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Webcomic / Suicide for Hire

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Suicide for Hire is a mature-rated Furry Comic by Rafael Medina about two teenagers, the extremely enthusiastic sex-obsessed fox Hunter Ravenwood, and the chain-smoking highly paranoid mouse Arcturus Winrock (who also has a homicidal split personality), who help other people kill themselves, often in a highly karmic way.

A typical story arc follows a standard formula:

  • Someone who would like to kill himself for some insane reason finds Hunter and Arc.
  • Said someone tells them his story and why he wants to die.
  • Arc tries to talk him out of it until he says or does something that convinces Arc that he's beyond redemption.
  • Hunter plots their client's Karmic Death.
  • At the last minute the client changes his mind but Hunter ensures that he follows through (yelling "Nonrefundable" to a jumper or throwing Arc's shoe at him if that doesn't work for example).
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  • Later Hunter and Arc usually find a brief article about their client's gruesome suicide.

More plot-significant arcs are more complex and don't always follow that formula, though the client always dies.

Found here.


This webcomic provides examples of the following:

  • Adults Are Useless: Why they haven't been caught yet.
  • A Good Name for a Rock Band: An occasional running gag.
  • And This Is for...: Arcturus and Hunter's Roaring Rampage of Revenge on Ty
  • Art Evolution: The author said in an interview that his drawing style changed so much that one of the earlier characters wasn't recognized when they returned later in the comic.
  • Art Shift: Crudely-drawn cartoons are used in a flashback sequence to demonstrate how feebly the character is lying.
  • Artistic License – Religion: Hunter (and therefore, presumably, the author) seems to be talking about the entire Christian faith during his rant against the religious right.
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  • Asshole Victim: Most of the people who hire them.
  • Ate His Gun:
  • Author Tract: He really hates lying. (Link is to part of the second arc IN A ROW to contain an anti-lying Author Tract.) Also the part with the pregnant woman they refuse to kill.
    • This actually induces a bit of Values Dissonance within the comic as well. For example, no one was especially upset when a girl claimed to have had sex on her grandmother's gravestone, but they were all absolutely scandalized to find out that the event never actually happened. Granted, this came out during a massive reveal of just how much she'd been lying to everyone, but the fact still holds that within the comic, dishonesty is apparently worse than desecration.
  • Awesome Mc Coolname: The two main characters, as well as Hunter's occasional girlfriend, Chryseis North, though most of their clients have more mundane names (if named at all).
  • Badass Adorable: Arcturus. C'mon, look at those big soft Puppy-Dog Eyes of his!
  • Body Horror: The result of a botched Shotgun in the mouth.
  • Bolt of Divine Retribution: Hunter refrains from pointing out St. John was called "Christ's Beloved" and that there were no female apostles because; "I like having both arms and not getting struck by lightning" during his epic chewing out of the local Not-Westborough Baptist Church.
  • Break Them by Talking: Hunter sometimes does this to people who piss him off, while he's inflicting serious pain.
  • Carnivore Confusion: Lampshaded by the author in a side note for a comic where Hunter and Arc were discussing milk. "You know of any species of wild animals that not only nurse after infancy, but from a source not even of its own species?" note: "To anal-retentive assholes like myself: you know what I mean. STFU."
  • Catchphrase: Hunter likes using "quityerbitchen" on Arcturus whenever he starts complaining.
  • Confusing Multiple Negatives: Apparently when Hunter was 13, his father tried to ensure that he would be straight using porn: "By the way, I don't not want you not watching not channel 169 when we're out of the house."
  • Costume Porn: Arcturus and Hunter wear elaborate outfits, and so does this girl, apparently.
  • Country Matters: the end of the confrontation with the "Religious Wrong".
  • Crapsack World: It seems that people only manage to succeed when they're complete assholes, not to mention that the police are apparently useless and clerks at gun shops barely check IDs.
  • Cut His Heart Out with a Spoon: The way most of their customers go down, which is why most of them try to chicken out halfway through.
  • Depraved Homosexual: One arc features a gay waiter who makes a crude sexual advance on Hunter and then threatens to stalk and rape him after he refuses. Right after Hunter chews out a bunch of Westboro Baptist Expys. It should be noted that the writer tries to make sure that the "Depraved" part of this character is not linked to the "Homosexual" part; while beating him up, Hunter explained that he understood that most homosexuals were not like this. Within the comic's universe Hunter was probably wrong: keep in mind that most of the straight characters in this comic are just as bad if not worse.
  • Domestic Abuse: Tybalt Montlet is an absolutely classical textbook example.
  • Driven to Suicide: well, look at the comic's title.
  • Enemy Without: It's unclear what exactly Xero is, but it is clear that he was formed from Arc's dark side and is practically a separate person.
  • Even Evil Has Standards:
    • The boys apparently don't like to harm women unless they're clients. Under the rules of SFH, they don't accept clients under 16 and don't plan suicides that result in the deaths of a third party (they reject a pregnant customer because of those rules).
    • For all his sociopathic tendencies, Hunter has a self-enforced guideline of only killing people who come to him to be killed. Unless they prove to be too dangerous to live or REALLY piss him off.
    • Altair keeps several guns in his truck to clear traffic in order to make deliveries on time, but he's modded each one to be non-lethal.
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: Arc and Hunter deal in over the top Karmic Deaths in the form of assisted suicide for those that wish to die.
  • The Faceless: Arcturus' parents, also Hunter's.
  • Fridge Logic: In-universe example mixed with Lampshade Hanging: Xero explains. Presumably it's going to get explained eventually.
  • Gilligan Cut: Here
  • Gun Twirling: Hunter does this. When Arcturus tells him to stop, he says he has it under control; and nearly shoots Codename Rudolph in the head just seconds after.
  • Going Commando: Hunter.
  • Gollum Made Me Do It: Xero apparently takes over to some extent when Arc is on the job, but it's unclear exactly how much of Arcturus' behavior is actually him and how much is Xero.
  • High Turnover Rate: One time Arcturus quits Suicide for Hire and gets a job at a ball park concession stand where the customers are particularly idiotic. He lasts four days longer than most people before snapping and trying to strangle someone.
  • Human Resources: In one comic Hunter is doing a report on Utilitarianism and suggests that the penalty for offenses as minor as speeding should be to get ground up into protein shakes that are then fed to hobos who are then lured into a hospital so their organs can be harvested.
  • Hypercompetent Sidekick: Arcturus Winrock and Hunter, to each other and at different times.
  • I Call It "Vera": Hunter's guns, "Bop" and "The Idiot Magnum".
  • It Tastes Like Feet: Lampshaded in a non-food example. Hunter comments that a scorpion sting feels like someone put out a cigarette on his foot, and when Arc asks him how he knows what a cigarette burn feels like he uses Arc's cigarette to provide a comparison.
  • Karmic Death: Most of the deaths that Hunter and Arc arrange, such as a frat boy who felt responsible for his friend's death by alcohol poisoning drinking methanol and then being set on fire.
  • Kill It with Fire: After Hunter's... alone time. The strip above also counts.


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