YMMV: Final Fantasy XIV

  • Anti-Climax Boss:
    • The final battle against Lahabrea is a pitiful boss to the point that he's really nothing more than a post final boss. So long as your healers are half-awake during the battle not only is he easier than the last two fights against the Ultima Weapon, it wouldn't be much of a stretch to say that he's easier than the battle with Gaius on the elevator.
    • Considering how hyped up he was, the Hard Mode version of the Leviathan fight is depressingly simple and easy, and even a poorly geared group of first timers can stumble through it with maybe a single wipe to Tidal Wave before they figure out how to avoid it. Extreme Mode, however...
    • Despite having interesting mechanics and some of the best visuals of any Final Fantasy final boss to date, Heavensward's final boss The Knights of the Round doesn't do nearly enough damage to pose a threat to even an at-gear-level player, and wiping on him requires completely ignoring mechanics that the earlier dungeons have been grooming you to counter. Many players are hopeful that a Minstrel's Ballad version will be released in 3.1.
  • Author's Saving Throw: Easily the best example of the series so far. The original game had an absolutely dismal reception among both fans and critics. A Realm Reborn on the other hand has been getting glowing praise, singlehandedly took Square Enix from losing money to being profitable, and surpassed Final Fantasy XI's subscriber figure almost immediately. Additionally, nobody and nothing from the game made it into either Dissidia Duodecim or the first Theatrhythm because Square barely wanted to acknowledge the game even existed. Come Theatrhythm Curtain Call? Y'shtola's on the cover, songs are in, and according to Square reps at Tokyo Game Show, this is as a matter of course. And Lightning Returns had its crossover costume with XIV promoted very heavily.
  • Awesome Music: Whatever else the game may be, it's a Final Fantasy title. And it's got some pretty nice tunes, yo. Special mentions go to the Primals music, with each one having its own fantastic theme, and the Ultima Arma battle theme, both part 1 and 2.
  • Base Breaker:
    • Minfilia. People either hate her for being captured multiple times, being too passive, and simply not doing anything to help the Scions or the player character directly or people like her for being a supportive character that uses diplomatic approaches instead of charging in head first. She certainly wouldn't get as much flak if she wasn't so passive in cutscenes.
    • As of Patch 2.55, Kan-E-Senna and Merlwyb are starting to get these reactions, due to them abandoning Raubahn, the Warrior of Light, and the Scions when the WoL is accused of killing Nanamo, despite knowing how corrupt the accuser (Teledji Adeledji, with the Brass Blades and now the Crystal Braves aligned with him) is. Some view this as unforgivable as they're basically abandoning Raubahn to save their own skin, despite Nanamo requesting them to help him after revealing to them her plan to abolish both the monetary and monarchy earlier. While others view this as a wise move to avoid a civil war between Ul'dah, as well as to ensure the security of their own city-states (which explains why there are no Crystal Braves in Gridania or Limsa Lominsa respectively anymore). Merlwyb's statement that their own city-states come first before the alliance either helps or hurts their standing. (although, talking to other characters in Limsa Lominsa reveals that Merlwyb believes you are innocent and that Lominsan lands are safe for you and the remaining Scions)
  • Best Boss Ever: Ravana's hard mode fight is generally considered one of the best, if not the best primal battle in the game.
    • The final boss of Heavensward's main story quest King Thordan and his Twelve Knights is essentially the Knights of the Round Summon from Final Fantasy VII turned into a Primal Trial. This is also marks the second appearance of the Knights of the Round in the main line Final Fantasy games.
  • Breather Boss:
    • Pharos Sirius's Tyrant has few hit points for a boss even at the appropriate gear level, and does nothing more dangerous than spawn minions and use an easily dodged Area of Effect spell. While all bosses get easier as better gear is released, Tyrant stands out for the fact that it can be killed in as few as 10 seconds, even with the slightly restricted gear item levels. Considering his fellow bosses are still somewhat challenging even with the aforementioned power creep, though. it's not entirely unappreciated.
    • Shiva's extreme mode is disproportionately easy compared to Ramuh EX, a mechanically intense fight that's nearly impossible to do with a pick-up-group. Shiva's mechanics are easy to memorize, not terribly threatening, and she has hardly any "you mess up, you die" mechanics aside from her ice bow, which dodging is as easy as moving behind her. All in all, she's considered extremely farmable by random groups.
  • Broken Base: It's an MMO and a Final Fantasy title, neither of which have a particularly unified fanbase. Put them together, and this was inevitable.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • 1.0 was particular notorious for this in regards to end game content. Warriors were flat out better than Paladins, thanks to the fact that Warriors attacks were boosted by both STR and VIT, and Steel Cyclone was not only powerful, but also allowed the Warrior to AoE tank. Bards and Black Mages could safely stand back and fire off arrows and spells for massive amounts of damage, with Bards also doubling as back up healers since Conjurer was one of it's sub-classes originally. A lot of parties began demanding that parties only consist of this, locking out players who preferred playing as Paladins Monks, and Dragoons. A Realm Reborn has taken a number of steps in improving gameplay balance to avoid, or at least reduce thisnote .
    • DPS caster roles tend to be in high demand for dungeons and trials that have multiple enemies the party has to fight at once. Why? Because the person playing as one of these classes has a massive AOE Limit Break that can seriously wreck multiple targets at once. A grand example of this is the fight against Ifrit (Hard) where the party needs to destroy multiple nails quickly less they suffer a One-Hit KO attack from Ifrit's Hellfire.
    • Bards and Black Mages are among the most commonly seen DPS role classes. Not because they are significantly stronger than Dragoon, Monk, or Summoner (indeed, of a group of level 50 characters, with equal gear, many of these other classes, the Dragoon and Monk have higher DPS, and the Summoner has a pet that can keep attacking even when they can't if they're busy dodging Ao Es), but because they are significantly easier to play as they can stay at range (whereas a Monk or a Dragoon has to stay close to the enemy, and as a result can't avoid some attacks easily and loses time running out of some Ao Es; The Howling Eye (Extreme) fight against Garuda is especially not Monk/Dragoon friendly at all, her wicked wheel attacks being able to make short work of your Tank if he doesn't use his defensive cooldowns wisely, and is a one hit K.O attack on any other class nearby), don't have to change positions every 10 to 20 seconds, have easier ability upkeep, and generally require using the same 3 or 4 abilities or spells to put out significant amounts of damage. Every other ability or spell of a Bard or Black Mage, are situational abilities, outside of their core damage abilities.
    • Tackling end game content like extreme primals and the Binding Coil of Bahamut will usually be done by players who have watched a tutorial video first and expect everyone else to do the same before they attempt the challenges. The only time players will tackle content without watching a video beforehand is when there's no videos at all due to the content being just released.
    • Speed running is notoriously popular for level 50 dungeons. The most common tactic is to have the party's tank pull every trash mob possible and have everyone spam their AOE abilities to quickly kill everything one shot, which is technically faster than taking on one group at a time. The act of speed running has caused quite a stir among the player base since people who are in favor of speed running might start doing it without checking to see if the rest of the party wants to do it or if they can even handle it. Those who like speed running feel it's a valid tactic and people should learn to adapt instead of causing everyone to slow down.
    • DPS classes are played far more often than healer and tank classes due to the fact that people feel less bored pumping out damage instead of spamming heals or maintaining aggro. On top of this, most DPS players roll as a Bard or a Black Mage due to the former being able to spam their abilities without needing to be in a certain position like other classes while the latter has a very simple rotation. Because not many people play as a tank or a healer, the wait times in the duty finder can get notoriously long unless you sign up for a duty that's very active.
    • For chocobo racing, Head Start and Choco Dash were the most used abilities since Head Start lets you start the race at max speed and Choco Dash is basically the dash panel in your pocket that can be used at will. The combo was so effective that everyone used it to get a huge lead at the start. Patch 2.55 would counter the strategy by making the buffer from lather (time it takes for lather to start sapping your stamina quickly) become extremely short.
    • Cross-classing skills tends to be very set in stone due to the incredible practicality of the skills. Melee will always want inner release and blood for blood, marauders can use (and due to the existence of tanks swaps, 100% need) provoke, casters always need raging strikes, quelling strikes, and swiftcast, and healers need eye for an eye, protect, stoneskin and swiftcast. The Jobs are practically railroaded into this as they have far less options to begin with.
    • EXP grinding used to be done through FATEs endlessly while dungeons got ignored because completing a FATE with a group of people was a lot faster than running a dungeon and doing groups of FATEs over and over would net players a bigger EXP payout in the long haul. The devs eventually changed things up where EXP in dungeons were better than ones gained in a FATE while doing a FATE is still a nice quick EXP gain while one waits for their duty to pop. However, 3.0 made leveling up past 50 notoriously tedious due to how much EXP one needed to get to the level cap of 60. People then discovered that, despite the level sync, getting EXP for a FATE in Northern Thanalan was not only faster, it was also faster than gaining EXP from a FATE in the new Heavensward areas and its dungeons. Grinding FATEs in Northern Thanalan grew so popular that not only does everything die in a matter of seconds due to the sheer amount of players, but many players have even resorted to using a bot program so that a computer can do the level grinding for them in a fairly quick manner. A patch rectified the problem by boosting the amount of EXP a FATE gives in the 3.0 areas, making them more viable compared to the old ones in the 2.0 zones.
    • When Heavensward launched, the new healer class Astrologian suffered from this when compared to the other healer classes. In 2.X, a combination of a White Mage and Scholar provided what was considered an optimal balance of healing and utility, with the White Mage offering tremendous burst and party-wide healing, and the Scholar providing damage, asynchronous healing from their fairy, and several utility skills. In comparison, Astrologians offered both lesser healing and lesser utility and damage, with its unique card mechanic supposed to make up for the difference. But even those seemed inadequate. Patch 3.05 buffed their abilities somewhat, but even now they seem subpar to parts of the player base.
  • Damsel Scrappy: Many consider Minfilia to be this for getting herself captured multiple times and never fights back against her captors/enemies, despite carrying a custom knife.
  • Ear Worm: Only one thing needs to be said: PaPaya~ Paya PaPaya Paya~ Pa Paya~
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Gaius van Baelsar only needed a single cutscene and less than twenty words of dialogue to become pretty much the most popular Final Fantasy XIV character - and get to a point where even his presence in Duodecim was requested. note  ARR then took this horse and ran with it; at this point, Gaius is generally agreed to be up there with Kefka, Golbez and Sephiroth in terms of popularity as a villain.
    • Y'shtola is regarded as the most popular Scion, and has since broken out to become Final Fantasy XIV's representative in Theatrhythm Final Fantasy and other crossover games, including a remake of Dissidia: Final Fantasy for Arcade consoles.
    • Let's not forget Sisipu, the only other NPC everyone apparently remembers by name.
    • As of ARR, HAMON HOLYFIST is getting way up there too, as easily the most popular (and hilarious, and lovable) of the class guild-masters.
    • Even people who haven't played the game have heard of Good King Moggle Mog, thanks to his awesome battle music and it's ridiculously silly lyrics.
    • Papashan, the Ul'danian rail-yard overseer and semi-but-not-really-retired Master Sultansworn is also fairly popular with both fans of Ul'dah and of lalafells, due to his status as a Reasonable Authority Figure, the surrogate-fatherly way he helps and treats Lady Lilira (AKA Sultana Nanamo), and for being the baddest-assed lalafell Paladin in canon, and perhaps baddest lala period, who isn't a player.
    • Hildibrand is rather popular amongst the fanbase as well, for his hilarious side story line and dialogues and borderline Uncanny Valley (in a good way) facial expressions.
    • Edda Pureheart started off as a simple Flat Character in an early story quest where the player sees a band of adventurers break up due to Edda's incompetent healing costing her the life of her fiance, who was also the party's tank. In patch 2.3, Edda returns while being completely insane and broken over the grief she endured since her fiance's death. Even after she falls to her death by slipping off a ledge, she briefly returns as a creepy ghost for one scene. Many fans instantly liked Edda's return and hope that she comes back in a future update. Even Yoshida hopes to bring her back in some form. Edda did make a brief cameo in the anniversary event by an artist drawing her and her fiance monster looking happy together (in a very creepy way).
    • Moenbryda gained quite a bit of popularity when she was introduced in patch 2.4. Fans instantly warmed up to her for having an outgoing personality to shake up the dynamic that the Scions have, being very book smart, and wielding a giant axe. Sadly, Moenbryda was killed off in patch 2.5 after performing a Heroic Sacrifice to help the player character kill one of the Ascians. While her death boosted her popularity further, many thought that she was discarded way too early, and that with only 2 patchs and a couple cutscenes she had little room to develop as a character. The fact that she was the only strong female character of the Scions (especially compared to Minfilia) left many people wishing she stayed longer.
    • Lord Haurchefaunt is quickly growing very popular with the fanbase. Not only is he one of the first Isgardians who isn't completely hostile to you just for being an outsider, he nearly worships the ground you walk on and helps soften the city-state towards opening their gates to outsiders. And of course, in the wake of a horrific Wham Episode that left Alphinaud, Tataru, and potentially the PC in a Heroic BSOD, he offers you shelter and to turn away anyone hunting you, offering encouragement to help you cheer up and stating he fully intends to be by your side when you take retribution. Plus he brings you cocoa! And then he dies in your character's arms at the end of The Vault...Needless to say, many a tear was shed.
  • Epileptic Trees: Has to be mentioned here because the end of the core story in A Realm Reborn is very deliberately set up to invoke a ton of this, as it drops a ton of amazing reveals late in the plot and after the credits roll. Namely, the possibility that the Ascian lords are The Twelve Scions of Light from the Ivalice setting, and they're trying to bring Zodiark into the world. And the fact the Ascian Igeyorhm has the same haircut as Lightning of all people. The end-quest for Summoners pours fuel on the fire, too - Belias is an elder primal. Exactly what all this means has been driving people into fits of mass guessing.
    • Heavensward gets in on this action, too: anyone paying the least bit of attention will begin to have some serious suspicions about the origins and nature of the player character, and then of course there's that bit with Elidibus and the "Warrior of Darkness" on the moon, which is basically just Square shaking a tree in your face.
  • Fandom Berserk Button: Trying to claim the game was better/worse before or after Yoshida took over tends to get the fans riled up. Ditto if people start comparing the game to Final Fantasy XI.
  • Fan Nickname:
    • Slightly altering every FFXI race and giving them new names doesn't stop many fans from calling them Elvaan, Tarutaru, Mithra and Galka. Though at this point, the game is so damn popular and has brought so many new players to the "Final Fantasy MMO scene" that a number of new players call the cat people in XI "Mi'qote" and the small folk "Lalas", which naturally drives XI veterans nutso.
    • Titan's Mountain Buster attack is given the nickname of "Table Flip", due to the animation making it look like he's flipping an invisible table.
    • LOLDragoon. See Never Live It Down.
    • Team jump rope, used to describe how most end game content is done where everyone in the party has to follow every scripted step in the battle in harmony with one another and anyone who screws up a step will likely cause the party to wipe.
  • Game Breaker: The Briar item for the chocobo races creates an AOE attack where any player who gets caught in it will suffer a massive stamina drop the longer they are in it. On a narrow path with no way to slow down or speed up to avoid the attack? You're boned. To make matters worse, multiple players using the item at the same time and in close proximity with one another makes the effect stack and if you get ganged up like this, you might as well go AFK until the race is over because it will become impossible to recover. The only way to completely avoid the attack is to use the Sprint Shoes, Stamina Tablet, or Hero Tonic, but that's assuming that RNG was good enough to you so that you have any of those items in the first place. Choco Meteor is also a huge game breaker due to how powerful it is and only the Hero Tonic can block it, which is rare in itself. The item basically gives a massive stamina drop to every player in front of the user and prevents them from accelerating. It's also entirely possible to have multiple Choco Meteors be used back to back, basically screwing everyone caught in the crossfire.
  • Gameplay Derailment:
    • The Hunts, prior to patch 2.4. To make a long story short, their rewards were good enough and easily accessible enough that most players simply camped out waiting for them to spawn instead of running dungeons as the dev team intended. The patch decreased the rewards significantly, bringing the frenzy around hunts down to reasonable levels.
    • The Triple Triad tournament, which gives players prizes if they come in the top 20 by winning against NPCs and players to rack up points. People quickly discovered that there's no rule or limit on how you earn the tourney points, so players began to cheat the system by playing against their friends to boost themselves endlessly.
  • Genius Bonus
    • In the English localization, the Alchemy level achievements are named "Tis True Without Lying", which is the Sir Isaac Newton translation of the beginning of an ancient alchemical treatise called The Emerald Tablet.
    • The Disciplines of the Land, Hand and Magic and War bear a certain resemblance to the Japanese adaptation of the Confucian philosophy of ideal social hierarchies.
  • Goddamn Bats:
    • Invoked for certain levehests. Your target enemies will always spawn near naturally spawning enemies, but there can also be enemies that spawn during your quest specifically to slow you down by forcing you to dispatch them and they don't appear outside of the quests.
    • Same deal with normal mobs near a FATE; not only do they not count towards your FATE contribution, you'll probably be level-synced down to their level, making them aggressive if they weren't before, and more dangerous besides. These kinds of mobs will just annoy you and force you to dispatch them so that you don't rack up unnecessary damage, though they'll just respawn.
    • Any giant toad monster. They aren't terribly dangerous, but the monsters always have a nasty Sticky Tongue ability that lets them drag you towards them so you are in their melee range. This gets more annoying when you're just passing through an area and you get yanked towards the monster.
    • Any enemy that has the Stoneskin spell, which blocks up to 10% of damage to the user equal to their maximum HP. Enemies with Stoneskin will drag the battle out since you have to break their invincible barrier before you can damage them again and it gets a lot worse if you fight boss enemies in a FATE since they have absurdly high amounts of HP.
    • Skeletons, they're pretty standard and usually have low HP, but they have an attack called Hell Slash that always does a flat percentage of your max HP, meaning that even a overgeared tank will take a good chunk of their HP in damage. And in story quests they tend to get paired with other enemies who can do more genuine damage.
    • Bees. Dear gods, bees. Many of the bee types in dungeons will, if not killed fast enough, use Final Sting - a suicide attack that is capable of one-shotting a tank. It can be stunlocked, thankfully, but all it takes is one bee that nobody's watching...
  • Good Bad Bugs: At 3.0's launch, there was a massive cluster of level 58 monsters in The Dravanian Hinterlands near the zone border leading to The Dravanian Forelands. Many players had their share of fun trying to see how long they could survive the onslaught, though Square fixed it in a matter of a day.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Ilberd's statement towards Eline Roaille that he would rather cut off his arm than to raise a hand against a friend becomes this as come Patch 2.55 not only does he betray Raubahn by admitting his role in Nanamo's death, but cuts off his left arm to protect Lolorito.
  • Growing the Beard: Many fans, despite enjoying the game as a whole, claim that A Realm Reborn has a few weaknesses that held back its potential, which include the voice acting, lack of challenge in dungeons, leveling a class taking too long, etc. When Heavensward was released, most of the issues were resolved; voice acting improved, character relationships and dynamics were made more apparent, dungeons and raids were made more reasonably difficult, and the plot improved substantially. Many people that didn't like how 2.0 was made were pleasantly surprised at how 3.0 improved on many things.
  • Hype Backlash: The new jobs introduced in 3.0, namely the Dark Knight, Astrologian, and Machinist, were hyped up a big deal in their previews many months back. When people actually got to play with the new jobs, there was a slew of complaints for Astrologians not having enough healing potency like a White Mage and lacking strong versatility like the Scholar. People who tried Machinists complained about the class having RNG in its abilities and overall DPS output being too low. This is also evident in duties where people are sticking to the old jobs for the new content.
  • It's Easy, so It Sucks: Many veterans of Final Fantasy XI and legacy players from 1.0 see Final Fantasy XIV as too easy and that a lack of punishment for failure is unappealing. People also see the hard mode dungeons as pathetically easy, despite the fact that said dungeons were designed for people who just finished the main story line and weren't made for people who have the best gear. Old content that have their difficulty reduced to allow new or struggling players to catch up are also seen as promoting bad players in the eyes of the more hardcore players. During the 2014 fan fest, Word of God stated that 2.0 was made easy on purpose since they were catering towards people who never played an MMORPG before. They also stated that with the level cap being raised to 60 when 3.0 launched, there will be increased danger and difficulty since the training wheels are now off.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks: People accused the Heavensward expansion pack of being this, claiming that the routines from 2.0 (gear acquisition, farming methods, etc) are the same in 3.0.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Liavinne, an Elezen Archer you meet during the starting dungeons of the three regions. When you first meet her, she has a bottle in her hand laughing her ass off at Avere berating Edda for not being able to obtain enough potions before going into Sastasha. Then after completing Tam-Tara Deepcroft, you see Liavinne's party have a Breaking the Fellowship moment where Avere has died and she places the blame solely on Edda for the latter's incompetent healing, going as far as saying that she never liked her and only tolerated for her healing abilities. After running into her in The Waking Sands, you then realize why she never liked Edda and how Avere's death has affected her.note She then gets killed when the Garleans attack the Waking Sands, and her corpse is later dug up and reanimated by Edda to serve as the first boss of The Tam-Tara Deepcroft (Hard).
    • A good number of Tragic Villains fall under this such as Foulques of the Mist and Eline Roaille.
  • Les Yay:
    • The above mentioned entertainers in Ul'dah don't mind offering their services to female player characters. Also, almost all of said performers happen to be Miqo'te.
    • ARR introduced a few more moments like this, such as a Mi'qote (again) who lets players of both genders know she doesn't mind if you look in on her bathing every now and then, and even comments about it if your character is female.
  • Loot Drama:
    • Surprisingly, there's very little drama over loot thanks to how loot is handled. All loot found in dungeons and trials are determined by a need VS greed system via dice rolling. Players rolling for need get higher priority over those that roll for greed (unless no one rolls for need, then it's about who rolled better for greed). However, patch 2.1 added an extremely rare mount from Primal Extreme fights; it's a black unicorn called Nightmare, which is pretty much a Palette Swap of the normal Unicorn players can unlock. The Nightmare mount has caused quite a bit of drama due to its rarity and the fact that it can only be found by fighting really difficult bosses.
    • The Atma items needed to create a player's Atma weapons have also caused heavy drama between those who gotten the items quickly and those who haven't been as lucky.
  • Memetic Badass: Godbert Manderville, granted, even in his introduction when he's shown as having felled a full grown chimera naked with nothing but a blacksmith's hammer, people began talking up his other incredible feats of strength, theorizing he's anything from an incarnation of Byregot (the god of craft) to an Elder Primal. The fanbase's reaction may have been why he was granted a role in the main story as one of the leaders of the syndicate, and later Hildibrand story quests have him topping himself with even more ridiculous feats like using a limit break by himself that makes his hammer grow as big as a small house, and using it to call down the equivalent of an orbital laser.
  • Memetic Mutation: But of course.
  • Most Annoying Sound:
    • While creating your character, the game insists on sampling the voice chosen with a hearty "Ha ha!"
    • Made worse in crowded areas with a lot of players since the game starts to play noisy crowded city sound effects which have the same few voice clips played over and over again.
    • Some of the voice clips tend to play in rapid succession in combat, when it's a female character with the highest pitched voice, you'll grow very annoyed of hearing their ear-splitting high battle cry on nearly every ability cast.
    • Certain battle skills like the White Mage's Holy spell or the Paladin's Flash ability can get very grating on the ears when spammed nonstop. Naturally, trolls will do this in crowded cities where people are talking/role playing/crafting/etc just to annoy them with the sounds and animations.
    • Fighting the final boss of The Vault dungeon will quickly have you reaching for the mute button due to his very loud voice. Hope you enjoy hearing him scream "SICKNESS MUST BE PURGED!" every time he uses his party wide hitting fire spell, which he uses fairly often.
  • Narm: See the main series page.
  • Never Live It Down: Dragoons being weak (that is, easily killed), carrying over their glorious reputation from Final Fantasy XI.note  This, as well as being considered overshadowed by the other melee classes (since Dragoons lack in utility and suffer from a lower than average magical defense, whereas every end-game fight deals a lot of magical damages) has gotten to the point where players have requested a buff for the job. To adress the issues, numerous patchs enhanced the Dragoon, reducing their animation lock, increasing significantly their magical defense and making one move less dependant on player's position, making them more easy to play overall.
  • Play the Game, Skip the Story: Despite the game having an incredibly rich lore on even the most minor things, some people simply don't care about the story and will skip every cut scene or dialogue box just to be able to advance or get their gear without being slowed down by the text. While this is not a problem normally, the people who don't care about the story tend to get lumped with the people who do care (or at least first timers to the content and wish to experience it), leading to some rather unpleasant experiences all around.
  • Rooting for the Empire: Between its obsession with exterminating dragons - and zeal for executing "heretics" who don't share the general enthusiasm - and its complete unwillingness to assist the rest of Eorzean grand companies during the events of the story, only to come crawling back to them for help when their hatred of of the very concept of compromise inevitably bites them in the ass, Ishgard is not exactly well liked. As a direct result, there's a sizable group of people hoping that Heavensward gives the option to side with the dragons and burn it to the ground. Ironically, you do sort of wind up doing this, while you don't exactly burn the city to the ground you remove the ruling caste responsible for most of the xenophobia and hostility while making sure that innocent civilians don't suffer, sort of like cutting out a cancer instead of just mercy killing the entire person.
    • Players of Dark Knights in particular agree with this sentiment when you learn how the city-state treated the first Au Ra refugees; Upon seeing them, they turn them away from the city believing them to be Dravinian, and then once they're far away enough from the city to retaliate, the temple knights open fire with cannons, killing untold men, women and children seeking shelter from Garlemald.
    • Then there's the detail of how the Dragonsong war started. They killed the Dragon Ratatoskr just to eat her eye and get the power held within it, staring a war that would last for a thousand years.
  • “Stop Having Fun” Guys: This comes with being a MMO:
    • Back in the day, just TRY having walked around town with any gear with an Optimal rank that's 10+ ranks above above your own. Yes, walking around town, don't even think about fighting or looking for a party.
    • If you were a Thaumaturge above rank 25, everyone expected you to have the Protect and Shell spells... two Conjurer abilities. Granted, getting to rank 16 Conjurer wasn't a hard task even back then, but naturally not everyone will always spend time leveling other classes until much later.
      • Conversely, Conjurers and their Job upgrade, White Mages, are firmly expected to have the Swiftcast spell... a level 26 Thaumaturge ability. This holds true even today, and applies to Arcanists of all stripes too.
      • To be fair, the reason this gets pushed even moreso than other key crossclass abilities is because Swiftcast is part of one of the most important skill combinations for healers - the combat raise, where Swiftcast is used to negate Raise/Ressurect's significant cast time in order to get another party member back into the fight while not tying up the healer.
    • For the longest time in Legacy, even playing as a Paladin. Paladins had excellent defense but not much else (at least until they got buffed quite late in the Legacy content cycle,) meaning that their primary contribution to harder battles was their ability to tank hits and heal. Warriors, who combined good defense with the ability to clear dungeons by simply sneezing, were the preferred Prestige Class by most veterans, and as such were typically far more in demand than Paladins.
      • Ironically, this was inverted during A Realm Reborn's launch period, as paladins became the popular ones due to Warriors needing a good buff in the eyes of fans. Patch 2.1 finally made the playing field more or less equal.
    • Arcanists using Topaz Carbuncle in dungeons. Tanking using a class that dies in a stiff breeze is...unwise.
    • For level 46-49, FATE events are the best way to level due to being fairly starved of quests, this leads to a crowd of people who will adamantly refuse to complete the actual objective in favor of grinding XP on the mobs that respawn quickly when said FATE is occurring. This leads them to harass and try to chase off anyone who doesn't want or know you can farm like that and go ahead and complete the objective anyway.
      • Mostly alleviated now that people have realized that finishing the FATE gives a very sizable chunk of experience, and finishing FATEs quickly will cause more to spawn, making finishing them quickly give overall more experience for your time.
    • Being a Conjurer/White Mage will also invoke people telling you that you don't know how to be a proper healer if you don't constantly spam Cure spells on them or buff them every single time with Protect, Stoneskin, or Regen. Heaven forbid that any of your allies get KO'd in your presence. The problems just get amplified when there's a ton of things going on that causes the party to be heavily damaged and hit with status debuffs at once. If you're knocked out as a healer, you can also expect someone to complain that it's your fault that you went down and made the team suffer for it.
    • The final two dungeons for the main storyline were, at launch, played by people constantly in order to grind for special tokens (that couldn't be earned in such volume as quickly elsewhere) to exchange them for powerful gear. People who were grinding the quests skipping every cutscene (and there are a lot of them in those) and rushing ahead through the dungeon while newbies to the dungeon got left in the dust while also being yelled at for not knowing how to tackle the dungeons was a depressingly common sight - especially depressing due to how cool the dungeons were when done "right".
      • Patch 2.1 took a number of steps to address this (one major one being that the two dungeons are no longer the only easy way to get the tomestones), but it does still crop up.
    • There is a lot of hostility from the squishier DPS classes and healers towards tanks who try to DPS during FATE events, particularly higher-leveled ones, or generally suboptimal tank performance therein, generally because tanks who are DPS-ing are usually not trying to draw hate, leaving everyone else to fend for themselves aggro-wise, which tends to end poorly for the squishies involved in the event. (Though this might be a self-perpetuating problem, as the number of healers who try to DPS during a given FATE rather than healing other players involved is also quite high. Basically, anyone who treats a FATE like a DPS free-for-all and ignores basic party roles because the events are typically more chaotic than the average dungeon can expect some nasty looks.)
    • The end game content (primal fights in hard and extreme modes, hard mode for Ultima Weapon, the Coil runs, etc) has people who have done the content before (usually due to grinding for rare loot) expecting everyone else in the party to have watched tutorial videos online before tackling the fights. If someone in the group admits that they haven't seen the videos yet, expect everyone else to groan in frustration or leave the group before the fight even starts. By the same vein, trying to tackle the high difficulty endgame content with a party while not wearing optimal gear will get you yelled at for not having your stats optimized. Any mistakes that occur during the tough battles will result in people yelling at the person who screwed up.
    • The ADS boss for turn 2 of the Binding Coil of Bahamut has a powerful attack called Rot, which can completely destroy parties that aren't prepared for it once the boss completes its clicks. However, you can also bait the boss to use a rage attack, which is a strong AOE attack, and have it spam it over and over again. Many parties use the rage strategy because it's easier to handle than the boss' normal attacks. Expect people who frown upon the rage strategy to complain about everyone else trying to do things the easy way.
    • Spirit binding gear during raids/dungeon runs is heavily frowned upon by many serious players since they feel people that come into raids without optimal gear/stats will just be a liability.
    • When patch 2.3 introduced a much easier way to obtain Sands and Oils of Time outside of the Second Coil of Bahamut, hardcore fans were quick to declare that anyone who upgraded their gear from the hunts or Syrcus Tower instead of getting the items from the Coil suck and have no skill.
    • For customizing your stats on your Novus/Nexus relics, expect be told how you are "doing it wrong" if you don't optimize your stats the way everyone is supposed to do.
    • Summoners have received increasing flack as the game has progressed through 2.0. Unlike the other DPS classes, who put out either mid range, constant streams of damage, or high number burst, the Summoner's damage primarily comes fro their array of Damage Over Time spells, and Summons, with the occasional burst thrown in. Additionally, their summons often require a bit of technical finesse while juggling between casting spells, buffs, and more, meaning their damage is slower in effect compared to other classes (though it does allow a Summoner the ability to act as an Off-Healer/Reviver who can get K.O.'d party members back on their feet and save the healers some MP). This alone causes some players to flat out leave parties that have 2 or more summoners. And trying to bring out Ifrit-Egi instead of Garuda-Egi can also bring some unwanted flak towards you, even if using Ifrit is a better option.note  Heavensward gave them more options, allowing them to put all of their damage over time spells with one action (Tri-disaster), ideal if you need to Fester a newly poped added, unlocked an instant and quite potent Ao E (Painflare), and granted them the all powerful Dreadwyrm Trans, allowing them to deal more damage and cast very powerful spells: Ruin III and Deathflare.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: A buttload of them:
    • Line of sight determines whether or not you can use your abilities on a target. If your target suddenly runs behind an object or changes elevation, you can no longer "see" them and your ability gets canceled if you were trying to use it on the target. Naturally, the AI will see you at all times, even through solid objects.
    • Teleportation fees. Every time you use the Teleport spell to warp to a city or town with visited previously, it costs you some gil. The farther away your destination is, the more gil it costs. You'll find yourself spending gil wildly if you have to travel from place to place and don't want to spend several minutes traveling on foot. And the main quest just loves to send you all over the place. You can save some gil by marking up to 3 favorite destinations (not that the game tells you anything about that), though.
    • Any FATE. On the one hand, it can be a good way to level-up while you are waiting to join a dungeon. On the other hand, you are required to complete some groups of FATE in order to do some quests (like the ones to unlock the Crystal Tower and the one you need to complete a tribal quest), and sometimes you will waste a lot of time doing absolutely nothing while waiting for the FATE to happen. Not to mention the Odin and Behemoth's events, which are basically unplayable for PS3 players due to the overload of people participating at the same time to those (and even if you are able to play, chances are you won't be able to actually see the boss)
    • The quest that can boost your Infinity+1 Sword to even higher levels of power requires players to take part in any FATE they want in specific regions in order to get 12 Atma items. Sounds easy, right? Doing the FATEs is easy enough, but good luck trying to endure the super low drop rates for the items you need to get. Because the drop rate of the Atmas are extremely low and are subjected to RNG, you have people who have either gotten all the items fairly quickly or people that have spent hours/days trying to get the items to drop and have no luck at all. What's even worse is getting all 12 Atmas isn't enough to power up your relic weapon; all it does is change the weapon's appearance slightly. To get the weapon to its full glory, you have to grind for several books and each book originally cost 1500 mythology tomes. Each book also contains challenges you have to complete in order to power up your weapon (beat the final bosses in dungeons, kill specific enemies, etc). While the grind for books is FAR more bearable than the RNG drops of the Atmas, you'd still be spending a lot of time grinding. The outcome was apparently so bad that the developers delayed the patch containing the Novus relics due to the fact that not enough people had their Animus relics at the time. Patch 2.4 made the Atma grind easier by increasing the drop rates and changed the costs of the books to 500 soldiery tomes each.
    • The Atma styled grind returned in patch 2.45 for the Zodiac weapons by having the player run dungeons, beat the final boss, and pray that RNG is kind to them by dropping the quest items they need. Unlike the FATE system that has you waste just a few minutes each time, dungeons can take 30 minutes or more to complete and it can easily wear out players who are caught on a huge unlucky streak.
    • Duty finder cooldowns, which apply if you are the first person in your party to quit in the middle of a quest. While the mechanic's purpose is to deter people from pulling a Rage Quit, it also punishes players who just want to give up a quest that is too hard or want to leave a party that is just awful. If you dare to be the first one to quit a duty, hope you enjoy not being able to do another quest for 30 minutes.
    • Enemies' range of territory. In order to prevent possible griefing and sever strains, all enemies (except those found in dungeons) are programmed to start wandering back to their territory/spawn point if they chase the player too far. However, once an enemy starts to retreat, they become immune to all damage and debuffs and they'll fully recover their HP. This means that you can't kite foes too far or they'll "reset". The mechanic is doubly painful when fighting boss characters found in a FATE due to their sky high HP.
    • Dragoon's Jump Animation Locks, which means while a Dragoon is using any of their Jump related abilities, they can not move. When used well, jumps help improve their mobility in battle. But if Murphy shows up and goads the monster you're fighting to use a devastating AOE move just as you're getting repositioned by a Spineshatter Dive or Dragonfire Dive, then you're in for a world of hurt. It's thanks to this, and a minority of bad Dragoon players who can't/won't utilize the class' weapon skills correctly has led to the return of the FFXI "loldragoon" meme much to the annoyance of decent Dragoon players. Square-Enix has released a number of patches that cut down on the animation lock, (and now, reduced the previously absurd cooldown times on their more advanced Jump attacks) to help out Dragoons due to the complaints.
      • A related, if rare issue are pathing issues with the jumps. Using the basic jump from a ledge may result in you landing below the ledge, while the other jumps may fail to land at all if there is an obstacle in the way. Thankfully most bosses are fought in completely flat terrain.
    • The Random rule for Triple Triad. Against another player, it can bring some excitement and new strategies on the fly, but when you play against an NPC, their version of "random" is having 4 to 6 different cards that are all powerful while you're possibly forced to use weaker cards from your collection. Whatever cards you claimed stays with you forever and that includes the starter deck that the Triple Triad Master gives you as an introduction to the game. To make matters worse, the new NPC opponents introduced for Heavensward use the Random rule almost exclusively while using other rules on top it that makes Random even worse, such as Chaos and Roulette.
    • The rare cards limit rule. You can have just one rare card in your deck and no more than that. NPCs gleefully ignore the rare cards limit rule as they pummel your deck with a deck that has nothing but rare cards.note 
    • Getting new cards via Random Drop. Playing in certain dungeons, raids, or fighting against primals gives you a slight chance of getting their cards. Beating an NPC might get you a random card. Buying the booster pack at the Gold Saucer will also give you a random card. The path to getting 30 cards so you can make the rare card rule less annoying borderlines Early Game Hell thanks to RNG determining what cards you get or if you even get a card to begin with.
    • The Machinist's Gauss Barrel and the Bard's Wandering Minuet skills were widely hated due to lots of drawbacks with little benefits. Initially, the two skills would give a small boost in the player's DPS in exchange for disabling their auto-attack and adding a charge time to certain skills while the player had to wait a bit to disable Gauss Barrel/Wanderer's Minuet. In a following patch, the two skills were given a much larger boost to the player's DPS, charge times for skills were reduced, and disabling Gauss Barrel/Wanderer's Minuet can be done a lot sooner. While Machinist players are happy for their skill being boosted, Bard players are still sour over their play style being changed and some are refusing to use Wanderer's Minuet out of sheer spite and don't care if their overall DPS output is worse because of it, when they don't forgo playing Bard altogether for another job instead.
    • Story cutscenes in dungeons. While they are definitely worth watching, anyone who has already seen them will be chomping at the bits to carry on. Especially in dungeons with 8 or more players its probably better to just skip them all and watch them in peace at an inn later. There is an option to automatically skip every cutscene you've already seen, but for some reason this still stops you in your tracks for a second beginning to fade to black for it.
    • Aether Currents. A mechanic introduced in Heavensward. Attune to all 15 (or 5 in Azys Lla, the expansion's final area) Currents, 10 of which are found in the map itself and 5 of which are obtained by quests (again, aside from Azys Lla, as the map-based Currents are removed) and you can fly in the area. The 10 map-found Currents can be rather tricky to find, though, as the Aether Compass you are given to find them with doesn't include a Z-axis. In addition, some quests can only be completed by being able to fly. But surely these sidequests that require flying can't be too important. They're only there for experience, right? One of the sidequests that requires flying is the quest to access Neverreap, one of the (as of patch 3.05) two end-game optional dungeons required for obtaining currency for end-game gear. Needless to say, people were not amused.
      • The larger zones themselves can be quite aggravating before you can finally fly, which is much faster.
  • Sidetracked by the Gold Saucer:
    • Just like in Final Fantasy VII, you can say fuck it when it comes to saving the world and waste your time playing mini games and cards. Emphasis on the card games.
    • Remember how addicting Triple Triad was? It's back~...
  • Stop Helping Me!: The original tutorial in Legacy was very much a case of this. The tutorial locked out all functions that hadn't been introduced yet, however obvious, important, or innocuous. Further, it interrupted what was an originally smooth narrative, and when it was first introduced, the locked targeting mode function defaulting to 'Friendly' meant that the combat section of the tutorial was actually impossible to complete with a gamepad!
    • A Realm Reborn is vastly smoother about integrating the tutorial and the plot, although more veteran players tend to bristle under some of the level and quest gating - for example, armor dyeing, a very simple function, is unavailable under any circumstance until level fifteen. Airship travel between city-states is similarly unavailable until quite a bit after you're likely ready to use it (unlocks at level 15) and more crucially makes it difficult to meet up with a friend who doesn't start in your city, and the Armory systemnote , an important part of character development, is locked until level 10[[/note]]That being said, the game provides an incredible number of ways to earn XP, and makes getting to level 10 possible with a couple of hours of work. It's the actual story that slows down the leveling curve, as the player watches cutscenes or travels to new areas[[/note]].
      • The gating can also be a bit exasperating later on with optional dungeons and such always needing a quest (which is usually just "talk with an NPC in front of the dungeon"). Every levemete location also requires you to complete a "trial" leve before you can choose freely (or even turn in the battle leves you might've picked up in the capital).
    • In-universe with Brayflox Alltalks, the goblin landowner of Brayflox's Longstop. In the second fight, she shows up being chased by a drake that you need to save her from. The drake itself is only a bit less durable than the boss and has a very damaging fireball, but after you kill it Brayflox decides to "help" you fight the boss by detonating bombs (that hurt you) and taunting the boss, then running behind one of the party members right as it begins to cast fire breath. Averted in the hard mode version of the dungeon where Brayflox hangs back and doesn't get involved with the battles.
  • Special Effect Failure:
    • The climax of the 2.5.5 patch story of Realm Reborn has some rough bits. First off, much like in the Edda storyline, the animators run up badly against some of the limitations of what their animation engine and character models are capable of, and a few characters who are meant to look smarmy or enraged - Teledji, Raubahn and Ilberd, specifically - all just end up looking ridiculous and careen straight into the Uncanny Valley. Also, Raubahn seems to be either a vampire or a robot... since he doesn't bleed when his arm gets cut off.
    • The ceremony of eternal bonding has a major goof involving gloves. Since the two players that are being wed are given a pair of dress gloves to go with the rest of their attire, one would naturally put them on. However, wearing the gloves (or any kind of glove in general) screws up the ring exchange cut scene where the rings are shown to being put on, but not rendering on the players' hands since gloves override the rendering of rings. This can make the event look extremely awkward as the bride and groom appear to be pretending that they have rings on. Because of this quirk, many future couples are told to not wear gloves so that the rings can appear in the cut scene.
  • Superlative Dubbing: By patch 2.5. The game's dub may have started rough, but not only was 2.5 well done in general, the patch finally, finally gave Gideon Emery the chance to really flex his acting chops for Urianger's soliloquy for Moenbryda. Which is even more impressive - taken by itself, the event actually could've been sort of lame, a character introduced just a patch ago killed off for cheap drama, but Emery, all by himself, manages to completely and totally sell the anguish Urianger and all the Scions felt about what happened, sold the idea that Moenbryda had been a big part of these characters' lives in the past and that this was a big loss, and enormously humanized a character who'd previously been known for being deliberately stiff - that now being revealed as a mask which hides the man's insecurities. The scene was a triumph for the English version and was a million miles removed from the often-embarrassing voicework of 1.0 or even release 2.0.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: "Good King Moggle Mog" is "This is Halloween" in all but name, lyrics, and the third verse.
  • Tainted by the Preview:
    • Some beta testers of the original version canceled their pre-orders due to perceived problems, see Broken Base above.
    • The open beta (again of the original) didn't launch in due time, a "critical bug" having appeared. Nerd rage ensued.
    • Discussion of the old, 1.0 game inevitably brought about at least one person who derided the game for major flaws that were patched out months prior. Hence, discussion of the game on Imageboards and the like tended to have titles such as "4.0 is now 7.0".
    • A Realm Reborn's preview period and launch being plagued by errors and server queues had a whole new batch of players throwing up their arms in frustration. Happily, this ended a little better for the game.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy: Bards and Machinists were considered to be this by the players when Heavensward launched. Bards couldn't run and fire their arrows anymore, but instead gotten an ability that would let them do more damage in exchange for having a charge up to their skills (meaning they can't move while it winds up). The change to the Bard's play style not only frustrated Bard players, but other players that expect optimal DPS would kick Bards out of their groups in end game content since they felt Bards would attack too slowly now. Machinists were also criticized for their overall low DPS compared to other classes and having abilities that were borderline useless. Machinists also got frequently booted out of raiding parties for low DPS performance (lots of end game raids have a DPS check that will kill the party if it's not met).
    • Not every crafting class is created equal. Armorer is considered to bring the least to the table in terms of both cross-classing skills (Rapid synthesis is too inaccurate to be reliable, and you generally don't begin progress until the very end where there's little room for error, the elemental brands are all useless, and piece by piece has been made obsolete by Muscle Memory and Maker's Mark). On the other end, Weaver and Carpenter have two of the strongest crafting skills so far (Careful Synthesis II and Byregot's Blessing), and Weaver makes crafting gear anyways. Alchemist and Culinarian are disliked because of how many niche ingredients they use that can only be farmed from monsters, (Culinarian moreso because each recipe is about 5-6 ingredients) and because they both aren't as directly useful as other classes.
  • That One Attack: Bad Breath, from Morbols and their cousins. It's so virulently debilitating it might as well be a one-hit-kill move. How bad is it? Bad Breath can cause Sleep (can't act or move), Poison (HP slowly drains), Blind (physical attacks miss more often), Silence (can't use magic), Paralysis (you randomly freeze in place), Heavy (slower movement), Slow (casting time and recharge for spells and skills take longer), Determination Down (damage taken is increased while attacking and healing is less effective), and Maximum HP Down (self explanatory). Esuna/Leech can cure it all, but it only removes one debuff at at time. Gets even worse if you encounter a Malboro during your dig of the Alexandrite maps. Not only does the monster have the usual Bad Breath attack, but it will inflict Bind (can't move) on you first before using Bad Breath so that you can't avoid its attack. Unless you can quickly cause Stun to stop Bad Breath or use Esuna/Leech to free yourself, you're screwed.
  • That One Boss: Par for the course.
  • That One Level: Plenty of them.
  • That One Sidequest: Yup, plenty of them are here too.
    • Some of the later Ixali beastmen quests are brutally difficult due to the severe handicaps that the player is imposed with when crafting airship parts. Firstly, you have to use the crafting gloves the Ixali give you and it's level 1, which means you're already handicapped with your performance. Second, every time you use a facility for your crafting, you'll get a debuff imposed on you; debuffs range from lowered CP (which means less actions to be used while crafting), max CP cut in half, or having skills you learned from other crafting classes becoming disabled. On top of all that, you are always required to make the parts in high quality and some quests have parts that are extremely difficult to make high quality. The handicaps and difficulties for some of the quests is hard for newbie crafters (since their gear isn't strong and they lack skills to make crafting easier) and veteran crafters (the big handicaps prevents them from performing optimally). While free company actions, materia, and food can slightly make the quests easier, it's only by a small margin. It wasn't until patch 2.5 that the more difficult Ixali quests were toned down.
      • For extra fun, some sets of dailies will use different debuffs for each and they will not overwrite eachother. You have to pay attention and manually cancel the previous effect so you're not crippled even more.
    • The process of obtaining your relic. While getting your relic at launch was tough (mostly due to Titan), as time progressed, it wasn't so bad. Getting your Zenith only requires that you get three Mists using tomestones. Then we get the Atma step, which requires you to farm FAT Es in twelve specific areas using your Zenith weapon. Before Patch 2.5, the drop rate for Atma's was abysmally low. If you were lucky, you would have it in a few days. RNG absolutely hates your guts? Weeks, and even months. Then, you have the Animus step, which requires you to do a total of nine books that has you defeat a total of 900 enemies, do 27 dungeons, FAT Es, and Guildleves. These weren't so bad except for the FAT Es part. Novus wasn't so bad, it just required you to give up lots of money if you wanted a perfect weapon, but there are ways around it. Neither was the Nexus step, which requires you to gain a total of 2000 Light by doing random instances in the game. It may take a while, but you would see a slow and steady progress. Last but not least, you have the Zodiac questline, which sends you to do 4 quests for random NPCs that require you to farm specific dungeons for drops that you have a small chance of obtaining. It is essentially the Atma version of dungeons and obtain crafted HQ items (and ONLY HQ) and certain Desynth materials. You will also need to farm some Soldiery and GC seals but those are arguably the easiest parts of the Zodiac questline. If you manage to get through all this, you either have sheer dumb luck or have a lot of time on your hands.
    • The process of obtaining the best crafting/gathering tools tend to fall straight into Luck-Based Mission most of the time.
    • Getting anything for a prize in the Gold Saucer due to the absurd prices and the relatively low payouts for the mini-games. Want to unlock a new hairstyle? Costs 8000 points. Want that complete set of the Gambler outfit? Costs several 10K worth of points. Got your eye on that Fenrir mount? That'll cost you one million points. You could try your luck at the weekly lottery and hope you hit it big, but like any form of lottery, it's all luck based.
      • "Any Way the Wind Blows" is a GATE (think FATE, but as mini-games in the Gold Saucer) that, unlike other events in the Gold Saucer, is completely luck based. You have to avoid Typhoon's snort attack 5 times in a row in order to win the game. How do you win? Leave it up to luck. You can move around a bit before you're rooted in place and hope that you aren't caught in the snort. If you get hit, you're eliminated from the game and just wasted 50 MGP. Naturally, there's achievements tied to this event.
    • Almost the entirety of the side quests given by the moogles in the Churning Mists. Not only is the map massive in scale, but you'll always have to go so far out of your way just to get to your objectives and heaven help you if you try to do most of the quests before you gain the ability to fly in the zone. To top if off, most of the side quesets are from moogles who are either too lazy to do work themselves or are too cowardly to fight the monsters and ask you to do it in their stead.
  • The Scrappy: The moogles in The Churning Mists. Almost no one likes them due to how tedious their side quests are nor do they like having to do massive searches for objects/other moogles in a huge map. People also hate how the moogles come off as cowardly and lazy, which is nearly the sole reason why the player has to do their quests to begin with.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks:
    • Fans had declared the game dead when Yoshi-P announced that a patch that introduces Leviathan would also make the first 5 turns for The Binding Coil of Bahamut and the fight against the Moogle King easier in order to allow lesser skilled players to catch up in content - despite the fact that this is almost certainly how everything was initially designed and intended, exactly so players could (eventually) see the content and so that it wasn't impossible to gear up any replacement members for your static group if necessary.
    • Fans have also cried foul when they saw that patch 2.2 enabled the Echo buff in certain late game/post game dungeons/trials. The buff in question boosts the party's HP, strength, and healing potency after suffering a wipe and the effects can stack if the party keeps getting defeated. The more hardened players claim that people don't need their hands being held and that they should learn how to play normally.note 
    • A portion of the Players coming over from FFXI have been a bit notorious for reaching to vitriolic levels of complaining about parts of the game not being basically FFXI-2. Example, jobs being locked to only two sub classes to select five cross class skills, as opposed to XI's "Equip any job as a subjob" method. This despite Yoshi P saying he does not just want to simply make an FFXI clone/sequel.
    • Any job or core game mechanics that were changed from 1.23 towards 2.0 generated tons of complaints, such as TP being used as a stamina gauge for sprinting and Warriors expecting to be actual tanks rather than broken overpowered fighters that could clear everything with no effort.
    • The graphics engine was changed in 2.0 after the massively horrible implantation of the old engine used in 1.0 that caused many people not being able to run the game properly. People who were fans of the graphics engine from 1.0 hate how 2.0 "simplified" the visuals, even though it was done as a necessary evil to allow the game to be multi platform and also be optimized for PC.
    • Frontlines, a new type of PvP mode, has been met with complaints before it was even released. Frontlines is doing away with the Morale stat (affects damage given and damage taken) so that people are on somewhat equal footing instead of teams dominating purely through gear. Even though the removal of the Morale stat would only be for Frontlines and not the Wolves' Den, people have already cried that all the time and gil spent in getting better PvP gear went to waste.
    • There's quite a number people in the vocal minority that feel the game changed for the worse when it was remade into A Realm Reborn. Said minority feels that many of the elements from 1.23 (no teleportations, more intensive graphics, a more dangerous overworld, etc.) should have remained instead of the game being catered to casuals.
    • Changes to the Hunt system were met with disappointment and disdain. B marks were changed to allow only players who have the bill matching the mark to claim the rewards behind them, meaning farming B marks is no longer possible. On top of this, the spawn rate for A marks were lengthened to be around 2 hours to further discourage farming for seals.
    • Spiritbinding materia was also changed and met with complaints. Before the change, spiritbinding came a flat rate; the higher the monster's level (or the general item level for a dungeon), the faster the binding would be. Patch 2.35 changed the binding mechanics to allow only binding on gear if the target's level matched the item's level or was in the general range. If the item's level was too high or too low, the bind rate would be reduced and any further discrepancies would cause binding to stop completely. On top of this, the probability of producing a tier 4 materia for binding a high level item was reduced, requiring players to bind gear beyond item level 70 (higher item levels generally take longer to reach 100% spiritbind). The whole change was brought about in order to discourage people from using extremely poor gear in high level raids. People that farmed materia complained that the process of binding was needlessly difficult now while people working on their Novus weapons feared the difficulty of getting materia would cause prices on the market board to skyrocket.
    • Patch 2.38 removed Cleric Stance entirely from PvP in order to force healers to actually heal instead of doubling as a DPS. Many people hated the change, claiming that PvP as a healer would be massively boring.
    • The additional drops of Oil/Sands of Time for the Sycrus Tower sparked many complaints from hardcore raiders who claim that additions to the loot drops in the tower made raiding the Binding Coil of Bahamut pointless due to the tower being much easier for the same rewards as the ones found in the coil.
    • The announcement of the Second Coil of Bahamut being made easier was met with a collection of booing from fans during the Las Vegas Fan Festival since they believe the coil should always remain difficult, even though the nerfs were done in a similar manner to the first Coil. Similar reactions were also had when 3.0 was announced to have its Alexander raid would have a story/normal mode to ease people into end game raiding.
    • The reveal of the Rogue class was met with disappointment over the fact that the class wasn't a Thief class. Similarly, the reveal of the Dark Knight class for the 3.0 expansion showed that said class will be classified as a tank. Cue the groans of everyone that expected the class to be a DPS as it was in Final Fantasy XI. The Dark Knight will burn MP to use most of its abilities rather than burning HP, which was met by disappointment from fans that expected the class to stay true to its roots.
    • An important cutscene involving the Warrior of Light and Midgardsormr raised quite a number of complaints due to how the scene was different in the English version compared to the Japanese version; the Japanese version of the scene has the character flat out tell you what happened and why he did what he did to the Warrior of Light while the English version has the character express himself in a more vague and condescending tone. One of the people in charge of the lore and localization explained that the changes in the English version was necessary since the character was "very chatty" in the Japanese version and needed to be changed into something that would be more suiting to him for who he was as well as being more appealing to English speaking/reading players.
    • Triple Triad, a popular card game from Final Fantasy VIII, was implemented in the Gold Saucer patch and plays pretty much exactly like it did originally, except you can't lose cards to an NPC or other players if you lose the game. Some believe that the risk of losing your cards so you can have a rematch to win it back should have stayed.
    • The Steps of Faith trial getting nerfed in patch 2.57 caused a ton of complaining from people who liked how difficult it was, fearing that making the trial easier would promote bad players. While the nerf was probably going to happen anyway, it was a necessity due to players being blocked off from playing in the 3.0 expansion pack if they didn't clear the trial first.
    • 3.0 nerfing the Holy and Flare spells by having them do less damage to each target beyond the first one via Diminishing Returns for Balance. This means that if Holy and/or Flare hits multiple targets, only one target will get full damage while every target after that will get less damage and the reduction increases until it hits the cap of a 50% reduction. Players cried foul and claimed the devs were trying to make speed running less desirable, though the nerfs were most likely done to balance against the new spells that have higher potency and/or additional effects.
    • Most of the entire cast of characters had their voice actors changed for 3.0, causing people who liked the vocal direction and evolution that the previous voice actors were going through to hate the sudden change.
    • The devs made a change to the Triple Triad tournaments by reducing the amount of points a player could earn from battling an NPC while also raising the threshold required for earning platinum card packs and lowering the amount of MGP earned if the player's overall score wasn't good enough. The idea behind the change was to encourage players to battle each other instead of NPCs, but the change was met with an outcry due to how difficult it was to earn enough points to rank high enough thanks to everyone else exploiting the system to always win the tournaments by rigging the game in their favor.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: The tension between Ilberd and Raubahn goes through the roof after the Ilberd cuts off Raubahn's arm at the end of 2.5 due to working with the Crystal Braves that were also working with Teledji Adeledji to overthrow the Sultana. Ilberd also attacked Raubahn out of anger because Raubahn, who came from the war ton city state of Ala Migho, "abandoned" his homeland to start a new life in Ul'dah. The conflict comes to head in Heavensward where Ilberd demands for Raubahn to be executed for his crimes. You kick Ilberd's ass, but he goes on about Raubahn's betrayal before fleeing. The conflict is seemingly resolved off screen where you're later told that Lolorito is no longer working with Ilberd or the Crystal Braves and the rest of Eozera won't take them in either, forcing them to wander aimlessly for the rest of their lives. Square missed the chance to develop Raubahn and Ilberd's characters and also missed the chance to have the side plot more developed before it closed.
  • Ugly Cute:
    • The coblyns, which look like something straight out of Spore. The "cute" part is debatable.
    • Gilgamesh looks more like an Oni in this game, complete with the Face of a Thug, but his elated smile when Nashu cheers him on after he saves her from some zombies makes him look Adorkable.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • Deliberate invocation. Lalafell only look like cutesy Precious Moments-esque small children, thus are inapplicable for Troubling Unchildlike Behavior, but Square Enix seems to be taking an unhealthy amount of glee in discomforting their audience by having their adult Lalafell ostentatiously act like it: they swear, drink, and make lewd comments...and more ominously, are vicious loan sharks, gang members, and apparently have histories of violent racial strife: The united Lalafell nation split into two city-states, Ul'dah and Sil'dih, when tensions got too high, and eventually the Ul'dahn Lalafell turned Sil'dih into rubble. Unsettling. ...Plus the male Lalafell can grow facial hair, which is just weird-looking.
    • Deliberately invoked with Hildibrand and anyone else involved in his quest lines. Their cartoon looking facial expressions stretch the facial features in such a way that makes the characters look even more hilarious.
    • The Paladin's war lion mount is full of uncanny valley due to how it's textured and modeled. The lion's mane looks like a massive lump of clay with the hair details almost non existent while the face itself looks like a lion you would see from a statue rather than a live animal. This is probably because the lion shares the model with Chimera monsters with the heads cut off, resulting in a shoddy copy/paste/cut job.
    • The animations of the player character emotes look just fine until they finish. Once a used emote is over, you can see the player character's face quickly return to their neutral face. The worst of it comes from the /laugh emote, where you can see the character laughing with their eyes half closed and their mouth open and then quickly shift to their default poker face, as if whatever joke they heard suddenly became unfunny in just half a second.
  • What The Hell Costuming Department:
    • The Evenstar set of armor obtained with Soldiery tomestones for Magic DPS classes. Up until that point, Black Mages have been wearing a variety of Badass Longrobes appropriate for a fantasy magic user. The Evenstar set is a very tight set Stage Magician style clothing with a top hat with an ace of spades on it. The male version features tight pants and heeled shoes while the female version adds a popped out frilly skirt, thigh high boots, fish net, and short shorts, and a top that features Absolute Cleavage. On Miqo'te of both genders, their cat tails are also covered and propped into an upward curve.
      • That said, there are fans of the Evenstar set, especially the nice hat which is a popular pick for glamour.
    • While it's not as bad as the Evenstar set, the Astrum set for Dragoons features mismatched gauntlets, a bowl-shaped helmet with mismatched golden wings (one being over a foot tall) and a breastplate with a long white skirt, giving it the feeling that the dragoon is going to sing The Ring of the Nibelung rather than killing gods.
  • Win Back the Crowd: The A Realm Reborn version is definitely this for Square-Enix. Before ARR's release, it was not uncommon to see some critics to declare any kind of "rebuilt" FFXIV as basically dead on arrival, and not bother bringing it back from the grave. Since the relaunch, some of the very same game review websites and magazines have had their opinions changed completely, and widely praise its changes. Game Informer for example went from saying "scrap it" before ARR, to now declaring it 2013's MMORPG of the Year by both the Readers and the Editors. Some of the reviewers, like Mike Fahey of Kotaku, even copped to and admitted their 180 of opinion on playing it.
  • The Woobie: Raubahn by the end of Patch 2.55. Even if you get past losing his homeland of Ala Mihgo and being the only member of the Syndicate loyal to the Sultana against the Monetarists who are trying to undermine (if not outright remove) any little authority she has left, his life seems to get worse and worse. His 2nd in command was revealed to be The Mole for the Garlean Empire (And possibly to the Monetarists as well). Then Nanamo is assassinated, with the Warrior of Light (and by association the Scions) being held responsible, enraging him to kill Teledji Adeledji. Then is betrayed by his friend Ilberd (already staging a Monetarist-backed coup of the Crystal Braves), who cuts off his left arm defending Lolorito before taunting him saying that serving the Sultana has made him weak, then stating he was responsible for Nanamo's death, enraging him even further into a fight. Not to mention Kan-E-Senna and Merlwyb, his allies in the Eorzean Alliance, seemingly abandons him through all of this. At the end of it all he is imprisoned and is disgraced as a traitor.
  • Woolseyism: While old Ted may not be working for Square anymore, his legacy lives on: the Japanese-language version of A Realm Reborn lacks much of the humor present in the English-language localization, let alone the panoply of Shout Outs.
    • There's a negative side to this as well. Much of the Japanese script is in standard Japanese, with the exception of a few characters such as Yugiri and Urianger. Unfortunately many of the characters speak in a form of Ye Olde Butchered English. While for standard characters this just means using words such as "anon" far more than any normal English speaking person has used the word in the past one hundred years, characters such as the aforementioned Yugiri and Urianger can become close to incomprehensible with their already archaic Japanese speech patterns translated and made even more archaic to compensate for the already older English word choice being used. While this gives the game some class in its script, it makes the barrier to entry for non-native English speakers and the jobs of the voice actors that much more difficult.
    • This was an especially big issue when the player talks to Midgardsomr. In the English voicework, his lines are short and vague, and you leave the cutscene not knowing whose side he's on. By contrast, the original Japanese is a lot more blunt and clear, and though he's still shady, he comes across as far more benevolent. According to Yoshi-P, this was intentional, since he wanted him to come across as more imposing compared to how chatty he was in Japanese.