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  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Did Luigi suspect that King Boo had planned a trap for him from the very beginning of the game? Notice how Luigi acts in the intro: unlike Mario, Peach, and the Toads, who are chatting and enjoying the bus ride, he's asleep. His only luggage is a flashlight and a book, which he doesn't seem very interested in, as when he tries to read it, he immediately conks out. When the gang arrives at the hotel, he's the last person to enter the building, and when he does enter, he's not as excited as the others, to the point where he's cautious toward Hellen Gravely (as indicated by him sneezing at the scent of her perfume). And in general, his attitude toward the whole thing doesn't exactly look like the sort of reaction anyone else would have to, you know, winning a free ride to a big hotel that promises lots of money, fun, and adventure. It's almost as if he suspects something is wrong...but being Luigi, he can't put his finger on what the problem is, or doesn't want to worry his friends about it. Then again, the last time Luigi got an invitation to a big, rich place full of money and treasure all around...
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    • How loyal are most of the ghosts? While Hellen is obviously on King Boo's side, the other ghosts are mostly fine with being left alone, with many of the bosses doing their own thing until Luigi shows up. In addition, when King Boo's crown vanishes, the normal ghosts seemingly snap out of a trance, hinting they were brainwashed. So were all the ghosts like this, or were any of them actually evil?
  • Angst? What Angst?: While being trapped within a painting is definitely a terrible fate, Luigi's friends don't seem all that bothered or affected by it at all when they are let out. They are their perfectly bubbly and cheery selves when they escape.
  • Annoying Video-Game Helper: Professor E Gadd is your standard Voice with an Internet Connection in this game, meaning sometimes his hints will be helpful (you won't be spending all day stuck trying to enter Spectral Catch) but will often butt in when the player is exploring or pointing out obvious objectives like "escape the trap you just fell in". He thankfully becomes more hands-off after all the Toads have been saved, and you can also turn his hints off after getting the Virtual Boo.
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  • Anti-Climax Boss: After the challenging and puzzling but fairly enjoyable Hellen Gravely penultimate boss fight immediately beforehand, King Boo makes for a somewhat disappointing Final Boss. It's a fairly straightforward "Feed It a Bomb Three Times" boss battle that is more frustrating than challenging, stemming from the difficulty in aiming the bomb in King Boo's mouth. Even with King Boo spawning decoys and introducing harder attack patterns in each stage, it still ends up feeling repetitive as you're just waiting for King Boo to perform the same attacks until bombs spawn; unlike Dark Moon, there are no chase sequences to break up the battle and spice things up. Not even the time limit is enough to make it feel climactic, since there's no Non Standard Game Over for letting time run out.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Dark Moon received some criticism for removing Portrait Ghosts (which were beloved for their humanoid appearances and personalities) and making the overall enemy design more cutesy. While Luigi's Mansion 3 still has a more goofy design than the original, enemies have been made more intimidating, and the game is once again host to a cast of human-like ghosts as NPCs and boss characters. Also, the bosses guarding Toads possess objects, a much-beloved aspect of the climactic boss fights in Dark Moon.
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    • Related to the above, most of the Portrait Ghosts in the first game never actually attempted to harm Luigi unless he provoked them, which made the ghosts come across more like Designated Villains. Here, the ghosts are genuinely malicious and purposely try to kill Luigi even if he doesn't mean to bother them. The only ghost that isn't antagonistic is Morty; capturing him is made completely optional.
    • One of the most divisive and complained about elements of Dark Moon was its mission-based structure, which limited exploration due to Luigi constantly being warped out of the mansions. Luigi's Mansion 3 replaces this with a more open design akin to the original Luigi's Mansion: the player can freely travel between floors of the hotel, with the game still maintaining the distinct, themed levels of Dark Moon via the different floors.
    • A concern that most fans have had with the first game was its short length. This game manages to have an impressive 17 floors (or 18 if you count the roof as its own floor), including at least a couple that you end up going through more than once.
    • Polterpup is much less polarizing than his appearance in Dark Moon, as he actively assists Luigi as he explores the hotel, giving him hints on where to go and interacting with the scenery in goofy ways, rather than stealing things Luigi needs and forcing him to backtrack through areas he's already been. Instead, Polterkitty takes up the role he played in the previous game.
    • The game seems to address the repetitive returns to the lab from both previous games by mostly allowing Luigi to keep moving forward after every boss ghost. Only when the plot intervenes is Luigi required to go back to Gadd, but otherwise, he can go at his own pace.
    • The game is much more forgiving than the previous two as far as challenge and ranking goes, only tracking the amount of money you collect. This means there is no metric for any of the bosses (you simply need to defeat them, with no reward for doing it with particular finesse), and the lack of missions means there are no ranks for that, either. It's more easygoing than the previous two, as a result.
    • Many fans didn't appreciate the Dramatic Irony of being let on that King Boo was behind the plot of Dark Moon from the start, whereas Luigi and E. Gadd were totally oblivious to both this, and the fact that he kidnapped Mario again, until very late in the game. In this game, Hellen Gravely is quick to introduce King Boo as the one who brought Luigi and company to the Last Resort, as well as reveal that he's captured Mario, Princess Peach, and the Toads.
    • Quite a few people were disappointed that King Boo basically disappeared after being defeated in Dark Moon, without so much as a mention after being sucked up by the Poltergust. During the credits of this game, we get to see a picture of King Boo trapped in a glass prison, with Hellen Gravely and her Polterkitty right next to him.
  • Best Boss Ever:
    • Amadeus Wolfgeist manages to make The Great Stage a truly great stage. His fight has two phases before he even attacks directly, and then he leaps into his piano to possess it like Dark Moon's bosses. From that point on, it's a surprisingly challenging fight as the piano attacks and you have to perform several steps to get Wolfgeist out of it so you can attack, which can be jarring at first, but turns out to be a really fun challenge. As a bonus, Wolfgeist serves his purpose as a pianist by providing music for the encounter, including the frenzied ghost-catching theme.
    • The other climax bosses guarding the paintings (Ug and Captain Fishook) are pretty fun, too, also borrowing from Dark Moon's formula very well.
      • To elaborate on both, Ug starts the fight possessing a freaking T-Rex skeleton! You have to franticly wait for him to drop eggs for you to fire into his mouth and after you do, he wises up and destroys one. You then have to use Gooigi in a creative way, get him stuck in the T-Rex's mouth. As for Captain Fishook, he takes it up a notch and possesses the ship you are fighting on. From there, you have to fire bombs thrown by other ghosts into his exposed mouth. Every time you land a hit, Fishook will possess the wall and tip the boat towards him and you have to use the suction shot to hold onto the other side in order to keep from falling in.
    • Serpci may not be a portrait-guarding boss like the previous three, but she manages to nonetheless be a very fun and involved fight, with multiple means of attacking you that require you to use every form of movement you have available to you to beat.
    • Nikki, Ginny, and Lindsay grant one of the most chaotic fights in the game. While it starts mostly standard, once you defeat the first sister, things get insane. You need to keep track of which of the spinning hats the remaining sisters are in, or you will get blown up, as all the while the hats are still firing cards at you and trying to ram you. The lights will also start to flicker, turning the fight into a frantic, but fun test of your skills.
    • Hellen Gravely is the ultimate test of working with Luigi and Gooigi in tandem, as you need to use Gooigi to go under the floor and shut off the barriers of Hellen's laser security system so Luigi can safely fight back. While Gooigi navigates the lower section, you have to keep track of Luigi to switch back to him when you need to move him away from the lasers or Hellen's attacks. When the lower floor starts getting flooded in certain paths during the later rounds, the fight is positively hectic, but all the more satisfying to beat.
  • Best Level Ever:
    • Floor 8, Paranormal Productions, is a more cerebral level that indulges in some fun surrealism and a couple of movie references as well, with a hilarious boss fight and a sympathetic ghost running the show. It's also home to a complicated, yet fair puzzle that really makes the player think outside the box.
    • Floor 10, Tomb Suites, is just as spooky and deadly as you'd expect from an Ancient Egyptian level, with several harrowing death traps and a challenging, fun boss.
    • Floor 11, Twisted Suites, for its eerie, whimsical music and magic show aesthetic, as well as having Cute Ghost Girl magicians with a fun boss battle.
  • Breather Boss: Both Johnny Deepend and DJ Phantasmagloria are very simple for late game bosses. This might be a relief for players since some of the previous ones were among the hardest in the game and the following ones, Hellen Gravely and King Boo, are the game's final bosses, being challenging by default.
    • Johnny is a Puzzle Boss whose only attacks are throwing highly-telegraphed volleyballs and spitting a stream of water, the latter of which is more of a nuisance than anything since it is only harmful to Gooigi. Shooting him with a volleyball stuns him for a significant amount of time, and once you find the solution (which can potentially take less than a minute) he can only defend himself with a small shockwave attack and goes down in a single cycle.
    • The ghost dancers Phantasmagloria summons before her fight can be annoying, but her fight proper has no notable gimmicks and is pretty straightfoward. While the spinning records she tosses can clutter the arena, they do damage only by 10- and have a tendency to drop hearts so there is rarely any actual danger. Her level also borders on being a Boss-Only Level, consisting of a straight hallway toward the boss room with only one short fight along the way.
  • Breather Level:
    • Paranormal Productions is not very hard, being more designed around a large puzzle than fending off ghosts (even if you do find some). The floor just before (Garden Suites) and the next real floors afterwards (the Boilerworks and the Tomb Suites) are long, difficult and have lots of enemies and hazards to work around.
    • The Dance Hall may as well be counted as a Boss-Only Level on account of it being so short, despite DJ Phantasmagloria not being the guardian of any portraits. It's put in between the long, puzzle-riffic Fitness Center and subsequent second Polterkitty chase, and the big finale at the Master Suite and Roof.
    • The Gathering Gold objective in the Scarescraper mode is far easier and simpler than the other objectives it may throw at you, given that every little piece of gold counts, giving those small money caches an actual purpose, and most of the gold ghosts, who don't fight back (but can disappear, and it's key to defeat as many of them as possible to reap the rewards).
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • Slamming the ghosts and the bosses is immensely satisfying, especially the bosses that take joy in tormenting Luigi like Clem, Dr. Potter, and especially King Boo.
    • The game massively ramps up the number of interactive objects per room, and the number of loose, vacuumable items and destructible furniture that your Poltergust and Suction Shot can tear up. The game actually delivers both kinds of catharsis—that of creating a huge mess and that of cleaning it up completely. It's very satisfying to empty out a room, and even to waste a good twenty minutes cleaning out the entire Sandy Grand Hall on floor 10 thanks to the almost meditative effect of the sand physics.
    • Launching a volleyball at Johnny Deepend once you're in the second phase of his fight doesn't do any damage to him. But man if it isn't cathartic to keep beaning him over and over.
    • During the battle against Wolfgeist, he possesses a piano and makes it look and act eerily similar to the infamous “Mad Piano” from Super Mario 64. As such it is incredibly satisfying to be able to completely destroy that piano.
  • Character Rerailment: E. Gadd became both dumber and meaner in Dark Moon which, while not necessarily unpopular, was still very jarring since he was never portrayed like that before. While both aspects are still present in this game, they're much more downplayed, with Gadd now halfway between his original and Dark Moon personalities.
  • Complete Monster: King Boo returns. See that page for details.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
  • Even Better Sequel: Seems to be generally regarded as this in regards to the previous two games. Both the original and Dark Moon were already considered very good, but there were a few notable flaws in each: the first game got hit with a hefty dose of It's Short, So It Sucks!, as well as the fact that there isn't a ton of variety to the environments within the mansion; the second game managed to expand somewhat on the length and introduced much more varied environments, but the mission system was generally considered to somewhat hamper the sense of exploration the first game had, and most of the boss ghosts felt less interesting than the first game's Portrait Ghosts. This game manages to strike a balance between the two formulas: it keeps the extended length and diverse environments of the second game while removing the mission system in favor of continuous exploration like in the first game, and most of the boss ghosts are much closer in feel to the original.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Hellen Gravely, part of the Big Bad Duumvirate, is fairly easy on the eyes for a female ghost in her middle age. When she isn't pissed.
    • Serpci looks just like how you would expect a pharaoh queen to be as a ghost.
    • Amadeus Wolfgeist has garnered quite the Estrogen Brigade thanks to his elegant appearance and personality.
  • Fridge Brilliance:
    • All of the themed floors in the mansion seem appropriate to the setting of a haunted hotel (the pirate-themed restaurant has a ghost ship and the desert suites are themed around pyramid tombs, after all) except the dance hall... until you realize it's disco-themed. Ever heard the phrase "as dead as disco"? That would adequately describe the clientele for this floor. The dancers also perform a synchronized dab move, which might invoke the idea of it being a dead meme.
    • Chambrea is kind of annoying, since you have to chase her around the floor, interrupted each time she moves... but it makes perfect sense that the location of a fight against a maid would be multiple guest rooms, since going from room to room is how maids do their job, and it ties perfectly into the classic trope of ghosts going through walls.
    • How exactly did Hellen Gravely bust King Boo out of containment? E. Gadd obviously forgot to get rid of the "Release Boos" button seen at the end of Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon.
    • When the Mario Bros. reach the roof of the hotel where Peach's portrait is, Mario absolutely panics upon seeing what happened to Peach. Seeing how Peach is kidnapped every other week, this should be no big deal, so why is Mario panicking now? Because for once, there is nothing he can do to save her, but Luigi can, and that's why he frantically begs Luigi to help her. In addition, Mario knows that when Bowser kidnaps Peach, he at least knows that Bowser would only hurt her if she directly interferes with his plans or Bowser isn't himself. King Boo, being The Unfettered and with a hateful grudge, probably would hurt Peach if it was what it took for him to win.
    • Most Boos, including King Boo himself in Dark Moon, stop moving and hide their face when the player approaches them. But in this game, King Boo never hides his face, not even during his boss battle. He's so pissed off at Luigi continuously foiling his plans that he managed to get over the inherent shyness of his kind.
    • E. Gadd states in his research journal, after the web page showcasing it is updated for Luigi's Mansion 3, that the ghosts of the original Luigi's Mansion have an energy that's "structurally different" than that of the Evershade Valley ghosts of Dark Moon. This is to be expected, actually, given the ghosts from the first game were creations of Vincent Van Gore.
    • While it may seem unnecessary that the elevator buttons magically screw themselves into their proper sockets every time Luigi tries to install one, this is obviously some sort of foresight on someone's part, be it King Boo, Hellen Gravely, or even the ghost minions responsible for snatching the buttons in the first place, to prevent Luigi from just screwing the button into the 15th floor's socket, and thus immediately reaching Hellen Gravely's room.
  • Fridge Horror: King Boo imprisons Luigi in a painting when you get a game over, even in cases where there wouldn't be any Luigi left, such as the spiked wall trap in Castle MacFrights and the ceiling traps in Tomb Suites. So does King Boo frame Luigi's ghost?
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • Both literally and figuratively when it comes to the bats that will swarm you. However, any critter enemy that cost only 5 to 10 heart points (like rats, birds, and snakes) can be considered this throughout the game.
    • Oozers, the lean yellow ghosts. They're as fragile as a Goob, but they can easily mess with you in different ways. Their main attack is to hurl junk at you, and they'll often do this while you're in the middle of sucking up another ghost, freeing it if a projectile hits you. They can also leave slippery banana peels on the floor, which can once again be problematic if you're busy with a ghost. Last but not least, they tend to hide in objects, and they'll change positions frequently when doing so. This can be especially annoying in Scarescraper, where wasting time isn't a good idea since you have at least five minutes to clear a floor.
  • Goddamned Boss:
    • Dr. Potter is initially very confusing, and once you understand how to get an opening, it's not much easier, as his plant has multiple attacks that won't leave it vulnerable.
    • If you didn't hate Polterkitty the first time it showed up to eat up your elevator button, then you will despise the second time it does (since, by then, it becomes a clear case of Padding). It's not hard to deal with Polterkitty in battle, but the strategy is repetitive and tracking it down through old floors can become boring fast.
    • Clem is infamous for stumping many players, but mostly because of Fake Difficulty. The tube riding controls are not the most intuitive, which makes navigating through the endless mines and spiked walls a frustrating experience, and in order to make Clem vulnerable in the first place, you need to let him get close enough to attempt to whack you (but not let yourself get whacked, which, again, is very troublesome due to the aforementioned controls). If you do manage to put Clem into a stunned state (either due to the dodging strategy or luck from a stray mine), you still have to chase after him when he's spinning around uncontrollably, catch his tube, shoot it into the spikes and chase after him again when he lands outside the pool. Overall, it's a boss with a simple logic behind it, but with plenty of steps and annoyances that are not immediately obvious about how to perform or overcome. The saving grace of this fight are the endless rats that provide health if vacuumed, so you can afford to get hurt and pop your tube repeatedly, but inflating a new rubber floatie is still an annoying process thanks to Luigi being unable to move until he finishes doing so.
    • While DJ Phantasmagloria is a straightforward fight, the pre-fight with her dancing Goobs minions is less so. You have to find the elevator button that one of them is holding and burst him twice in a row, then suck up the Goob who had it. Now, here's the problem: Luigi is snapping his fingers to DJ Phantasmagloria's music... which means he's moving slower. This isn't too terrible for the first round of hide-and-seek, but the second round is a Timed Mission (and not a very long one either) where if you take too long or burst the wrong Goob, you have to start over. All the Goobs do full damage to you, which is a problem with Luigi's slowed movement. Depending on the patterns you get for the second hide-and-seek, sucking up that one Goob can be a longer and more painful task than the actual boss fight.
    • Final bosses are usually meant to be challenging, so That One Boss often doesn't apply to them. However, due to another case of Fake Difficulty caused by a combination of Depth Deception and an unfair attack pattern, it's fair to mention King Boo as a frustrating Goddamned Boss. To defeat him, the player is supposed to shoot bombs, that he himself tosses at Luigi, into his mouth. Sounds simple enough, but only if you ignore the wonky aiming and the strange perspective between King Boo and the arena, meaning that you have to adjust your shots in a way that doesn't look natural, otherwise you'll keep missing over and over. This turns an already challenging, yet fair fight into a complete nightmare for people who don't immediately figure out what the heck they're doing wrong, especially because King Boo tends to vanish quickly (becoming faster as the fight drags on). Having endless patience won't save you, either, since King Boo will add a time limit of 4 minutes in his final phase that leads to an instant game over if he's not defeated before then, and he won't throw bombs until after he's cycled through all of his other attacks. To make things even worse, King Boo only leaves himself clearly vulnerable if he decides to throw bombs twice in a row.note 
  • Guide Dang It!:
    • Ug's first phase as the T-Rex skeleton. First part is easy; shoot one egg at it, then a second while it's busy chewing on the first. The second part, however, requires you to feed Gooigi to it. Since virtually all players want to avoid taking damage, just walking up and letting the boss hurt you is not easy to figure out (though Gooigi doesn't actually get damaged). Plus, the E. Gadd Hotline offers no assistance, and it takes a long time before E. Gadd chimes in with tips, the second of which tells you to use Gooigi.
    • The Hammers in the Weight Room almost seem impossible to defeat at first, since they block your Strobulb. The solution? You need to lead the boxing glove Hammer into the range of dumbell throwing one. Not only is this significantly different from any other puzzle solution (most involve shooting, suction, Gooigi, or a combination.) these are some of the only Hammers that need to disarmed, the only other instance being in Dr Potter's floor. Plus, the boxing glove ghost has very dangerous, nonstop attacks for a basic mook and will hunt you down with unrelenting determination.
  • Ho Yay: Morty's immediate interest in Luigi and his comments about his appearance have not gone unnoticed.
    Morty: I didn't notice until now, but your face... It has some nice features! And your build... Not bad. Not bad at all!
  • Jerkass Woobie: Hellen Gravely. Yes, she aids King Boo in his twisted revenge scheme, but it's made abundantly clear that everything she does is so she can gain King Boo's attention. Unfortunately for her, King Boo is so obsessed with his vendetta against Luigi that he couldn't care less about her and even dismisses her as useless despite the fact that the only reason he escaped in the first place was thanks to her help.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • The game is set at a haunted hotel. Cue Hotel Mario jokes.
    • One of the early moments of the game is Luigi trying to read a book while lying in his hotel room bed, only to almost immediately fall asleep. It quickly became a reaction clip for sleep-inducing situations.
    • Luigi's entering Mario's hotel room and finding it filled with empty pizza boxes only a few hours after they checked in has caused many fans to poke fun at the plumber's huge appetite.
    • The scene of Luigi bashing ghosts around drawing parallels to Hulk's beatdown on Loki.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: Mario and Luigi telling each other "Night night" at the beginning of the game. Awww...
  • Older Than They Think: In regards to the Uncanny Valley example below, the game's box art isn't the first time Luigi has sported realistic teeth, since this front cover for the August 2001 issue of Next Gen Magazine featured its own contemptible CGI art for Luigi.
  • Player Punch: Morty is the only friendly ghost encountered in the game, being a film director who willingly gives Luigi his elevator button after he helps him with his new movie and the player has the choice to not capture him if they want. However, he is a boss ghost and catching him is an achievement in itself, so the player must capture him if they want to fully complete the game. What's worse is that when Luigi catches Monty, the ghost has the least amount of HP of any enemy in the game, he doesn't try to fight back and after he's captured, Luigi's usual victory cheer sounds far more depressed and regretful than normal.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: The Polterpup was quickly saved from this via it being helpful this time around by helping guide Luigi, his behavior Luigi being so adorable and heartwarming, and it being thanks to him Luigi was able to defeat King Boo. It helps that he has his own Evil Counterpart in the Polterkitty, who fills his role from the last game.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • In order to ride a pool floatie in the Boilerworks, you need to either suck or blow with the Poltergust in a specific direction. The problem is that both actions have an opposite effect to each other depending on the direction Luigi is currently facing on the tube, meaning it's easy to fall trap to Damn You, Muscle Memory! as you attempt to avoid all the hazards coming your way by, say, sucking, but end up accidentally blowing and going the other way instead. Turning is a huge issue as well, as constantly pressing in one direction with the stick does not make Luigi continue turning. While it might not be so bad if it was a one-and-done deal, the mechanic then comes back for the floor's boss. It's as fun as it sounds.
    • The time limit combined with the floor size and number of ghosts in the ScareScraper mode makes doing it in single-player almost impossible. Dark Moon's version of the mode was definitely harder as one person, but it was perfectly doable. Here, the positively sprawling floors are fine, but the time limit has not expanded for them and clocks that boost your time are seemingly random drops. This essentially prohibits a single player from clearing a five-floor tower, let alone a ten-floor one, since there's always too much to manage with no assurance that you'll find the right rooms or get enough clocks. It feels like it's built exclusively for co-op with friends or online play, the latter of which is gated behind paid membership to the Switch Online service. For completion purposes, this is a problem since the ScareScraper is where you find the rare ghosts for the gallery, and you only see them on fifth-interval boss floors, which demands that you do well when each floor is mostly up to random chance as a solo player. There are also several achievements earned in ScareScraper that are unachievable as a solo player.
    • The floors in the Scarescraper often feature a switch that all players need to stand on to unlock a door to more rooms containing ghosts. If just one of those players is occupied with catching ghosts in another room, collecting treasure, just plain ignores repeated calls of "Over here!", or is simply too far away to get to the switch room in time, the door cannot be opened and you run out of time, failing the mission. This is especially annoying if you've otherwise had a good run.
    • Then there are the random events that deliberately screw with the players, such as a power outage or taking away their Poltergusts, making them have to scrounge around the floor to find them.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge:
    • The series-wide challenge of getting as much/little money as possible is still prominent here, but unlike the first game, there is no ending rank for having an extremely small amount of cash.
    • It's possible to complete the game without slamming ghosts, save for a few mandatory cases like Polterkitty, Johnny Deepend, and King Boo. Since slamming multiple times in a row does a lot of damage, going without it makes most fights, especially bosses, last much longer than they normally would.
  • Slow-Paced Beginning: The first few floors of the game are quite short and have mundane themes that would appear in a real hotel (lobby, suites, shops, etc.), and their associated bosses are very straightforward to defeat. There are also a few mandatory visits to E. Gadd's lab during this time, and you don't yet have the option to instantly teleport there. It's not until you encounter Amadeus Wolfgeist, and visit Castle MacFrights afterward, that the more bizarre floor themes, intricate puzzles, and complicated boss fights really come into play.
  • Squick: During an earlier part of the game, you can spy on a ghost in a bathroom brushing his teeth with a toilet brush... who then proceeds to scrub his butt with it... then brush his teeth again after doing so...
  • Spiritual Adaptation: A lovable coward wearing a green shirt, and his dog, chased everywhere by ghosts? Are you sure we're not playing a Scooby-Doo game?
  • That One Boss:
    • Serpci is uncharacteristically strong for a boss that doesn't guard a painting, featuring some nasty moves and requiring the player to get up close, where they have a high chance of becoming sand snake food.
    • Hellen Graveley can come off as this, especially if you're playing in solo mode. It can be difficult to keep track of what's going on above the floor when you're playing as Gooigi, trying to turn off the colored laser beams. You not only have to run around below the ground to turn off the switches (and try to avoid water coming in on you later in the fight), but you also have to keep an eye on Luigi, and make sure he doesn't get clobbered by Hellen, or hit with a laser, all at the same time.
  • That One Level:
    • The Tomb Suites (10F) are suitably deadly, mainly because they literally don't give the player time to think. It introduces some downright evil death traps under surprisingly strict time limits that will insta-kill Luigi if the player is too slow at figuring out how to solve its puzzles (especially the laser room one).
    • Boilerworks (B2) can be really bad, mainly because of the tube riding gimmick, which is a major pain for those who have trouble with the controls. The worst part is that it's one of the floors you'll need to revisit later in the game (and for an Escort Mission too, because of course), though mercifully, you only have to ride the tube on your first visit.
    • The Twisted Suites (11F) are pretty straight forward until the magician sisters decide to pull one final trick to keep you from facing them. They proceed to scramble the rooms meaning that the level turns into a complete maze. Yes, every room is dark until you go through it once. Thankfully, it shifts back to normal once the level is beaten.
    • The Scarescraper has become that much more difficult than in the previous game, mostly because of how much larger each floor is, and the greater abundance of traps. There are also certain obstacles that require absolute co-operation, and certain events that make things even more difficult, such as power outages.
  • That One Sidequest: Getting all of the "rare ghosts". You can only catch them in the ScareScraper, but there are a few things that make this tedious. For one, the game doesn't make it clear exactly how you even find rare ghosts; you need to play the 10 Floor Mode or 20 Floor Mode specifically, since the rare ghosts appear on the 5th floor, so playing 5 Floor Mode won't yield any rare ghosts. Secondly, the 10 floors are quite long, each floor lasting around 4 minutes apiece. Lastly, and most crucially, you can only find one type of rare ghost per run. This wasn't so bad back when there were originally only 9 ghosts but the number has since expanded to nineteen, making this quite the Luck-Based Mission since there are no measures in place to prevent you from encountering the same rare ghost types) over and over. The only saving grace is that ScareScraper is a pretty fun mode, especially with friends, but even then, that's quite the grind if you want to reach 100% completion. Then there's the themed ghosts which only appear on floors themed after certain levels from the main game. How do you get these floors to appear? DLC costumes. That's right, unless you happen to get really lucky with your ScareScraper partners, 100% completion is now locked behind a paywall.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Aside from King Boo, this is the first game in the series where the Boos have no story importance. You can capture one on each floor of the hotel through optional backtracking, but none of them pose any active threat to Luigi.
    • Despite all the sympathy he gets for being a cute and helpful Canine Companion this time around, Polterpup falls under this for some players. For someone who is initially presented as a major ally (who even appears on the boxart alongside Luigi and has an own figurine), he vanishes for most of the game, only popping up now and then to goof around and assist Luigi, just to disappear again afterwards. Consensus seems to be that he should have replaced Gooigi as the co-op-partner, especially since the latter is a Featureless Protagonist.
    • Unlike previous games in the Luigi's Mansion series, Mario is rescued before fighting King Boo. What does this amount to? Absolutely nothing, since he's hardly free for five minutes before getting captured again immediately before the boss battle begins. Players hoping that Mario and Luigi would have teamed up against King Boo were sadly disappointed. Similarly, Princess Peach has practically no role beyond being a Damsel in Distress. Contrast with the Toads, who at least serve a role in gameplay with an entire Escort Mission built around Luigi and Toad navigating the Boilerworks.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Many fans wish that there was a special cutscene when you ran out of time during the Final Boss fight, since King Boo was trying to absorb the entire hotel into the one group painting during the final stage of the boss fight. However, the player just loses all of their health and the game runs a typical Game Over screen when you run out of time, which caused some disappointment.
    • Many players would have liked to see some kind of additional scene or alternate ending that involved Morty if the player chose to spare him.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • The new ghost designs, deliberately so, as they take on a more cartoony yet intimidating feel like Casper or Courage gone wrong. This is much more apparent when compared to the Ghostbusters-like caricature look of the first game and the simpler and cuter ghosts of the second.
    • The ghosts' human disguises at the beginning of the game are also uncanny, with their un-emotive grotesque cartoon masks.
    • On the boxart, there's just something awkward with Luigi averting Tooth Strip which looks very realistic compared to the cartoon teeth he normally has (including in-game).
    • Amadeus Wolfgeist's fingers look a little too long on his hands.
  • Underused Game Mechanic: Super Suction, for being a satisfyingly destructive powerup and requiring an entire Escort Mission to obtain it, is introduced late in the game and only has three places where it can be used. Only one of those is tied to progression through the game, with the other two merely opening up puzzles for collectibles.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: The animation and visuals are ab-soul-utely spot on, with many people noting that Luigi's design is ludicrously detailed, from the stitches on the L on his cap to his overalls having polyester similar to Super Mario Odyssey. The animation itself has gotten a fair amount of praise too, with many claiming that it looks close to a film made by Pixar. The game also has complex dynamic lighting and tons of interactive objects with full physics in each room, and overall completely outclasses the original and even the Dark Moon art direction it's built on. Many reviews of the game were quick to call it one of the best-looking titles on the Switch, which already has games noted for their visuals.
  • What an Idiot!: While Hellen Gravely's plan to abduct the good guys were effective, there are a few mistakes that ruined the entire plan.
    • In the attempt of capturing Luigi, neither King Boo nor Gravely expect Luigi to run away and escape down the laundry chute.
    • You'd expect: That Hellen to send the ghost staff down the chute ASAP.
    • Instead: She did nothing of the sort, once Luigi arrives at the parking lot nearby and found the Poltergust G-00, it spells the end for the ghosts.
    • Even with the Poltergust G-00, there is another obstacle in Luigi's way, the elevator's the only way to access any other floors beside B1,1, and 2. Gravely knew this fact and ordered her staff to get rid of the elevator buttons.
    • You'd expect: That Hellen to confiscate all the buttons to herself to prevent Luigi from any progress.
    • Instead: She distributes the buttons to the staff, each button leads to another.
    • As a result: Luigi can defeat each staff member, free his friends, and beat both her and King Boo.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • Fans were generally unimpressed by the first trailer, with many apprehensive about how similar the game looked in gameplay and visuals to Dark Moon, which had a very different direction that disappointed many fans of the first game. However, the E3 spotlight in 2019 got many of those viewers on board by showing drastically improved visuals, the return of character ghosts like the first game's, the new mechanics of the game, and the less restrictive structure, which all changed many opinions to excitement.
    • This is the game that put Next Level Games back into prestige after their highly controversial previous work (Metroid Prime: Federation Force).

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