YMMV / Monster Hunter

Lazy days like today make me want to hit the Felvine...
I'll just drop these YMMV Examples in your YMMV Page, nya?

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    #-A 
  • 8.8: Yahtzee's review of Tri sparked an edit war on the ZP Dethroning Moment page and a Hiroshima's worth of backdraft across the internet. Things got worse when he talked about the game in his "Extra Punctuation" column the following week, in which he announced that he had stopped after the Great Jaggi fight. Said fight is occasionally considered by the community to be the unofficial end of the tutorial for Tri, which certainly did not reflect well on him in their eyes.
  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • The description for the Dios Katana says it can "pierce foes and detonate inside them."
    • Tri Ultimate's description of the Gigginox mentions that parts of its body harden when it becomes excited.
    • One of the items you can carry gives you stamina and makes you warm. Its name? "Hot Meat".
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Are the Ace Hunters the professionals they're made out to be, or are they merely frauds who got their positions through cheating the system? Which is very much possible, given that a given quest is counted as completed for all involved hunters no matter how much participation each one had. Adding fuel to the fire is that they are all confirmed to be G-Rank hunters, and yet they failed to defeat a Low-Rank Gore Magala. Though some are willing to make an exception for the time where they assist the player in repelling the Rusted Kushala Daora that was threatening Dundorma.
  • Americans Hate Tingle:
    • The series is a blockbuster hit in Japan, and new games have been known to boost sales of the consoles they're on, but in the United States, the games are Cult Classics at best; detractors cite the lack of visible monster Life Meters, auto-targeting, slightly sub-par graphics, and heavy grinding as turn-offs to the series. The fact that the servers for the Western versions close years before their Japan-region counterparts speaks for itself. Additionally, while the portability of many games is touted as a major strength amongst Japanese players, Western players feel that they would enjoy the games much more if Capcom released more of them on consoles. The early portable games having no online mode does no favors to players outside of Japan due to the series not having household-name status and therefore making it harder for players to find and meet up with fellow players to do multiplayer quests, which means most players not in Japan have to do the multiplayer quests themselves, enemy HP boost and all; on top of that, Western gamers just prefer console gaming over handheld gaming overall, which doesn't help this series' case as it has been handheld-exclusive since the Wii U port of 3 Ultimate. This can leave Westerners surprised that it's Capcom's third best-selling franchise, outselling even Mega Man. This started changing after Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate sold out, selling a solid 290,000 copies in its first month, but it's still far from the Cash Cow Franchise that it is in Japan. World is an attempt to address complaints from Western players in particular, in an effort to popularize the series outside of its native country.
    • The Felynes aren't hated by most people, but they tend to be ignored in favor of all the badass monsters. In Japan, however, the Felynes are the most iconic part of the franchise, getting a series of animated shorts, and even their own spinoff game.
    • Basarios is the third most popular Flying Wyvern in Japan, but is considered to be dull and unmemorable in the West. This can leave Westerners surprised that it's actually more popular in Japan than the likes of Rathalos, Tigrex, and Nargacuga, as well as its adult form, Gravios, who are all considered to be more interesting in comparison.
    • Kirin is highly popular in Japan due to it being the source of one of the most provocative female armors in the series, but tends to be divisive at best in the West due to being painful to fight and for having a design that many Westerners find bland and nonthreatening compared to those of other monsters.
    • Generations not having G rank is an especially sore point for Western hunters, who haven't had a game without G rank in a while (tri in 2010; 4 is Asia-only).
  • Annoying Video Game Helper: Palicoes will attempt to hit you out of various statuses, which is fine on its own, but it becomes a big problem on Malfestio with its Confusion status, where your Palicoes will attempt to hit you out of Confusion even if you've gotten used to your controls being reversed or worse, if you're in the middle of deploying a Hunter Art.
  • Anticlimax Boss:
    • Ceadeus, to most. While its attacks are fairly damaging and difficult to dodge if you're close to it, especially without the Lagiacrus armor, you can't fail against it unless you faint three times or don't cut its beard before it gets to Area 3. Upon hitting the seemingly narrow time limit of 30 minutes, it flees and you get some materials. You are then free to take the quest over and over until you've completely whittled down its health. 3 Ultimate lampshades this by demoting Ceadeus from a 6-star monster to a 5-star monster, putting it on par with more common, albeit powerful monsters. Goldbeard Ceadeus, on the other hand, is a different story.
    • Lao Shan Lung and Yamatsukami, both of whom are even more predictable than the above. Lao doesn't even have a move that targets players on the ground, whilst virtually every one of Yama's attacks is clearly telegraphed and easily avoidable even if you have the reaction time of a dead cow.
    • The Ivory Lagiacrus in Tri Ultimate is hyped up a lot in game, being the monster that eventually forced the Village Chief into retirement from his hunting career and all, and is also the last fight before the credits sequence. In practice, however, it's a slightly stronger Lagiacrus who has roughly the same (or, in some occasions, less) health as most of the fights leading up to it, fights nearly entirely on land (generally considered to be easier than fighting them in water), and whose only real additional threats compared to the normal Lagaicrus are slightly wider hitboxes on its electric attacks and slightly increased damage.
    • Shagaru Magala for some. There's a ton of build-up to the final showdown against the closest thing the series has to a Big Bad, with an epic and bombastic musical score to the fight... and then it goes down in ten minutes even with a mediocre weapon, all while having a moveset you're probably familiar with. This has led to many considering Shagaru Magala to be the weakest Elder Dragon. Generations lampshades this by keeping it at a 6-star threat level while the other Elder Dragons (save Kirin) got buffed to 7-star or 8-star threat levels.
    • Rusted Kushala Daora, the True Final Boss of 4U's postgame. All of Dundorma fears it as they believe that it may possibly destroy the entire town, and it is the monster that cost the Master of Defense his career as a Hunter. Most of the postgame focuses on preparing for the fight against it. This unfortunately results in the fact that when you get to the fight itself, it's less of a fight and more about waiting until you can use the new superweapon you put together to One-Hit Kill it. You can't even fail the Quest; you get unlimited tries. Granted, you can fight it on the ground for a real challenge, but the fight is so easy otherwise, that Apex Seregios you killed a Quest earlier could feel a little bit harder than Rusted Kushala Daora, if not by much.
  • Author's Saving Throw: The number of adjustments from game to game, be it to monster hitboxes or weapon mechanics, over the course of the series could easily fill an entire page on its own, such as correcting the hitboxes of the Plesioth and Diablos in later generations, completely redesigning and repackaging the Jhen Mohran fight as the far more forgiving and varied Dah'ren Mohran fight, or revamping the mounting mechanic from 4 Ultimate to Generations so that additional hits to a monster that's mounted don't carry the chance of knocking the player off.

    B 
  • Base-Breaking Character:
  • Breather Boss: On occasion, you will fight a new monster who gives you trouble, but then after that, fight another monster who feels quite easy.
    • Gravios can feel like this in 4U, after following a few monsters that don't screw around with you. Gravios moves slow, has a rather large hitbox, and predictable attack patterns. For gunners, this makes it very easy to kite, and for Blademasters, it's very easy to trap.
    • Ukanlos, from the same game, is also considered to be quite easy — mostly because Dalamadur (the previous monster) is a Gimmick Boss, and Ukanlos's gimmick is a little more familiar.
    • Brachydios in Generations can be this for Adept Style users, as it has so many ways to gain Insta-Evade status; not only does it have many telegraphed attacks, but its slime patches, due to being counted as attacks, can be used for Insta-Evade, allowing you to beat down on it with your most powerful attacks.
    • For Deviants, Deadeye Yian Garuga is far from easy, but much more tolerable than its normal counterpart. Despite having a tougher shell, some nasty attacks, and Fatal Poison, its attacks are more telegraphed and it is less likely to use the attacks that make normal Yian Garuga a pain. It's also smaller, removing some of the Hitbox Dissonance issues and making it easier to hit its head and tail. As such, "Deadeye X: Hunt" is the most popular quest for grinding Palico levels.
    • Diablos in XX, the target of the Urgent Quest required to reach G Rank, is a more straightforward fight following the gimmicky Damage-Sponge Boss Nakarkos.
  • Breather Level:
    • The Everwood expeditions in 4 and 4 Ultimate have these in the form of the treasure rooms and poogie / wild palico rooms. They never have any enemies in them, and large monsters will skip over them when changing zones. They're just a spot for you to catch your breath, heal, sharpen your weapon, eat food, gather some materials, scout palicoes, et cetera. Finding one of these rooms right after or during a tense large monster battle can be a very welcome relief.
    • Harvest Tours can also be this, giving you a chance to take a break from the constant boss fights that make up the game and just relax and gather materials for a while.
    • The DLC G-rank quest "Fan Club: Desert Training" in 4U pits you against a half-sized Cephadrome. While it hits just as hard as its basic counterpart, it's a lot easier to hit and to avoid its attacks. As a result, it's a popular quest amongst G-rank players for farming Cephadrome drops.
    • In Freedom Unite, the first G Rank quest is against a pair of Hypnocatrice. It's a nice breather after Shen Gaoren and Akantor.
  • Broken Base: Beginning with the release of Tri, the changes made to the series over time have unsurprisingly split the Monster Hunter fanbase to some degree. The argument primarily centers around whether the 1st and 2nd Generation titles were comparatively better than the 3rd generation onwards, in no small part due to the main console series switching from being published by Sony Computer Entertainment to being handled by Nintendo. More specifically:
    • Does the game belong more on handhelds or consoles? Handheld fans argue that the portability is great for social players and those who don't spend a lot of time at home, while console fans argue that it's more comfortable to play on a bigger screen with a more comfortable controller, to say nothing about the pointlessness of local multiplayer if one doesn't live near fellow players. This is perhaps why there's a difference in series' opinion between Japan and the West: Japanese consumer gaming heavily favors handhelds and mobile devices (hence why Freedom Unite was such a Killer App for the PSP), while the Western gaming scene is all about console and PC games (which explains why the Wii U port of 3 Ultimate is better received in the West).
    • Slime / Blastblight status: a fun addition or a Game-Breaker that induces Complacent Gaming Syndrome? Made less of an issue when 4/4U nerfed it, and then reignited in Generations, where most of the best weapons in the game are blast weapons.
    • The Swimming mechanic in Tri and 3 Ultimate: Diversifying combat with full three-dimensional movement, or an exercise in patience involving slow-moving Hunters vs. monsters who can swim around in circles?
    • The scarcity of old monsters in Tri and 3 Ultimate vs. the predominance of old monsters in 4 and 4 Ultimate.
    • How dreadfully flat and dreary the 1st and 2nd gen games looked in terms of art direction vs. how sickeningly bright and colorful the 3rd and 4th gen games look in comparison.
    • Does the emphasis on different elevations in the fourth generation add great variety to the environments and enhance the gameplay, does it make the game too easy by allowing players to just spam aerial attacks and topple monsters with the mounting mechanic, or does it make the game just as cumbersome to play as, if not more than, the underwater combat in Tri and 3 Ultimate?
    • Are the Apex monsters of 4 Ultimate a brilliant challenge or do they show that you can take That One Boss too far?
    • The Dunes area in 4 Ultimate, a remixed version of the Old Desert map from the original Monster Hunter, complete with the original BGM. Either it's a nice way to spice up an old map to include the new elevation mechanics, or the changes are unnecessary, or It's the Same, So It Sucks.
    • The issue of whether Frontier is an awesome game that deserves to be localized for international gamers, or a hilariously broken spinoff that should just stay in East Asia.
    • Is Online a visually awesome and creative game that adds spice to the series, or is the gameplay too bland and cumbersome for it to be considered a worthy Monster Hunter title?
    • Whether Stories is a worthy spinoff to the series great to attract a new generation of hunters with an awesome cel-shaded style... or if Capcom should just focus on making the next main series installment while toning down the even-more-bright-and-colorful-than-3-and-4 art style.
    • Monsters from the main series appearing in Frontier. Some people are fine with the main series and Frontier integrating, while others see a Double Standard; sure, monsters from the main series get to show up in the spinoff, but no spinoff monsters sans Hypnocatrice and Lavasioth get to appear in the main series?
    • The series' Competitive Balance being affected by the overall changes in mechanics (new weapons, special moves, monsters and monster abilities, items, armor skills, etc.) is another major point of contention between the fanbase, with some veterans claiming that the newer mechanics have shifted the emphasis away from methodical combat and more into hack and slash territory in many different waysnote  while defenders of the changes are claiming that many of the additions were not only needed to breathe new life into the series, but were also necessary for addressing quality of life issues that the original titles had in spades.
    • Even the method of playing the game can divide the players. Is it more fun to find ways to speedkill monsters and therefore avoid tedium and frustration, or is it more exciting to drag out and analyze the fight in order to show that ugly wyvern some fancy tricks of your own, like cutting off its tail right in the middle of its sure-kill attack?
    • A contention that arose with Generations and its Hunting Arts + Hunting Styles mechanic is the rise of the "Meta Only" attitude among a portion of the fans. While the mentality has been present in earlier installmentsnote , the fact that certain weapon and armor skill combinations work extremely well with certain Art / Style combinations has given birth to a mentality that if you're not using Meta-approved gear and Hunting Art / Hunting Style setups, you might as well not join a lobby.
    • Generations examples:
      • Is the high emphasis on style and action an exciting way to shake up how players hunt, or is it a disservice to the franchise's tried-and-true formula?
      • For that matter, the announcement coming just four months after 4 Ultimate's Western release: Will there still be time to do everything 4 Ultimate has to offer, or is the announcement too soon and the series falling victim to "Madden Syndrome"? This same argument was once again brought into the spotlight after the announcement of Double Cross.
      • Is Generations' overhauled upgrade mechanicsnote  a great way to cut down on the franchise's infamous grind and make the series more accessible for newcomers, or does it alienate older fans by removing a key component of the series that made it unique?
      • The English names of the four Generations flagships are causing a break in the fanbase, especially Glavenus. Some enjoy the difference in name after the similarities between 4U's English and Japanese monster names (Tetsucabra / Tetsucabura and Kecha Wacha / Kechawacha), while others think Glavenus sounds like a bad portmanteau pun of glaive and a certain rear body part and that Gammoth sounds like a bad pun.
      • Is there enough content in the game? This is an especially sore point for Westerners, as it's been a while since they last received a Monster Hunter game with no G rank (Tri; vanilla 4 was skipped over) and thus have likely gotten used to games having three rank tiers instead of two. Then there are those who point that there's so many different monsters — more than 4 Ultimate, in fact — and equipment pieces that the game can be forgiven for it.
      • Are Hyper Monsters more fun to fight than Apex or Frenzied Monsters? Are they at least a reasonable replacement?
      • Adept Style: A fun and aggressive high-risk high-reward playstyle that makes some monsters bearable, or an easy-mode crutch?
    • Which is the better house pet: Poogies or Moofy?
    • When it was announced that Generations XX would add the option to transmogrify two pieces of equipment together, putting the stats and skills of the first item on the model of the second, the reception was mostly positive, with people liking that there would be more diversity instead of everyone wearing one of a few armor sets in the late game. However, some people dislike that it removes "Fashion Hunting", the art of coming up with original combinations of armor that both look and perform well.
    • World, from the dramatic changes to the usual MH formula to the game being on non-Nintendo platforms instead for the first time in many years. Some fans cry They Changed It, Now It Sucks and feel like Capcom is "dumbing down" the game for Western "casuals", others, including longtime fans, welcome the changes (many of which are what they feel are sorely-needed quality-of-life changes) and that the game will receive a simultaneous worldwide release rather than the infamous staggered releases of past games.

    C-E 
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • The Plesioth, notorious for its Hitbox Dissonance-laced hipcheck, appears in 4 and 4 Ultimate...as part of a fishing minigame. Catching it causes it to die upon landing on the wharf. Revenge has never been sweeter.
    • Lopping off a Rathian's tail robs it of its poison tail and gives you more bonuses as it stumbles around looking like an idiot. As the guildmarm put it:
    Guildmarm: Nothing says "I haaaaate you, Gold Rathian!" like lopping off its tail!
    • In general, killing a monster that has been That One Boss for so long brings a ton of satisfaction to many. And after it's done, you could just carve your parts and leave its corpse alone, but why stop there?
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • One of the series' trademarks used to be the rock-paper-scissors mechanic of picking a weapon with the right elemental type to be good against your enemy, then Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate added the explosive Slime element (Blastblight in 4). Slime / Blastblight does massive damage and isn't actually resisted by anything, so many 3U players just make a good Slime weapon and then never use anything else. Capcom has noticed this and appropriately nerfed the status effect in 4, even going so far as to give a few monsters resistances against it, though it largely remains a useful general-purpose tool for breaking monster parts faster than usual.
    • Following the theme of Blast element being absurd, the Kelbi Stringshot / Great Kelbi Deershot bow in 3U was this. Being able to use Spread 3 / Spread 4 arrows and having 350 Blast made it an effective tool to stunlock a monster. There's a reason it was effectively nerfed in 4U, then had its Blast capabilities stripped from it in Generations.
    • With the exception of 3rd Gen, every generation has its own best Rapid bow leading to this: the Akantor Bow in 2, Exterminator Bow II in Unite, Kama Sedition in 4U, and The Bow Of Hope & Valor in Generations. Generations has it worst as The Bow Of Hope & Valor does not need Load Up to be useful, deals a huge amount of Blast element damage, and has 2 slots.
    • Many endgame Blademaster sets in 4U can be reduced to a few key pieces: Grand Divine Ire (Furious Rajang) chest+waist, Rusted Daora gloves, and Dire Miralis legs. These four pieces — give or take some situational alternatives — are crucial for getting the skills Honed Bladenote  and Challenger+2note , which are both highly sought after for speedkilling monsters. If these aren't available, there are also the MiKu MiKu Minote  and U-Ka U-Ka Unote  sets, both of which were popularized by GaijinHunter.
    • In regards to the Insect Glaive, in 4U the most popular path for the Kinsect is the Effect Extender Bug, which doubles the duration of weapon's self buffs, giving the player two whole minutes of incredible power and speed, which far outstripped other final Kinsects in utility. In Generations the Effect Extender was nerfed to only add 30 seconds instead of a minute, and the other Kinsect paths were made more viable. However, the new go-to Kinsect ended up being the Speed 1 bug, which gives a massive 30% affinity boost upon grabbing a white extract.
    • Hame runs are seen by some as this. A multiplayer speedrunning method used for farming charms and Relic gear in max-level Guild Quests, hame basically consists of four hunters repeatedly stunlocking monsters using Sleep element weapons / shots and traps, then sleep-bombing them until they croak. While this method averts having long, drawn-out battles against Apex monsters if done correctly, it also led to quite a few players accusing 4U's endgame of being nothing but spamming cheese tactics over and over, leading to the derogatory nickname "Rajang Hunter 4 Ultimate"note .
    • In theory, the Character Class System of Generations encourages players to find a playstyle that suits their preferences. In practice, most players run Adept everything, with a few exceptions for Aerial; the invincibility frames and Adept dash are incredibly powerful for what they give up, which is some Art slots and a few moves. XX also throws Brave into the mix, as its Attack! Attack! Attack! gameplay is very appealing for crushing monsters.
    • A common set in the early game of Generations is the "BujaBujaBu set", popularized by Gaijinhunter, which consists of mixed Bullfango and Jaggi armor, provides a very good attack boost, and can be farmed within an hour or two of starting the game.
    • If you go online and see an archer in Generations, they will have one of two things: 1) The Bow of Hope & Valor, a.k.a. the Teostra Bow or 2) The fully upgraded Teostra Bow. Also, expect to see a lot of deviant weapons, especially Hellblade Glavenus weapons, online. Conveniently, both of the above examples possess the Blastblight property.
    • For players fond of creating mixed armor sets, a good portion of mix sets contain one of two different headpieces. If you're a Gunner then you likely have the Barrage Earring, a headpiece that instantly gives you the skill Load Up, which of often paired with the previously mentioned Bow Of Hope And Valor. For everything else, there's the Hayabusa Feather, a headpiece that instantly gives you Critical Eye+2 (which increases Affinity by 20%). This is mitigated slightly by the fact that the former requires you get an A-rank on every Arena quest, and the latter requires you complete every non-Advanced, non-Prowler village quest plus a tough Arena-set village quest.
    • In Generations, it is very common to see rooms labeled "Charm farming", "Sakura", or something similar that consists of doing the "Coal Hearted" quest, as that quest has a Good Bad Bug that allows the quest to be farmed for a large number of charms per run with minimal effort compared to other methods of gaining charms (known as the "Sakura method", hence one of the common room names used for farming this quest). Make a room of this sort yourself and watch fellow hunters pour in to join in on the fun.
    • In XX, expect to see a lot of players using the Atoraru Ka weapons due to these weapons having above-average raw, decent purple Sharpness, three slots, and a sizeable Defense boost.
  • Creator's Pet:
    • Glavenus was accused of being this by fans who were upset because it was featured on Generations's boxart while the other three flagship monsters were left out. This has died down since Capcom revealed that there will be four alternate game covers, one for each monster (and the Prowlers), though reignited when it was revealed that the Glavenus is both the final story quest in Generations and the only one of the four flagships to have a Deviant prior to XX.
    • The Fatalis trio tends to be this to some fans. The dragons are often hyped as being the strongest creatures in existence as well as being the perfect enemy for mankind, and Capcom tends to go on their way to remind everyone how awesome they are (for instance, their ecology has them destroying an entire kingdom on their own) despite the fact many players find that they don't live up to all the hype they receive.
    • While it remains a popular monster overall, Zinogre is considered to be an example of how shilling a Breakout Character can go poorly; the wyvern has received backlash from fans for being shoehorned into many different spinoffs, gaining multiple variants, and being hyped up by Capcom whenever it makes another appearance even though many players are getting tired of its frequent appearances. Some have even called for Zinogre to be retired just so other monsters can have a chance at the spotlight. Others were bothered that until World, the only Fanged Wyverns in the series were Zinogre and its six variants.
  • Creepy Awesome: Khezu and Gigginox are popular with Japanese players because of how creepy they are. In fact, they are the most popular Flying Wyverns in Japan, with the former being #1 and the latter being #2.
  • Cult Classic: A strange example because even though in Japan these games are easily considered a Killer App and very popular, internationally, it is much less popular overall but the fandom of it still very much love the games. This is one of the main reasons that half of the games are not released outside Japan. This same status meant that up until 4, players of the portable games outside of Japan had a hard time with multiplayer-capable quests due to the general lack of fellow local players.
  • Ear Worm:
    • The classic BBQ Spit jingle.
    • The Deviant monster theme, due to being the only music that ever plays when fighting the vast majority of the Deviant monsters.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
  • Evil Is Cool: While none of the monsters in the series are truly evil, fans have taken a liking to the especially menacing and destructive ones like Deviljho and Fatalis because they are so menacing and destructive.

    G 
  • Game-Breaker:
    • Hammers in Tri: attack twice then windup charge, then attack immediately after you go into charge mode, and repeat. You'll attack as quickly as with a Sword & Shield.
    • The Slime element introduced in Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate, which throws the balance of the game out the window, making the other elements obsolete. The Kelbi Bow, with the Awaken skill which unlocks its Slime element, was infamous because of this thanks to its level 1 charge spread shot, allowing it to inflict the Slime element quickly and easily for massive damage. And that's before you apply bonuses from the Bombardier skill. Granted, monsters will gradually increase their resistance against Slime elements (like any other status attacks), farming Brachydios is not easy, and slow weapons prefer high raw damage to status or elemental attributes, but Slime's utility makes it a great all-rounder. Fortunately, when it returned in 4 as Blastblight, it was heavily nerfed, and some monsters gained a huge Acquired Poison Immunity level of resistance to it, particularly Brachydios and Teostra (since they use it as well), though it's still useful for breaking monster parts and in marathon hunting quests. Also of note is that the Kelbi Bow in 4 has also been nerfed in response.
    • The G-rank Chameleos armour set "Grand Mizuha", when used together with the Chameleos Insect Glaive "Caster's Rod", is nothing but this in 4U. On top of the Insect Glaive already being one of the best weapons in the title, Chameleos' version also possesses the Poison attribute, which is very effective against many monsters, including Elder Dragons. Grand Mizuha's perk, on the other hand, is that the armor set has almost every single skill you need in order to use said Insect Glaive effectively: Earplugs, Wind Resistance, Status Attack +2, and Status Crit. And the materials for both the weapon and armor all come from the same monster. It's possible to grind Chameleos for long enough and go hog wild mounting and poisoning monsters with this set, and the kicker is that it makes Kushala Daora substantially easier — which will in turn help you create another batch of strong endgame weapons and armors using Daora parts. The only catch? If you slip up and get hit by a Fire-based attack, you're toast.
    • The Star Knight DLC armor in 4U is one of the best all-purpose armor sets in the game. The blademaster version has the Steady Hand skill, which combines Mind's Eye and Razor Sharp, and has four points towards the Handicraft skill. The gunner version has Load Up and seven points towards the Unscathed skill. In addition, both versions have Rodeo God and Challenger +2 and three pieces of armor with three decoration slots.
    • The Battle Tonfas introduced in Frontier are criticized for ruining the Competitive Balance due to their highly versatile moveset. It has the mobility and versatility of Sword & Shield, the attack speed of Dual Blades and charge gauge-based special attacks like the Charge Axe, but with spontaneous damage output like the Gunlance's Wyvern Fire and the ability to do jump attacks similar to the Insect Glaive, with the added perk of being able to jump kick against the target to remain airborne for extended periods, allowing Tonfa users to perform DMC-style air combos that also serve to help dodge ground-based monster attacks. On top of that, it can also switch between both Impact and Piercing damage at will using the charge gauge and is therefore the quickest impact weapon you can use to knock out monsters with. Japanese fans have claimed that this weapon has managed to put the Lance, Hammer, Dual Blades, and Insect Glaive to shame all at once. Observe carefully.
    • The Insect Glaive and (to a slightly lesser extent) the Charge Blade are mostly this in MH4U. The Glaive is the go-to weapon if you want to mount monsters (in fact, mounting itself can be considered a Game-Breaker if abused correctly), and in addition to its phenomenal air combat abilities, it's also one of the few weapons with a built-in buffing mechanic (the other two being the Charge Blade and the Hunting Horn), but without the dexterity requirements that place the Hunting Horn in Difficult, but Awesome instead of Game-Breaker territory.

      The Charge Blade, meanwhile, is considered one of the most complete weapons of the series, with both Cutting and Knockout damage potential, guarding abilities that rival the Lance, and quick but hard-hitting attacks. Guard Points may be considered Difficult, but Awesome, but overall the Charge Blade is an extremely decent weapon even in the hands of inexperienced players.

      Both of these were duly nerfed come Generations. The Insect Glaive got almost all of its motion values dropped by 15-20%, along with Aerial Style giving other weapons a chance to keep up in the mounting department; and the Charge Blade kept its old moves but got a mechanical overhaul, changing the way its phials worked and greatly reining in the super amped elemental discharge.
    • In the 4th Generation, spamming mounts is definitely seen as this in multiplayer as it trivializes a lot of quests due to keeping the monster down a long time.
    • The "Coal Hearted" charm reward bug in Generations allows you to farm a large number of charms per iteration of the quest and sell them off for five-digit amounts of zenny at a time. Even better, this quest is commonly used in online rooms, dividing up the required charms needed to trigger the bug amongst all players. Never worry about being short on cash again!
    • Deviant gear has caused the rise of a staggeringly popular setup. That is the Dreadking armor with any Hellblade melee weapon. While nothing fancy, this gives you a 200 damage, positive affinity, white sharp, blast element weapon along with a powerful armor that gives immunity to roars/winds, increased affinity on weak points, and attack up large. In G Rank, this is further upgraded to 300 raw and purple sharp with a defense boost at low health. In terms of pure, brutal efficiency, few setups can compare, and more people are using it the more deadly the blast weapons become.
    • The Teostra Bow (Bow of Hope & Valor/Bow of Light & Courage) in Generations makes almost every other bow obsolete. It boasts great raw, high Blastblight status, several useful coatings such as Power and Element lvl 2, has two slots, and is fairly easy to craft compared to other bows, making it very good already. What pushes it over the edge is Load Up, which gives it Rapid LV 5, the best type of bow shot in the game. As such, you'll see most Bow users wielding this bow. Case in point: A quartet of Teo Bow users taking down Ukanlos in less than two minutes. The poor sucker barely gets to move. It was somewhat nerfed in XX: while the Bow of Light & Courage was untouched, the fully upgraded G Rank version has the exact same element rating, charge levels, and coatings with average raw for G Rank.
  • Gateway Series: The Freedom handheld titles are arguably this for the series, with Unite being its Breakthrough Hit. When once the series was an obscure MMO-esque home console game, putting them on the PSP allowed players to easily congregate in public and take full advantage of Socialization Bonuses, thus spreading the hype even further. Unite then pulled out all the stops and crammed in tons of content into a single UMD, including the famed G-rank mode. To this day it's still being played by diehard MonHun fans, especially now that an Updated Re-release has been created for the iOS.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff:
    • In Japan, Qurupeco and Barroth are the least popular Bird Wyverns and Brute Wyverns in the series (though the former has been Rescued from the Scrappy Heap, as shown by the latest Japanese polls), respectively. Down there, Qurupeco received scorn for replacing Yian Kut-Ku and making hunts more tedious through the use of its monster calls, and Barroth is considered to be really bland and ugly in comparison to the other Brute Wyverns. In the West, however, they're much more popular; the former is considered to be quite memorable as its unique battle tactic makes for some hilarious moments at times, and the latter is well-liked for being an effective Wake-Up Call Boss.
    • The Dog Wyverns with the exception of the Maccaos are widely disliked by Japanese fans, with many of them accusing the raptors of being uninspired expies of the Swift Wyverns, but are more well-liked in the West, with many Western players praising them for having more variety in their designs and movesets, claiming that it makes them feel more original and fresh than the Swift Wyverns, who come off as uninspired and boring to them due to how similar their designs and movesets are to each other.
    • The Insect Glaive weapon seems to be exceptionally popular within the French MH4U community, which results in players on the non-Asian versions being subject to the "Je suis monté!" French-default mounting message ad infinitum.
    • The Wii U port of 3 Ultimate is better received in the West than in Japan, as Japanese fans primarily see the series as better suited for handhelds and console gaming is generally more popular overseas. Helping matters for Western fans is that it has online multiplayer unlike the 3DS version, and due to the series' lack of popularity in the West it's just more convenient to hop online to find hunting buddies than to try to meet up with fellow hunters around one's local area. This has left Western hunters disappointed that there's no matching Wii U ports of 4 Ultimate or Generations.
  • Goddamned Bats: Quite a few of them. "STUPID VESPOIDS!" and "STUPID BULLFANGOS!" is practically a catch phrase to some hunters.
    • The first generation had Apceros, huge camera-obscuring armor plated herbivores that would charge you on sight and would relentlessly pursue you until you or they died.
    • Melynxes don't hurt you and their attacks barely make you flinch, but they steal your items. What they steal could be anything from an Insect Husk to a Max Potion. Granted, you can get them back by hitting them or rummaging through their loot pile, but they are very quick to run once they snag something and in the early games, some maps didn't have a loot pile for you to check. They were toned down somewhat in Tri, which added felvine bombs to distract them and made it so only a specific, easy to avoid attack would filch your stuff.
    • Tri adds Goddamned Rhenoplos to the mix. Basically, they're a mashup of a Bullfango and an Apceros — they share the Bullfango's love for charging but knock you even further, and they have health about equivalent to an Apceros. Add in armored craniums that can deflect frontal attacks of even green sharpness and you've got one annoying enemy.
    • Tri also adds Bnahabras, souped up Vespoids. While Vespoids were annoying for sneaking up on you then leaving you vulnerable to attack by a paralyzing sting, Bnahabras add in the ability to shoot a defense-lowering goop at your hunter, making everything else hurt more.
    • In 3 Ultimate, all of the smaller minion bird wyverns. Male Jaggi are tolerable and rarely knock you down. The larger female Jaggia, however, have a full body check that sends you flying as far as a Bullfango / Rhenoplos charge plus a bite attack that knocks you down. Wroggis also have the same body check as the Jaggia and a poison breath attack. Luckily it's not as potent as a fully grown Great Wroggi, but the thing that sucks is Great Wroggi will target you with its strongest attacks when you are poisoned. Baggis are just as annoying with their sleep toxin that'll drop you in about 10-15 seconds. Like Great Wroggi, Great Baggi will hound you as soon as you get drowsy. And they sometimes attack your prey when it's sleeping.
    • Tri also introduces Uroktor, which have the ability to burrow out from right under you and interrupt your attacks. Thankfully, they don't show up in very many areas.
    • 4 and 4 Ultimate add the Konchu, small Crayfish-like crustaceans that can roll into a ball and ram into unsuspecting Hunters. Not only are they as fast as Bullfangos when rolling, but hitting them while they're standing up or curled — whether intentionally or not — will cause your weapon to bounce off, leaving you vulnerable to more lethal threats. They can even latch onto nearby large monsters just to make your weapon bounce and leave you reeling while the large monster smacks you across the room as a result.
  • Goddamned Boss: Now has its own page.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • The Yian Garuga Glitch from Freedom. To activate it, take the "Revenge of the Yian Garuga" quest, go to the Veggie Elder and trade a Spiderweb for a Special Mushroom (if you don't have a Spiderweb, gather a Special Mushroom from the spot near the elder), and wait for the time to run out. The game will think you successfully completed the quest. Even better, the next time you face a Yian Garuga, it will have substantially low health, making it easy to beat.
    • In a rare example of Hitbox Dissonance working for the players instead of against them, it is possible to avoid the beginning portion of Ukanlos' swim attack entirely in Freedom Unite by simply standing in place, as long as you know the correct distance and angle at which you should position yourself. It also works sometimes where if you just graze the weak spot, the game registers it as a full hit.
    • MH4U has the Infinite Earth Crystals glitch. It involves making a (Ruby) Basarios trip and then stunning it while it's tripped. Somehow this creates a glitched invisible mining spot that can be gathered from indefinitely (read: until you reach the carrying capacity cap). This is especially helpful because upgrading Rusted and Worn weapons costs a lot of Earth Crystals. Grinding for them has never been easier.
    • Generations has the Sakura Method of charm farming which allows you to obtain nearly 15 charms per quest. In the Hub 6 quest "Coal Hearted", you need to deliver 10 pieces of coal at the Volcano, then deliver a Paw Pass Ticket. For whatever reason, delivering 12 coals one at a time instead of all at once while being on a multiplayer server tricks the game into thinking you've delivered the max amount the quest will allow, and reward you with a mountain of charms, alongside a number of ores and armor spheres to sell for zenny. Charm farming has never been so easy.

    H-I 
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: tri on the Wii introduces the Switch Axe, a weapon that can switch between two modes. One generation of games later, XX got announced for a port on a console that can switch between two modes, one called the Switch, no less!
  • Hypocritical Fandom:
    • When you hear a Monster Hunter fan complain that a game has too much grind, then you've hit an example of this trope.
    • Conversely, when you hear fans of other games that involve tons of grinding themselves complain about this regarding Monster Hunter, you've hit another example in the form of a Double Standard.
  • I Am Not Shazam: "Black Rathian" is actually just a Fan Nickname for the Unknown Black Flying Wyvern. Despite sharing some aspects of Rathian's model, it's actually a completely separate species from the Rath wyverns. Doesn't stop people from calling it that or even mistaking it for a Rathian subspecies, though.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • When news that Monster Hunter Tri was going to be a Wii-exclusive, the 360 and PS3 fans did not take it well.
    • When fans found out that not only was the Updated Re-release of Tri exclusive to the Nintendo 3DS, but the upcoming sequel as well, fans weren't amused. This died down once 3 Ultimate was announced to be ported to the Wii U.
    • In a less Console Wars-based example, the fact that the 3DS version of Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate has no online multiplayer, being limited to local multiplayer, made some people bitter, especially considering that Monster Hunter 4, which released on the 3DS too, offers online multiplayer. The Wii U version of the game allowed online multiplayer, though.
    • Following the announcement of Monster Hunter World — it by itself causing a Broken Base — during Sony's 2017 E3 press conference, Nintendo did not make any sort of announcement for XX, which has led to worries that XX will never leave Japan.
  • It's Easy, So It Sucks: Generations gets some flak due to the lack of G Rank, the addition of Hunter Arts and Hunter Styles (especially Adept Style), and various adjustments to damage and monster health. Though detractors acknowledge that some quests, especially Hyper and high-level Deviant quests, provide sufficient challenge.
  • It's Hard, So It Sucks: 4 Ultimate gets a fair bit of heat because of the Apex monsters, which some players feel add more frustration than fun to the game.
  • It's the Same, So It Sucks:
    • Dah'ren Mohran in 4 is derided by many for being a carbon copy of Jhen Mohran from Tri with only a few key differences.
    • The Dunes in 4 Ultimate have gotten some criticism for being what is basically the original Monster Hunter's Old Desert — complete with the original BGM — except with some changes to account for the new elevation-based mechanics.
  • It's Short, So It Sucks: One concern about Generations, particularly Western players who started with 3 Ultimate or 4 Ultimate (vanilla 4 is Japan- and Korea-only), is the lack of G-rank, since the two localized games before it included it.
  • It Was His Sled: Thanks to Play the Game, Skip the Story, you can't really talk about the games without someone bringing up the spoilerrific endgame monsters. For example, anyone who's played 4 Ultimate for at least ten hours and talked about it probably has had the existences of the Shagaru Magala and Gogmazios spoiled to them by now.

    L-P 
  • Les Yay: The female owner of the item shop in Tri REALLY likes hunters, even if you choose to play as a female. At one point she will even crack a joke about accepting a lock of your hair for an expensive item.
  • Love It or Hate It: The series as a whole. Highly inaccessible jumbled mess of a Widget Series with a generous dash of Nintendo Hard or well crafted fantasy hunting simulator with loads of challenging content? You decide. It's also the biggest reason why many of the games were never brought out of Japan.
  • Memetic Badass:
  • Memetic Loser:
    • The Jaggis are infamous for harassing larger monsters to no avail.
    • The Great Jaggi, the first large monster that the player faces in the third- and fourth-generation games. The "R.I.P. Great Jaggi ;_;" video shows a G Rank Great Jaggi falling into a Pitfall Trap and then getting destroyed by four Gunlance users and Barrel Bomb L+'s in less than 10 seconds. In 4 and 4 Ultimate, the Great Jaggi serves as cannon fodder for the training quests. The Great Jaggi does not appear in Generationsnote , leading to jokes about having hunted the poor sap to extinction.
    • As of 4 Ultimate, there's Plesioth, which has been reduced to a randomly-occuring Fishing Machine event and can be killed simply by catching it.
    • Rathalos and Rathian tend to get this treatment in some circles due to them getting frequently subjected to The Worf Effect as the series goes on.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • Khezu and Gigginox. The sheer amount of Rule 34 that features one or both of the two monsters is somewhere between impressive and horrifying.
    • Rajang is this to players who have difficulty beating it, especially the level 140 Apex version. These players tend to use the catchphrase "Hot Rajang Dick" to describe their difficulties with the monster.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • GOTCHA BITCH!
    • NIBELSNARFExplanation 
    • G.I. 'Jho.Explanation 
    • Hipcheck!Explanation 
    • Desire SensorExplanation 
    • For Japanese players, "Nice ROMAN!"Explanation 
    • Amongst North American and European fans, 4 Ultimate's release date of February 13, 2015, the day before Valentine's Day, spawned a number of jokes about people (especially those in relationships) having to choose between Monster Hunter or their significant others. Some instead plan on a third option: Playing Monster Hunter with their lovers.
    • The Argosy Captain's and Neko (Means Cat)'s frequent use of Gratuitous Nihongo. "Nihongo" means "Japanese language"!Explanation 
    • ClawgripExplanation 
    • "Je suis monté!"Explanation 
    • "How many honeys you got?"Explanation 
    • Kyu! Kyu! Kyu! Nya~! Explanation 
    • #MHXForTheWestExplanation 
    • JhoJho's Bizarre AdventureExplanation 
    • Khezu's Theme Explanation 
    • "When are we getting Monster Hunter XXX?" Explanation 
  • Memetic Troll:
    • Plesioth. Fight him in the water? Well, it's water. Fight him on land? Hipchecks, hipchecks everywhere!
    • Rathalos, whose idea of combat is flying around for minutes at a time just to run down the quest timer, i.e. the Rathalos World Tour.
    • The -prey series of Bird Wyverns, who love to disrupt your attacks and ruin the egg delivery quests.
    • Congala, who treats nature as their toilet.
    • The High Questrix, who loves telling you that you're going to fail. The Arena Bambina is even worse.
    • So you're just going around on the latest High Rank quest and — god damn it, Deviljho!
    • The RNG, otherwise known as the Desire Sensor. "Oh look, I cut off the monster's tail, let me carve it so I can get the tail I need for this wea—" <monster> Scale obtained. Quest abandoned.
    • The most feared monster isn't the Rathalos, or the Deviljho, or the Gogmazios... it's the all-deflecting Konchu.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • The "bonk!" sound of a weapon bouncing off, especially if it happens in succession.
    • The sound that plays when your character is stunned.
    • The meowing of Melynxes when you're trying to fight another monster.
    • Fittingly enough, the monsters' roars, especially if employed in succession, as they render you immobile for the length of the roar and, in rare cases, damage you. Monster roars can get very old very fast.
    • The Scare Chord that plays when you get knocked out, especially if you keep getting beaten down.
    • Plesioth snoring when it goes to sleep.
    • The Palicos in 4 almost NEVER stop their incessant mewling during quests, especially when there's not a giant monster that they're fighting. Worse, if you're playing solo, you're probably going to want to bring them to watch your back, so you can either put up with a non-stop barrage of high-pitched caterwauling or deal with the bosses in a co-op focused game with absolutely no support. Or, just turn your sound off, but that comes with its own downsides...
    • The puffing sounds made when you're under the effect of Defense Down or Resistance Down. Worse if you don't have a way to cure it (any Defense-raising item for Defense Down, Nulberry for Resistance Down, among other things), as the effect and thus the sounds last for minutes.
    • The Deviant Monster music in Generations. While not considered terrible by any means, it's not regarded as highly as many of the other themes in the series, and is also used for every single Deviant Monster in the game. This means much of endgame involves listening to this track a lot, which will obviously make a player sick of it after a while.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The iconic horn that plays when you and your hunting team depart on a multiplayer quest.
    • The tearing sound when you finally cut off a monster's tail, which is often used for nasty attacks and prized as a source of rare materials, tends to be very satisfying.
    • The meowing sounds the Felynes make. Subverted if you hear it coming from a Melynx instead.
    • The "SO TASTY!" clip that plays when you successfully cook a Well-Done Steak with the BBQ Spit, or cook one from the last Raw Steak on a Double BBQ Spit. And the clip is appropiately dubbed into each of the game's available language versions.
    • The sound of a monster crying in pain as it tries to retreat away from the area, signifying that it's almost dead.
    • The "Quest Complete!" jingle; very satisfying, especially if you've just defeated a very durable or very painful boss.
    • The unique fanfare that plays when you uncover a Rustshard, Battered Weapon, or a high-grade Talisman, or when a Hunters for Hire team comes back with a "Big Success", the latter of which is accompanied by the team of hunters cheering in unison.
    • Inverted with the music stopping when you kill or capture a large monster outside of a quest to slay it or as part of a quest to defeat multiple monstersnote . A Most Wonderful Lack of Sound, if you will.
    • The sound of the Palicoes' support horns, especially if it's coming from a Healing Forte Palico and you need that health recovery right now.
    • The sound that plays when a Wystone is done charging.
    • The distinct deep crashing sound that your weapon makes when you hit a monster's weakest section.
    • The "DING!" of an impact-based weapon hitting the monster's head.
    • The sound of a monster sleeping, which means the perfect opportunity to put down some Barrel Bombs or lay down a Great Sword charged swing or Charge Blade Super AED for massive damage. Whatever your choice, the sound your attack makes will almost always be followed up with the "Quest Complete!" jingle and the monster's death cries.
    • The distinct whooshing sound that signals a successful Insta-Evade.
    • The high-pitched squeal of a dying Vespoid/Hornetaur/Bnahabra, signifying that you managed to kill them without splattering them and can loot their valuable carves.
  • Narm Charm: The Tigerstripe Zamtrios. Inflates a lot more often than basic Zamtrios, but what humor can be derived out of that tends to disappate for many players as they realize to their horror it now has a few new tricks up its sleeve to take advantage of its inflated form, including a very damaging Ground Pound attack.
  • Newbie Boom: The pitch for World as a big AAA title for the Xbox One, PS4, and PC seemed to work for Capcom, as following its reveal trailer at E3, there was a sudden spike in Western interest in the franchise, many of whom had never heard of Monster Hunter prior and were intrigued by the trailer for World.
  • Nightmare Retardant: The Frenzy Virus is hyped up to be something horrible if it infects you...yet the worst it does is stop your natural health regeneration (i.e. the red part of your Life Meter being recovered over time). If anything, it's a case of Cursed with Awesome, as recovering out of it gives you Attack and Affinity boosts.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Najarala's scales attack is actually very similar to an attack used by the Brute Wyvern Gear Rex in Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker's Monster Hunter Crossover missions.
    • Monster Hunter Stories involves playing as a subclass of Hunters called "Riders", who can tame, befriend, and ride monsters into combat. At first, this only seems like an Ascended Meme of some sort given the immense amount of fan art involving riding Kut-Kus and Raths, until you realize that one of the staple weapons since the series' beginning happens to be a Lance called the "Dragon Rider Spear", which is described in its flavor text to be the weapon of choice for mercenaries who specialize in the secret art of Dragon Riding, a potentially dangerous practice which allows them to use wyverns as mounts. The latter issue is even brought up in the Monster Hunter Stories: Ride On anime.
    • Believe it or not, Zinogre wasn't the first main series monster to be included in Frontier after its debut; that distinction belongs to Akantor and Tigrex.
    • Generations wasn't the first game to incorporate Hunting Styles in its arsenal; that distinction goes to Frontier and its 2010 update, which incorporated the Skill Rank system and allowed hunters to specialize in one of three hunting styles for their chosen weapon. Unlike Generations, these hunting styles did not change the weapon's moveset drastically, instead adding one or two new moves and / or altering one or more of the default motions on top of buffing the player's stats to correspond with the style. Frontier Z would later get a more Generations-esque Hunting Style update in the form of "Extreme Style".
  • Paranoia Fuel: Quests with "Unstable" environments, especially on High Rank and above, otherwise known as "pray that the intruder at least is a Velocidrome or Great Maccao and not something like Deviljho or Apex Rajang". And yes, the latter two can and will intrude even on relatively easy High and G Rank quests, which only amps up the soil-your-waist-armor factor.
  • Play the Game, Skip the Story:
    • The Monster Hunter world is filled with robust wildlife with unique traits, various habitats, and lots of locales, many of which aren't even visited. Looking at the quest descriptions can paint a pretty good picture of the type of society the world is, and how the hunters affect them. There are also various sentient races that aren't monsters, like Wyverians, Felynes, Melynxes, and Shakalakas. There are even what are presumably maps of the world at the base camps in some locations. Even the weapons and armors have colorful descriptions, especially in regards to the origins of the weapons or the cultures they come from. But go on any forum and 99.9% of what you'll see is how to fight a monster, what armor to wear, or where to get what material. All ANYBODY cares about is the gameplay. It's even more apparent with Monster Hunter 4, which was announced to have a greater emphasis on story with the player character being part of a travelling caravan that has various colorful characters. This didn't stop western players from importing Japanese copies and not caring a bit about not being able to read one bit of the text.
    • When Fan Translations of Generations and XX were released, only important interface elements were translated; NPC dialogue was completely left out.
  • Player Punch: In 4 Ultimate, a High-Rank quest to capture a Rathian ends in the Seregios chasing her away, resulting in a scripted quest failure. This has angered many players who went through a good deal of prep work for the quest only to have their efforts wasted. Sure, the Caravaneer and the Guild compensate you for your efforts, but all you get is 7000 zenny and some common Rathian parts like the Rathian Scale+; you don't get any rare Rathian drops like the Rathian Plate or Rathian Ruby, and any post-completion rewards you would've gotten from breaking her parts are nullified.
  • Polished Port: The Wii U port of 3 Ultimate gives the graphics a beautiful HD treatment and allows for online multiplayer unlike the 3DS version, on top of even being compatible with the 3DS version for local multiplayer. This view is mostly held in the West where console gaming is more popular, while in Japan this port is seen as So Okay, It's Average at best due to MonHun being primarily seen as a handheld series.

    S 
  • The Scrappy:
  • Scrappy Mechanic: Has enough examples to warrant its own page.
  • Scrappy Weapon: This trope tends to rollercoaster as a weapon that may be a Scrappy Weapon for some monsters may be the optimal weapon for others, and additionally certain weapons fluctuate in preference depending on whether you're hunting solo or with allies:
    • Sword & Shield is widely regarded as a poor choice for solo hunts. Although S&S users have generally high elemental or status ratings on their weapons, amazing mobility compared to other melee classes, a shield for blocking attacks (including those ever-annoying flashes and roars), and can use items without sheathing (making them excellent support in multiplayer), the damage-per-second and reach leave much to be desired. And unlike most other classes, the S&S class doesn't have a hard-hitting special attack or Super Mode. However, Capcom has slowly been granting the S&S much needed improvements starting from 4U, including its own charged heavy slash. Generations furthers this by not only giving it Roundforce, a wide-ranged Hunting Art that has total invulnerability, but also introduces a new consumable item only usable by S&S users that vastly improves the weapon's capabilities, albeit temporarily.
    • The Long Sword weapon class in 4U tends to be highly reviled in group play. In the eyes of fans, while using kenjutsu on monsters and pretending to be Sephiroth can be very cool, accidentally hitting your teammates and interrupting their actions is most assuredly not. This has gotten to the point where the Long Sword is generally considered a "noob weapon", for better or for worse. It doesn't help that the Long Sword doesn't have any worthwhile benefits to make up for it like the other weapons with wide reaches.note 
    • In multiplayer hunts, Pellet Shots for Bowguns are widely despised by Blademaster players, due to their cone of damage being so wide that they have a bad tendency to constantly pelt other players trying to melee the monster. The only times they're acceptable is if one is fighting in an all-Gunner team or the monster is so large that one can use them without fear of hitting others (such as Akantor or Ukanlos), but otherwise, one is strongly advised to use Normal, elemental, and Pierce shots instead.
    • In multiplayer, melee weapons with long sweeping reaches tend to be loathed for the same reasons as Pellet Shots due to the knockback and tripping when accidentally hitting other players, the usual culprits being the Long Sword, Insect Glaive, Switch Axe (in axe form), Charge Blade (in axe form) and Hunting Horn (otherwise a stellar support class due to its Area of Effect buffs and healing). Unless the monster is big enough that everyone can spread out to avoid hitting each other, it is hard to avoid interrupting other players' combos with these weapons.
    • Rusted Kushala Daora weapons in 4 Ultimate — made possible due to the addition of Rusted Kushala Daora drops instead of just basic KD ones — are often ignored because despite their long purple Sharpness segments, they all have terrible negative Affinity.
    • Aside from the Hellblade weapons, most Deviant weapons are ignored because, despite a slight increase in Hunter Art gauge build, many of them are outclassed by their standard forms or are much harder to upgrade for a minimal increase in element, Sharpness, etc.
    • Gunlance in Generations quickly gained this perception. A significant nerf to its motion values was bad enough, but then the Gunlance gained a heat gauge mechanic that often does more harm than good. Combine this with underwhelming Hunter Arts and significant flaws in armor setsnote , and the Gunlance quickly became seen as a low-tier weapon that was usable but not optimal. And then it was nerfed again in XX by slightly weakening the Adept counter's thrust. At least XX introduced Sleep-element Gunlances that had more than 140 raw.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: Some, who have moved on to other giant monster hunting games have felt this way about Monster Hunter, seeing it not innovate as much as its copiers. Ever since 4 Ultimate was released though, many of these detractors rescind their claims and feel that the verticality and other new features on 4 Ultimate has made the game stand out on its own.
  • Slow-Paced Beginning: Most of the early game of each version tends to consist of dull "collect gatherables or monster carves" quests and small monster hunting quests. It takes a few hours to start beating up the big monstrosities that the series is well-known for.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: What with its "climb on a monster and stab it repeatedly" mechanic, eternal sidekick in the main member of a race of sidekicks, and its story centered around a dragon that threatens the world, Monster Hunter 4 is a pretty good remake of Dragon's Dogma.
  • Squick:
    • The most common reaction to Khezu and its cousin Gigginox. Even the Japanese title of Gigginox translates to "creepy".
    • Conga and its variants, who basically attack using various forms of Fartillery and Dung Fu.
  • "Stop Having Fun" Guys:
    • Complaining about the difficulty of monsters in later-gen games, especially 1st- and 2nd-gen monsters that got reintroduced and nerfed in 3rd- 4th-gen games (such as Plesioth), sometimes illicits mockery from veteran players who will tell you that back in their day, the monster you're fighting was much worse. Heaven forbid you have any issue about so and so monster even if it's still legitimately That One Boss.
    • Some players will give you the stink eye if you pick a less effective weapon against a particular monster. Even if it's out of not knowing that it's a bad weapon or why, you'll probably get lambasted for not using guides.
    • Heaven forbid you go hunt with friends who are dedicated to the game, locally or online, and pick quests that are not "key quests" (quests that must be cleared to trigger Urgent Quests), even if they're large monster quests. You're excused if you're trying to farm a particular monster for parts and the quest you pick is easier to farm from than key quests, or if it's an endgame quest, but other than that you'll be seen as wasting everyone's time.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: The Snowy Mountains battle theme in 2 is suspiciously similar to "The Chase" from Steam Boy.
  • Sweet Dreams Fuel:
    • Several maps have small areas that are basically just Felyne bases, with the only monsters being Felynes and non-hostile Melynxes, neither of which you could damage. Often these areas contain a few useful items for you to grab freely, and in 4 and 4 Ultimate, houses a Palico which you can hire.
    • As scary as the Sunken Hollow is to arachnophobes due to the massive cobwebs, seeing Felynes and Melynxes at work in the webbed-up areas helps take some of the edge off. Even a Melynx stealing your last Antidote or Nulberry is absolutely adorable in contrast to the hanging displays of murdered Gypceros in Area 5.
    • Occasionally in 4, you'll find a wild Poogie during Expeditions. Sometimes, picking it up causes it to crawl onto you affectionately before taking off.
    • The Rath-of-Meow Team Attack. Watching your Palicoes hop into a miniature tank to shoot Rathalos-style fireballs at enemies is all kinds of Badass Adorable.
    • The existence of Yukumo Village. It's a mountainous village home to some amazing natural hot springs, with relaxing BGM to boot.
    • Moofahs in Generations. You can pet the adult ones until hearts float over them, and when you finish petting one, you kiss it on the nose. You can also take in a baby Moofah as a pet, and when you save by going to bed, it will sleep next to you! Poogies in other villages do the same if they're under your ownership.

    T 
  • Tainted by the Preview: Upon early reveal, some of the changes in World rubbed a few veterans the wrong way, including the use of an on-screen command guide, damage numbers, a heartbeat monitor that acts similarly to an Enemy Scan function telling you how much life the monster has left, and proper voice acting. However, it was later confirmed that most, if not all of these options can be turned off or otherwise changed, which softened the blow.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: The Plesioth, notorious for its broken-hitbox hip check, has been reduced to part of a net fishing minigame in 4, and it even dies without a fight upon being landed on the wharf.
  • Tear Jerker:
    • Surprisingly, one occurs in the High Rank portion of the Caravan campaign in 4 Ultimate, after you slay a Pink Rathian to boost the Street Cook's kitchen. The Ace Commander reveals why he's particularly uneased by Rathians: He and the Master of Defense were out one day hunting a Rathian when a Kushala Daora stepped in. The Ace Commander tried to take it on, and was saved from critical wounds by the Master of Defense, at the cost of the latter's hunting career, and has been beating himself up about it ever since for indirectly ending his master's hunting days.
    • The Frenzy Virus tends to change monsters' growls and howls. In the case of some monsters the adjusted cries make them sound like they're in perpetual pain (which might not be far from the truth, considering it's confirmed that Frenzied monsters tend not to live long even WITHOUT the hunters tasked with putting them down, with the survivors becoming Apex variants). Case in point, the Zinogre, whose typically noble roar while charging up energy instead comes across as an agonized whine that you'd expect to hear from a kicked puppy. It really makes you feel like you're performing a Mercy Kill. As if that wasn't bad enough, while the Wystones can break them out of the infection, it's only temporary, which feels like they're experiencing a brief period of sanity before eventually succumbing again.
    • Dismissing palicoes in 4 / 4U. Capcom REALLY went out of their way to make you feeling like a jerk for firing your felyne companions. First, the palico jumps with surprise as spotlights center in on them, before adopting a sad, "everyone's against me" look. Then they walk pitifully to their escape vehicle, a wood rocket ship. They then give you a single courteous bow before turning around and instantly bursting into tears. They finally beg one last time for you to let them stay, right before blasting off into space. But lest you think Capcom will at least let you get away on a humorous note, it quickly goes into the rare Double Mood Whiplash as you return to the palico list to the sound of one last, mournful cry far off in the distance. You can avert this by hiring a Palico when at max Palico capacity, which will force you to dismiss a Palico but doesn't play the farewell ceremony.
    • NCHProductions released a short video about a baby Nargacuga and its mother. Their interactions together are heartmeltingly tender, but as time goes on, the mother gets more and more scars from fending off threats to the baby, who grows more and more worried about her. It culminates in the baby begging the mother to stay with it, and she nuzzles him reassuringly before she flies off. When it realizes she isn't coming back, the baby starts crying, and the last shot before the credits is the now empty nest... And to twist the knife even further, the very last scene of the video is a hunter showing off his complete Nargacuga evasion set to his friends.
  • That One Achievement:
    • The "Crown" awards are all notorious Last Lousy Points. If you defeat a monster that's significantly larger or smaller than normal, its size is recorded with a gold crown or a silver crown for a remarkably large specimen. These achievements require you to do this for every large monster whose size isn't constant. They combine Last Lousy Point and Luck-Based Mission to the extreme. While there are some DLC quests that are guaranteed to have gold-crown sized monsters, you're out of luck for the rest. And this includes Kushala Daora, Chameleos, Teostra, and Shagaru Magala. Many Hunters give up before they get either of these awards. 4 Ultimate and Generations at least accept silver crowns for the "large" crown achievement. No luck for 3 Ultimate.
    • Moofah Cheese Fondue, Simmered Goldendrome, and Frozen Meatball in Generations require you to contribute 3,000 village points to Bherna Village, Kokoto Village, and Pokke Village, respectively. Super Sprout Rice (for Yukumo Village) is easy to get thanks to Coal Hearted. The others aren't so lucky. After completing all the requests for the other villages, you'll be at around 1,500 for Bherna and 2,000 for the other two. Most request quests give 15 village points on a repeat, while the more lucrative quests are harder and less time-efficient. Prepare for a lot of grinding.
  • That One Attack: See here.
  • That One Boss: See here.
  • That One Level: Has its own page.
  • That One Sidequest: Getting the Glavenus tail is a total bitch to do. For one, it's only cuttable when it's orange hot with fire, meaning you have to get in close to recieve some massive damage. That's not the worst of it, however. Since the tail makes up for a majority of the monster's more dangerous moves and is very hard to reach due to the height, It requires massive amounts of farming. Hope you like fighting Glavenuses!
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks:
    • Some older fans of Monster Hunter tend to feel this way about the gameplay additions in newer titles. Swimming and the new monsters in 3, elevation and Frenzy / Apex status in 4, Hunting Arts / Styles and the revamped weapon upgrading in Gen, the changes to the weapon mechanics over time... no change is safe from criticism, be it valid or otherwise.
    • World deviating from traditional MonHun fare even moreso than Generations, especially with its focus on open-world gameplay, has caused quite a stir from series traditionalists. Coupled with the high likelihood (though not outright confirmation) that XX may not be leaving Japan, fans feel like Capcom is trying to market a totally different game as Monster Hunter to the West in an attempt to appeal to what Westerners consider a good game. It doesn't help that it's the first Monster Hunter game in a while to not be released on Nintendo platforms.
    • On a smaller note, some Hunting Horn mains were particularly upset that World did not bring back Double Notes from Generations, which were seen as a game-changer for Hunting Horn that encouraged aggressive play. World still has the Encore mechanic, but now requires using the Play action twice in succession, which eats up some extra time.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • Striker Style in Generations is least-liked by many players, because while it allows up to 3 Hunter Arts at once as well as faster Hunter Art charging, it sacrifices each weapon's movesets for it. While there are some weapons that do quite well in Striker style due to only losing situational moves (such as Lance and Switch Axe), those are the weapons that don't really suffer. Striker Bow and Striker Gunlance in particular are seen as particularly "why would you use this" weapons, due to giving up the Arc Shot and Power Shot and the Burst Fire respectively.
    • Prowlers in Generations are heavily disliked and seen as little more than Joke Characters because they can't heal themselves except through Support Moves that take time to charge, they can't use items, they're lacking in damage output, and overall anything a Prowler can do, a Hunter can do better or more often. And that's just if you're using a Fighting Prowler; less combat-oriented Prowlers are seen as even bigger wastes of player slots that could be used by a Hunter instead. They are useful in gathering runs due to not having to manage usable items and having infinite-use gathering tools, and even then they're not used in "Sakura farming" runs because there's no Felyne equivalent of Farcasters.

    U-W 
  • Ugly Cute:
    • Yian Kut-Ku, with its oversized beak, large ears, and reptilian body, isn't your typical picture of cute. However, its bird-like sounds, funny run, its tendency to trip at the end of its charges, and overall silly appearance has endeared it to the fanbase. Even better, a DLC Event Quest allows you fight a Fun Size Kut-Ku that's a little under half the size of a standard one.
    • Nibelsnarf is a beady-eyed, stubby-legged, sand-burrowing monster that, despite having More Teeth than the Osmond Family, looks more goofy than threatening. Even its name is comical.
    • Chameleos is surprisingly cute for an Elder Dragon, thanks to its nonthreatening design with big beady eyes, making cute sounds, and having some funny movements. Just don't look at it when its mouth is open.
    • The Deviljhog costume, which makes your Poogie look like an adorable baby version of the hideous and nightmare-inducing Deviljho. Just don't ask why the costume sometimes comes with a sample of Deviljho Saliva.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • 4U's Little Miss Forge has an Animesque style that looks fine in-game, but does not mesh well with the very realistically rendered cutscenes.
    • Some Frontier event monsters fall into this category due to having eerily realistic proportions that clash with their otherwise cartoonish designs. The most infamous examples of this are the producer and director dressed respectively as a Congalala and a Gogomoa (very realistic faces that show little to no emotion combined with cartoonish movesets) and the Higanjima-themed Plesioth (polygonal humanoid body combined with a realistically rendered fish head and wyvern's animations), with comments complaining about how creepy they are taking up a good majority of YouTube videos that feature them.
  • Underused Game Mechanic: 4 and 4 Ultimate let you explore villages while in an online or local multiplayer lobby in lieu of having an instance map, letting you freely shop, check services such as trading carts and Talisman Melding, etc. Which sadly was not carried over into Generations, in which you can only visit the Hub and Prep Area while in a lobby much like in 3 Ultimate. While most services are available in lobbies by going to the Prep Area and talking to your Housekeeper, those services don't include Melding, the Felyne Courier, reporting completed villager requests, or accepting new villager requests.
  • Unfortunate Character Design: Gogmazios has glowing markings on its chin that look like a sad face. This has led to it receiving the Fan Nickname "Gogsadios".
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: When the designs for the Fated Four were released, many players thought that Gammoth was male and that Mizutsune was female. This turned out to be the opposite of what they expected. note 
  • Vindicated by History: A concept for an undead, two-headed Elder Dragon called the Crypt Hydra was initially planned to be in the first game, but the idea became scrapped after receiving poor reception from Japanese fans, who felt that a supernatural monster had no place in a semi-realistic game. However, many of these fans have retracted their previous beliefs about the monster after the second generation introduced fan-favourite Elder Dragons such as Kushula Daora who fit said bill, and continue to lament its removal to this day.
  • The Woobie:
    • The Lagombi looks like a bumbling cross between a rabbit and a koala. When it's low on health, it turns its head to look back at you while it's limping away, as if it knows you're going to chase it down.
    • The Kecha Wacha is a very friendly-looking monster (until it's enraged), with playful mannerisms. Townsfolk usually ask you to hunt it because it sprayed watery goop at them. Killing the Kecha Wacha for this annoying but mostly harmless prank can feel like Disproportionate Retribution. When it's exhausted, it looks absolutely pitiful with its half-closed eyes.
    • Whitescruff, the meek and sad-looking Felyne in Cheeko Sands. He wants to defend the village from rampaging monsters but is too cowardly to even approach them. He hopes that, by watching you hunt big scary monsters, he can learn what courage feels like.
    • The Seltas whenever paired up with a Seltas Queen. The poor Seltas ends up getting used as a battering ram, a food source, and a projectile by the Seltas Queen, as if the Seltas is less of a mating partner and more of a tool for her to use.
    • Chaotic Gore Magala is stuck in a terrible amalgamation of Gore Magala and Shagaru Magala. It's constantly groaning in pain as you fight it, and its fight music sounds just as jumbled and unstable as the monster. Slaying it feels like a Mercy Kill.
  • Woolseyism:
    • The subspecies of a monster in the Japanese versions usually just adds "subspecies" (亜種) to its name, but the localizations make their names more descriptive to add flavor. For instance, "Lagiacrus subspecies" (ラギアクルス亜種) thus becomes Ivory Lagiacrus due to its distinct white scales.
    • In the Japanese version of Tri, Leviathans were known as Sea Wyverns, which doesn't suit them very well.note  Leviathan describes them more accurately as the class is composed of serpentine or fish-like creatures.
    • In the localization for 4U, Felyne Comrades were renamed to Palicoes, a clever play on "Pal" and "Calico".
    • The "Frenzy Virus" was called the "Feral Wyvern Virus" in the Japanese version, a Non-Indicative Name on multiple levels.note  By contrast, Frenzy describes the violent, unpredictable behavior of infected monsters much more accurately.
    • Monsters that overcome the Frenzy Virus are known as "Extreme" monsters in the Japanese version, which seems like a case of Totally Radical to Westerners. The localizations instead refer to them as "Apex" monsters. As in, an apex predator.


How come nobody sends me any exampawls?

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/MonsterHunter