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  • The Wonderlic Personnel Test is an intelligence test frequently given to NFL pre-draft prospects. The highest scorers tend to be offensive linemen (generally some of the biggest, strongest guys on the field). The quarterback, often regarded as the smartest on the team — often described as a team's "field general" — averages third, behind the offensive tackles and the center (the offensive linemen in the middle of the line, whose job, significantly, is protecting the quarterback until he either runs the ball out, hands it off to a running back, or passes it to a wide receiver), respectively; since these guys have to basically form a wall against the defensive line—basically the biggest guys on the field—they are usually pretty big themselves. The running backs and wide receivers average dead last.
  • Dolph Lundgren, the well-muscled actor famous for playing Ivan Drago in Rocky IV and He-Man in the live-action Masters of the Universe, has a master's degree in chemical engineering. He also received the Fulbright Scholarship to MIT, though he quit when he pursued an acting career. Also fluent in three languages and can get by in four others, including Japanese. Rumors that he has a 160 IQ score are, however, "exaggerated" according to him. Back on the brawn side, besides his generally muscly action hero persona a la Rocky and Masters of the Universe and impressive build, he's a black belt who's won a variety of martial arts competitions and served in the military as a Special Forces team leader.
  • Iconic martial artist/actor Bruce Lee was able to hand over your ass as well as your mind to you in ways you can't yet process. He was arguably one of the most insightful and intriguing thinkers of his generation whose ideals still make an impact to this day. (He also danced the cha-cha, but that's another trope.)
  • Carlo Pedersoli, better known as "Bud Spencer" of Spaghetti Western fame. 270lbs of pure muscle and fat, a pilot, a degree in law, holder of several patents... You wouldn't believe, seeing his fat, Hulk-like stature in the movies, that he was also a professional swimmer before he took up acting.
  • Though he probably hasn't beat anybody up since high school (if he ever did at all), physicist Neil deGrasse Tyson described his cool, muscular, black high school self as a "nerd who could kick your butt". He was also captain of his high school wrestling team and wrestled at the collegiate level during his undergraduate years at Harvard (earning a letter his senior year). No doubt much butt-kicking was involved.
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  • Arnold Schwarzenegger is one of the most decorated bodybuilders in history. He also has a history of intelligent investments with his fortunes, and use to work as the Governator of California. Even back during his bodybuilding days, he came across as a student of psychology and a master manipulator. Reportedly, he would sabotage other contestants by deliberately lying about his workout regimen so his opponents who were listening would deliberately over- or under-train and ruin their chances. When he became known as an action star, he had already been a self-made millionaire for years.
  • Sylvester Stallone has a lot going against him with his garbled speech (caused by accidental nerve damage when he was born), but is actually a very sly businessman, and the more intimately involved with a film's production he is the better-quality film it usually turns out to be. He wrote the Rocky script. It was nominated for the Best Original Screenplay Oscar, and Sly himself was nominated for Best Actor. Sly himself had also scored over 130 while taking an IQ test in Larry King's television show if one thinks such a test (especially under such circumstances) is controversially a good indicator of intelligence.
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  • Theodore Roosevelt was a very effective president for two terms, as well as a heavyweight boxer with a black belt in Ju-Jitsu. Plus his excellent grades in Harvard and his extensive zoological work. He was also an author, historian, polyglot, naturalist, cattle-rancher, hunter, explorer, and soldier. While President, he avoided politicians he didn't want to talk to by inviting them to join him on his morning jog. Even if they managed to keep up with him, they'd be too winded to talk to him much. To date, he is the only person in history to win both the Nobel Peace Prize and the Medal of Honor (though the latter was posthumous). He read a book every day before breakfast, and still found the time to kick huge amounts of ass.
  • Abraham Lincoln also qualifies, being big enough to break up brawls by picking up grown men with his bare hands and hauling heavy crates of rocks — by some contemporary accounts weighing up to half a ton. Before becoming a lawyer, congressman and eventually president, Abraham Lincoln was a famous wrestler. He is said to have fought over 400 matches without a loss, and the popular style of wrestling at the time was essentially MMA without strikes. When working on a ship as a young man, Lincoln rushed a group of armed pirates who had attacked the ship and ended up beating them all bare handed. One of them was thrown overboard with a move that can only be described as a chokeslam. On the genius side, besides his known intelligence in politics, he was one of America's first great corporate/business lawyers, innovating all kinds of legal strategies for the big companies of the day (largely railroads), and would likely have won a (small) spot for himself in the history books even if he hadn't decided to go into politics.
  • Byron "Whizzer" White played college football at the University of Colorado, where he was their best-ever running back. He signed to the Pittsburgh Football Pirates (now the Steelers)... just as he learned he was getting a Rhodes Scholarship. He took a year at Oxford, came home, played two seasons for the Detroit Lions (where he was one of the first "big-money" football players, with a $15,000 salarynote )...and then World War II broke out; White served in the Navy. After the war ended, he decided not to go back into football and instead studied law at Yale. In 1962, he was appointed by John F. Kennedy to the US Supreme Court, where he served until 1993.
  • In the same era as White (though never playing against him; their schools didn't meet in football until 1974) was Gerald Ford, star center and linebacker for the University of Michigan. One of the premier college football players of his era, Ford turned down professional contract offers from the Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers to apply for law school at Yale. While at Yale he coached that school's football and boxing teams but was turned down by Yale Law because of concerns his full-time coaching responsibilities would interfere with law school. Ford would later serve in the Navy during World War II, seeing heavy action in the Pacific, and was reassigned as a physical training officer when the carrier he had been serving on was scrapped due to heavy damage. After the war, Ford would be elected to the House of Representatives and eventually serve as House Minority Leader, Vice-President, and President (although he expressed disappointment that he never got to hold the one office he really wanted, Speaker of the House).
  • In the modern National Football League, there's now-retired Baltimore Ravens center and guard John Urschel, who is also a doctoral student in mathematics at MIT, and has authored/co-authored 9 research papers. He retired shortly before the 2017 season, heavily influenced by a study published in JAMAnote  on the prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathynote  in deceased NFL players.
  • Heavily muscled punk icon Henry Rollins is also a writer and a poet who owns his own publishing house.
    • His friend and peer Ian MacKaye is an author on the side, and very articulate in interviews. As a further subversion of the "bruiser" stereotype, he is a vegan.
  • John Knox, one of the leading theologians of the Protestant Reformation, began his involvement with the movement as a bodyguard for George Wishart. His Weapon of Choice was a two-handed sword, and those things are heavy.
    • He also survived 19 months of being a galley slave when he was captured by the French.
  • Whilst boxer Nikolai Valuev looks like he's carved from stone, apparently, he's a pretty smart guy.
  • Gorillas are incredibly smart by animal standards, as well as strong enough to move trucks.
    • Chimpanzees and dolphins too. Chimps can use tools and have surprisingly good memories and are several times stronger than a similarly sized human. Dolphins, while being incredibly strong and fast aquatic acrobats, seem to have a language of their own, and can solve puzzles, help humans in danger, and learn rudimentary math concepts.
    • Humans aren't slouches either. Most people on this site are more familiar with the domesticated human, but scientists believe that early humans had their own strategy for chasing down prey before we started over specializing in the Genius part. Before humans got the hang of propelling sharp objects into potential food at a distance, our ancestors would just chase the prey. And chase. And chase. And chase. Humans may not have been the fastest animal on the savannah, but long after the prey had fallen down out of exhaustion, the early humans were still going strong and would proceed to finish off the animal and cart it back home.
    • On land we have the elephants who have the largest brain of any land-based animal today. Elephants can feel many of the same emotions we do and are considered by some scientists to be on the level with great apes and perhaps approaching dolphins. They are also so big and strong they can casually knock down trees for food and can curb stomp any other land animal. They can also move incredibly fast when they get their momentum - not surprising given their massive, muscled legs.
    • Also on land, Komodo dragons and crocodiles are among the most intelligent reptiles, with human-like social structures and good memories; many also like playing and crocs are even capable of tool use. Don't get within a few... well, miles of one if you can avoid it.
    • In the sea we have the orca who can learn strategies to hunt its prey in any situation (knocking up ice floes, beaching, spy hopping) which are taught and passed down through generations, and demonstrate problem-solving abilities (like when they steal fish from fishermen by splitting into different groups). They are also one of the most powerful hunters in the sea to the extent that some orcas have developed a taste for the great white shark, which in turn developed a fear of the orca; now let that sink in for a moment.
  • Genius Composer George Frederic Handel ("The Messiah" etc. etc.) was a big, strong man with a hair-trigger temper. He is said to have made a difficult prima donna more cooperative by picking her up bodily and threatening to throw her out of a window, and to have thrown a kettle-drum (the smallest of which, for those not in the know, are bowls of solid copper at least half a meter wide and half a meter deep) at a violinist who had played a bum note. Handel was of course a writer of truly brilliant and innovative music (although he is famous for doing a lot of borrowing, he basically always ended up transforming it) and a fairly shrewd businessman, as well (his famous series of oratorios was a calculated business move: oratorios were cheaper to produce than operas but still drew big crowds, so they had bigger profit margins).
  • Ancient Greek philosophers, orators, and poets were all former hoplite soldiers. Greek culture prized both physical and mental achievement.
    • According to at least some sources, Plato, the ancient Greek philosopher and founder of the first institution of higher learning in the Western world, was a two-time Olympic champion in pankration;note  he certainly exhibits an intimate familiarity with the sport in some of his works, particularly the Laws. "Plato" is actually a nickname meaning "broad shoulders"—his real name was Aristocles. He was apparently a pretty burly guy, hence the nickname.
    • Plato's teacher Socrates was not only a hoplite but served with distinction at the battles of Potidaeum and Delium in The Peloponnesian War and may have earned his living as a stonecutter. Even by ancient Greek standards, he was a force to be reckoned with!
  • Benito Mussolini was arguably a subversion. He talked a good game and boasted an impressive intellectual background, but once he actually gained power he screwed things up so badly in both the political and military spheres it was hard to tell if he was a more incompetent general or statesman.
    • However, he actually was pretty smart, writing highly influential works on fascism that were actually coherent, if repulsive, and creating a genuine political theory (something you can't really say about Mein Kampf).
    • Also, one might argue that Mussolini's problem wasn't his brain but his birth: he was Italian. Modern Italy had always been the sad sack among the Great Powers of Europe, with regionalism, low levels of development in the South, and general political apathy dragging it down. It didn't help (from Mussolini's perspective) that Italy had been on the winning side of World War One, meaning that Italians didn't have half as big of a national chip on their shoulders as the Germans, and Italian nationalists tended towards Italian irredentism rather than a yearning for the Roman Empire. Had Mussolini been born in Germany, given his smarts and sanity...yeah.
    • On the brawn side, Mussolini was one of the few world leaders to be willingly photographed shirtless, and it wasn't bad.
    • When in the Army, Mussolini had been a Bersagliere. The Bersaglieri are a light infantry specialty whose defining quirk is being physically fit enough to run all the freaking time (their rules actually forbid them from walking unless on a leave), with their band doing it while playing trumpets, and are well known in Italy for being basically unstoppable if they charge at an enemy... And Mussolini was one of the toughest.
  • Cannibalistic, necrophilic and 6'9" (2.08 m) serial killer Edmund Kemper was discovered to have an IQ of 136 when he was tested at the age of fifteen.
  • Kevin Grevioux, the Scary Black Man who played werewolf Raze in the Underworld movies and voiced the Badass Baritone Black Beetle in Young Justice, was working on his Master's degree in genetic engineering until he decided to go Hollywood. Oh, yeah, and he wrote Underworld, basing the script on his knowledge of interracial dating.
  • Chris "Jesus" Ferguson can cut vegetables with a thrown playing card. While he is certainly an imposing figure at the poker table, the five-time bracelet winner (including the main event title in 2000) owes his success largely to his knowledge of game theory and development of computer simulations, as he has a Ph.D. in computer science.
  • René Descartes, the great 17th-century French mathematician and founder of modern philosophy, also served as a mercenary soldier in Bavaria and seems to have drawn inspiration from his battlefield experiences.
  • All astronauts are in space for the specific reason of doing complex research in space, but also must keep remarkably fit in order to fight muscle degeneration and bone loss that are consequent of long durations of a lack of gravity.
    • Specific case: Buzz Aldrin, second man on the Moon—also decorated fighter pilot, graduated #2 in his class at West Point, earned a Ph.D. in astronautics from MIT (writing the book on manned orbital rendezvous for NASA)... and delivered an epic upper-cut to a Moon-landing conspiracy theorist who was harassing him (Buzz was 80 years old at the time, and the lady who was with him was his daughter, making Buzz Aldrin a Papa Wolf and a Cool Old Guy as well).note 
    • If we are going to talk astronauts then we have to talk William Shepherd, the first Navy SEAL in space. While being interviewed by NASA he was asked what he does better than anyone else and he replied: "kill someone with a knife". Flew on 3 Shuttle missions, commanded the first mission to the ISS and after returning to the Navy after his NASA service was assigned to the staff of Commander, Naval Special Warfare Command
    • And then there is the second SEAL in space, Commander Chris Cassidy. Graduated USNA. Honor Graduate from BUD/S, Masters Degree from MIT, the Bronze Star for leading the team against insurgents in Afghanistan, flew on a Shuttle mission, mission specialist on ISS mission, and appointed Chief Astronaut of NASA
  • Any Society for Creative Anachronism heavy fighters. History re-enactment is considered a very nerdy hobby, but those guys fight in full armor with rattan weapons and are trained to hit hard. SCA has given the initial spark on researching and reviving the original Medieval Western Martial Arts.
  • Szeklers (Transylvanian ethnic Hungarians) are generally seen as aggressive, violent and in general, very strong fighters. One of their prominent figures (János Bolyai) is known for being the first person to discover non-Euclidean geometry. Another (Sándor Kőrösi Csoma) is best known as the author of the first English-Tibetan dictionary.
  • Former boxing champion - and Mensa member - Bobby Czyz.
  • Japanese famous writer Mishima Yukio, who was also a first-rank kendo master and had an impressive physique; however, this case is a little bit different, for the reason he trained himself so hard in order to reach these impressive physical abilities was part and parcel of his own philosophy of Existence and Beauty. In a very strange and mindscrewing book, Sun and Steel, he even explained how the beauty of the body shaped by years of bodybuilding was a perfect mirror of his theory of morality and aesthetic. Yeah, strange guy indeed.
  • Charlemagne. The guy was over 6 feet tall (freaking gigantic in medieval times) and despite the beer belly was muscular. He used to terrify his enemies because of his height and build. He also stabilized the political situation of Europe for the first time in centuries, established the largest western European empire since the Romans — it's been equaled only by Napoleon and Hitler — minted the first silver coins since Rome fell, mediated ecclesiastical disputes, founded schools, spoke and read several languages (he tried to learn to write but gave up as he was too old), and had five wives and God-only-knows how many concubines.note  They don't call it the Carolingian Renaissance for nothing.
  • Saladin probably counts. His brilliance as a military leader was well known, but he was also well versed in science, mathematics, and poetry.
  • Mehmed the Conqueror, the sultan of the Ottoman Empire, who was best known for conquering Istanbul note , unifying Anatolia by conquering little Turkish sultanates and conquering most of the Balkans, all at the age of 21 is this. He was very interested in maths, theology, astronomy, and arts and always encouraged all kinds of scholarly discussions and inventions. He saved the Parthenon of Athens from destruction because he could convince his troops that they were masterpieces to be protected and not idols to be destroyednote . He spoke at least six languages fluently and he was also a poet.
    • Selim I aka Selim the Grim, his grandson also applies. He conquered the whole Middle East in a single year and was also an accomplished poet.
  • William Marshall was probably rightfully called "the greatest knight who ever lived" at the time of his death. He was one of the most important military commanders for three kings and ruled over England for a fourth who was still a child at the time, making him the most powerful statesman of the country. Born as one of several sons to a minor knight, he was sent to France as a child and became probably the greatest champion of knight tournaments in his time. He came into contact with the royal family when he was made the personal coach of the king's son in the extremely dangerous and often lethal martial arts sport.
  • Dr. John Turner, senior citizen, psychiatrist, and can probably hand your ass to you.
  • Ernest Rutherford, Nobel winning scientist and keen rugby player (at least as a university student).
  • Eric Greitens: Attended the prestigious Duke University as an undergrad before attending the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar (most prestigious scholarship in the world). At Oxford, he earned a Master's degree as well as a doctorate. Mr. Greitens then joined the U.S. Navy, became a Navy SEAL and served in Iraq and Afghanistan. After leaving active duty, Greitens completed a White House Fellowship and founded the Mission Continues, a nonprofit which allows veterans to serve their communities. Greitens has also taught courses at the University of Missouri and Washington University. He was elected Governor of Missouri in 2016.
  • Dr. Andrew Exum: Attended the University of Pennsylvania (Ivy League). During his senior year, he was apart of the Sphinx Senior Society, the oldest and most prestigious senior society at U Penn. He then went on to serve as a U.S. Army officer in the Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. He was in the Army Rangers, an elite special operations infantry unit. After leaving the Army, Dr. Exum got his Master's degree in Middle Eastern Studies at the American University of Beirut and a doctorate from King's College, London.
  • Meet Aleksandr Karelin: Doctor of law, member of the State Duma, opera and ballet aficionado, and unstoppable heavyweight Greco-Roman wrestler legendary for regularly lifting his 300-pound opponents off the ground. Considered one of the strongest men in the world, Karelin once got a 500-pound refrigerator to his apartment by bear-hugging it and walking up eight flights of stairs.
  • This kitten is both smart and strong enough to move the object out of the way to get the toy back.
  • Dromaeosaurid dinosaurs. Fast (comparable to a modern bear, at 20 to 45 miles per hour depending on species), extremely agile and superb at Combat Parkour, very strong (lots of kicking and biting power), and, like almost all predators, intelligent and tactical, coming up with creative plans.
    • Carnivorous dinosaurs were this in general.
  • Meme macro Professor Badass - Kevin Stewart: fashion designer, style director for ESPN The Magazine, co-owner of Roger Charles New York design studio (and no, the photo doesn't come from a shoot, this is just how he rocks it on a daily basis)
  • As it turns out, crocodiles are as intelligent as most mammals, with a far smaller brain. This being the same crocodile that also tears its prey apart with a death roll and also ambushes said prey from the water. It turns out crocodiles got a whole lot more terrifying.
  • Sir Richard Francis Burton, genius linguist, explorer, anthropologist, diplomat, gunfighter, fencer, chess master, bayonet fighter, Sufi sage, freemason, libertine, translator and general all-around badass.
  • Jesse Ventura, former Navy SEAL, pro wrestler, movie star, media pundit, and Governor of Minnesota.
  • Ambrose Bierce, Brevet Major, US Civil War hero, newspaperman, author of the Devil's Dictionary, masterful writer of suspense and horror short stories, disappeared while adventuring with Pancho Villa. Depicted as such in the film, "The Hangman's Daughter".
  • Several Native American leaders, notably Tecumseh, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull.
  • The East Roman (Byzantine) General Belisarius who defeated Persia and reconquered much of the fallen Western Roman Empire with never more than 50,000 Roman troops and auxiliaries under his command.
  • Egil Skallagrimsson, a gigantic Norseman with superhuman strength and guile, runemaster, poet, sociopath, and all-around badass. Said to be a half-troll.
  • Kaj Larsen: Mr. Larsen holds a Bachelor's degree in political science from UC Santa Cruz. After graduating from college, he joined the U.S. Navy and became a SEAL. He served in Iraq. After leaving active duty, Larsen graduated from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is currently a journalist who has been nominated for an Emmy as well as a Peabody Award.
  • Paul Robeson, All-American and NFL (American) football player, Bachelor of Laws (Columbia), civil rights advocate, Communist, actor, world-renowned singer.
  • Elliot Ackerman: Got Bachelor's and Master's degrees at the prestigious Tufts University (graduated with top honors). He then became an infantry officer in the U.S. Marines before joining special operations. He served in both Iraq and Afghanistan. After leaving the military, Mr. Ackerman published a novel and continues to write on conflicts around the world, most notably the Syrian Civil War.
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin graduated from the International Law branch of the Law Department of the Leningrad State University, and was then a Lieutenant Colonel in the KGB before going on to have a political career that has spanned from 1990 to the present, and his approval rating in Russia was at one point 81%, better than any other world leader at the time. He's known for his "tough guy" outdoorsman image and has taken part in extreme sports and interaction with wild animals. He is also known to be skilled in martial arts.
    • Putin actually has a Ph.D. in Economics from the St. Petersburg Mining Institute which he got in 1996, shortly after he began his career in politics. This one is controversial since (and not unusual for Russian politicians of the time) it was found that parts of his dissertation were plagiarised and the whole thing may have been ghostwritten since he was also busy running an election campaign when he allegedly wrote it, though it is known that he has publicly and successfully defended the thesis and is clearly smart enough to understand the material.
  • Chess Boxing is a sport where the competitors alternate a round of chess with a round of boxing.
  • Retired boxer Nicky Piper won 26 of his 33 professional fights. He is also a member of Mensa.
  • Richard Trevithick. 19th-century engineer, inventor, and locomotive-pioneer who developed the high-pressure steam engine which, being smaller and more powerful than earlier engines, was soon driving one of the world's earliest self-propelled road vehicles of Trevithick's own design. The 6'2" "Cornish Giant" was also exceptionally strong and a skilled wrestler. At a dinner Trevithick demonstrated his grappling proficiency by gripping a heavily built mine engineer around the waist, turning him upside down, to stamp his bootprints on the ceiling.
  • Bassist/composer Charles Mingus was one of the most influential figures in jazz, a self-taught student of world religion and literature. He was also a tank. Given his volatile temperament, especially when he'd been drinking, it could be tense to be in his band.
  • Most special forces operators today need to be this. They are trained to complete missions in difficult environments without tons of heavy firepower backing them up, drawing principally on their own brawn and brain and the training in both dimensions. They need to know local languages, customs, histories, and current events and be able to size the situation very accurately and very fast, or risk losing their heads.
  • Predators. See examples of crocodiles and dinosaurs above. Snakes, monitor lizards, sharks, big cats, wolves, orcas, squid, and in fact almost anything that kills for a living fit this trope to a T. Crocs have learned to hunt in packs and use bait to draw in birds, squid have a complex communication system using color changes to send signals, moray eels are capable of communicating with other species of predators to hunt cooperatively, sharks join forces despite being loners when the circumstances dictate, orcas have specific tactics for killing almost anything in the ocean including great whites-it goes on.
  • Generals of any army anywhere are often as intelligent as they are strong.
  • Octopi are incredibly intelligent species of the sea and all that muscle in their tentacles can let them jet around the sea at near 20 to 25 miles per hour. They're actually tough enough to fight sharks and smart enough to hunt things on land.
  • Raven, real name Scott Levy, is a pro wrestler who possesses an IQ of 143 and is a member of Mensa and the Theta Chi fraternity. He attended the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in criminal justice, and he took a semester off from college to enlist in the United States Marine Corps Reserve.
  • Rasputin the Mad Monk. 6'4" (albeit pretty slim), and (while this has been exaggerated by the myth) renowned for his physical strength and stamina (his "survival" of multiple bullet wounds aside; that was more due to inaccurate shooting and slow bullets than his personal toughness). He was also of above-average intelligence. While the specifics are unclear, he was certainly a gifted Snake Oil Salesman, a cunning if erratic politician, and he was clearly doing something right when ameliorating the Prince's hemophilia (whether it was hypnosis or Simple-Minded Medical Advice is still a mystery).
  • Frank Spangenberg is an officer in the Transit Bureau of the New York City Police Department (formerly the New York City Transit Police Department) who appeared on Jeopardy! in January 1990 and won $102,597 as a 5-time undefeated championnote , with a record-setting $30,600 total during his last game. He's been the only player to appear in every "all-time" tournamentnote , and even after they doubled the in-game scoring system in 2001 (and removed the 5-win limit in 2003), he's still the show's top 5-time champion.
  • 19th century Anarchist Mikhail Bakunin was a 6'5", muscular and charismatic adventurer who voluntarily did a lot of heavy lifting and fighting in the various revolutionary conflicts he was involved in, but he is best known as the author of classic Anarchist texts such as The State and Anarchy, and at one point was writing a Russian translation of Das Kapital by Karl Marx during the period they didn't hate each other's guts (though he quit under controversial circumstances, in part because he preferred action to lengthy writing projects).
  • NHL Defenseman Zdeno Chára (currently of the Boston Bruins) is 6'9" and 250 lbs. He also speaks 6 languages in addition to his native Slovak(Czech, Polish, Swedish, Russian, German, and English), has a diploma in financial planning from Algonquin College, and is a licensed realtor in the state of Massachusetts.
  • Retired MMA fighter Rosi Sexton not only had an impressive run as a fighter before retiring at age 36, she also holds a PHD in theoretical computer sciences at the university of Manchester, before taking up fighting, she wrote not one, but two rather well regarded papers on the subject.
  • Astronomer Edwin Hubble, later considered the father of observational cosmology, had been a good student, best renowned for his athletic skills, playing baseball, basketball, football and running, with excellent marks. He was famously an amateur heavyweight boxer; an unconfirmed story talks about a sponsor offering Hubble to go pro and fight then-champion Jack Johnson.
  • Brothers Niels and Harald Bohr played football in the Akademisk Boldklub ("the Academics") of Copenhange, as goalkeeper and goaler respectively. Harald then played for Denmark in the 1908 Olympics, earning the silver. When he later defended his Ph D, there were more soccer fans in the room than mathematicians. Niels, who enjoyed western movies, is also reported to have mastered fast draw skill using physics.
  • Santiago Ramón y Cajal, Nobel Prize in medicine 1906, had been a rowdy youngster: After armwrestling with a friend and losing, his pride led him to a gym. He became a noted body builder with, per his own words, a 112-centimeter thorax (44 inches) and the inelegant waddle of a fair strongman.
  • Spanish author Ramón María del Valle-Inclán lost his arm because of a duel he himself was not involved in: Valle-Inclán and his journalist friend Manuel Bueno argued about whether a duel (between two other people) was admissible or not, and they came to blows, armed Valle-Inclán with a bottle and Bueno with a cane. Valle-Inclán's arm was injured, then became gangrenous and cut, ending the playwright's acting career. A number of comedic versions of the story appeared, including one where Valle-Inclán willingly cut his arm to send it by mail so he could shake an admired person's hand.

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