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YMMV: Twilight
The following contains YMMV items to the Twilight literature.

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    Unfortunate Implications 

The series has become rather notorious for having these.
  • Edward's behavior is basically that of an emotionally abusive boyfriend, and he has all the personality of a cardboard box. Bella uses excuses that real life abused women use to justify his behavior, such as that Edward acts this way because he really loves her.
  • Bella's behavior is arguably just as vile. This review takes Dr. Hare's twenty traits of sociopathy and applies every single one to something Bella has done or thought in New Moon.
  • This article examines some of Twilight's unfortunate implications: specifically, how interracial relationships never work out, how Bella is essentially marrying an old man who doesn't want sex but always wants to boss her around, how Bella, who wants sex, goes after the painfully prudish Edward instead of the man who wants it as much as she does, and how in the end, Bella essentially chooses not to choose.
  • In the official guide to Twilight, Meyer outright says that turning into a vampire causes the person to turn white, no matter what their ethnicity is. This is not so bad, except that in a previous section, Meyer also states that it is the sparkly, pale appearance of the vampires that make them universally beautiful.
    • This article (second part is here) outlines many other unfortunate racial implications as well. And also here.
  • As stated in this review, the concept of immortal children is terrifying. Meyer (certainly unintentionally) implies that many, many children died in the process of making immortal children so that their vampire creators could have someone to baby and drool over; considering how hard it is for vampires to stop feeding and begin the transformation process, it's very possible that countless children died during this process. Not to mention these vampires were stealing these babies away from their rightful families and condemning them to a life of eternal pain (seeing how painful it is for a vampire to be thirsty), not to mention the fact that they'll never mature or be able to experience life to the fullest. Also, they were responsible for the deaths of literally thousands of people because they couldn't control themselves. And yet we're supposed to believe the Volturi are just so evil for putting a stop to this reign of terror.

    Mary Sue Tropes 
  • Her name is Bella Swan ("Beautiful Swan")
    • Or it could be a reference to Bela Lugosi and Swan Lake. Which is still pretentious, so it still fits.
    • Her full name is Isabella Marie Swan, which also fits the self-chosen nickname and useless second name often found in Sues.
  • Anti-Sue: Despite the fact that the author frequently stresses Bella being plain, awkward and outwardly unremarkable, everyone she meets instantly adores her, she gets perfect grades while barely trying, she has a cool vehicle, all the guys want her and anyone who doesn't like her is eventually revealed to be ether jealous or evil... sound familiar?
    • It could possibly be due to Meyer's poor writing, but it's immediately obvious that Bella is a very conventionally attractive girl. Another writer, who wished to convey that a character who did not think much of their appearance was actually very attractive, would have Bella describe her appearance with phrases such as "scrawny" and "pasty" etc, and leave it to the reader to glean from other characters' reactions to Bella that she is actually beautiful but does not realise it. Meyer has Bella describe herself in much more flattering terms, such as "slender" and "pale".
    • Almost every boy that Bella meets, at least the ones she spends any significant amount of time with, spend at least one conversation telling Bella how wonderful and special they think she is, usually when they have not even known her very long and haven't actually heard her say or seen her do anything remarkable or even unexpected.
    • Despite the fact that Bella acts very socially awkward and off putting, all the other characters react to her as though she were the most dazzling, charismatic, gem of a person they've ever met.
      • Also, Edward frequently goes on about how good and pure and kind Bella is despite the fact that the majority of her actions are ether selfishly motivated or panicked reactions to external stimuli; she usually just takes her first impulse and goes with it. In fact, one of the justifications for the vampires being so attracted to her is that she possesses an uncommonly pure "essence". Then again, she's the one person in the world whose mind he can't read, and over the years he seems to have come to rely on that almost exclusively for judging people...
  • Black Hole Sue: All the other characters, whether they be minor or major, male or female, good or evil, act as though Bella is the most important thing in their lives, even if they barely know her. All the events of the story, regardless of whether they logically have anything to do with Bella or not, wind up centering around her somehow or featuring her as a vital (though passive) linchpin.
  • Canon Sue: Bella is especially this based on how others react to her; everyone who meets her instantly adores her despite the fact that she never really does or says anything to inspire such feelings, she gets perfect grades while barely trying, her flaws (clumsiness and shyness) are the ones typically given to a Mary Sue to make her seem more realistic (and so the author has something to point to as proof that she isn't a Mary Sue), those flaws also only show up under the most contrived circumstances (that lead to Edward and/or Jacob noticing and/or "romantically" saving her) and then go away only to return when they are needed again. Everyone who doesn't adore Bella is eventually revealed to be either jealous, evil, or only acting as if they didn't like her for her own good. Bella's Mary Sue status is hilariously lampshaded in the parody film Vampires Suck. Becca, a parody character, states that "every hot guy finds me irresistible", and moments later a guy puts his arm around her.
  • Escapist Character: For the women: Bella Swan. For the guys: Jacob Black.
  • God-Mode Sue:
    • Bella as of Breaking Dawnnote . But honestly, the whole time, because her latent power was so strong she couldn't be affected by the strongest of vampire abilities before she even had it amplified by vampirism. As a vampire she gains the ability to stretch it out to cover all her supernatural allies as well. In point of fact, she learns how to stretch it out when she realizes she wants to use it to protect her daughter, making one wonder if she could've even done that as a human if she'd only been properly motivated.
      • Perhaps the funniest thing about that is Bella's power could only keep the Volturi from using theirs against the Cullens and their friends. For Bella to seem like the most important, powerful and vital member of the Cullens' defense, the author had to completely ignore some vampires with far more impressive and directly useful powers, including of course the one with control over the four elements. He could've just burnt the Volturi to a crisp where they stood, or willed the ground to open and swallow them up. But then nobody would've cared about Bella.
    • Edward. He's considered insanely desirable, even by the standards of other vampires. He's incredibly fast and can read minds, so it's impossible for anyone to sneak up on him or escape him. And he's considered the favorite "child" of his family, to the point where he gets everyone to abandon their jobs and lives in Forks in New Moon and actively and successfully orders Alice to not speak to Bella in Midnight Sun and all the Cullen women to kidnap Bella in Eclipse.
  • Jerk Sue: Bella blatantly mistreats the people around her, at best showing no concern for their needs or feelings and at worst manipulating those feelings to her own ends with no thought to how she may be hurting them in the process, and they rarely seem bothered by it. They're usually just happy to be given the opportunity to be in her presence (despite the fact that she's always ether annoyed, angry, or depressed, which can't make being around her all that enjoyable), and when one of them does object to the way she's treating them (which is extremely rare) it is written in such a way as to make the reader believe that they are in the wrong and just don't understand Bella. She also makes little or no attempt to conceal the fact that she doesn't care about other people and is just using them but, again, they don't seem bothered by it because they just adore her so damn much (for reasons that are never specified.)
    • The only reason Bella is interpreted in a sympathetic light by most of the readers is because Stephenie Meyer works so hard to make her sympathetic (via warped perspective), despite the fact that none of her thoughts or behavior ever indicate that she's a good person. Viewed subjectively, Bella's a shallow, callous manipulator bordering on psychopathic. The most commonly given excuse for the negative aspects of her personality is that she's a teenage girl, but the author lets all the air out of this excuse by making Bella unable to get along with other teenagers because she's supposedly more mature, intelligent and down-to-earth than them.
    • Edward would apply as well. All of the girls swoon over him, even though he ignores them and is generally anti-social and unfriendly. He constantly forces Bella to do things she tells him she doesn't want to and throws tantrums if he doesn't get his way. Despite all of this, he is the favorite of the Cullen family and everyone constantly talks about how great he is and how they do anything to please him.
      • And how compassionate he is, that's why he is a mindreader.
  • Relationship Sue: Robert Pattinson, or RPattz, noted in an interview that Bella was basically a big wish-fulfillment fantasy of Meyer's. And in the fourth book, Renesmee Carlie "Nessie" Cullen is one for Jacob Black, though thankfully there's a hook that the human-vampire hybrid Nahuel will be making a bid for her in the future, which will hopefully be successful, as it's far less creepy.
    • Almost all of the shapeshifter teens get them also—Quil gets Claire, Sam gets Emily, Paul gets Jacob's sister, and Jared gets a female classmate who had a crush on him.
  • Suetiful All Along: Bella is described as plain and socially awkward, but everyone she meets begs to differ.
    • The author makes some feeble attempts at Lampshade Hanging this by having Bella wonder why everyone loves her so much at one point in the story and having her be irritated by her popularity instead of enjoying it, but it's so obvious that she's Lampshade Hanging that it renders it ineffective.
      • Plus, complaining about being well liked is a common trait of the Mary Sue (see My Immortal).
      • This trope is barely even concealed in the story since even Bella, who supposedly considers herself to be very plain and is supposed to have low self esteem, describes herself in terms that most would consider extremely flattering ("ivory-skinned", "chocolate brown eyes", "slender but soft.")
  • Sympathetic Sue: Poor, poor Bella! She's so tortured! Poor, poor Edward! He's so tortured!
    • Nearly every character in the series, even ones who barely know Edward and Bella, seem to care about Edward and Bella's relationship so much that they are willing to die to protect it and anyone who ever dares to even imply that their own problems or their own suffering should take priority over that of Edward and Bella (who never experience anything other than self imposed suffering anyway) is swiftly reprimanded by the other characters. It seems that Edward and Bella are the two most important people in existence.
    • In the last part, at least in the movie, it's at least implied that people are uniting behind the Cullens because they're fed up with the Volturi for their own reasons (they are, after all, cruel, merciless and tend to dick around with other vampires' lives) and this just happens to be a convenient time for them to do something about it.
  • Thirty Sue Pileup: There's Bella (Purity Sue/Mary Sue/Sympathetic Sue/God-Mode Sue), Edward (Straight God-Mode Sue/Sympathetic Sue), (Renesmee (Straight Mary Sue)...

    All The Rest 
  • Acceptable Target: For Your Vampires Suck. Run CTRL+F on that page and you'll find 25 entries. Pick up a vampire book/show/game etc written after Twilight and there's a high probability that it will bash Twilight at some point.
  • Accidental Aesop: Many opponents of the series cite examples of Jacob and Edward's dominance of Bella as anything from undermining feminism to propagating Mormon beliefs (just look at the Alternate Character Interpretation section).
  • Accidental Innuendo: Eclipse, in the dedication. Among his other positive qualities, the author thanks her husband for his "willingness to eat out." One may be shocked by the level of TMI about their private relationship, before realizing Meyer means going to restaurants.
    Bella: (exasperated) I'm coming!
    Edward: I don't want you to come!
  • Actor Shipping: Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart have repeatedly denied they are in a relationship. This does not stop fans from insisting that they are lying. Of course, a few fans have seen multiple videos and pictures of Kristen Stewart and Nikki Reed kissing and are pairing them as well.
    • Contributing to this is the fact that Pattinson admitted/joked that he auditioned for the part of Edward entirely for the opportunity to hit on Stewart.
    • Confirmed between Pattinson and Stewart, even after Stewart's "cheating" scandal.
    • And now they have broken up again. A cynical man could be forgiven for thinking that they stayed together after she cheated on him just long enough to promote the film release of Breaking Dawn Part 2.
  • Always Second Best: The best any of the other characters can ever hope to be when being compared to Edward or Bella.
    • Bella describes herself at this at everything... except being a vampire.
  • Anvilicious: The first book in particular is made of anvil. Giving into those base desires will kill you! Sex before marriage will kill you!! Blood equals sex equals death equals don't do it!!!
    • Every woman has the desire to get married and be a mother ingrained in her DNA, even if she doesn't realize it; if she says she doesn't want these things, it's just a silly little rebellious phase that she will get over.
      • In the books Bella originally doesn't want to get married and admits to never wanting a child, but after Edward gives her an ultimatum (he won't even discuss having sex with her unless they get married) and she unintentionally becomes pregnant, everything clicks into place and she realizes that marriage and motherhood were the keys to happiness all along.
      • Similarly, every women in the books is ether married and has children, wants to get married and have children, or regrets that she can't get married and have children unless she is one of the villains or is meant to serve as an example of someone selfish and irresponsible (i.e. the sort of person YOU shouldn't want to be.)
    • Don't even think naughty thoughts. Vampires will hear you. And... and... judge you!
    • Your boyfriend should be the most important thing in your life, he should come before your family, your friends, your future, and even your own personal safety.
    • If you can't get a boyfriend you're doomed to a life of solitary misery... and there's probably something wrong with you (especially if you don't even want a boyfriend).
  • Ass Pull:
    • The Big Bad vamps Victoria, James, and Laurent were not mentioned at all until the very end of the first book. The movie rectifies this mistake and has them shown earlier. The role of the Volturi in enforcing the rules of vampire society was similarly introduced out of the blue in New Moon.
    • Before Breaking Dawn Part II was released, the promotional materials and marketing hyped up an epic final battle that was shown in nearly every trailer and TV spot. When the film was released, the final battle turned out to be one of Alice's visions.
    • Also from Breaking Dawn, just when it seems the Cullens will have to face the consequences of allying with werewolves, mortal enemies of vampires, Jake and his tribe are suddenly revealed to be a group of shapeshifters whose powers are completely unrelated to those of real werewolves (or "Children of the Moon" as the book calls them). This comes despite them being regarded as werewolves by the narrative for the whole of the series. And the Cullens knowing they weren't real werewolves all that time. They didn't say anything about it because You Didn't Ask.
  • Author's Saving Throw: Fans were happy to hear that the film would not end with the massive Anti-Climax that the book had and that there would actually be a final battle. Even though it turns out that the film has it both ways, and the battle was All Just A Vision.
  • Award Snub: Inverted. For the past two years (and without a doubt the next two) the movies have been nominated in nearly every category at the MTV Movie Awards, and winning every one of them. Because MTV doesn't monitor IP addresses and allows people to vote multiple times, New Moon beat out Alice in Wonderland and Avatar (both of which grossed over a billion dollars), The Hangover (the highest grossing comedy ever which, like Avatar, won Best Picture at the Golden Globes), and Half-Blood Prince.
    • Got even worse in 2010, when Eclipse beat Inception, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Black Swan and The Social Network in categories like Best Film, Best Male Performance, Best Female Performance, and Best Fight (Yes, the films with wizards blowing up a restaurant with spells and two guys fighting in a rotating hall got beaten by, well, this.)
    • Finally averted in 2012, where Breaking Dawn Part II only won the distinguished award for Best Shirtless Scene, the only category it was nominated for. Its four year streak for the Best Film category was broken by The Avengers.
    • On the other hand has been nominated to about every category of Razzie Awards and won none (except for Jackson Rathbone, but then again, that was mainly because he had the misfortune to turn in two bad performances in the same year, the other being in The Last Airbender).
  • Awesome Music: In an inversion to the quality of the films, many of the songs on the soundtracks are fantastic featuring work by the likes of Muse, Paramore, Thom Yorke, Bat For Lashes, Beck, Metric, Bombay Bicycle Club, The Black Ghosts, Lykke Li, Death Cab For Cutie, The Joy Formidable, and many others. The OST is great as well, scored by none other than Carter Burwell
    • Special note goes to Iron & Wine, whose "Flightless Bird, American Mouth" was rereleased as a digital single and became his most famous song overnight due to a heavy case of Song Association.
  • Bile Fascination: Like a bizarrely-enjoyable train-wreck, some readers can't pull away.
    • Also, those who hate it seem to be just as obsessed with it as those who love it; as though they're perpetually trying to figure out how anything so purely terrible could exist, let alone get published and make money. In pursuit of the answer to this riddle, many of them spend even more time thinking about it (analyzing it and picking apart its every intricacy) than fans do.
      • Although some of those antis would argue that the only way someone could enjoy this series is not to think about the contents.
  • Broken Aesop: Far too much to be included on one page. If determined, you can start looking at all the unfortunate implications.
  • Broken Base: Leading up to the release of the film version of New Moon, the war between the "Team Edward" and "Team Jacob" factions became so intense that Burger King was able to base an ad campaign around it.
    • And the base promptly exploded when Breaking Dawn came out.
  • Cliché Storm: Awkward, clumsy girl moves to new school and is instantly adored by all? Check. New girl falling in love with the hottest (cough) guy in school? Check. Hot boy falls in love with new girl? Check. Girl is so in love she will do anything for her true love? Check. And that's just the beginning...
  • Complaining About Shows You Don't Like: Lots of distaste even on this wiki, though ideally tropers are providing examples showing why the negative tropes qualify.
  • Contested Sequel: Even the fans became a Broken Base with Breaking Dawn. The Amazon page gives it an average 3-star rating — because most of the reviews are either 5 stars or 1 star.
  • Creator's Pet: Renesmee from Breaking Dawn. EVERYONE who meets her loves her, despite the fact that she hasn't done anything other than be Edward and Bella's half human/half vampire daughter with psychic powers. Many fans loathe her for hijacking the story away from the Official Couple. Others hate her because her very existence is Artistic License - Biology AND a direct contradiction to previous Word of God. Team Jacob fans hate her for other reasons.
  • Critic Proof: Greatly savaged by critics, but still a box office success.
  • Damsel Scrappy: Bella Swan pretty much epitomizes this trope, even commenting in her own narrative that "I guess my brain will never work right. At least I'm pretty." Add in the fact that she can't seem to get out of any scrape without the intervention of a male, you've got one of the most textbook examples of this trope EVER.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: When all three of the main characters are extremely possessive, selfish and emotionally manipulative Jerkasses at best, neither the Cullens nor the Volturi have very many redeeming traits and the story itself pushing jerks to the front, often giving them incredibly fucked up backstories but portraying them rather positively, while pushing the ones that aren't jerks to the background as fast as possible, portraying them negatively despite them not really showing any negative traits, or making them worse in an apparent attempt to make them less sympathetic, it can become really rather hard to even fake that one cares who ends up with who and/or how the story ends because all end reults are equally repugnant.
  • Deader Than Disco: You can largely blame both the Unfortunate Implications mentioned above and the Hunger Games stealing almost all of Twilight's teen girl fanbase. There is a more complete explanation on the trope page.
  • Death of the Author: Meyer ostensibly wrote the series to be about the triumph of love over all obstacles. As is well-known by now, it's instead interpreted by many to be a paean to Stalking Is Love, that vampirism "fixes" people of other ethnicities by making them white, and Bella's baby being so spoiled rotten and easily able to bend others to her will she'll probably grow up to take over the world, among others.
  • Designated Hero:
    • Edward and the Cullens are the good guys because... well, they don't eat humans. They let their vampire buddies eat humans, routinely show up the Muggles, use their awesome powers for pure personal gain, and screw up the lives of many a werewolf to get their way, but at least they don't eat humans.
    • Bella gives minimal thought to the innocent people being killed by vampires, unless it's someone she knows. In New Moon, she seriously considers withholding what she knows about vampires from the werewolves because telling them anything would feel like betrayal to the Cullens (even though she knows full well that the Cullens are in no danger from the wolves at all and that helping the wolves learn about the vampires will help them stop Victoria more quickly and thus keep more people from dying).
    • It's a lot harder to sympathize with Bree Tanner when she shows no remorse at all for committing multiple murders and seems under the impression that she is above laws as long as there is no one to hold her to them. There's also the matter of her and Diego suffering from a severe case of Too Dumb to Live.
    • And in the unfinished manuscript for Midnight Sun, Edward is definitely genocidal, casually mentioning wanting to slaughter the Quilute tribe due to Jacob daring to speak to Bella because as far as he knew they were defenseless. He also comes across as a school killer, plotting the murders of his entire class so he could get to Bella without witnesses, and later plots getting her at her home in a way that comes across as very much like he's planning a rape.
  • Designated Villain: James and Victoria are pretty thinly etched, but it could be argued that the Big Bad of the Volturi have, in spite of some questionable practices, actually done a lot of good over the centuries, particularly by overthrowing the despotic Romanian coven and preventing vampire wars from escalating or breaking out altogether. If analyzed closely, the Cullens and their friends' determination to stand up to them seems to be fueled in part over petulance at still having to obey rules even as powerful immortal beings. Like not turning toddlers into unstoppable murder machines (which requires them to eat babies).
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?: When Edward first brings Bella home to meet his family, Esme is happy to see that Edward found somebody after being alone for so long, but the way it's written makes it sound like she was afraid he was gay and is happy to see he's dating a girl.
  • Don't Shoot the Message: Many, many anti-abortion activists do not like Breaking Dawn. Also counts as Stop Helping Me!
  • Double Standard: Mainly when it comes to Twilight's Fandom in the saying that: "If these were 40-year old men screaming for 17-year old girls, they'd be on To Catch A Predator so fast it would make your head spin."
    • The series also repeatedly implies that men should not be held accountable for things that they do when they are very angry or otherwise emotionally over whelmed.
      • Both Edward and Jacob "accidentally" hurt Bella (or come really close to doing so) on at least a few occasions and this is usually excused by the fact that they are male and therefore unable to control certain impulses.
      • Most of the other men in the series also do things that could be interpreted in a negative light but usually aren't because they did them in "the heat of" rage/passion/jealousy/lust/etc. But any time a woman steps even the slightest bit out of line she is swiftly and harshly reprimanded for it, usually by the men around her some of whom exhibit the exact same behavior at some point.
      • The series implies that men, and only men, should not be held accountable for things they do while angry, or any other time for that matter. Bella's narrative is willing to forgive any man for almost anything he does, and the few times she doesn't, she still describes him in surprisingly positive terms. By comparison, Bella seems to hate women by default, especially non-vampires, and expects them to remain in control of their emotions at all time (except herself) and views women as stupid, shallow, or selfish for being even a little bit emotional about anything. About the only non-vampire woman she doesn't hold in contempt at least a little bit is Angela, and that's mostly because she's too much of a doormat to bother her the way almost all other humans do.
    • A lot of things the Cullens (The Beautiful Elite) do are considered horrible when anyone else does them.
      • Bella also judges all the non-vampires around her very harshly (even when their only crime is having the sort of flaws that any normal human being would) but is endlessly forgiving of the vampires in the Cullen family pretty much no matter what they do.
      • The series is greatly biased in favor of the vampires over the werewolves. The vampires are almost always described as insanely beautiful every time one of them is mentioned, and narrative even kisses the asses of the villainous vampires, however the werewolves usually don't get off so well. Bella's narration constantly expresses doubt that the werewolves can handle vampires, even after she finds out that they already have and she personally witnessed one fleeing from the pack in terror. Also, if a werewolf says something negative about vampires, Bella will express in narration feeling outright offended by it, and if it's Jacob saying it, she'll often yell at him and force him to apologize. Whenever a vampire, usually Edward or Alice, says something negative about the werewolves, Bella never says anything to them about it and at most wishes silently that the two sides would get along.
    • When Leah is heartbroken over Sam and is moody about it, everyone considers her a bitch who should get over it. When Jacob is heartbroken over Bella, everyone holds his hand and doesn't say a cross word to him.
    • Bella at one point criticizes another girl for only liking Edward for his looks and the fact that he comes from a wealthy family, even while she herself constantly gushes over his physical appearance and hardly ever mentions anything else about him aside from his nice house, cool car, and equally attractive well-to-do family.
    • She's also always rolling her eyes at the few human girls she occasionally hangs out with for being shallow and silly and frivolous, but adores Alice who is, arguably, the embodiment of those qualities. Implying that it's bad to be that way, unless you're a beautiful, wealthy vampire.
    • The age difference between Bella and Edward arguably invokes this, considering that the older one is a male.
    • Bella often manipulates the feelings of those around her to get what she wants with no regard to rather or not she is hurting them, any other woman in the series who acts in this way is framed as a heartless bitch.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: "Team James" has quite a following. Same for Victoria, particularly for Bella haters.
    • Aro has become something of this after New Moon's movie came out and Michael Sheen turned in his Large Ham performance.
    • Tyler's van. At least it tried.
    • Jane is also extremely sadistic and otherwise emotionless, but being played by Dakota Fanning have increased her fandom.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse: Carlisle. Some of his fans are among those who otherwise loathe the books. Ditto Alice, who counts Movie Bob and Cleolinda Jones among her fans. Being played by Ashley Greene helps just a tad.
    • Jasper, redeemed Blood Knight. On the villains' side, you have Aro, though the Volturi in general probably count.
    • And Rosalie for some, particularly people who dislike Bella.
    • For the werewolves there's sweet kid Seth and fierce Leah, who has a particularly memorable moment involving a Narrative Profanity Filter. Jacob too, ignoring his jerkass moments in Eclipse and anything after the imprinting.
    • A lot of the moviegoers loved how Charlie was done. Like Leah and Carlisle, even the Hatedom tends to like him. The Spoony One (referring to him as "moustache dad") even says he's the most sympathetic character throughout all the movies.
      • Even the Rifftrax team like him!
      • The Distressed Watcher says he wishes the movies were centered on Charlie, a silent but resourceful lawman investigating a string of mysterious murders and struggling with single fatherhood while his daughter keeps secrets from him.
      • Leah Clearwater in particular has become very popular amongst those who don't like the series.
    • Tyler, aka "the guy who almost hit Bella with his van." The van itself too, really.
    • Bree made people pity her to the point that they wrote an alternate take on her encounter with the Volturi and even went as far as have her be adopted by the Cullens.
    • Jane (the movie version, at least) is also a popular character even amongst Antis, particularly those who are fans of Dakota Fanning.
    • Jessica, also from the movies. Being played by Anna Kendrick doesn't hurt.
    • Basically a case could be made for any character but the protagonists, Renesmee, and Esme (because she is boring).
  • Esoteric Happy Ending: Jacob's imprinting on Renesmee, considering he stated it's actually a terrible brainwashing not long before, indeed loses his personality and becomes Demoted to Extra, his imprintee is practically abusive to him, and he had to leave his family and pack for good to live at the Cullens' Condescending Compassion instead.
  • Everyone Is Satan in Hell: Okay, some conservative objections against the book make sense, but there are a lot of people who take the most bizarre potshots against it. According to this video, Stephenie Meyer must have intentionally hidden Satanic messages into her series because, among other things, a kid with the last name "Cullen" once escaped a Satanic cult, and the chessboard on the Breaking Dawn cover has a check pattern just like the floor in a Masonic lodge.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Victoria in the films, Laurent in the book.
    • James in the film as well.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: Most likely unintentional; arguably the whole series.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: If the Amazon.com reviews are any indication, a good portion of the fanbase has excommunicated Breaking Dawn.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Jacob/Bella, though the official couple has its own vast devoted fanbase.
    • Not to mention Alice/Bella.
    • Jacob/Leah.
    • Among Jacob/Leah shippers, Nessie/Seth sounds like a better imprinted couple, given that Seth has a pure mind and already likes vampires and is at least younger, so him waiting for Nessie to grow up is easier to buy as a relationship. Or, alternatively, Nessie/Nahuel, which is even hinted at in the freaking book at the end, despite the whole business with Jacob being Nessie's "soul mate".
    • Bella/Tyler's Van.
    • A lot of people feel the books and movies would be half-way decent if it were Jacob/Edward. Given that Bella is the most boring female character in literature, they're not wrong.
  • Faux Symbolism: The author tries to invoke this with references to the forbidden fruit and the lion and the lamb, but seems to have a poor understanding of what those things mean so it doesn't really work. Especially bad since Stephenie Meyer is a Mormon and presumably went to sunday school in her youth.
    • To address the former, it's supposed to be about exciting but dangerous knowledge, and being pulled from the confines of your safe reality forever (finding out vampires are real and the hot, moody boy you've been swooning over is one). But Bella despises living in Forks, looks down on most of the normal people in her life in one way or another, and obviously places little to no value on living the way she is when the story begins (she says she'd gladly die for any of the Cullens' sake so many times it practically becomes a catchphrase). What she stands to gain from hanging around the Cullens (love, power, wealth, simple excitement) far outweighs anything she has to lose, and she never thinks twice about accepting. Having accepted, whenever something bad happens that might reasonably cause her to step back and rethink her situation, she always uses it as a reason to try to go even deeper (I.e. They find out an evil vampire's probably out to get Bella. She presents that as evidence that she needs to be turned into a vampire right away). Eating the apple's her ticket into paradise, not out.
  • Foe Yay: Fanfiction like you wouldn't believe. To be fair, it's more or less I-don't-like-you yay than actual Foe Yay. Some of the better ones out there, plot wise, are actually Victoria/Bella, Rosalie/Bella, Rosalie/Jacob, Alice/Jacob and Edward/Jacob.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: Breaking Dawn Part 2 looks like one big one now that Kristen and Rob have broken up due to her infidelity.
  • Ham and Cheese: Robert Pattinson.
    • In the film of New Moon, Dakota Fanning managed to rival him despite having a grand total of five lines.
    • You can really see Pattinson giving up at trying at all in Eclipse and deciding to just have fun, making his scenes FAR more enjoyable than the book counterpart. (Probably helped since in an interview he mentioned being super tired and busy from other projects while filming and barely remembers filming the movie.)
    • Michael Sheen, too, promptly stealing the show.
      • Especially in the Sequel Hook of Breaking Dawn Part 1
  • Harsher in Hindsight: When Edward leaves Bella in New Moon, she breaks down and remains almost catatonic for months. This foreshadowed Kristen Stewart's reaction to her highly publicized breakup with Robert Pattinson in 2012.
  • Happiness in Slavery: Of the second kind. Jacob is content to let Bella use him and manipulate him into doing things for her while getting nothing in return because he's nursing the vain hope that Bella will eventually forget Edward and fall in love with him.
    • Heck, as soon as Bella shows up on the first day of school every male she meets practically begs to do things for her.
    • In general, Bella seems to invoke these feelings in people (especially men);K from the moment most of the male characters meet her she becomes the focal point of their entire existence and they want nothing more than to do things for her even when she openly objects to them doing so. You'd be hard pressed to find any point in the story when Bella expresses some dissatisfaction or desire without the nearest male jumping at the opportunity to fix it for her, wanting nothing in return than to get into her good graces so that they can spend more time around her so that they can do more things for her.
    • In The Short, Second Life of Bree Tanner, Bree knows full well that something suspicious is going on and that Victoria and Riley hardly have her best interests in mind, yet still seriously considers going along with them and fighting for their cause. Towards the end of the novella, she starts to think of the other newborns as a team briefly, even though she knows they're being groomed as a disposable army.
    • One could argue that the entire concept of imprinting is this trope, for both parties involved.
  • Hollywood Homely: Alice looks exotic next to Bella.
    • Though, in the eyes of Edward (and apparently the entire male population of Forks), Bella is exceedingly beautiful.
    • Kristen Stewart is a quite good-looking woman, not "plain" like Bella is supposed to be. Although, it could simply be that Bella suffers from low self-esteem.
      • Stephenie Meyer originally wanted Emily Browning to play Bella. Either the author is vain or she wants Bella to appear beautiful.
      • Bella also averts plain in the graphic novel.
      • Given that Bella seems at least moderately attractive from her description and has at least six guys who want to get in her pants and think she's hot, this seems to take place in canon as well.
      • Bella describes what she's apparently supposed to see as negative attributes in terms of glowing beauty, like "ivory-skinned", "chocolate brown eyes", "slender but soft". This could be purple prose, or her "plainness" could be like a size 2 complaining how fat she is so everyone will tell her how she's really thin and beautiful.
  • Ho Yay: Loads of this, usually unintentional, between Edward and most other males such as Jacob. One assumes that Stephenie Meyer was unaware of the implications of biting pillows, breaking headboards, and Carlisle selecting a handsome teenage boy as his "companion" in vampirism (rather than say, a pretty woman).
    • The Romanian vampires, Vladmir and Stefan. Not only do they live and travel together, but they finish each other's sentences.
    • Believe it or not, Stephenie Meyer's joke story "Breaking Down" included Mike leaving Bella for Eric.
    • The Volturi.
    • Or all the Riley/Diego subtext as seen in Life Packs A Punch.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Jacob has a sister named Rebecca.
  • Hype Backlash: Inevitable when one of the world's biggest little romantic Guilty Pleasures gets hyped by a good half of the people you know as some sort of epic good-versus-evil story with vampires and werewolves, and oh, there's some romance... and they fail to warn you about the sparkling thing to boot.
    • This got about a billion times worse when Breaking Dawn came out.
    • Many in the Hatedom have professed that they wouldn't have hated it so much if the fans hadn't gotten so overzealous about Edward being the perfect guy or the insanity of the Edward vs. Jacob war when it was clear Jacob never had a chance. And since the haters started hating it they found out, as one stamp proclaims "I love hating Twilight more than you love loving it." Now it's a cycle of who can be louder and there have been many lols and much bawling.
    • Another fuel for the hatedom is how vampires are portrayed given Meyer barely seems to understand the lore. Had she made up a unique name, or maybe had them adopt the name, at least some of the hatred would dial down.
  • Hypocritical Humor: Any time someone else in the story criticizes Edward and Bella defends him, or when Bella criticizes someone else (minus the humor). From the first book alone, Bella is outraged that her police officer father still checks up on her at night when she's sleeping. This is a mere five pages after finding out that total stranger Edward breaks into her room to watch her sleep and thinking it's the romantic thing ever.
    • Bella mentally goes on about how Jessica only thinks that Edward is hot, "as if that excused any flaws". When Bella herself is obsessed with Edward's looks, taking literally every chance to remind us of how perfect his features are, the majestic shade of his eyes, etc., and forgetting to be angry with him more than once just by getting a chance to look at him again.
  • Idiot Plot: Almost every plot point in the first book is brought about by one or more characters being stupid. Hasn't Carlisle ever heard of homeschooling?
    • In Eclipse, the Cullens, Bella, and the wolves wonder who could be behind the strange vampire activity in Seattle. While they also know full well that Victoria is in the area and trying to kill Bella.
    • A large chunk of the conflict in the latter half of New Moon could have been averted, had anyone thought to use a telephone—or had Jacob not decided to answer Bella's phone for her (which was a Jerk Ass thing to do anyway, since she was sitting right there). They also could have been sensible enough to go on more than just Alice's vision, since she herself had admitted her powers weren't always precise or accurate. (One can't really accuse any of the Cullen "kids" of much sense, but Carlisle was a practical person who probably should have thought of that.)
      • Or why Edward didn't call Alice's cellphone, seeing as he knew she had one and knew that she was in Forks and could definitely say if Bella was dead or not. He even comments later that he should have done that!
  • I Just Want to Be Special/ I Just Want to Be Beautiful (?): The story implies that the source of all Bella's unhappiness was the fact that deep down she was in some way inherently superior to everyone around her and that just being forced to live as though she were a normal person when she was meant to be one of The Beautiful Elite was reason enough for her to be miserable, so she could only be truly happy after she became a vampire (making her as superior outside as she was inside) and was allowed to spend the rest of eternity in the company of other beings as superior as herself (i.e. the Cullen family.)
    • In fact the main reason she has trouble connecting with other mortals seems to be just because she feels that she deserves to be surrounded by more exceptional (and attractive, don't forget attractive!) people; she often seems disgusted with or irritated by her "friends" at school for no other reason than that they are not as super-humanly flawless as the Cullens, whom she seems to regard as the only people in the world who are truly worth her time.
  • Inferred Holocaust: Breaking Dawn ends with the Volturi admitting defeat and leaving the Cullens alone and Bella and Edward being left to have a happy marriage for eternity, with no one else wanting to shanghai members of the family or kill their daughter. They all apparently have forgotten that Aro touched Edward's hand during the climax, giving him access to all of Edward's thoughts so he now has knowledge of all of the powers of the gathered vampires, including Bella, who was supposed to be the secret ace-in-the-hole. That, coupled with the book's insistence that the Volturi would never give up trying to have their way, has led a number of people to comment that Bella and Edward's happily ever after will probably be interrupted when the Volturi come back to kill them which the Cullens won't be able to see coming because the Volturi now know how to block out Alice's visions completely and are going to visit the people they need to be around to do so.
  • Informed Attribute: Bella is supposedly very intelligent, other characters talk about how smart she is a lot and the story frequently mentions her getting straight A's, but she never actually does anything that demonstrates above average intelligence. In fact in dangerous or stressful situations, when a high intellect might prove beneficial, she usually just grabs her first emotional impulse and goes with it without stopping for an instant to think about the potential consequences; things only turn out o.k. through sheer luck/coincidence or through the interference of Edward, Jacob or one of the Cullens.
    • The author also seemed to be trying to convince the reader that Bella is a head strong, independent, modern woman despite the fact that throughout the entire story she almost never actively tries to take control of her own life; she makes a few vain attempts to seem self-possessed (she occasionally argues with Edward or puts up a little resistance before giving in), but Edward usually winds up making her decisions for her in the end.
    • Edward also talks a lot about how good and kind and pure and virtuous Bella is (Incorruptible Pure Pureness), but most of her actions are ether completely selfish, or impulsive reactions to external stimuli; the majority of the things she does that would conventionally be considered indicators of virtue or selflessness are things that Edward forces her to do or things that she's doing out of her selfish desire to be with Edward (usually only with regard to how they affect Edward and herself, with no consideration for anyone else.) Left to her own devices, Bella is childishly selfish and reckless.
      • The fact is, everything about Bella's personality is defined in terms of what she hates and/or holds in contempt. Even the things she ostensibly does like or care about (e.g. Edward's looks, Alice's company, sparkly vampires, having her "true love") are distinguished solely by how they lack the flaws she carps about in everything else — which is, after all, what "perfect" really means — or by how miserable the prospect of not having them there will make her. Small wonder that she wants to be a vampire: it's not that she likes vampires, it's that she loathes imperfect humans and her own mortality.
    • Carlisle is repeatedly said to be incredibly compassionate but (apart from being a doctor) never seems to show any concern for anyone outside his own "family"; in many instances he is even shown passively allowing innocent people to suffer and die, deciding that Edward and Bella's relationship is more deserving of his attention.
  • It Was His Sled: Believe it or not, Edward being a vampire is supposed to be the major twist of book one. In fact, Eclipse is the only book not to spend its whole first half building to a twist everyone already knows; the others are that Jacob is a werewolf, and Bella has a baby that Jacob imprints on.
  • Eclipse had one; it was that the vampire population surge in Seattle was an army being created by Victoria to get even with Bella. That one was arguably the worst of the lot, since Bella had known for two-thirds of the previous book that Victoria was out for revenge on her.
  • Jail Bait Wait: Jacob and Renesmee (in a BIG way.)
    • Bella at one point notes that Jacob is literally QUIVERING at the thought of how soon Renesmee's going to be old enough for him to have sex with her, given how quickly she's growing. The fact that Bella is Renesmee's mother (and Jacob's former object of infatuation) makes this little detail extra creepy.
  • Lethally Stupid: Bella.
  • Les Yay:
    • The Amazon vampire coven. Also, Alice and Bella. And in Eclipse, Leah and Bella when Leah tells Jacob that she had a dream about kissing Bella. We are supposed to see this as a natural result of the werewolf telepathy but... not everybody does.
    • Even with Esme and Bella. Anyone remember her calling Bella "Dearest Bella", like, right against her skin?
  • Love It or Hate It: You're either an anti or a huge fan of the series. There isn't a middle ground to be found.
  • Love Makes You Crazy: The supposed justification for Edward's Stalker with a Crush behavior and (in the second book) for Bella's extremely reckless behavior.
  • Love Makes You Dumb: The supposed justification for Bella's seeming lack of common sense and survival instincts throughout the entire story.
    • YMMV on whether Bella was already idiot before she meet Edward or not.
      • Though quite frankly, she did willingly give up her right to be smart. In the cafeteria date in the chapter with the blood typing, she first claims hypothetical stupidity ("Let's say for argument's sake that I'm not smart.") She goes on to do the thing she herself agreed was a stupid thing to do, i.e. stay with Edward.
      • The above example just further proves that the trope is present, in that scene (and many others) Bella directly acknowledges that she's making bad decisions and doing stupid things but goes along with them anyway because she believes that "love is irrational" meaning that if you're in love you never have to use common sense and you never have to justify or explain your actions (it's basically just really blunt Lamp Shade Hanging.) The fact that a character willingly chose to not act intelligently does not negate the existence of this trope.
  • Love Makes You Evil: The supposed justification for any behavior exhibited by Bella, Edward or Jacob that could be interpreted in a negative way.
    • In fact the over arching message of the series seems to be that no matter how wrong or selfish something seems, it's justified as long as the end result of it is that you get to be with your true love.
    • Really, most of the things Bella does.
  • Memetic Mutation: CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN
    • Also, it's nearly mandatory to Photoshop any picture of Edward Cullen to include sparkles (see pic). On forums and boards that allow it (such as LiveJournal), sometimes even just his name is formatted to sparkle.
    • Association with Twilight Sparkle is also popular, for obvious reasons.
    • Edward seeing Bella for the first time is sometimes interpreted... differently.
    • "This is the skin of a killer, Bella!" *sparkles*
    • Pattinson's "greasy" real-world hair seems to be approaching meme status. If a picture of him is posted somewhere, someone will mention his hair.
    • "JACOB, KEEP YOUR SHIRT ON!" "NO!"
    • And then there's the habit haters have of coming up with alternate shipping teams (i.e., "team Tyler's van", "team Mike Newton", etc.)
    • Still a better love story than Twilight (used often in Youtube videos about, well, everything)
    • Aro's Squee over Renesmee used to be funny.
    • "No one hates Twilight more than Robert Pattinson does." Has become this, since he's a rare, open hater of a franchise he himself stars in.
  • Narm: Edward dramatically proclaiming 'This is the skin of a killer!'... then sparkling is almost impossible to take seriously.
  • Narm Charm: All of team Jacob and team Edward should be able to agree that what makes the whole Twilight Saga so good is its cheesiness.
    • One special mention goes to "YOU NAMED MY DAUGHTER AFTER THE LOCH NESS MONSTUURR??!!111!
  • Never Live It Down: *sparkles* Also, the movie was enough of a hit that the actors are now tied to their characters.
  • Nice Guys Finish Last: Team Jacob's take on Bella's ultimate choice of romantic partners.
  • No Such Thing as Bad Publicity: Before, you'd be much more likely to find it placed in the Teen section - usually huddled in the back of the bookstores, behind all the Fantasy and Science Fiction sections, even. Now? Bookstores have an entire section dedicated to Teen Paranormal Romance; the film franchise, along with the books, find themselves regularly on the bestseller lists.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: Rosalie's brief summary of how she went Kill Bill on the people who gang-raped her could have made a very interesting book or movie, but sadly all the best and bloodiest parts are left out when she recounts it - in all of three paragraphs - to Bella. For those who haven't read it, she puts on a wedding dress and kills all of the men one by one, saving her former fiancé, who is behind a barricaded door and protected by two guards, for last. It's easily one of the most interesting parts of Eclipse, and it's not even described.
    • In Twilight, we don't see James getting killed because Bella passes out just as it starts to happen!
    • In both Eclipse and The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner, we miss the entire battle between the Cullens and wolves and the newborn army. This is especially silly in Bree Tanner's novella, given that she is a newborn and thus should have been at the battle herself.
    • For antis, Leah calling out Bella for stringing Jacob along in Breaking Dawn. Sadly, since the section's from Jacob's point of view it's only mentioned.
  • Older Than They Think: Let's just say that the series is not as original as some of the more zealous fans say it is.
    • Most fans of the series seem to be under the impression that Vegetarian Vampire is a new innovation that Meyer introduced to the vampire genre when, in reality, the concept was used by Bram Stoker, Anne Rice, Vampire: The Masquerade and many others long before the Twilight series came out. This also goes for vampires walking in daylight, having luminous skin and developing emotional attachments to humans.
    • On the flip side, a lot of haters blame it for making vampires sexy and glamorous instead of monstrous.
      • Though to be fair with the whole Dracula thing, even though the sunlight didn't burn him, it still rendered him incapable of using his supernatural powers. The thing that bugs most haters is that Meyer didn't give them ANY weaknesses at all.
    • Even vampires being mineral-based isn't a new idea, as Tim Powers used it in The Stress of Her Regard.
    • Before Renesmee Cullen, there has been in literature a half-human supernatural baby that grows up and matures to an adult in a fraction of the usual time, has incredible powers, and creeps out some people. Who is it? Wilbur Whately.
  • Padding: The books have lots of padding such as Stephenie Meyer describing how beautiful Edward was and how much Bella loved him and the step-by-step descriptions of Bella getting up, brushing her teeth, picking out her clothes, making breakfast for her and Charlie, closing all the pop-up boxes after running her web browser, etc. The most extreme example of padding was in the second book (New Moon), where there are (literally) ten blank pages in the middle of the book. It essentially goes blank when Edward decides he must remove all traces of his life from Bella's.
    • A frequent criticism leveled at the (first half of the) film adaptation of Breaking Dawn - Since the filmmakers decided to split the book into two movies, despite how the novel could have been easily squeezed into a single film, Part 1 is packed to the brim with montages to pad out the running time to just under two hours.
  • Periphery Demographic: The TwiMoms, as well as the aforementioned gay following.
    • Also, racial purists.
    • Hardened convicts base their views on romance on this book.
  • Poe's Law: To this day, people debate whether or not Stephanie Meyer is either a very lucky but very poor author, or a very, very good Troll.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: Jakeward. It's not too hard to guess who they are. Alice/Bella goes by the name of Bellice, while Rosalie/Bella is called Rosella. And some people actually refer to Bella/Edward as Bedward.
    • There's always what the slash shippers come up with. Some examples being: Jaspard, Jaspeth, and Mareth. The former two of which have rather impressive followings, with Jaspard being one of the more popular slash pairings.
  • Protection from Editors: Quality of the writing aside, the sheer amount of basic research fail in the books suggests this. Not just the biology fail, or the Misplaced Wildlife, but the west coast of Brazil? Whatever else any editors might or might not have done, fact-checking and Real Life research they did not. Given how Meyer goes on and on about how much she hated to cut the few scenes she did (and how she put said scenes on her website, spelling errors and all), that seems rather likely.
    • This also happens with the graphic novel, even though Meyer didn't even do that one. Young Kim, the artist, wrote about how her editor would have her cut out a scene for pacing reasons, only for Meyer to convince her to put the scene back in.
  • Purple Prose: Though Stephenie Meyer writes at a regular teen-reading level, she suddenly becomes very poetic when describing Edward's appearance. Also, Edward Cullen whenever he attempts to say something romantic.
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: Ironically, many critics of the series complain that the story would have been far more interesting had the author only devoted more time to the secondary characters and less to the Edward/Jacob/Bella love triangle and Edward and Bella's relationship drama, which seemed stale and boring compared to the far more origional, provocative personalities and backstories of the secondary characters.
    • There have even been people on Deviantart and LiveJournal who post "edited" plots that actually aren't hate-oriented. A memorable one suggested that there should have been hints of James' coven's existence earlier and that Bella should have thought Edward was the reason for those hints, making her wonder about the relationship instead of just diving right in without complications. Another pointed out that the books are a good example of when romance should really be a subplot.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble: Except in visual form... The scene where Jacob and Bella are dancing in pt 1 of Breaking Dawn has more intimacy and romance and pure connection than the original dance with Edward at the actual wedding.
    • This is consistent with the books. One of the biggest complaints Team Jacob have with the eventual outcome is that Bella and Jacob actually have some level of chemistry together.
    • A bigger example is Jacob and Leah in Breaking Dawn. Many, many readers/viewers consider them just right for each other due to their interactions. But nope, according to Stephanie Meyer, they're "just friends", thus Leah ends up with no-one and Jacob ends up with a vampire baby.
  • Rooting for the Empire: The series features the three tracker vampires who are trying to kill Bella, which is seen by some as a sympathetic aim. Never mind the fact that each is an Ensemble Dark Horse in their own right.
    • The books put a lot of emphasis on the Volturi being a power-hungry dictatorship that ruthlessly oppresses the vampire world. The trouble is, the only restriction they apparently put on the vampires is to not be noticed by humans, which is given a reasonable justification (human technology could kill vampires) and very lightly limits the ability for a vampire to kidnap or kill a human. Word of God and the series also show that vampires are more or less animals if left to their own devices, so it makes it difficult to see the Volturi as dictators instead of a group of people who are trying to get some sort of order or structure to their world. Meyer tries to make the Volturi corruptness really apparent in Breaking Dawn when it's hammered in that they'll arrive to kill Renesmee and in no way listen to reason... only for them to bring witnesses, reasonably listen to evidence, and leave without killing anyone.
      • It is made clear that the witnesses and plans for listening to evidence were really for show, as they were planning to put them all under a mist and kidnap Alice and whoever else they wanted for their powers. Only Bella's shield actually protects them from this.
      • It's also the prosecuted vampires who come to that conclusion. Consider this. Basically, the Volturi's methods may not be totally angelic, but they've also prevented a vampire population explosion that'd put a strain on their feeding stock, but also kept the feeding stock which is now equipped to hunt them to extinction from finding out they exist. And as mentioned above, by their nature most vampires are basically animals ruled by their hungers and passions. Even though the book makes a point that the Cullens are so unique for remembering how to still love, they're still supremely arrogant toward non-vampires (toward the end of Breaking Dawn Bella thinks it would be "a shame" to have to kill someone) and think nothing of flaunting their superiority. Mainly in displays of wealth which should stick out like a sore thumb in a tiny town, where a family of seven has only one breadwinner. At the end of the story it mentions all the Cullens' allies maybe reuniting one day to overthrow the Volturi once and for all and presents that as a heroic happy ending, but the books also portray them as the only thing keeping vampires from giving into their urges completely and exposing themselves to a world that would hunt them to the last one. TL;DR, the Volturi are written as being mean for telling vampires not to kill as many people as they want, but they're also written as the only thing keeping humans from learning vampires exist and wiping vampires out.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Bella Swan. Many fans, whether they really enjoy the book's content or just see it as So Bad, It's Good, really do not like Bella.
    • There are also those who hate Edward AND Jacob. While each is the scrappy to the other side, some people are sick of the merchandise fuel despite the ending of the series being determined before the first movie came out.
    • Renesmee is probably hated by fans and haters more than Bella, Edward, or Jacob combined!
  • Selective Squick
  • Shout-Out to Shakespeare: Whilst butchering Shakespeare.
  • Show, Don't Tell: Advice that someone should have given Meyer at some point in her writing career.
    • This happens a lot when it comes to characterization; instead of having characters actions indicate what sort of people they are, Meyer usually just has the characters describe each other to Bella.
      • Usually it's a member of the Cullen family describing another member of the Cullen family to Bella, Jacob describing a member of the wolf pack to Bella, or one of Bella's class mates describing a member of one of those two groups to Bella (in fact Bella's friends at school seem to exist solely for this purpose.)
      • This can get problematic when a characters actions do not fit (or even directly contradict) the way the other characters describe them and yet Bella continues to react to them as though they are the way they were described, it creates the impression that Bella will believe whatever she is told even if reality doesn't support it.
    • Instead of showing some sort of natural progression of Edward and Bella's relationship, having it develop in a plausible way at a plausible pace and having them go through actual experiences together that would make the audience understand why their feelings for each other are so strong, Meyer just has them talk prematurely and incessantly about how in love they are, it's literally the second conversation they have (after they've only known each other for about two weeks mind you) and almost every conversation after that. The expectation on the author's part seems to be that just their repeated insistence that they're truly and deeply in love will be enough to get the audience emotionally invested in the fate of their relationship.
      • They do have one generic "getting to know you" type conversation, but that's orchestrated by Edward after he's already decided that he's in love with her and is rushed through and written in such sparse detail that it feels like an after thought.
      • Only two years into the relationship, Bella thinks it's appropriate to declare that the love she has for Edward is the greatest love of all time, somehow beating out the likes of couples who have been together for centuries.
    • It also seems as though the only reason the author gave certain characters psychic abilities or enabled them to read minds is so that they would be able to know what it was necessary for them to know in order to move the plot forward (without her having to explain how they knew it) and so they could give exposition when necessary, usually to fill in plot holes or to save the author from having to indicate how a character is feeling through their actions (because it's far easier to simply have Edward instantly know how they're feeling.)
      • This is very obvious when you note that those psychic abilities only work when it facilitates the plot, for example: Alice has psychic visions with perfect clarity when it will lead to the main characters knowing something that they need to know in order for the plot to move forward (the newborn army) but when her knowing something would hinder the plot or make a big moment less dramatic (Edward's suicide attempt in response to falsely being told that Bella is dead) her visions suddenly become ambiguous and hazy for some reason. All her "blind spots" just happen to be really plot convenient.
      • Also, Edward's mind reading ability seems to exist solely so that he can explain the actions of other characters when they don't make sense, for example: in the first film, Bella (like much of the audience) wonders what motivation James has for chasing after her and Edward is conveniently able to explain it because he had read James' mind. Though the reason winds up not making much sense anyway.
      • Also the members of the Volturi whose power is to see the strength of relationships. It's explained briefly that this does have a strategic function, but it's first seen being used to remind us how true and pure and enduring Bella and Edward's love is, so that's the usage that sticks with the reader.
    • Plenty is said about how Leah is this vindictive harpy who won't graciously step aside and let her ex be happy with her maid of honor and how she's so mean to the rest of the pack. The only thing the reader actually sees is how vicious the pack is to her, how she's being forced to live in her ex's mind while he constantly thinks about how much he loves the woman Leah used to see as her sister, the pack's Double Standard regarding her and Jacob, Leah pointing out things that are actually very logical, and her actively taking steps to improve her situation. The end result is Leah turning into the poster child for Unintentionally Sympathetic.
  • Silent Majority: Statistically Speaking, this is actually a very successful franchise. The way the internet talks about it? There are no fans about them. Yet nowadays, people are much more likely to run into haters than fans... clearly there are a lot of people who like this franchise, yet feel no need to scream about it on the internet. (Especially since fan haters will chase them out)
  • Single-Target Sexuality: Edward is completely Bella-sexual. The werewolves also become this after they imprint.
    • Jacob seemed Bella-sexual as well, before imprinting on Renesmee.
    • All the boys at the school seem Bella-sexual as well, that is until Bella tells them that they should go out with someone else.
      • Mike remains Bella-sexual even while dating someone else. Hell, he's still holding out for her during her wedding.
  • Sidekick: Everyone who isn't Edward or Bella.
  • Static Character: Bella. She goes from being a socially awkward, world weary, somewhat stuck up teenager with what most psychiatrists would see as an unhealthy obsession for Edward to being Edward's socially awkward, world weary, somewhat stuck up vampire wife with what most psychiatrists would see as an unhealthy obsession for Edward. Bella never learns any lessons or grows as a person or even changes at all (for better or worse), by the end of the series she's basically the same person she was in the beginning except that she's a vampire and all her dreams have come true.
    • Whether you see this as a good or a bad thing depends on whether or not you were a fan of her character to begin with.
      • Or if you believe in Character Development. There are authors, both here at TV Tropes and out in the wider world, who despair over the lowering of literary standards Twilight either caused or revealed.
  • Smug Snake: Some have noted that for all the squealing about how awesome Edward is, his most astonishing trait is the extent to which he is stuck up his own ass when not Wangsting.
  • Smitten Teenage Girl: Bella.
  • Snark Bait: For a sizable fraction of those following it.
  • So Bad, It's Good: A significant portion of the series’ internet fanbase enjoys the books because of the melodramatic plot, unrealistically 'perfect' characters, and sparkling.
    • The commercials involved with Burger King (especially the toy commercial for Eclipse) can qualify.
  • Special Effects Failure: Many in The Film of the Book, including a sparkling vampire who looks a lot more like he's covered in sweat, and way too much pale makeup on the Cullens. Said pale makeup also would stop at the neck or fail to cover the ears, particularly with Bella in the hospital scene.
    • Most distracting was the indescribably abysmal wire-works for the jumping bits that can be easily spotted.
    • Jacob's absurdly obvious hair weave (until he gets his Important Haircut).
    • The special effects in the second film were significantly better in most aspects. Just so long as you ignore the werewolf transformations...
    • The CGI baby in Breaking Dawn part 2.
  • Strangled by the Red String: The series has this both in-universe with the concept of "imprinting", which means this can be done to werewolves as soon as the plot demands (arguably, all the examples in book 3 were only to prepare the reader for the last one), and out-of-universe with Bella and Edward's relationship. Edward acts surly and moody toward Bella for the first half of the book, and yet Bella decides that she's "unconditionally and irrevocably in love with [Edward]" right after she realizes that he's a vampire who thirsts after her blood, and is completely devoted to him from that point on, even in the face of Edward's own warnings about how he could kill her. Just how devoted is she? She's willing to give up her human life without any second thoughts to be with him forever after what can't be any more than a month of knowing him, and instantly leaps back into his arms after he renders her practically comatose by leaving her without explanation. And her interactions with Edward after the vampire "reveal" consist almost entirely of them repeatedly professing their love to one another and her even more repeatedly being "dazzled" by Edward's glorious beauty.
    • This is arguably furthered in the films, when in their "romantic" scenes, they both just look bored and uncomfortable.
    • Likewise, in The Short Second Life Of Bree Tanner, with Bree and Diego and, later, Freddie. Bree and Diego interact for one night, she spends most of it afraid that he's going to kill her, and by morning they seemingly are madly in love with each other. The same goes for Freddie. Since it's from Bree's point of view and the "relationships" between her and the guys are so muted, it's possible that we're supposed to see it as her mistaking simple friendship for love (which would fit with her background of being abused and neglected), except that nothing ever indicates this and she acts almost exactly the same way Bella does, including being perfectly alright to die when she finds out he's gone, because life without him isn't worth living.
  • Strawman Has a Point:
    • In the novel New Moon, Bella is annoyed that Jessica won't talk to her, and thinks that Jessica is being petty and evil. This is after Bella has ignored everyone for four months, used Jessica to get Charlie off her back, ditched her shortly into the movie to pine over Edward, and then nearly frightened Jessica to death by walking up to a very dangerous-looking biker in a bad part of town that Jessica clearly wanted to avoid, all because Bella thought it may be the same one that Edward rescued her from before.
    • In Breaking Dawn, Leah calls Bella out on some of her more selfish actions in trying to manipulate and keep Jacob with her despite knowing full well how much it hurts Jacob to be around her knowing that she's chosen to die and become an undead monstrosity with Edward over a life with him. Even Bella admits that she's being selfish, but chooses to keep doing it anyway. Everyone else gets angry at Leah for upsetting Bella, including the guy Leah was trying to stand up for. And any point Leah made is completely forgotten.
    • Also, the part where Aro says that humans now have technology that could be used to hurt or kill vampires, so since there's no way of knowing that Renesmee will always be able to keep vampires a secret she's a vulnerability. The response to this is something along the lines of "Aro is a big mean jerk who just wants to destroy the Cullen family for loving each other" and nobody bothers to refute his point until Alice conveniently shows up with another half-vampire. Aro is actually kind of right, though, especially since Renesmee's superpower involves sharing her thoughts with people—that could easily develop into something that'd make it hard for her to keep secrets if she gets more powerful as she grows older (if she ever experiences any Power Incontinence she could end up accidentally sharing random things with random humans).
      • Let's also not forget that Bella finds out she has the ability to project her power over an area. Since Renesmee's power is suspected to be basically an inversion of her mother's, who's to say she couldn't be capable of projecting her thoughts not just into a person she touches, but everyone within a given area? And on top of that, the full scope of Bella's abilities were held back by her self-doubt until she was angry enough to overcome it. Renesmee, on the other hand, seems unencumbered by any such baggage.
    • Charlie gets both this and Informed Wrongness. His daughter is creepily obsessed with a guy who has never displayed any attributes aside from being equally creepily obsessed with her and being an asshole and also gives him no reason to assume he isn't an abuser (which, by real world standards, he is). The narrative pretty clearly wants the reader to side against Charlie, even when Bella and Edward team up to casually manipulate and bully him into letting her do whatever she wants, and despite the fact that Charlie really hadn't been wrong about ‘’anything’’ in the entire story.
      • Goes into Tear Jerker territory in New Moon when he's trying to get Bella help when she's clearly depressed. He points out (correctly) that she's just going through the motions and that it would be better if she lived with her mother rather than staying in the town that has too many painful memories. And the readers are supposed to side with Bella, who refuses to move on with her life and even exploits Jacob's infatuation with her, because the only way she can find any measure of happiness is playing games with her life which causes her to hallucinate Edward telling her to stop risking her life.
  • Straw Vulcan: Any character who tries to convince Bella to think rationally and make practical decisions as opposed to blindly following her heart is usually treated as an enemy and in the end Bella's flat out refusal to be logical or rational, using the fact that she's in love as a justification for making decisions that even she openly admits are not wise, winds up making all of her dreams come true.
    • This is of coarse treated as a triumph of the 'wisdom' of love over the bland practicality of reason.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: In Breaking Dawn, there's one brief, shining moment when Leah chews Bella out for leading Jacob on like she has been. It happens offscreen and the reader is supposed to hate Leah for it, but it's still something.
  • Television Geography: In Eclipse, Bella has a 10:30 curfew. Edward shows up at 7:00 and offers to take her to Portland, promising to get her back before curfew. Portland is 250 miles away - it takes five hours to get there and back. Though, this could be explained by that fact that vampires have a super speed ability (though Edward's established speed [102 MPH] means it would still take two and a half hours for him to run 250 miles). Or he's lying to convince her to go. Or he Drives Like Crazy.
    • Not to mention that apparently you can get from Forks to Alaska in sixteen hours. On (apparently) one tank of gas. That's almost two and a half thousand miles—Edward would have had to be traveling at a fraction of the speed of light to manage that. The Al-Can highway is so long and so remote that they have (or used to have) checkpoints; when you leave one, they radio ahead to the next to tell them you're coming. If you don't show up in a certain amount of time, they go looking for you to make sure you're not dead. This simply cannot be done in sixteen hours.
    • The Cullens' private island is described as being off the "west coast of Brazil." Look at a map of Brazil and see its beautiful western coastline.
  • This Loser Is You: The author attempts to write Bella as this, but winds up unintentionally writing a Canon Sue (with a dash of Anti-Sue) instead.
    • Oddly enough most of the fans still say they like the books because of how much they identify with Bella/ wish they were Bella.
      • That's because this trope DID work, but probably not for a reason the author intended. One criticism of the book is that Bella has few to no personality traits of her own. She isn't shown with many hobbies, and they don't talk about many of her likes or dislikes. Bella is practically a blank slate, which makes it incredibly easy for the reader to envision themselves as Bella. It's kind of like a "Choose Your Own Adventure" book with an undefined hero.
      • Oddly enough, the author has gone on record saying this was intentional.
  • They Just Didn't Care
    • The films in general. Aside from the dozens of Special Effects Failures, some of the cast and crew don't really seem to care about putting effort into the movie they are making. Robert Pattinson, in particular, has outright stated his general lack of research into preparing for the role and his motivation for getting a paycheck at the end of the day.
    • The manhwa. The art's actually decent, but the lettering is absolutely terrible. Half the word bubbles have to be transparent because they're covering people's faces. That's an amateur webcomic mistake!
    • Imprinted werewolf couple Quil and Claire. Does Stephenie Meyer know who Clare Quilty is?! (And if she does, talk about Unfortunate Implications...)
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Many feel that the sprawling, epic vampires vs. werewolves story would be far more interesting than the walking Romantic Plot Tumor that forms the books. Many others feel that the books would be better if they were about likable, clever small-town cop Charlie solving supernatural murders, rather than being about his obnoxious daughter getting laid.
    • Plus, Rosalie's backstory could easily be a great story on its own, essentially being Kill Bill with vampires. Yet it's briefly summed up in a single chapter and never mentioned again.
  • Uncanny Valley: Robert Pattinson's heavily made-up face combined with massive Photoshopping on covers, posters, and promotional art.
    • Renesmee. Full stop. Her CGI self is not very convincing. However, it could have been so much worse. For a while the crew tried using an animatronic doll, but the result was deemed so horrifying the cast even began calling it "Chuckesmee."
    • Bella's character profile in the official guide; as Zelda Queen said, she looks like someone took the face of a grown woman and slapped it onto a teenage girl's body.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic: Leah, oh dear God, Leah. Through most of the Twilight series, Leah is meant to be seen as a heartless bitch who didn't bow graciously out for Sam hooking up with Emily, uses the pack mind to think of various scandals, and tell Jacob he's being overly angsty about Bella. The problem with that is, with all the stuff she's been through (She has been dumped by her boyfriend because he imprinted on her cousin, she's hated by her wolf pack for being upset about it (while Jacob is coddled for doing the same thing), might have caused her dad's heart attack when she transformed in front of him, is not able to have children, she's the only female to not be paired up romantically with someone at the end of Breaking Dawn, also in the same book she mentally admits that her ex-fiance wants her to disappear, and, to top it all off, her own brother, who she spends all of her time protecting, tells her "you ruin everything!") she comes across as an Iron Woobie. She comes across as this even more so when one considers that the same people who call her selfish and whiny all coddle Jacob for being even more self-centered and whiny over Bella, who he was involved with far less than Leah was with Sam.
    • Because of this, Leah is arguably the most popular character with antis, or even the only character they like at all.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Bella, whose helplessness and other attributes cause many to regard her as an Anti-Sue.
    • Also her lack of problems but constant "need" to whine about basically everything and even when there are genuine problems and threats she still tends to focus the narrative back on her.
    • All Meyers's shallow attempts to make Bella seem intelligent and deep and tortured just wind up making her seem whiny and pretentious and entitled.
  • Wangst: Both Bella and Edward. Full stop, reaching the absolute peak in New Moon.
  • Vocal Minority: Twilight has spawned a fantastically trollish fans, which doesn't really pan out great for the 90% who just want to read the books. A lot of fans will actually acknowledge all of Twilight's flaws and parody it shamelessly themselves.
    • Also, the majority simply don't like things in the books, and are considered to be a rabid haters just because of the small but loud percentage of them who are like that.
  • Voodoo Shark: Meyer's attempt at explaining why male vampires could breed.
  • What an Idiot: Despite supposedly being a great doctor, Carlisle tends to do things that only make sense to someone with no medical experience. Like cleaning the shrapnel from Bella's wound at the beginning of New Moon in the very dining room where it happened, and stocking up on the rarest kind of blood from the Forks blood bank to make sure Bella has nourishment handy during her first few days as a vampire. When Bella's pregnancy is killing her, he even exclaims "I can't figure out what it wants!" He can't figure out that the offspring from a human x vampire copulation could, possibly, be part-vampire and have a vampire's dietary needs.
    • Not to mention that freaking morphine is his go-to drug, even in circumstances where a much less potent painkiller could have been used.
    • And the fact that he applies antiseptic after suturing Bella's wound, not before. Doesn't do much good if the bacteria you want to get rid of is inside the closed wound.
    • Also, agreeing to ally with the Romanian vampires in Breaking Dawn. They were the previous rulers of vampire-kind before being overthrown by the Volturi. The enmity between the two groups is apparently so strong Laurent was denied into the Volturi just because he talked to them once. Yet the Cullens accept the Romanians' help, even though they're hoping to reach a peaceful solution to the dispute with the Volturi.
  • What Could Have Been: The casting crew for Breaking Dawn was originally going to use this to show Renesmee.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Didactic?: Possibly one of the most major criticisms leveled at the film, especially by the British education system and by British parents.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: And yet Burger King just made Twilight-themed Happy Meals.
  • The Woobie: Bree Tanner. That is all.
    • Robert Pattinson. He didn't even like his role and non-fans and fans alike pity him for it.
    • Kristen Stewart, she was a critic favorite, praised for her previous performances, but this movie, who made her worldwide famous, will probably cause her to forever be remembered as "That Twilight Chick That Can't Act".
    • Depending on your "team", most characters can be perceived as Woobies:
      • Bella when Edward, her true soulmate and only love, leaves her and takes the loving family she thought she would spend eternity being part of with him on New Moon.
      • Jacob when Bella, the girl he has been helping to heal in hopes of winning her love, leaves him, risking her life, to save the man he was healing her from in New Moon.
      • Edward when you realize that while everyone had someone to love in the Cullen Coven he was all alone, didn't even have a date to prom (any of them), and was so depressed that he couldn't even play music anymore before Bella.
      • Rosalie being to having the family she always wanted, then being gang-raped and left for dead by the man she loved.
      • Carlisle was turned into a vampire against his will and had to leave his father knowing that he would never accept him and probably tried to kill him, spent centuries trying to kill himself to avoid feeding on people and was almost mad out of loneliness till he managed to get a companion in Edward and then a whole family.
      • Jasper feeling the agony of the thousands of people he killed till he found Alice and peace with the Cullens and his "vegetarian" lifestyle.
      • Leah for being dumped by her fiance for her cousin (who he scarred when she rejected him), might have caused her dad's heart attack when she transformed in front of him, is not able to have children, is hated by the rest of the pack, protects a clan she hates, and is the only female not to be paired up at the end. In Breaking Dawn, she mentally admits that her ex-fiance wants her to disappear and her own brother, who she spends all of her time protecting, tells her "you ruin everything!"
      • It's also implied that she's infertile. She says something about being either "not female enough", and she's stopped having her period as a result of being a werew- I mean, loups- dammit, shape shifter.
      • Charlie, whose only daughter routinely comes home beaten and bruised, refuses to tell him anything, runs off on a regular basis without EVER giving him an explanation (sometimes to foreign countries), goes on a four month crying spree over her abusive boyfriend during which she becomes nearly suicidally depressed (and still refuses to tell her father anything) and can't stand him despite the fact that he is endlessly indulgent with her and makes almost no attempt to control her.
      • Alistair. He's clearly unhappy about being dragged by the Cullens into a potential battle with the Volturi, and he abandons everyone as soon as he can. Then the official Guide came out, and his backstory was revealed: his own father sold him and his entire family to a vampire in exchange for power. When said vampire transformed him, he fell into a bloodlust that caused the death of dozens, including his father. Upon realizing what he had done, he ran away, only to discover that not only his family was gone and he couldn't live anymore among humans, his beloved animals rejected him out of sheer terror. No wonder he turned into a paranoid loony who refuses any kind of company. The movie makes it worse, because he stated that he was actually growing a little hope that everything would be settled peacefully... before seeing Bella packing a note and resources for Jacob and Renésmee's getaway, at which points he realizes she never had any hope for the Volturi to stop and listen.
  • Vanilla Protagonist: Fans and detractors mostly agree that Bella lacks a personality and is generally boring. She was specifically written so that the reader can step into her shoes, and experience the cool supernatural world of vampires and werewolves (and the hotties fighting over her). Compare her backstory (moves from Phoenix to a small town in Washington, becomes popular, falls in love with supernatural beings) with that of Carlisle (devout Christian vampire hunter becomes vampire, spends his life helping people even though they're his natural prey), Rosalie ( girl becomes a vampire after being raped and left for dead by her fiance, kills him), Jasper (ex-Confederate soldier and some of his friends raise a vampire army), and others.

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