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The Total War franchise has many different factions in each of its iterations.


Regular games:

  • Rome: Total War:
    • Romans — Generalist early on, later Brute Force: Pre-Marian Reform: Mix of light and heavy infantry, archers, skirmishers and light cavalry. Post-Marian Reform: Heavily armed and armored Legionary infantry, huge array of siege weaponry, mediocre ranged units, mediocre cavalry. Can feel like a Spammer when fighting them, since all three Houses will simultaneously wage war against you.
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    • The Greek Cities — Brute force/ Specialist: Almost no ranged units, below-average cavalry, but increasingly heavy hoplites, including the super-tough Spartans.
    • Macedon — Brute force/Elitist: Some of the best hoplite/pikemen infantry, companion cavalry, not much else of notice.
    • Egypt — Generalist: Good all around roster, with heavy phalanx units, melee infantry, archers and the ever fearsome chariots.
    • The Seleucid Empire — Elitist/Generalist: Good pike-phalanx units, good cavalry including cataphracts and war elephants, also good heavy infantry, although not cheap. Best units take more than 1 turn to recruit.
    • Parthia — Ranger/Guerilla: Appalingly bad infantry, yet has one of the best cavalries in the game, with cataphracts, war elephants and horse archers.
    • Pontus — Specialist/Brute Force: Mediocre Infantry, but can recruit cataphracts and chariots.
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    • Armenia — Generalist: Average all around roster, with better cavalry than infantry.
    • The Gauls — Spammer early on, Specialist later: Lots of mediocre warband infantry, but gains access to Chosen Swordsmen and Forrester Warbands — the perhaps best archers in the game — later.
    • The Germans — Spammer/Guerilla early on, Specialist/Brute force later: Throw huge hordes of Spear Warband at you early in the game, aided by Screaching Women and Night Raiders, but later gains access to Gothic Cavalry, Chosen Axemen, Chosen Archers and Berserkers, who hit with all the force of an elephant.
    • The Britons — Specialist: Mediocre Infantry, no normal cavalry, but fearsome chariots.
    • Spain — Guerilla: Excellent skirmishers and light infantry and cavalry, but alomst nothing that can hold a battle line for more than a few moments.
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    • Dacia — Generalist: Good all around, with a few stand outs, like Falxmen and Chosen archers.
    • Thracia — Brute force: Hoplites and phalangites combined with more barbarian shock infantry, not much in terms of ranged units and cavalry.
    • Scythia — Ranger/Specialist: Focused on (ranged) cavalry to the point that their most basic unit isn't a warband like with other "barbarian" factions, but Horse Archers. Able to destroy pretty much anything on the open field, but rather ill-equipped for sieges.
    • Carthage — Elitist: Good Infantry with the Sacred Band as the top elite, but their true trump card are the elephants.
    • Numidia — Guerilla: Mediocre infantry, but lots of good skirmishers, both on foot and mounted.
    • Barbarian Invasion:
    • Huns — Brute Force/Ranger, with more focus on Brute Force: Lots and lots of cavalry, light, heavy and missile alike. Mediocre infantry. May feel like Spammer in the early game due to vast numbers.
    • Goths/Ostrogoths — Generalist: Good all around, with a focus on cavalry.
    • Sarmatians/Roxolani — Brute Force/Ranger, with more focus on Ranger: Lots and lots of cavalry, light, heavy and missile alike. Mediocre infantry, average archers.
    • Vandals — Brute Force: Mediocre infantry, very good cavalry, melee and missile alike. May feel like Spammer in the early game due to vast numbers.
    • Franks — Brute Force/Elitist: Focussed on heavy troops both cavalry and infantry. Some light troops in support.
    • Saxons — Generalist, leaning towards Guerilla early on, later more towards Brute Force: Average units all around, with the Hearth troops as the elite.
    • Celts — Brute Force/Specialist: Focused on heavy infantry, with a wild array of all kinds of troops in support, including Celtish chariots. Many of their troops lack armour, however.
    • Sassanids — Elitist/Specialist: Poor to average infantry, but has access to cataphracts and war elephants.
    • Alemanni — Generalist, leaning towards Brute Force: Good all around roster, with some fierce heavy units such the Lombard Berserkers and the Golden Band.
    • Burgundii/Lombardi — Generalist: Good all around, with more focus on infantry than cavalry.
    • Romano-British — Generalist: Good all around, with the Graal Knights as the top elite.
    • Slavs — Generalist: Good all around, with more focus on cavalry than infantry.
    • Berbers — Guerilla: Lots of fast, light troops, but nothing that could really stand up to the heavy troops of other factions.
    • Western Roman Empire — Generalist/Pariah: Good choice in every branch, but poor stability and surrounded by enemies.
    • Eastern Roman Empire — Generalist, leaning towards Brute Force: Good choice in every branch, but can field Clibinarii and Cataphracts, that punch through any enemy line, no matter how heavy they are equipped.
  • Medieval II: Total War:
    • The Byzantine Empire — Ranger/Specialist (missile cavalry & naval), with traces of Economist: Below average infantry; strong archers, despite the lack of armor-piercing longbows or crossbows; very bad early heavy cavalry (though by the late game it is competitive thanks to Latinkon and Kataphraktoi) and Vardariotai, the best horse archers in the game, available right from the start; the unique Fireboat unit makes early to mid-game naval battles very one-sided. Holding one of the biggest cities in the world gives them a economic head start, though being surrounded by hostile factions, they need it. Quite dominant early on but they soon hit a technology ceiling and other kingdoms will catch up.
    • Denmark — Brute: Has some of the best shock infantry, with Viking Raiders and Dismounted Huscarls early on, which are later replaced by Norse Axemen, Swordstaff Militia and Obudshaer. Most infantry and cavalry fight with axes so armour-piercing is abundant, but their archers and crossbowmen are subpar.
    • Egypt — Generalist/Economist: Good all-around army, with some really outstanding units such as the Tabardariyya and the Mamluks. Holds some of the richest provinces in the game, and as such boast a very powerful economy.
    • England — Ranger early on, Generalist later: Starts out with excellent Longbowmen archers and Billmen to protect them, and later get much stronger equivalents like Retinue Longbowmen, Armoured Swordsmen (a Dismounted Feudal Knight with more armor and less upkeep), and English Knights for a well-rounded army.
    • France — Brute Force/Elitist: Has some of the best heavy infantry and cavalry in the game, but also fields very good late ranged units in their Aventuriers (armoured crossbowmen) and Scots Guard (armoured longbowmen) and very good gunpowder artillery later on.
    • The Holy Roman Empire — Brute Force/Elitist: Has some of the best heavy troops in the game, both infantry and cavalry, but more focused on infantry. Though like the Byzantines they are lacking in late-game technology.
    • Hungary — Guerilla/Ranger: Starts with good light infantry and ranged cavalry (but no heavy melee cavalry); later gets excellent heavy cavalry & Hussars, one of the best light cavalry in the game, but their heavy infantry is always lacking.
    • Milan — Spammer early on, Specialist/Technician later, Economist through out: Starts with lots and lots of cheap and better-than-average Italian militia, but later gets units like Famiglia Ducale, Genoese Crossbowmen and their Militia variant, also Musketeers and Monster Ribaults once Gunpowder has been discovered. Genoese Crossbowmen are the best missile infantry in the game, but Milan's melee infantry and cavalry options are lackluster, leading them into a Specialist role. Like Venice on the other side of Italy, Milan has a very good starting position to build up a trade empire.
    • The Moors — Guerilla/Specialist (cavalry), Economist: Very good skirmishers and desert units, strong sword infantry in the Urban Militia and Dismounted Christian Guard, adequate heavy cavalry, and in the late-game very dangerous gunpowder units with Sudanese Gunners and Camel Gunners. Potential Game-Breaker with Timbuktu and Arguin, two of the richest provinces in the game, isolated from everyone else in the world and almost impossible to lose once you take them.
    • Poland — Guerilla early on, Brute Force later: Needs to employ hit-and-run-tactics early on, due to the generic Mailed Knights being replaced by ranged Polish Nobles, but gets some very good heavy cavalry units later. Generally lacks missile infantry
    • Portugal — Guerilla early on, Elitist/Brute later: Has some of the best skirmisher units in the game that stay useful throughout the game, but later gets things like Conquistadores from New World settlements (both mounted and on foot), Portuguese Arquebusiers and Aventuros (elite pikemen).
    • Russia — Spammer early on, later Ranger, Technician or Generalist, depending on the playstyle: Lots of cheap troops early on. Good all around roster mid-game, with excellent cavalry units, both melee and missile. Like all the Eastern factions, it relies more on cavalry (especially missile cavalry) then Western Europeans.
    • Scotland — Brute/Specialist (melee infantry): All Scotland's melee infantry hit hard on the charge with near-unbreakable morale and shred armour like chainsaws, and they also have good pikemen, but by far the worst ranged units in the game (with poor range and zero access to armour-piercing) and below-average cavalry.
    • Sicily — Spammer early on, Generalist later: Starts with high-quality Italian militia, above-average Muslim Archers, and excellent Norman Knights once Palermo has been upgraded once; later fans out into an average all around, but without the Carracio Standard for Italian armies morale can be a problem.
    • Spain — Guerilla early on, Elitist/Brute Force later: Has some of the best skirmisher units in the game that stay useful throughout the game, but later gets units like Sword & Buckler Men, Tercio Pikemen and Conquistadores once they capture settlements in America.
    • The Turks — Guerrilla/Ranger early on, Brute force/Technician later: Starts out with mostly light infantry and ranged units, later gets Qapukulu, Janissary units and Monster Bombards, becoming a real force to be reckoned with.
    • Venice — Spammer early on, Specialist/Technician later, Economist throughout: Starts with lots and lots of cheap and better-than-average militia, but later gets units like Stradiots (one of the best light cavalry in the game), Venetians Archers and armor-piercing Venetian Heavy Infantry. Venice is in a good starting position to build a trade empire and benefits a lot from gunpowder technology.
    • The Mongols — Ranger/Spammer: Some of the best cavalry and ranged infantry in the game, but mediocre melee infantry. Spammer comes into play as, when they first arrive, they typically come with six or more armies at maximum power and elite generals, soon followed by another eight armies a few years later. These reinforcements will continue until they have either found a new home or are destroyed completely.
    • The Timurids — Ranger/Specialist, Spammer: Similar to the Mongols, with the addition of Gunpowder and their unique Elephant units.
    • The Aztecs — Spammer/Loyal: Huge numbers of high-morale infantry, but with primitive weapons. Still, an invasion force will be hard pressed to cut their way through thousands of bloodthirsty and fanatical infantry units.
    • Mayans/Tlaxcalans/Tarascans (Americas) — Spammer/Loyal: Huge units sizes compared to the European factions, but without metal weapons or cavalry.
    • Apachean Tribes (Americas) — Ranger/Spammer early on, Technican later: Rely on large numbers of light ranged troops, but can recruit cavalry and gunpowder units once they beat enough European armies with them.
    • Chichimenic Tribes (Americas) — Spammer early on, Technican later: Same as Apaches, but with a greater emphasis on melee infantry.
    • Ireland (Britannia) — Guerrilla/Technician: Lots of skirmishers and light troops, very good Calivermen gunpowder units (infantry and cavalry), and some decent light and medium cavalry too. Unfortunately they lack quality spearmen and heavy cavalry, and their line infantry while decent are also unreliable.
    • Wales (Britannia) — Guerrilla/Ranger: Wales has a focus on superior longbowmen (better even than England's) and light infantry, but no real heavy infantry. Many Welsh units have multiple functions; their Magnelwyr gunners for instance also have heavy armour and an axe, so they are quite capable faux-heavy infantry as well.
    • Norway (Britannia) — Brute Force: Mostly a copy of Denmark, with the addition of Gotland Footmen. Focused on heavy infantry with some cavalry and ranged units in support.
    • Kingdom of Jerusalem (Crusades) — Brute force: Focused on heavy troops, both cavalry and infantry, with some support troops. Slightly more cavalry-focused.
    • Principality of Antioch (Crusades) — Brute force: Focused on heavy troops, both cavalry and infantry, with some support troops. Slightly more infantry-focused.
    • The Teutonic Order (Teutonic') — Brute Force/Elitist: Brimming with heavy troops, yet little in the way of skirmishers and only mediocre ranged units, save the Livonian Auxiliaries.
    • Lithuania (Teutonic) — Guerilla/Loyal as Pagans, Generalist as Christians: Unable to stand to the Teutonic Order man-to-man, but with some really scary pagan melee troops and high-morale religious fanatics. After their conversion to Christianity, they get heavier infantry and some very good gunpowder troops.
    • Novgorod (Teutonic) — Spammer early on, later Ranger, Technician or Generalist, depending on the playstyle: Vanilla's Russia with a Recolor.
  • Total War: Shogun 2:
    • Shimazu: Loyal (loyal generals)/Generalist (stronger Katana Samurai and unique Heavy Gunners)
    • Mori: Unit Specialist (naval)
    • Chosokabe: Economist (farm income)/Ranger (archers of all sorts)
    • Hojo: Industrial (castle-building)/Technical (siege weapons)
    • Oda: Spammer (ashigaru)/Ranger (late game, due to the ability to spam matchlock ashigaru)
    • Tokugawa: Diplomat/Espionage (metsuke)/Guerrilla (kisho ninja); a pariah faction due to starting position (beginning as a vassal clan) and a lack of any particular military advantages.
    • Takeda: Unit Specialist (cavalry); something of a pariah due to the ubiquity of Anti-Cavalry.
    • Uesugi: Elitist (warrior monks); a Pariah faction due to starting position and the difficulty of setting up a monk infrastructure.
    • Date: Brute (all units get a charge bonus, stronger No-Dachi Samurai)
    • Hattori: Espionage (ninja)
    • Ikko-Ikki: Highly unconventional. Spammer (powerful Loan Sword Ashigaru and large but weak normal ashigaru units)/Elitist (warrior monk)/Espionage (can conquer through Ikko revolts without invading), but with a weak economy (no metsuke). The faction's strength is disputed; it's been argued as both a pariah and a Game-Breaker.
    • Otomo: Ranger (gun units)/Espionage (spreading Christianity).
    • Christians in general: Research (churches)/Naval (Nanban Trade Ships)/Espionage (spreading Christianity damages enemy public order, and Christian revolts can be used to take over provinces without starting a war).
  • Total War: Rome II:
    • Illyrian Tribes: Pariah. Generally poor unit choice and one unit of sub-par cavalry.
    • Iberian Tribes: Guerrilla/Generalist mix, as they have good light infantry for ambushes but good medium infantry that can hold its own against even Romans. Their infantry excel in the cut-and-thrust of melee since they have high melee defense (meaning that they are highly likely to dodge attacks in melee).
    • Germanic Tribes: Guerilla/Technical, as they get the "scare" ability for many units, making them horribly damaging to enemy morale, but their units are otherwise of unremarkable quality.
    • Celtic Tribes: Brute. Celts have a great selection of units, especially infantry, but they don't have any of the specialized units or cost-effective units of other factions.
    • Carthage: Generalist. They have access to a large variety of decent units (although most are mercenaries) but they lack really cost-effective units.
    • Eastern and Desert factions: Ranger/Unit Specialist. Their rosters have average infantry at best but tend to have excellent skirmishers, both foot and mounted. They also have great melee and shock cavalry, particularly cataphracts.
    • Greek Factions: Generalist. Large rosters with good units in just about every category.
    • Sparta: Elitist, using powerful (but expensive) hoplites to pull its weight.
    • Steppe Tribes: Ranger/Unit Specialist all the way, they rely on their shock cavalry and missile cavalry to get anything done.
    • Daco-Thracian Tribes: Unit Specialist. They make use of infantry with staggeringly high charge stats to break enemy infantry, but they lack armor and don't have great non-melee units with the exception of skirmishers (which are of above-average quality and can hold well in melee). Their warriors are also not very good in standing melee, as they lack proper shields.
    • And last but not least, Rome itself is a Game-Breaker all the way. They have cheap, very strong infantry, a wide selection of auxiliaries that help cover any potential faults (good skirmishers, elephants, and even some javelin cavalry), and even some decent cavalry. Not unbeatable, but certainly a challenge even in the hands of poor players.
  • Total War: Warhammer:
    • The Empire: A Balanced/Generalist faction, with a combination of light and heavy, melee and ranged infantry and cavalry, and artillery both mundane and arcane, perfect for taking on all comers. Additionally, the Empire has access to a wider range of magic than any other faction, giving it numerous options for healing, buffing, debuffing and damage-dealing. The key weaknesses of the Empire are a lack of air units outside of high-level Hero units and a relatively weak infantry line — their elite melee infantry will rarely beat other factions' own elites. Also has shades of Diplomat due to good starting relations with surrounding factions and confederation allowing them to absorb smaller friendly nations without a fight.
    • Greenskins: A Spammer/Brute faction. Orc-focused armies tend to put more emphasis on "Brute" while Goblin-focused armies tend to focus more on "Spammer", but cheap and effective melee units are a cornerstone of both. The Greenskins are however let down by poor options for technology, trade and diplomacy, and can suffer attrition losses if their armies go too long without a good fight.
    • Dwarfs: A rare example of an Elitist/Technical faction. They are slow-moving and small in number, but a combination of heavily armoured and disciplined infantry with devastating ranged weaponry and artillery can turn them into well-coordinated Mighty Glaciers. Dwarfs are also Loyalist as they have no civil wars.
    • Vampire Counts: A Spammer/Technical faction. Their force is built around weak and expendable undead fodder (which can be created instantaneously and on the move) with a variety of powerful combat monsters, flying units, and magical abilities to support them. They have no ranged weaponry of any kind. The Vampire Counts can also corrupt an enemy's land, causing attrition losses to armies and also potentially causing uprisings in their provinces.
    • Chaos Warriors: An Elitist/Brute/Gimmick faction, less concerned about having overwhelming numbers of disposable units like many other factions and instead focused on having a few very powerful soldiers who pound the enemies into the ground and easily instill fear into the heart of the enemy. Chaos Warriors control no cities; they produce no buildings and gather no income, they only recruit warriors through their armies and sustain themselves by constantly raiding enemy cities. Similarly to the Vampires, they also spread Chaos corruption into provinces.
    • Bretonnia: An extremely unusual Spammer/Elite faction. Peasant infantry is cheap, plentiful, and tend to die in droves. Meanwhile the various Bretonnian cavalry units are all quite powerful and highly mobile. This encourages a hammer and anvil style of combat in which disposable peasants keep the enemy busy while knights position themselves for a lethal charge from behind. They also have access to more significant flying units than the Empire. Generally speaking, Bretonnia requires a fair deal of micromanaging to use effectively, but can be very deadly in expert hands.
    • Beastmen: A Spammer/Guerrilla/Brute faction. They rely heavily on ambush tactics on the grand campaign, their hordes being invisible and capable of traveling through hidden "Beastpaths". In combat they hit hard but have really poor morale, relying heavily on their units' superior mobility and numbers, but will fall apart in prolonged combat. Much like the Warriors of Chaos they cannot maintain settlements, but have a unit ability to raze and corrupt a region, along with a mechanic similar to the Orcs' Waaagh!, spawning AI-controlled armies to assist your own hordes. Unlike the Warriors, the Beastmen do not suffer attrition when two hordes are near one another, meaning you can quickly create new hordes in order to flood the map with your forces.
    • Wood Elves: A Glass Cannon/Ranger faction and a Elite/Brute faction rolled together. They have some of the best archers in the game. Even their basic archers have extraordinary range and can fire while moving, allowing them to attack while getting into position. Higher tier archers have outstanding armor piercing damage and can fire in any direction without having to change facing. They also have the only flying archers in the game. On the other hand they also have the tree spirit units, which are Mighty Glacier infantry and monsters capable of dominating infantry engagements. However, most of their units have poor defense and suffer in prolonged combat, and the powerful monsters will also do very poorly against fiery attacks; as such, the wood elves are an army reliant on skirmishing, motion and a lot of micromanagement. In the Grand Campaign they are split between the Wood Elves under Orion and the Tree Spirits under Durthu, with severe restrictions on the ability to recruit units from the other half of the faction. To win the Grand Campaign they must gather sufficient Amber to complete their Wonder-based win condition.
    • Norsca: A Elitist/Brute Force/Gimmick, just like their parent army — the Warriors of Chaos. A relatively small number of extremely powerful warriors (Marauder Champions, Berserkers) supported by a number of extremely powerful monstrous units (Mammoths, Skinwolves, Fimir, and Frost Wyrms) that pound the enemy into submission through pure violent power. They have a number of powerful quirks like their Berserker and Frost Bite abilities, which allow them to become insanely stronger the longer they remain in battle and significantly slow their enemies in combat, respectively.
  • The sequel has so far introduced five factions:
    • High Elves: A Generalist/Elitist/Ranger/Intrigue faction with lots of expensive units that are capable of fighting in multiple scenarios. In the Grand Campaign they can use influence to quickly develop alliances or trick other factions into war. Examples of their extremely generalist units include: Lothern Sea Guard, which are effective, though not great, archers with shields (allowing them to resist other archers), decent melee stats (allowing them to briefly stand against basic infantry) and a bonus against large creatures (making them dangerous to cavalry that catches them). The Eagle Claw Bolt Thrower is an extremely accurate artillery piece that can switch between having a bonus against large creatures (to snipe monsters) and against infantry (to disrupt infantry formations). The Swordmasters of Hoeth are greatsword infantry with high damage and a bonus against other infantry, this almost always means not having shields and thus being weak to archers but the Swordmasters get the shielded status anyway because they can deflect arrows with their swords. They also have access to powerful archers that can hold themselves in melee, such as the Sisters of Avelorn and Shadow Warriors, and a number of powerful flying monsters.
    • Dark Elves: A Balanced/Technical/Brute faction. Their units require more micromanagement than most but ultimately they have effective answers to nearly anything. However, if their units aren't managed well and get caught in unfavorable matchups they tend to fall apart. Their unique battle mechanic, Murderous Prowess, causes an army wide damage bonus once a certain number of units have been killed.
    • Skaven: A Spammer/Guerilla/Ranger faction. Skaven have huge numbers of incredibly cheap, incredibly weak units and the ability to ambush other armies while attacking. This represents the idea that Skaven are everywhere and will come swarming in from all sides. With their Menace From Below faction ability they can even produce free units of infantry anywhere on the map a few times each battle. In campaign their Food mechanic prevents them from holding large amounts of territory encouraging them to sack and raze enemy cities instead of conquering them. With the The Prophet and the Warlock DLC, the sheer amount of ranged firepower Skaven has shifted their playstyle considerably, coupled with their army's generally better mobility, they're now able to play as a Ranger faction now.
    • Lizardmen: A Elite/Brute/Research faction. The Lizardmen are a technomagically advanced civilization that has degenerated due to its leaders meditating through millennia of corruption and decay. Their main combat units have become half feral, sometimes going insane in combat and not responding to orders. However, they benefit from extremely powerful infantry and a wide selection of monster units, while lords and heroes wield sophisticated magic. Their settlements can be joined together into a massive Geomantic Web they can use to enhance all aspects of their civilization. Their research is extensive and highly effective.
    • Tomb Kings : A Spammer/Technical/Gimmick faction. The Tomb Kings are one of the most powerful defensive factions in the game, alongside the Dwarfs. They have access to hordes and hordes of hardy, if offensively weak, skeleton infantry, which can hold enemies in place for long periods of time, whilst their more powerful and fast units, such as horsemen, and the various constructs can go in for the kill. They make heavy use of their lores to further support their skeletons, and make them last longer (whose sustainability is enhanced even further with their battlefield mechanic, realm of souls). Unlike the Vampire Counts, they do have archers and powerful artillery, which let them turtle even more.
    • Vampire Coast: A Spammer/Technical Faction. The pirates of the Vampire Coast are an interesting faction: they're not able to field a traditional infantry line, as their zombie infantry are have such crap stats, while their Elite units, the Depth Guard, lack anti-armour and have a very small unit size of 45. That said, they get armour piercing firepower in volumes the Dwarfs could only dream of, have a cannon that is almost map-ranged, and their Lore of the Deep gives them a few spells to jam up enemy charges and disrupt their lines to buy more time shooting. On the campaign map they have a very weak domestic economy, piss-poor expansion options on the outset, but thanks to a mechanic for creating secret pirate coves on enemy port settlements, can rapidly become a small but connected, wealthy power, with several semi-horde armies that let them have a presence anywhere on the map.
    • The Rogue Armies are nonplayable Gimmick factions that are totally focused on one particular tactic or theme. For instance: only cavalry, only units that fit a pirate theme, only monsters, hilariously impractical amounts of artillery, and so on.

Game mods

  • The popular Medieval II: Total War conversion mod Thera:
    • Kingdom of Avalon: Balanced/Generalist. A good mixture of archers, medium and heavy infantry and powerful cavalry.
    • Gaelic Nations:
      • Balanced/Generalist in Version 3.
      • Guerrilla/Spammer in Version 4. Strong emphasis on rushing and ambush tactics with light barbarian infantry.
    • Bons Chevaliers/Royame de Merevangi: Elitist. Very powerful heavy cavalry, with heavy infantry as support.
    • Ducado de Sangre Valiente: Elitist. Emphasis on elite close-combat troops and advanced firearms.
    • Povos de Hispania: Guerrilla/Ranger. Very little in the way of heavy infantry or cavalry, but light infantry are very mobile, good at hiding and ambushes, and a lot of their troops wield javelins.
    • Faustian Reich: Elitist/Ranger. Masters of ranged combat with advanced firearms, but with a limited unit roster.
    • Men of Wotan: Balanced/Ranger. A balanced unit list , boasting stronger than average ranged cavalry.
    • Men of Valhalla: Brute. Strong emphasis on infantry with heavy, armour-piercing axes and strong charges. What did you expect?
    • Romuli Empire: Balanced. Excellent heavy infantry, good (but not great) archers and gunpowder, and good cavalry.
    • Grand Duchy of Dracule:
      • Brute in Version 3. Focus on light/missile cavalry, with super-heavy Blood Knights, but lacking in both kinds of infantry.
      • Balanced/Generalist in Version 4. The roster has been rounded out to include decent missile and melee infantry, as well as gunpowder units.
    • Teutonic Order: Brute. Focused on powerful heavy infantry and cavalry, but with a lack of good light infantry and mediocre archers.
    • Holy Order Of The Pale Knight: Elitist. Has some of the best infantry and cavalry in the game. They need it, considering their starting location....
    • Tahar Caliphate: Ranger/Balanced. Great ranged units and cavalry.
    • Vastha Sultanate: Generalist. Lacking in heavy armour at first, but they can develop some fairly powerful heavy troops later on.
    • Barka Caliphate: Ranger/Brute. Depends on how you build the army, but compared with the Vashta, they're a lot stronger on the heavy infantry and cavalry front.
    • Lao Che Khanate: Ranger. The archery faction, through and through, with great cavalry to boot.
    • Sycorax Nation: Technical/Ranger. A variety of versatile units and a mishmash of technology, making them powerful if used properly.
    • Warriors of Kukulkan: Brute/Spammer. More emphasis on the Brute side.
    • Paynal Empire: Brute/Spammer. More emphasis on the Spammer side.
    • Uruk Dominion: Elitist/Brute. Best heavy infantry in the game, with a list built around charging and supporting the charge, but with a total lack of cavalry or artillery.
    • League of Privateers:
      • Balanced/Generalist in Version 3. A bit more emphasis on ranged, but still decent melee troops.
      • Ranger in Version 4. Have probably the most powerful gunners in the entire game, but close-quarters troops are limited and roster is comparatively small.
  • Likewise, the Medieval II: Total War total conversion mod Third Age: Total War is laid out like:
    • Gondor: Elitist/Brute. Decent heavy cavalry and infantry with good armour stats, but archers are comparatively weak and units are costly to recruit and maintain.
    • Rohan: Balanced. Cavalry are pretty tough, although they lack decent heavy infantry, in the early game at least. This means they dominate in the open fields of their home turf, but fall apart once they hit a solid fortress.
    • Dale: Balanced. Average in all respects. Dale's heavy infantry is good but not as good as Gondor's, Dale's cavalry is good but not as good as Rohan's, Dale's longbowmen are good but not as good as the Elves', and Dale's light infantry are good but not as good as Eriador's.
    • Eriador: Guerilla/Spammer. Many units are cheap but comparatively weak in straight-up fights, with emphasis on light infantry, militia and rangers, forcing reliance on stealth and/or Zerg Rush tactics. However...
      • Arnor: Elitist. Has the strongest units in the game all-round. Borderline Game-Breaker, but then you have to play as Eriador to unlock Arnor anyway.
    • High Elves: Elitist. Extremely strong units all across the board, but the high cost of units combined with the standard Elven birth-rate problem means that armies will be relatively small.
    • Silvan Elves: Elitist/Ranger. Like their High Elf cousins, small, powerful armies of elite units, but with a much greater focus on archers at the expense of cavalry.
    • Dwarves: Brute/Unit Specialist. Tons of powerful axe/pike infantry who are extremely dangerous in melee and heavily armoured, but they have limited options for long-range engagements, and almost no cavalry at all (save for extremely rare Dale mercenary cavalry units). Because of this, Dwarven armies shine in offensive and defensive siege battles, but struggle in open battles.
    • Orcs of Gundabad: Spammer/Guerilla. Standard Orc numerical superiority combined with many skirmisher units who are good at hiding.
    • Orcs of Misty Mountains: Brute. Expect to fight Trolls a lot when fighting this faction.
    • Rhûn: Balanced, although cavalry are Elitist. Basically, Gondor's Evil Counterpart.
    • Harad: Balanced/Spammer.
    • Isengard: Elitist/Brute. Tough Uruk-hai heavy infantry, Wargs and crossbows.
    • Mordor: Spammer/Technical. Huge hordes of useless Orcs, supported by extremely powerful and expensive one-of-a-kind units and generals with strange abilities.
  • Another Total War mod, Hyrule: Total War uses this as well.
    • Hyrule: Generalist: They have a solid range of troops of all types but do not excel in any one area.
    • Kokiri: Spammer/Guerilla: Lots of units of huge size, but individual Kokiri are weak and prone to fleeing. However, they move fast, have good mobility on both the tactical and strategic map, and rarely get exhausted.
    • Gorons: Brute/Unit Specialist: Gorons hit hard, and their troops pretty much define the idea of Lightning Bruiser, with infantry hitting as hard as most factions' heavy cavalry. Just don't expect them to do well at range.
    • Zora: Ranger: Very powerful at a distance, especially with their artillery, and their armies can cross any body of water.
    • Shiekah: Guerilla: Small units that can hide anywhere and hit with extreme damage when they attack a formation from behind. Able to steal money from neighbors and move in and out of territorial-seizing stance at will.
    • Laranyu Province: Ranger/Guerilla: Good at mobility and fighting at range, but not so great up close due to light armor.
    • Ghoma: Spammer: They're pretty much Zerg Rush: The Faction, though they throw in some shockingly-powerful heavy units at the highest tiers of their military.
    • Gerudo: Ranger: One of the better cavalry factions and with good archers, but infantry are more of a Glass Cannon than anything else.
    • Darknut Legion: Brute/Unit Specialist: Their entire army is heavy infantry with swords (save for Fokka Knights). Of course, this makes them very vulnerable at range and when faced by cavalry, but they are utterly terrifying in close combat.
    • Moblin: Brute. All about attacking with raw, brute force and huge soldiers.
    • Ordona Province: Ranger/Unit Specialist: Ordona has good archers, but they also have the best cavalry in the game.
    • Lizalfos: Guerilla/Spammer: Lightly-armored troops who come in large numbers and also move extremely quickly. Specializing in flanking maneuvers and ambush.
    • Deku: Ranger/Spammer: Come in huge numbers with good ranged ability. You'll need to use it, because the Deku have the worst morale in the game....
    • Labrynna: Techical/Elitist: Labrynna is the only faction with working gunpowder, steampunk mecha, and other Renaissance technology.
    • Fairies of Tarm: Ranger: Masters of long-range combat withd dazzling beams of bright, cheery death.
    • Twili: Elitist/Technical: Twilight's troops are powerful and psychologically terrifying, but cannot move very quickly in Hyrule proper and tire easily.
    • Ikana: Technical/Elitist: Ikana has some of the best troops in the game. They also can't replace them directly; their soldiers have to return to Hyrule through various rifts in their lands.
    • Stalfos: Technical/Spammer: Stalfos troops are recruited from the dead of those armies they defeat, letting them assemble a powerful but brittle force that neither tires nor breaks and routs.
    • Order of the Wizzrobe: Technical/Ranger: An army of wizards, essentially. Devastating at a distance, terrible up close. Can cause rebellions in vulnerable provinces by converting the local population and inciting revolt.


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