Face, Joker, Penguin, and Lady Arkham were either created or inspired by Batman (especially Joker) and Bruce's crusade being directly or indirectly responsible for Lucius Fox’s death and Tiffany's subsequent murder of Riddler, Alfred accumulating trauma, and Bruce nearly dying several times. Player choice blurs the line further, with Alfred's points becoming stronger or weaker depending on the consequences of their decisions, and their responses to his assertions.
    • Also as of the Season 2 finale, Tiffany Fox. She was almost universally beloved until then, but the revelation that she killed Riddler caused many fans to turn on her, and there's much debate as to whether forgiving her constitutes Karma Houdini or not. Besides that, fans debate how well-handled the twist was, with some considering it a Shocking Swerve since it's hard to believe she could've found Riddler and planned his murder in such a short amount of time, when even Batman had trouble locating him. Some fans are also angry that this potentially invalidates most of the arc the season established for her, and contributes to Alfred's above mentioned breakdown. Others consider Tiffany talented and smart for tracking down Riddler by following Batman using the drone she gave him earlier. And despite arguments over her actions, statistics show that over 70% players chose to let her join Batman.
  • Broken Base: Whether or not the Joker should be in the game. Some think the character is too integral to the franchise to be excluded and want to see Telltale's interpretation of the Clown Prince of Crime, and some feel that he's overexposed between the heavy focus on him in the Arkham series and the game being released concurrently with his appearance in Suicide Squad. These fans would also prefer to see some of Bruce's other villains emphasized after Arkham Origins teased a story about Batman fighting the mob in his early days, only for the story to be hijacked by Joker.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: When he's searching Falcone's club and holding the Hill/Dent debate audience hostage Penguin is aided by Blockbuster, a seven-foot tall, blue skinned, bald, shirtless thug. No commentary is offered by anyone who sees him.
    • Continues this while in Arkham, where in Episode 4 he just stares off into space and in Episode 5 he spends the entire riot playing with a door.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: Downplayed: at the very end of The Enemy Within episode one, it is shown that Amanda Waller knows Batman is Bruce Wayne. This is treated as the shocking cliffhanger moment, except it is already the case in most comic and adaptation continuities, such as Suicide Squad and the Justice League cartoon series, so it's only a shocking reveal if the player isn't aware of those other continuities.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • While Bruce's reputation takes a major hit if you do, punching Oswald in the face at Wayne Enterprises is amazingly satisfying. And you get the option to hit him again.
    • The boss fight against Penguin or Harvey Dent at the end of Chapter 4 is nothing short but satisfying on either choice.
    • Proving all of Lady Arkham's thoughts about Bruce Wayne being no different than his father dead wrong by unmasking yourself in Episode 5 can be pretty satisfying.
    • Basically everytime you land a hit on Riddler. To see that smug Asshole get beaten down is satisfying.
    • Given how traumatic the Riddler's first two riddles are at the end of "The Enigma", Batman turning the tables is very satisfying.
      Prompt: Shut him up.
    • Showing Waller the evidence against her in the Vigilante path.
    • Telling Waller to get the hell out of Gotham in Episode 5, first calmly, and then followed by an very angry "NOW!". The look of surprise and fear on her face, while brief, is very satisfying nonetheless.
    • The fact that the Joker of all people can molded into a hero that saves the Gotham bridge is pretty amazing given the dozens of times we've seen the Joker go insane and kill people. The fact that you made that happen is pretty satisfying.
  • Cry for the Devil: Surprisingly, given his role in the story, Carmine Falcone may elicit this reaction during his scene with Bruce in the infirmary. The scene is rather quiet and even a little melancholic, with all the revelations about Thomas and Martha (especially if the player decides to have Bruce "play nice" and not threaten him). Falcone acts nicer to Bruce than during their first meeting and seems to remember fondly of Thomas and Martha Wayne. Even claiming that they were close friends, practically family and that he has a closet full of birthday presents he was never able to give Bruce. If Bruce gives him morphine to ease his pain, he says he reminds him of his mother's kindness. At first, you can have Bruce angrily rebuke him, giving the impression that Falcone was going to imply something untoward about her. Falcone is sounds genuinely confused about the rebuke since he was being sincere. All in all, with him lying down injured on the bed and his dialogues implying that he's a Recovered Addict who managed to keep clean during 40 years and him referring to himself as an "old dog", Falcone gives the impression of being an old lion that has finally been brought down. Whether it qualifies as Alas, Poor Villain or not is up to anyone's interpretation though. Regardless, this seems to be the intended audience reaction so that his murder looks more heinous and to make him look much nicer than Thomas Wayne and Mayor Hill.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Lucius Fox's daughter, Tiffany, to the point that an astounding majority of players really want to be honest with her and want her to be Lucius' replacement and Legacy Character. It gets taken even further in the Season 2 finale where it's implied she'll be the game's version of Batgirl.
    • Mr. Freeze gained a lot of popularity for being the most sympathetic villain on the Pact, to the point where 95% of players showed him mercy by decreasing the temperature in his prison cell so he wouldn't succumb to the toxic virus.
  • Epileptic Trees: One of the biggest theories surrounding the game before Episode 5 was that The Joker would somehow be revealed as the real villain. It turns out, however, that Vicki Vale was the true Big Bad after all. The Joker does appear in Episodes 4 and 5 but for once doesn't take over as Big Bad. That was saved for Season 2..
    • Due to the Ambiguous Situation of what happened at the carnival when John killed the Agency members, his more manipulative and untrustworthy behaviour in season one, The Stinger for season one, and certain 'clues' throughout The Enemy Within there's a section of players that speculate that John was much more Joker-like, villainous and scheming from the beginning and the entire events of The Enemy Within were manipulated and orchestrated by him as a form of entertainment.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Catwoman has her usual mysterious Femme Fatale appeal, though she drops the "evil" part quickly if you're nice to her.
    • Penguin is more attractive in this continuity, too.
    • Lady Arkham (a.k.a. Vicki Vale), naturally.
    • Harley Quinn is as sexy as she is crazy.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: 90% of players had Bruce and Selina hook up in episode 3.
  • Fashion-Victim Villain: Both of Joker's outfits in the two endings of Enemy Within have gained some negative reception for their totally bizarre looks. Given the individual in question, it was probably intentional. And both looks do have their fans, though Villain Joker gets more flack for the overall gaudy look compared to Vigilant Joker's slightly more classical, albeit Batman-inspired look.
  • Foe Yay:
    • Batman and Catwoman's Snark-to-Snark Combat carries shades of this. They can become a couple if the player chooses to.
    • A few fans have taken to shipping Penguin and Bruce.note 
    • Bruce Wayne and John Doe share a very disturbing trust in one another. It helps that Joker already has a strange subtext with the Dark Knight in most other media. Not only that, but John Doe really seems to be most sympathetic, sane (relatively) and friendly patient in Arkham up and until we see his way of distracting people. In Enemy Within's second episode, when John reveals that he's in love, Bruce can ask if John is in love with him. John takes a few seconds to sincerely ponder the question before saying that he's not, but hopes that he can Bruce can still be friends. Later, when listing off Bruce's good points he can note that he's "handsome... super handsome!"
      • The same scene can have John shout out "WHY WON'T YOU LOVE ME?!" to Bruce... while he's roleplaying as Harley so John can practice.
      • And a depressing version comes on at the climax of Episode 4, where Vigilante!Joker will sadly remark "Bruce taught me to be good, Harley. Like you never could."
      • In the final episode of the season Bruce can tell Villain!Joker that he broke his heart. "You broke my heart, John. I did need you. I cared about you. But you took what I gave you and twisted it into something ugly and wrong."
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Tiffany's guilt over suggesting a gun to Batman takes a darker meaning when it's revealed in Episode 5 that she's the Riddler's killer.
    • If you have Joker become a villain, one of the targets of his chemical attacks is Mercy Street Station, the very same place the Children of Arkham tried to gas back in Season 1. This means that the Station is the victim of an attack regardless of the villain depending on Batman's choices.
  • He Really Can Act: Anthony Ingruber was finally able to show off his true acting skills as John Doe in Season 2 once his character gained main focus in the plot. His performance as the Joker was also able to earn him some fan appreciation in the finale, where he gets some of the creepiest and most emotional moments with Bruce as well, giving his role some well-deserved justice.
  • Ho Yay:
    • Harvey telling Bruce he needs to distance himself from his campaign sounds kind of like he's breaking up with him, especially the part where he says that he "didn't want to do this over the phone". Also the amount of support that Bruce can show Harvey can verge on devotion, like at the beginning of episode 3 when Bruce visits Harvey in the hospital with a bouquet of flowers (granted, if Selina was saved instead of Harvey, the flowers came from her, but still).
    • At the end of the first episode of season 2, Waller flat-out accuses Batman and Gordon of being too busy "gazing into each other's eyes".
  • Idiot Ball: Amanda Waller grabs this and scores a touchdown with it in Season 2, Episode 4. On the Vigilante!Joker path, John had just disarmed Harley and retrieved both the Dead Man's Switch and the virus. His only compunction against handing it over to Waller is his belief that it's too dangerous for anyone to have.
    • You'd Expect: That, with the situation largely defused, that Waller would calmly negotiate for the return of the virus.
    • What Happens: She pulls a gun on the guy that had just saved everyone's asses and threatens to kill him unless he hands the virus over now - while he's still holding both the virus and the detonator. This prompts him to detonate the bridge, potentially stab her, and declare that he and Batman will upend the Agency for justice.
  • Iron Woobie: Bruce Wayne as always. The entire town hates him as both a person and as Batman, the entire game is devoted to breaking his spirit, he learns that his parents were really mob bosses who got rich from the suffering of others, Alfred is his only Parental Substitute but has been withholding information even from him, his best friend Harvey slowly turns against until he becomes the villainous Two-Face, his old best friend hates him, his company gets taken away from him and given to the Penguin, and a terrorist group is out to ruin his good name, nearly succeeding, and destroying the city he loves. Nevertheless, he selflessly carries on his duties as Batman so the innocent won't have to suffer anymore.
    • His pain continues in Season 2, where one of his best friends gets blown up because of a device he brought in, and he could potentially alienate said friend's daughter as well as Gordon if he makes certain choices, and knowing Telltale, it's only going to get worse from here.
    • And it does. Among other things, you could completely alienate Tiffany to the point that she'll decide to leave Gotham and work for Waller; no matter what you do, John will either turn into the Joker we know, or into an equally dangerous vigilante, so you have to take him down anyway; and at the end of the season Alfred decides to leave, with the only possible choices giving up on him or on being Batman.
  • It's Easy, So It Sucks!: As usual with most Telltale Games, the most complaints are the lack of challenge in the gameplay. However, some gamers go as far as to say that Batman is practically an Invincible Hero who goes down less easily than most Telltale protagonists. Admittedly this is nothing new to the Batman franchise, even comicbook fans tend to refer to him as Bat God because of how unstoppable he is.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: Some reviewers have complained about the game being yet another revisit of Batman's early years and Origin Story.
  • It Was His Sled:
    • Harvey Dent eventually becoming Two-Face, regardless of the player's choices.
    • John Doe becoming the Joker was completely given away by Telltale's trailers showing him decked out in the clown gear laughing mad. Although to be fair, the fact that he had white skin, green hair, was in an insane asylum, and laughed constantly may have been subtle hints as to who he would be.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Penguin, Harvey, Vicki, and Harley all have validly tragic Freudian Excuses for their nonetheless-horrible crimes.
    • John Doe may have No Social Skills and be pretty Ax-Crazy, but after being freed from Arkham Asylum, he has no idea what do do with himself, as when he was in Arkham, he at least knew the rules.
  • Love to Hate: Telltale's take on the Penguin has been praised as one of the positives of the game, even though Cobblepot carries on his tradition of being a Faux Affably Evil bastard.
  • Magnificent Bitch: Lady Arkham, real name of Victoria Arkham AKA "Vicki" Vale, is the charming, strategic leader of the Children of Arkham, a terrorist organization seeking absolution for the crimes committed against them by the higher society of Gotham City. A victim of abuse who lost her parents at a young age thanks to Thomas Wayne's corruption, Arkham spent her childhood plotting revenge and making schemes, and upon adulthood, puts these into action as she rallies the otherwise peaceful Children of Arkham and radicalizes them into a military force. Utilizing an insanity drug to drive mayor Harvey Dent mad—injecting the serum into the other candidate in the process as a precaution—Arkham uses her public guise to masterfully manipulate the situation to seem as though the Children of Arkham are heroes, driving Bruce Wayne himself temporarily insane and getting him thrown into Arkham Asylum. When her master plan to flood the streets with her insanity drug fails, Arkham initiates her backup plan to raid Arkham Asylum and free the dozens of inmates as a final "justice" against the corrupt Asylum's checkered past.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Penguin crosses it when shooting the innocent debate moderator. Even Bruce admits this event cemented that his best friend is gone.
    • Sadly for Batman/Bruce, Thomas Wayne crossed it by deliberately subjecting Esther Cobblepot to a Fate Worse than Death just to get her family's estate.
    • Vicki Vale, of all people, crosses this by forming the Children of Arkham, getting heaven knows how many people killed, and later drugs Bruce to get him out of the way.
      • If she didn't cross it then, then she crossed it when she beats an innocent old man half to death just to hurt Bruce.
    • Harvey crossed it in episode 4 when he blew up the Children of Arkham's weapon hideout, killing several cops and innocent civilians.
    • A random mook in Episode 4 actually manages to pass it when he coldly executes a fellow police officer by shooting him in the head for not having the stones to kill a helpless civilian when ordered to, even if the player was helping said officers have a Heel Realization.
    • The Vales crossed this via their Torture Cellar treatment against Vicki (implicitly along with other orphans). Not for nothing most players find themselves retroactively Rooting for the Empire regarding her payback against them.
    • Riddler already crosses quite a few lines in his introduction — mutilating Mori with intent to execute him, slitting a casino security guard's throat for standing in his way, ordering his men to shoot their hostages to serve as a distraction, cutting off his prison warden's face in old security footage — but the act that solidifies him as a true villain of the Batfamily is indirectly smuggling a signal-broadcasting puzzle box into the Wayne Enterprises building, which leads to the manslaughter of Lucius Fox when the pulse leads a homing missile straight into the side of the building. For no reason other than a sick compulsion to test the Batman's mettle, Riddler manages to hurt over a dozen innocent people, and kill one of Bruce's oldest friends and allies, all in one stroke.
    • Amanda Waller crossed it in season 2's fourth episode when she uses Mr. Freeze as a guinea pig for the virus effects, then plans on taking the illegal technology to use for her own forces while disregarding the rules of the Agency. If that didn't seal her as a monster, well then it gets to the point where she attempts to have John Doe killed after he saved the day (potentially) when he refuses to hand over the last virus sample and she tries to get Bruce arrested for going against her command.
    • Harley and Joker cross it in the Villain Route by detonating deadly gas bombs all across Gotham, killing God knows how many people.
      • If the player alternatively goes the Vigilante Route, John Doe crosses it by brutally murdering three members of the Agency after they step in to try to apprehend him, becoming the Joker.
    • Depending on the player's choice, Tiffany killing the Riddler in cold blood as an act for vengeance may be this.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: Anthony Ingruber does a pretty good Joker laugh, especially at the end of Episode 4. Whether it can rival Mark Hamill's is up to contention, but he gets Laughing Mad down pat.
  • Narm:
    • Depending on how you treated Harvey, the reasons behind his Face–Heel Turn can come of as very silly. Support him at every point and he'll only Face–Heel Turn because Bruce possibly slept with Selena. Essentially, Harvey becomes Two-Face just because Bruce (maybe) broke the "bro code".
    • In Episode 3 if Batman chooses to save Montoya instead of Dent, he is shown literally running into point-blank automatic rifle fire, bullets ricocheting from his forearm. Borrowing Diana's bracers, Bruce?
    • The first sentence Rumi Mori's profile in Season 2 Episode 1 contains a typo that ruins the whole thing.
    There are two sides to Rumi Mori: the face he shows to the public and the person he really are.
    • Villain Joker's look is pretty gaudy even by the character's standards such as the make-up around his eyes and the fact he has one eyebrow. Though it could be Narm Charm for some.
    • On the other hand, Vigilante Joker can be just as silly (if potentially endearing), with his hair swept into two devil horn spikes and black shadow around his eyes. It's not helped by the way he keeps trying to crack heroic poses, though considering his inner conflict is that he really doesn't understand how to be a hero, this may be intentional.
  • Nightmare Retardant: The Penguin's ridiculous penguin gas mask is a little too silly too take seriously.
    • The fact that Villain Joker's fashionable asymmetry also applies to his EYEBROWS of all things may push his look into this territory for some.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Frank, the guy Bruce runs into at the bar in episode two. He's on screen for less than thirty seconds, but good luck finding someone who didn't at least approve of him. Telltale took a hint on his popularity and he eventually made a reappearance in Season 2 as a Mook working under the Vigilante Joker.
  • Player Punch:
    • Harvey Dent turning on his best friend Bruce Wayne, no matter what you do, really comes across as harsh especially to players who've been nothing but loyal to him even in the darkest of times.
    • The finale of season one has Alfred, Bruce's most faithful companion, forced into a torture cellar where Lady Arkham has him punished for all her hatred towards Bruce Wayne. Just the mere thought of Alfred enduring this is painful enough. To make matters worse, he can potentially lose an eye depending on the player's choice in the final confrontation.
      • Season two adds to this: Alfred becomes so distraught that he decides to quit, and the only way to convince him to stay is to give up being Batman.
    • In the first episode of The Enemy Within, Lucius Fox is killed off due to the puzzle box actually being a homing beacon for a missile strike. He calls in to have Bruce apologize to Tiffany on his behalf for not being there for her more often, and wants to be reassured that they did good work, followed swiftly by his death. This is made even worse by the fact that there is nothing the player can do about it, and it's all their fault he even has the box in the first place.
    • The end of the second episode of The Enemy Within has an unusual example. Both Bane and Harley Quinn are about to attack some policemen, and you have to choose who to restrain. The punch is that the result of this choice isn't what you think it is. Whoever you don't choose to restrain is left behind while the rest of you escape. Many players would rather try and stop Bane, but would rather he be left behind instead of Harley.
    • John Doe, who looks up to Bruce as a best friend, completely goes off the deep end and decides to become the Joker even if you tried to help save him from his dark path. Sadly, it only took one really bad day...
    • Bruce and Selina's relationship falling apart in the final episode of season 2. Potentially, Selina could abandon all hope in heroism completely depending on how bad it is thanks to your choices.
    • It's possible to take Tiffany on-board as Batman's new protege, and she seems set to become this universe's version of Batgirl. Then Episode 5 reveals she was the one who killed Riddler. The only way to keep her on Batman's side is to ensure she doesn't face justice for his murder, which compromises Batman's code.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • Two-Face was not well-praised by a few Batman fans for being an infamously bad Anti-Climax Boss back in the Batman: Arkham Series along with coming across as a Big Bad Wannabe and having a lot of wasted potential in favor of more popular Batman villains, but this story makes him more of a well-developed antagonist and one of the coolest boss encounters in the game, even having more of an impact on Bruce Wayne than the Joker did.
    • John Doe was once considered by many to be the worst incarnation of the Joker ever and is still a huge Base-Breaking Character for some, but after his increased involvement in the second season, fans have started to gain a little interest in his sympathetic story. However, a lot of people were finally glad that he became the Joker in the end of Episode 4 as now the player finally gets an interesting villain that feels closer to Bruce thanks to the player shaping his destiny. The idea of his obsession being a twisted form of admiration and the idea of him becoming a vigilante was seen by some fans as a very unique twist on the story. Also, removing his most psychotic tendencies makes him rather Adorkable and makes his fall as Bruce's friend and as a hero all the more tragic.
  • Rooting for the Empire: A lot of players of the Vigilante Route have expressed disappointment that they couldn't just let the Joker kill Waller.
  • The Scrappy: Amanda Waller quickly became this for fans in the vigilante finale of Season 2, where she not only turns on Batman and makes him public enemy number one despite all the good he's done, but she also gets away completely scott-free with causing a large portion of the problems in the story arc since she gives a vague apology and the game may give the impression that she's a Well-Intentioned Extremist who only wanted to bring justice like the dark knight. To make it worse, she can keep all of Batman's defeated rogues to use for her Suicide Squad and there's no word on whether or not she'll send them back to prison or keep them as her gambling chips. Nevertheless, the game looks like it wants us to sympathize with her as a foil to Batman.
    • On top of that, she grabbed firm hold of the Idiot Ball in Episode 4 by threatening John after the situation had been defused because he refused to hand the virus over to her. Not because he wanted to use it, but because he considered it too dangerous for anyone.
  • Shocking Swerve:
    • Due to the game playing extremely fast and loose with series canon, there are a lot of things that'll surprise most comic fans, such as Bruce Wayne's father being involved in the mob. While accusations that Bruce's parents were involved in illicit activities pop up every few years, before these have all been proven false, as a plot of some villain, or a misunderstanding (barring the Flashpoint version of Martha Wayne who was the Joker). This series openly states, "No, there is no misunderstanding. Thomas and Martha were bad people who did illegal things." Given that the two had always been shown as beacons of purity and righteousness before, this was a big gamble on Telltale's part.
    • Who's the leader of the Children of Arkham? Hugo Strange? Scarecrow? Joker (again)? Some other well-known Batman villain that's fond of mindgames? Nope, it's actually Vicki Vale of all people.
    • Lucius Fox is killed by a homing missile early on in Season 2. The Riddler doesn't survive past the end of that same episode either, getting shot with a poison dart by Tiffany.
    • Tiffany Fox being the Riddler's murderer seems to come completely out of left field since there was no clear way she could have located the villain out in the ocean when Batman himself struggled to track down the Riddler's base of operations.
  • So Okay, It's Average: The series recieved fairly mixed reviews from critics for its distinct lack of actual gameplay for most of the game. This could be seen as Telltale cutting corners so that they can release more episodes in a fraction of the time it used to take them. The graphical upgrade on consoles also came at the cost of the game going back and forth between 30 and 60 frames per second, whereas all the other games released up until that point had been 60 frames per second on PS4 and Xbox One.
  • Special Effect Failure:
    • When Bruce is in Crime Alley, trying remember additional details about his parents' murder, the camera suffers several clipping issues. Also, occasionally there's a glitch where Martha's hair is missing, revealing the empty void beneath and the back of her eyes and teeth.
    • During the footage of Thomas Wayne drugging Mrs. Cobblepot, everyone save for Thomas Wayne looks graphically like a background CGI character from an early original PlayStation game.
    • There's a glitch primarily in the PS4 version during the Arkham Asylum breakout in episode 5 where one inmate is completely missing his character model, meaning you get to beat up a floating pair of eyes and tongue.
  • Squick: Harvey Dent's charred face. Unlike most examples of the character, his face is still bleeding and festering.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: Some reviewers have complained about the game changing around some of the character's origins and motivations. One of the biggest changes that fans are split over is changing both Thomas Wayne and Vicki Vale into monstrous villains.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Arnold Wesker aka the Ventriloquist, a complex villain from Batman's rogues gallery whose been underused for a long time in DC media, ends up only having a single cameo in the game and no major part in taking on the Dark Knight. Heck, even Scarface was Adapted Out (although since Wesker is seen with a sock puppet, it's possible this takes place before he created the Scarface dummy, or the dummy could have been removed from him by the hospital (as has happened before)).
    • Another example would have to be the Riddler. Introduced in his debut episode as an Ax-Crazy Gadgeteer Genius of a Manipulative Bastard, he proved to be the next foe that could legitimately go toe-to-toe with Batman after Lady Arkham, Riddler was Killed Off for Real in the same episode he was introduced in after his allies abandoned him. One can only imagine how interesting his conversations with his betrayers would have been had he lived past his debut, but it seems now we'll never know the answer.
      • That being said, the Pact has recovered Riddler's body for reasons unknown at the end of Episode 2.
    • SANCTUS is built up as the Big Bad of Season 2, creating biological weapons for an unknown endgame, being responsible for Riddler's insanity, and having a rather dark and mysterious past with both the Pact and the Agency. Ultimately they turn out to be a bunch of Mooks guarding a McGuffin, and after they're defeated the season abruptly shifts to dealing with John Doe and his journey to becoming Joker.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • In Episode 2, if you visit Hill as Bruce, you can get him to open up by agreeing to pull funding for Harvey's campaign. And you can then promise Harvey you'll keep funding him anyway (which a large majority of players have picked). Hill then dies at the end of the episode, before any kind of real choice between helping Harvey or keeping your bait on the hook is necessary.
    • In Episode 4, Bruce Wayne visits Arkham Asylum as an inmate and encounters a few members of Batman's rogues gallery... for less than 30 minutes. The remainder of the episode has Wayne leave the iconic hospital as soon as possible and continue following the rest of the Children of Arkham story with Arkham barely making an impact for a few players. However, Arkham Asylum does feature more in Episode 5 and serves as the location of the final battle between Batman and the Children of Arkham's leader.
    • John Doe is a total mystery when he turns up in Season 1. How does he know Lady Arkham's identity? How did his skin get that way? How did he come to Arkham? When he became a central character in Season 2, it introduced hope that these questions might be answered. They aren't. They're largely hand-waved by him not having any memories of his early life. The same season confirms that he met Harley at some point and she later decided to make him an agent of the Pact, but gives us no idea what their relationship was like or why she decided to do so.
    • At the end of Season 2 Episode 2, while undercover on a mission with the Pact, you can arrange for either Harley or Bane to be apprehended by the Agency while the rest of you flee. Do the other Pact members attempt a rescue? Do we get to see the Agency interrogate their new prisoner? No. They get back fine at the start of the next episode (set maybe an hour or two later) without a scratch.
    • In Season 2 Episode 5, Tiffany Fox becomes the game's version of Batgirl, but sadly it's treated as footnote instead of a major subplot coinciding with the main plot of the game. Even worse, the character arc gets abruptly stopped before it can even begin and is treated as a Sequel Hook rather than having a proper conclusion.
  • Tough Act to Follow: This game is the first major Batman game to come after the critically acclaimed Batman: Arkham Series, so it'll be a tough hill to climb.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Amanda Waller is a general DC character than a Batman one, so her inclusion in The Enemy Within is quite surprising.
    • A minor one for most comic fans but Tiffany Fox showing up before Luke (aka Batwing) was certainly a surprise. Most she's known for in the comics was being one of Batgirl's protegees in the Future's End storyline.
    • Harley Quinn has established herself as a villain before John Doe becomes the Joker.
    • Harvey Bullock was a surprising choice to include, especially since Gordon is mainly seen with Montoya as his Number Two.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • Amanda Waller in the finale attempts to justify all her immoral actions by arguing how she wanted to bring good for others in the end, but it may fall flat since her immoral actions can be seen as outweighing her noble intentions. Such as trying to shoot John right after he disarmed his crush and prevented a bridge from being blown up just because he wouldn't hand over the virus causing him to become a violent psychopathic vigilante in response. It's not present in the Villain route where she praises Bruce for saving the day, even pulls in multiple favors for him as thanks and promises to keep his identity a secret in a genuine tone. In the Vigilante route however, Batman obtains files that expose her dirty dealings such as having witnesses killed and keeping Sanctus equipment and keeps the pact under her thumb using shock collars which is highly illegal and can potentially get people killed which severely undermines her arguments.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • The unnamed officer at the start of Episode 1 who flat-out disobeys Gordon's explicit order not to fire upon Batman. Right in front of Gordon.
    • The Agency manages to implant a shock collar onto Bane to keep him under their thumb. However, they send the agent who controls Bane out in the same battlefield as the berserk villain to keep an eye on him instead of having the controlling agent away at a safe distance where Bane can't reach him. Unsurprisingly, this leads to Bane breaking free from his control temporarily to rampage.
  • The Woobie: Harvey Dent decides to run for mayor and is targeted by Oswald and the Children of Arkham during a debate. If you opt to save Selina instead of Harvey, he gets his face burnt, which is right after he gets injected with the Children of Arkham's drug. Charred face or not, Harvey begins to buckle under pressure due to various factors, ultimately leading to Harvey walking in on Selina and Bruce after what he believes, accurately or not, to be a one-night stand. He begins to lose himself under a new brutal personality, culminating in him invading Wayne Manor. If you opt to not go back to Wayne Manor in Episode 4, you confront him in Episode 5, where Bruce forces a psychotic break once he takes his coin, turning him into a sobbing wreck.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?: Who thought it would be a good idea for Catwoman, a professional thief, to have fingerless gloves? Telltale got the message, as her appearance in episode 2 and beyond has her wearing full gloves.
    • There's also the fact that the Riddler's design, while a faithful business suit for the most part, also includes a green hood under it. Not over, under.

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