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Characters: Goof Troop
A Character Sheet for characters appearing within Disney's Goof Troop series. Characters from the movie spin-offs, A Goofy Movie and An Extremely Goofy Movie will also be included for simplicity's sake.

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     Goofy Goof 

See also Goofy
Voiced by: Bill Farmer

The good-natured but clueless father of Max. He's the next door neighbor of the Pete family, and is often brought into Pete's schemes as a sidekick. He ends up with Sylvia in An Extremely Goofy Movie.

  • Accidental Athlete: In An Extremely Goofy Movie when he interferes with Max's practice and is even offered a spot with the Gammas by complete accident.
  • Alliterative Name/Repetitive Name: Like all of the examples on this show, he is never referred to by full name, just as "Goofy" and "Mr. Goof."
  • Amazingly Embarrassing Parents: If it's not embarrassing enough that he ends up following Max to school (twice, although the two events are mutually exclusive), it certainly is that he continues to baby Max in public when Max is a teenager. Or an adult.
  • Back to School: In the second movie. And, much to Max's horror, at the same college as him.
  • Birds of a Feather: He and Sylvia are both Disco Dan types.
  • Bow Ties Are Cool: Goofy is one of the most unashamed characters in the series, hence, he wears bow ties all the time.
  • Bumbling Dad: Goofy is a great parent, but due to his clumsiness, stupidity, and/or difference in personality to his son, he ends up causing some issues anyway.
  • Bumbling Sidekick: Screws up nearly every Zany Scheme he's a part of. And yet, for some reason, Pete always insists on using him.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: He has bizarre logic that no one else on the show can follow. Pete and Max in particular find it annoying, but Peg and PJ tend to humor him more.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: There are moments of this, usually when he's protecting Max, such as in "To Catch a Goof" where he trains to be a ninja.
  • Disco Dan: He is revealed to be one of these in An Extremely Goofy Movie, even thinking wearing bell-bottoms, platform shoes, and afros to class is appropriate attire.
  • The Ditz: The other characters really have a hard time keeping him up to speed, although Pete does enjoy exploiting this as an easy way to get help.
  • Dogs Are Dumb: Goofy is a dog as well as being The Ditz and a Cloudcuckoolander. Despite this, he does have his moments of insight.
  • Doting Parent: To Max. He provides lots of attention to Max much to the latter's embarrassment.
  • Drives Like Crazy: Most prominently in A Goofy Movie but there was also an episode where he said he would drive and everyone freaks out.
    Max: The old man drives like such a klutz that I'm about to hurl my guts directly upon the open road.
  • Dumb Is Good: Providing a Good Parent contrast to Pete, he's not as smart as anyone else.
  • Fat and Skinny: The skinny to Pete's fat. He plays the optimist just along for the ride.
  • The Fool: Considering how often Goofy ends up with the upper hand over Pete or succeeding at something despite his incredible stupidity, he's very, very lucky.
  • Four Philosophy Ensemble: The apathetic, because he's too weird or crazy to know what's going on.
  • Former Teen Rebel: Goofy was a notorious biker.
  • Good Parents: Despite being weird and embarrassing, he truly does care about Max, and does try to make Max happy and do what's best for him most of the time, even if it doesn't always work. He is also very good at being emotionally supportive and generally talking to kids. He acts as a Parental Substitute for PJ on occasion, and is shown being able to talk to and calm Pistol down (if only for a moment). He also does baby photography in the movie, where it is clear the kids and their parents adore him.
  • Heroes Want Redheads: Ends up with the redheaded Sylvia Marpole in the second movie.
  • Horrible Judge of Character: In general, his relationship with Pete. Being The Pollyanna he doesn't seem to have any concept of what a Jerk Ass Pete is, regarding Pete as his bestest best friend in the entire world, in spite of Pete's typical disdain of him.
  • Iron Butt Monkey: Oh, Goofy. Your stupidity got you injured again... and again... and there seem to be no long-lasting ill-effects.
  • Kindhearted Cat Lover: Goofy, one of the sweetest people around, just loves his cat Waffles. And for that extra zing, the cat lover in question is an anthropomorphic dog.
  • Kindhearted Simpleton: Goofy is certainly not the sharpest tool in the shed, but he's also very sweet and loving towards everyone.
  • The Klutz: Constantly causes destruction and self-injury due to his clumsiness. And his stupidity.
  • Lethal Chef: Don't eat Goofy's "Goofy Burgers". You'll regret it. The one he made for PJ punched Waffles in the face.
  • Lethally Stupid: The cause of many of Pete's mishaps, especially in "Goof Fellas" when Goofy gets them both in trouble with The Mafia and given special attention in "The Good, the Bad, and the Goofy", although in that episode, the stupidity manages to save Pete.
  • Literal-Minded: Several jokes in the series come from him not understanding when Pete is using a metaphor or being sarcastic. Strangely, he's pretty good at making analogies himself.
  • Made of Iron: The only way he manages to survive the troubles he gets himself into.
  • Malaproper: Often.
    Goofy: Don't worry! I'm the decimated driver!
    Goofy: Easy, Pete, or I'll have to bring you to your senses! You're historical!
  • Meaningful Name: As with all versions of the character, he ain't called Goofy for nothing.
  • Mistaken for Badass: Goofy was once known as "the Skull". Though apparently nobody knew it was short for numbskull.
  • Nice Guy: All he really wants to do is help other people out with their problems, no matter how grateful they end up being to him.
  • Parental Substitute: To PJ on occasions, most notably in "O R-V, I N-V U", where he successfully cheers him up with a motivational speech. PJ does have a father at home but he's not a very good one.
  • The Pollyanna: He suffers physical injury regularly, is continually screwed over by his neighbor, and his son doesn't always appreciate what he does for him. He still maintains one of the two cheeriest and most optimistic dispositions on the show... most of the time, but even he has his breaking points.
  • Simpleton Voice: Goofy manages to pull this off and still maintain something of an emotional range.
  • Too Dumb to Fool: Occasionally Pete will try to trick him but due to his stupidity Goofy will cause more harm than good, most notably when Pete hypnotizes him in "In Goof We Trust."
  • Too Dumb to Live: His stupidity puts him in life-threatening danger on several occasions and he doesn't know any better, with mistaking The Mafia for tailors in "Goof Fellas" being the biggest example. He usually survives only due to dumb luck and being Made of Iron.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: With Pete of the one-sided variety; Pete hates him but he doesn't hate Pete back.
  • Wacky Parent, Serious Child: Wacky Parent to Max's Serious Child, especially in the movies where Max is a more disillusioned teenager.
  • White Gloves: As with every version of the character.

     Max Goof 

Voiced by: Dana Hill (Age 11), Jason Marsden (Age 14/18+)

The relatively serious and ambitious son of Goofy. He is the next door neighbor of the Pete family, and is PJ's best friend. He often comes up with schemes and involves PJ. In A Goofy Movie, he befriends Bobby and gets together with Roxanne.

  • Adorkable: He's socially awkward around the girl he likes and he is Goofy's son, but he's adorable for it.
  • Aesop Amnesia: Max learning how lucky he is to have his dad in A Goofy Movie, and then seeming to hate him again in the sequel.
  • Anti-Hero: When he can, he will consistently help out people in need (from his dad to his depressed neighbor to one of his enemies), and will not go out of his way to hurt other people...but he will resort to underhanded tactics in order to get what he wants sometimes, such as lying to his crush, tricking his dad, or taking advantage of his friends.
  • Berserk Button: Okay, so he doesn't exactly go berserk, but Max consistently, and always, hates it when somebody tells him he looks/acts/talks just like his dad.
  • Birds of a Feather: Like Roxanne, he is somewhat Adorkable when flirting with her, and needs his friends' help to get with her.
  • Bratty Teenage Son: A male example in the movies and on a few occasions on the show. Max cares about his popularity and image, loudly complains about minor inconveniences, and is somewhat materialistic. Most of the time this shows up, however, he learns to appreciate what he has... for now.
  • Chromatic Arrangement: In An Extremely Goofy Movie with PJ (blue) and Bobby (green), he's the red-wearing main character.
  • Comic Trio: The reckless leader to PJ (powerless) and Bobby (follower) during the "Stand Out" stunt, since he's the one who comes up with the plan.
  • Cool Loser: There's a little more basis for this one than some others (being somewhat socially awkward and having a mostly unenviable legacy), but compared to PJ and Bobby, he definitely doesn't seem like that much of a loser. Not to mention that Roxanne has many of his flaws too and is not a loser.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Max loves to snark about all the various stupidities of the two fathers, and at PJ as well (though in his case it's mutual).
  • Distressed Dude: Due to his optimism, sometimes Max ends up in predicaments and needs to be rescued. More often than not, the rescuer is PJ.
  • Fat and Skinny: The skinny to PJ's fat. He's played as both the leader and the optimist.
  • Fearless Fool: Not stupid, but he is incredibly optimistic and doesn't worry about much of anything. At least before the movies. One time he decided it would be a good idea to help a baby bear find its parents. Another time he decided to go downtown without supervision. Then of course there are the Distressed Dude moments.
    Max (completely calmly talking about a baby bear): Remember the three rules of camping. "Be clean, be courteous, and be careful." Helping this little guy is the courteous thing to do.
    PJ (agitated): You let me know when we hit that part about "careful".
  • Four Philosophy Ensemble: The optimist, as a defining aspect of his personality is how often he thinks his Zany Schemes will work.
  • Friendless Background: Max is revealed in "Everything's Coming Up Goofy" to have only been friends with trees before moving to Spoonerville, and in "Pistolgeist" Goofy talks about how Max had an Imaginary Friend, until the day that he met his first real friend, PJ. This is mutual.
  • Heroes Want Redheads: Roxanne, his (thus far) most prominent and most well known Love Interest.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners/True Companions: He is extremely close friends with PJ in the show and the first movie. In the second movie, he has the same amount of loyalty to Bobby.
  • High School Hustler: He is one of the most clever characters on the show, and does have personal motivations for his deeds a lot of the time, but he's a good person at heart.
  • I Am Not My Father: See Berserk Button.
  • I Just Want to Be Normal: As much as he loves his dad, he does not want to grow up to be as weird. He even has a nightmare about it in A Goofy Movie.
  • Living Emotional Crutch: To PJ. While PJ's not exactly sunshine-and-rainbows with Max around, the pilot shows that without him, things would be a lot worse. Normally, this is shown from PJ being devastated when they end up in a (one-sided) fight, but in An Extremely Goofy Movie, he relapses from his Character Development when Max threatens to transfer.
    PJ (upon hearing that he's not allowed to see Max again): Oh, well... at least I had one day of fun in my life... twenty-four wonderful, happenin' hours.
  • Missing Mom: Max's mother has never been seen or even mentioned, and thus it's not actually known who she even is or what happened to her.
  • No Sympathy: Zig-Zagged. Sometimes Max will be very sympathetic—such as in the pilot and "Close Encounters of the Weird Mime"—and go out of his way to help, but other times he just can't fathom why PJ might be upset at being treated inconsiderately, nervous about a plan, or annoyed that Max complains about his dad in front of him. He also accuses him of being a bad friend thrice despite the fact that every time he was either obviously contrite or actively denying the betrayal. Goofy tries to tell Max to be more sympathetic when this happens.
  • Not So Different: From Pete. Even though Max despises Pete, he is just as guilty at times of being self-absorbed and using other people as a means to an end. Their chemistry works out a little too well in "O, R-V, I N-V U."
  • Only Friend: To PJ, until the movies (excluding "Buddy Building" and "Puppy Love"—see Chuck Cunningham Syndrome here). See Living Emotional Crutch.
  • Red Is Heroic: The most traditionally heroic character of both the show and the movies, he always wears a red hoodie or shirt.
  • Shared Family Quirks: When Max hits puberty, he inherits the Goofy laugh, which embarrasses him greatly.
  • Shipper on Deck: Very supportive when PJ wants to get with Rose Deckenbloom. Also, he doesn't actively support the relationship before it happens, but he definitely appears smug that PJ got Beret Girl instead of Bobby. He's also rather supportive of Goofy and Sylvia in the sequel; at first, it's just because he hopes she'll keep Goofy busy so he doesn't start bugging him and his friends, but toward the end he's genuinely supportive.
  • Shorter Means Smarter: The shortest character and also the smartest in terms of ideas.
  • Silly Rabbit, Idealism Is for Kids!: He is extremely optimistic in the show, even glossing over possible negative consequences. But by the movies, he's even more negative than PJ, though he seems to have gotten somewhat better in the sequel.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: The show had an ensemble cast giving both fathers and sons roughly equal attention. Max was actually in fewer episodes than either Goofy or Pete and was not any (or much) more important than PJ. In the movies, the focus is all about him, even in the sequel when Goofy and PJ are the ones getting Love Interests and bettering themselves/starting to feel better.
  • Straight Man and Wise Guy: A relatively mutual partnership with PJ, though Max is the wise guy more often due to his shortsightedness.
  • Wacky Parent, Serious Child: Serious Child to Goofy's wacky parent. He's not very serious on the show, but he becomes more jaded in the movies. Even on the show, however, he's certainly more serious than Goofy.
  • White Gloves: Just like his dad.

     Peter Pete Sr. 

See also Pete
Voiced by: Jim Cummings

The self-centered and tricky husband of Peg and father of PJ and Pistol. He is the next door neighbor of the Goofs, and often brings Goofy along on schemes.

  • Abusive Parents: Is very psychologically abusive towards PJ, although he's not abusive towards Pistol.
  • Adaptational Heroism. Pete was made a far nicer guy in the series than his typical portrayals. Not especially nice mind you, he's still a Jerk Ass, but he's not an outright villain.
  • Aesop Amnesia: His "I'm a terrible parent" breakdown in "Axed By Addition", a very early episode (first by some counts) had no effect whatsoever on how he treated PJ in the rest of the series. Or even the rest of the episode, once he found out PJ wasn't really dying. He more or less learned the lesson again in "From Air to Eternity", and then the movies came around.
  • Alliterative Name/Repetitive Name: Like all of the examples on this show, he is never actually referred to by his full name, just separately as "Pete(r)" and "Mr. Pete."
  • Ambition Is Evil: Providing an Abusive Parent contrast to Goofy, he is the person of the main cast most interested in business success.
  • Anti-Hero: He's not a good person by any means, and he does have a conflict with all of the other male characters on the show, but he also has standards and is treated like a protagonist by the POV shifts. Despite causing the lion's share of problems for everyone including himself, many of which are at least partly intentional, he has shown that he can do the right thing on several fleeting occasions.
  • Aww, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: Pete and Peg have a few of these moments, "Gymnauseum" and "Peg o' the Jungle" in particular, where Pete goes out of his way to stay with Peg.
  • Big Eater: In one episode he pretended to go on a diet. When he received power bars in the mail he ate six in one sitting, which Peg described as "snacking between snacks". His response when he heard he was only supposed to eat one per meal?
    Pete: Well, then you better get cooking. I've eaten a half dozen of these; that's six meals!
  • Book Dumb: He's a very clever Manipulative Bastard and a Consummate Liar to boot, but he is also a Malaproper who apparently never finished high school. He cannot accept that this trait may have been passed on to his son.
  • Bumbling Dad: He isn't always abusive. Sometimes, he just screws things up for his family by accident.
  • Cats Are Mean: Whilst his design was tweaked a bit for the series, Pete traditionally has always been a cat. He's also definitely mean.
  • The Chew Toy: Suffers lots of punishment at the hands of the universe, but considering the way he treats his son and his neighbors, it's very funny.
  • Consummate Liar: He manages to get a decent income on a used car lot he sells broken if not entirely useless cars on, and to repeatedly trick his fairly smart neighbor kid, and his own son, who is completely aware (first-hand) of how much of a Jerkass he is, though his lies do end up found out by the end of most episodes.
  • Cranky Neighbor: It can be trying living next door to Goofy, the Lethally Stupid Cloudcuckoolander. However, he becomes cranky at smaller things, like Goofy's Verbal Tics, and it's shown in the pilot that at least part of his animosity stems from Goofy making him lose a game back in high school.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: There are moments of this, but especially when he goes into a volcano to rescue Peg's first anniversary gift in "Peg o' the Jungle".
  • Demoted to Extra: In A Goofy Movie where he's only in about a third of the scenes, but especially the sequel, where he's only in two scenes.
  • Doting Parent: He generally spoils Pistol and never punishes her, but he's not doting towards PJ at all.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: Maybe not truly "evil", but obviously one of the meanest characters in the series, and also has a very low voice, especially compared to his son.
  • Fat and Skinny: The fat to Goofy's skinny. He's played as the cynical leader.
  • Fat Bastard: A big Jerkass and one of the two fattest characters in the series.
  • Fat Cat: As in all of his appearances.
  • Financial Abuse: Repeatedly harms PJ financially, whether by stealing/withholding money, using him as free advertising, or forcing him to do hard labor for nothing or essentially nothing. He'll occasionally do the first two things to Pistol as well.
  • Four Philosophy Ensemble: The cynic, because he's both generally antagonistic and negative.
  • Freudian Excuse: He had one for becoming so angry about "When the Saints Go Marching In" in "Dr. Horatio's Magic Orchestra" and one for wanting to tear down the mini-golf in "Tee for Two", but the biggest example is that much of his animosity towards Goofy (and by extension, Max) stems from Goofy accidentally making Pete lose the big football game in high school.
  • Goofy Print Underwear: When his underwear is exposed it is usually a pair of brightly-colored boxers with hearts on it.
  • Hair-Trigger Temper: Sometimes doing something seemingly innocuous can send him on a screaming tirade. This helps explain why PJ is so terrified of him.
  • Happily Married: A few episodes do draw attention to this, and Pete does really love Peg, to the point where the idea that his marriage could be threatened is one of the few things that can get him to straighten up and into action.
  • Hate Sink: His unlikable personality and poor treatment of other characters makes his schemes' failures all the more satisfying, along with his Chew Toy status. Downplayed in that Pete does have some, albeit infrequent, intentionally sympathetic moments.
  • Henpecked Husband: Sometimes Peg can be very pushy with him. How sympathetic he is in this department depends on the episode, but usually Peg has a very good reason for her behavior (such as trying to protect her children).
  • Honest John's Dealership: He runs "Honest Pete's Used Cars", which sells broken if not useless cars.
  • Hypocrite: He holds other people to standards he doesn't even try to reach himself and will freely insult people for seeming to possess character flaws he also has. One of the biggest examples is the fact that he's shown to be afraid of heights on multiple occasions and lies to PJ about it, guilt-tripping him for being a "phony" and for being afraid of heights himself in "From Air to Eternity".
  • Hypocritical Heartwarming: Sure, he can push PJ around and publicly humiliate him all he wants, but if someone outside his family does it it's completely unacceptable, even if it's an accident.
  • It's All About Me: He generally doesn't even consider how anyone else will be affected by his behavior, just whether it's good for him in the end.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: A rare occurrence, but he would occasionally slip into being one of these when the writers were feeling generous. His Pet the Dog moments at the end of "Tee for Two" and during "Puppy Love", and his Aww, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other moments with Peg are the best examples of this.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk: When the writers are feeling evil. Most notably in "Axed By Addition" where he spends most of the episode trying to apologize to PJ while in succession, choosing self-preservation over redemption, changing his mind for a self-centered reason, and immediately forgetting the lesson he learned.
  • Jerkass: He is simultaneously a Cranky Neighbor, a Toxic Friend, an Abusive Parent, a Manipulative Bastard, a Hypocrite, and a scam artist.
  • Lack of Empathy: He sees the other characters most often as means to an end and either doesn't notice or doesn't care how much anguish he causes any of them until something drastic happens, and even then it's more about him trying to keep them in his life than actually caring how they feel. He does display empathy to the little boy who lost at mini-golf in "Tee for Two", however.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Whatever it is Pete does wrong, you can bet he'll end up suffering for it.
  • Lazy Bum: If he wants something done, he usually chooses between tricking Goofy into doing it for him or enslaving PJ (and occasionally also Max). If he's feeling a bit more generous to PJ, he'll actually bribe him and Pistol into doing the work for him. He will whine whenever Peg expects him to do something, and will blatantly criticize anyone else for being lazy.
  • Lazy Husband: He gets upset whenever Peg asks him to do something, while taking for granted that she will do the housework. However, he is more often seen deliberately pushing around his son and neighbor than his wife. In "Mrs. Spoonerville" Pete tries to avert this... but fails, and eventually resorts to bribing his children to do the housework for him, which he is then called out on.
  • Malaproper: To the point that in "Good Neighbor Goof", PJ emulates his attitude (so that he can be friends with Max) and adds the malapropisms.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Manipulates his neighbors and his son on multiple occasions, which changes style depending on their weaknesses. This is Lampshaded in "Fool's Gold:"
    Goofy: Trust me!
    Pete: Well, okay... but you better not mean what I mean when I say that!
  • Mega Neko: The logical conclusion of Fat Cat and Petting Zoo People.
  • Miles Gloriosus: He claims he used to be a champion wrestler in "The Incredible Bulk", and that he has done countless acrobatic feats in "From Air to Eternity." He makes these up completely just for bragging purposes, and they do come to bite him in the butt later.
  • Not So Different: From Max. He clearly thinks Max is inferior, but the truth is Max has the same level of guile, ambition, and leadership that Pete does. In "O, R-V, I N-V U," Pete does see the similarities between him and Max, and their relationship ends up working a little too well.
  • Oo C Is Serious Business: In both "For Pete's Sake" and "Terminal Pete," PJ is wholly confused by Pete being nice and attentive to him. Pete acts that way in those episodes because he thinks he's going to die.
  • Papa Wolf: When PJ isn't in life-threatening danger, Pete is an absolute Jerkass to him. But when he is (at least as far as Pete knows), Pete becomes very concerned and does everything he can to save him. He also shows this attitude towards Pistol in "Three Ring Bind."
  • Parental Favoritism: When PJ and Pistol are in focus, Pete invariably treats PJ like dirt and Pistol like a princess (or is implied to). When PJ and Pistol are not in focus, Pete usually treats them equally... both with either negligence or civil distance. But in the many episodes where he mistreats exactly one child, regardless of focus, it's always PJ.
  • The Patriarch: He's the manly man who runs the house, takes tyrannical authority over his Nice Guy son while holding him to high expectations, and seems to believe that his son deserves to be treated by a different standard than his wife and daughter. He's also quick to jump into action any time anyone in his family is in danger.
  • Real Men Wear Pink: Pete has purple pajamas and pink bunny slippers. And the luxury sports car he wanted in one episode was colored Cherry Pink.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Money!: Has on multiple occasions used his money to try to push his own selfish agenda. "Tee for Two" is a big example, where he almost managed to get the mini-golf course torn down just because he was a sore loser.
  • Sensitive Guy and Manly Man: The manly man to PJ's sensitive guy. He has a deep voice, stereotypically manly interests, and an aggressive personality.
  • Slimeball: He's a narcissistic Manipulative Bastard, who simultaneously tries to feign trustworthiness around others and behaves in a very uncouth manner.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Pete is convinced that he is smarter than everyone else when in many ways he's in the bottom two, and in general a far better catch than he actually is. He also seems to believe that his bad-to-mediocre parenting is worth sharing or winning awards for as shown in A Goofy Movie and "Meanwhile, Back at the Ramp."
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Despite the fact that the show is called Goof Troop and for the most part has an ensemble cast, Pete has more focus episodes than anyone else does, mainly because he's both a Manipulative Bastard and The Chew Toy. However, he suffers Demoted to Extra worst in the movies of the Rotating Protagonists.
  • Stout Strength: A physically strong person, although he is also very lazy.
  • Toxic Friend Influence: In A Goofy Movie, he gives Goofy parenting tips, which generally make his relationship with Max worse, unsurprisingly given their respective parenting archetypes.
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife: With Peg, who is much more beautiful than he is both inside and out.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: With Goofy, although Pete's the only one who's actively antagonistic.
  • White Gloves: Just like all versions of the character.

     Peter "PJ" Pete Jr. 
Voiced by Rob Paulsen

The anxious and longsuffering son of Pete and Peg and brother of Pistol. He is the next door neighbor of the Goof family and Max's best friend. He is often dragged into Max's schemes as a sidekick. In A Goofy Movie, he befriends Bobby. In An Extremely Goofy Movie, he gets together with Beret Girl.

  • Acrofatic: Very overweight, but decent at both skateboarding and biking, able to run nearly as fast as Max, and able to make risky jumps when the situation calls for it.
  • Adorkable: Takes both the "dork" part and the "adorable" part pretty far, being a baby-faced fat kid with an extremely socially awkward personality that makes Max look like a smooth operator and a voice that never changed.
  • Alliterative Name/Repetitive Name: Like all the examples on the show, he is never actually referred to by his fall name—the fullest it ever gets is "Pete Jr." and we know his last name from context.
  • Bad Liar: Usually he will not even consider lying a possibility, attempt to find a way to technically not lie, evade the direct questions entirely, or come up with a ridiculous explanation such as "I'm trying to see how hot I can make my knees!" (Of course, Goofy believed him about that one anyway). As Pete puts it in "To Heir Is Human", his problem is "a bad habit of telling the truth." Any time a lie helps PJ reach his goal, it's entirely Max's doing.
  • Beatnik: Seems "New PJ" assimilated to Beret Girl by incorporating her mannerisms and fashion sense.
  • Beauty Equals Goodness: Downplayed. While his body doesn't look any better than his father's, when it comes to their faces, there's no contest.
  • Because You Were Nice to Me: His Undying Loyalty to Max blossoms because Max went out of his way to show him compassion and even help him out of his situation by providing him with a chance to play, respite from his chores, and a friend.
  • Being Good Sucks: ...Because if you're aware enough to be consistently selfless, gentle, and patient on purpose then everyone will treat you like an Extreme Doormat, The Drag-Along and a No Respect Guy.
  • Beleaguered Assistant/Hypercompetent Sidekick: Sometimes PJ is the only reason Max is alive, and he gets basically no credit. How okay he is with his position depends on the episode.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: A textbook Gentle Giant, with some Extreme Doormat tendencies too... but on a few occasions, even he goes for revenge.
  • Big Eater: Several jokes to this effect are made throughout the series, but one of the biggest examples is this line from An Extremely Goofy Movie:
    Max: Hey, Peej, isn't ten hot dogs enough? Pass 'em over here!
  • Big Fun: He gains elements of this after his Character Development, becoming a lot less bashful and gaining a more positive attitude. Before then he's practically an inversion, having one of the most negative outlooks and being the most openly hurt character in the series.
  • Birds of a Feather: He and Beret Girl both care more about personality than looks, have a somewhat cynical attitude, and are interested in beatnik poetry. He and Rose Deckenbloom are both sweet and incredibly timid, and understand what it's like to be belittled.
  • Book Dumb: He is repeatedly in danger of failing classes, has no sense of direction, and has difficulty reading the manuals he insists people should read, but he also has more common sense and creative prowess (which was a Hidden Depth) than most of the other characters.
  • Butt Monkey: Not only does he suffer some physical harm as a result of clumsiness or other characters' malice or inattentiveness (which admittedly happens less to him than his dad or his best friend's dad), he is constantly pushed around, ignored, insulted, and betrayed for reasons that are nonexistent, flimsy, or totally false. This is played seriously and eventually rectified. See No Respect Guy.
  • The Cassandra: PJ, both overly honest and the Only Sane Man, has his comments disbelieved or dismissed far more often than they should be. See No Respect Guy.
  • Character Development: After Beret Girl chooses him over Bobby in An Extremely Goofy Movie, he becomes much more confident, much more willing to show his true colors, much calmer (except for when he relapses), and much more enthusiastic. Most importantly of all, his life satisfaction level completely reverses from the beginning of the movie.
  • Chromatic Arrangement: In An Extremely Goofy Movie, he's the uptight blue with Max (red) and Bobby (green).
  • Comic Trio: During the "Stand Out" stunt, with Max (leader) and Bobby (follower), he plays the powerless protesting party. Played With in that it took less to get him involved than it did Bobby.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Generally a more covert example when it comes to parent-snarking, but he's usually willing to snark to Max's face, and on some occasions to Pete's as well.
  • The Drag-Along: Almost always reluctant to join Max on his plans (often with good reasons), but always does so anyway. Lampshaded in "Slightly Dinghy" in the second half of the Gilligan Cut.
  • The Eeyore: Often is understandably gloomy, and his pessimism can manifest in despair, especially in his focus episodes and the pilot, but he can tread closer to a remarkably compassionate Stepford Snarker when he's partnered with Max.
  • Evil Sounds Deep: Inverted. He is extremely kind and, as becomes clear by the second movie if not the first, a countertenor.
  • Extreme Doormat: Usually does everything that both Max and Pete tell him to, often reluctantly and unhappily, but with no resistence to speak of. Averted when Beware the Nice Ones comes up.
  • Fat and Skinny: The fat to Max's skinny. He's played as a pessimistic critic of Max's plans.
  • Fat Best Friend: The insecure pal to Max, almost exclusively, primarily not for his weight, though the other types (confident and wacky) show up rarely, either when he's alone with Max or after his Character Development, the first more than the second.
  • Fat Cat: Shaped very similarly to his dad, despite all of their differences.
  • Four Philosophy Ensemble: The realist, due to the combination of his negative attitude and his strong moral code.
  • Friendless Background: Max and PJ were eleven when they first met, and PJ states in "Goodbye Mr. Goofy" that Max is the Only Friend he's ever had. When combined with his insecurities and the state of his home life, Max becoming his Living Emotional Crutch was close to inevitable.
  • Gender Equals Breed: Resembles his father more than his mother.
  • Gentle Giant: One of the two fattest (and three biggest) characters in the series, he is completely passive, sensitive, and kind. He never puts his own self-interest above that of another character.
  • Has a Type: Though he has infrequently shown mild attraction to other characters, he only ever falls head-over-heels in love with girls who recite poetry in front of him. The way they look seems to be entirely moot.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners/True Companions: He's extremely close friends with Max in the show and the first movie. In the second movie, Bobby joins their group.
  • Hidden Depths: Due to his insecurities, there are quite a few traits that don't surface often. See The So-Called Coward and Beware the Nice Ones for some examples, although the most prominent example is probably that he's poetically inclined, which even surprised Max, who had been friends with him for seven years when it surfaced.
  • In Touch with His Feminine Side: He's shy, passive, emotional, and very interested in poetry to the point of getting a crush on someone who recited it twice. In contrast, he cannot stand many of the stereotypically "manly" activities his dad wants him to do. Notably, he was asked out by Beret Girl in the second movie.
  • Insecure Love Interest: He says literally nothing to Beret Girl (being visibly stunned speechless every time) before she starts flirting with him, after which point he recites a poem about how no one notices fat people, no matter how they act. Then after she sympathetically and lovingly responds, asking him to dance, he immediately becomes a lot less insecure.
  • Masculine Girl, Feminine Boy: With Beret Girl. Their similarities are complemented by Beret Girl being much more bold, aggressive, and flirtatious than PJ is.
  • Mega Neko: He's a Gentle Giant cat person.
  • Nervous Wreck: Often shown to panic or tremble, consistently pessimistic and fearful—occasionally becoming petrified—and very emotionally vulnerable. This is played as an unfortunate result of his upbringing, and he gets significantly better by the end of the second movie.
  • Nice Guy: He is very loyal, honest, helpful, patient, forgiving, and on multiple occasions puts aside his own problems in order to be happy for Max. Unlike Goofy, he is not too dumb to realize he's getting a raw deal, though he doesn't complain about it that much.
  • No Respect Guy: He is one of the only two rational people in the cast along with Peg, his skepticism always loses to Max's optimism, even when he's right, and he is interrupted frequently and falsely accused on multiple occasions despite never doing anything to deserve it. Multiple episodes end with the realization that the plan he reluctantly went along with served no purpose, and many involve some sort of disaster he is unable to prevent because everyone just decides not to listen to him.
  • Not so Above It All: Though he is significantly more mature than Max, Pistol, and Bobby most of the time, he also has some moments of wackiness.
  • Only Known by Initials: Because he shares his father's name. Played for Laughs in "Cabana Fever" where Pistol refers to him as "a certain someone whose initials are P.J."
  • Only Sane Man: Of the characters who go on the most adventures, he is the only one with any common sense: Max is a Fearless Fool, Goofy is Too Dumb to Live, and Pete is too busy thinking about what will happen if his plans work to notice what will happen if they don't. He's The Drag-Along for a reason.
  • Out of Focus: In the first movie, he's only in about a third of the scenes and has very few lines and little screentime in most of those, though he is a main character again in the sequel, unlike his dad.
  • Sensitive Guy and Manly Man: The sensitive guy to Pete's manly man. He has a high voice, generally unmanly interests, and a mostly passive personality.
  • Shipper on Deck: Very supportive of Max's relationship with Roxanne.
  • Shrinking Violet: Part of why he has such a hard time asking out Rose Deckenbloom. And why Beret Girl asked him out in An Extremely Goofy Movie. But he's incredibly shy just in general. The contrast between him and Bobby is huge, especially noticeable when they see Beret Girl the first time and when Max calls them "serious athletes."
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: He's shy, melancholy, prudent, and nice, unlike his sister Pistol.
  • Sir Not-Appearing-in-This-Trailer: In the trailer for A Goofy Movie, though Roxanne and Pete weren't much better off.
  • The So-Called Coward: Very cautious, pessimistic, and shy... but he has risked his life on multiple occasions to protect Max.
  • Stepford Snarker: A remarkably compassionate variation in some episodes when he's paired up with Max, where he snarks the hardest when Max is either treating him inconsiderately or involving Pete with something, though in his own focus episodes he's more likely to be The Eeyore.
  • Stout Strength: Though he doesn't think of himself as very strong, he has fought off bullies before, and his father makes him do a lot of manual labor which is pretty intense.
  • Straight Man and Wise Guy: A mostly mutual relationship with Max, though he's more likely to be the straight man due to his cautiousness.
  • Undying Loyalty: To Max. Shown very clearly in "O R-V, I N-V U", "Talent to the Max", and "Tub Be or Not Tub Be", all of which involve Max either ignoring or deliberately dumping him (with reasons only the audience knows are false), and PJ going out of his way to help Max anyway.
  • The Unfavorite: His mother does treat him fairly, but his father outright abuses him (and is strict with him even on a good day) while spoiling his sister.
  • "Well Done, Son" Guy: In some episodes PJ will try and fail to make Pete proud, mainly because Pete's standards are generally unrealistic to meet if not hypocritical or nonexistent/illusory.
  • White Gloves: Just like his father, except that sometimes he would not wear them on the show.

     Peg Pete 

Voiced by: April Winchell

The wise and influential wife of Pete and mother of PJ and Pistol. She is the next door neighbor to the Goof family. She serves as a supporting role on the show. She isn't present in the movies.

  • Action Mom: To an extent, but she is capable of punching out a guy twice her size. According to Pete in "Peg Of The Jungle", she lifts weights at the gym and has a black belt in karate.
  • Alliterative Name: Named after a deliberately alliterative incarnation of Pete.
  • Aww, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: Pete and Peg have a few of these moments, "Gymnauseum" and "Peg o' the Jungle" in particular, where Pete goes out of his way to please her.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Disappeared, along with Pistol and the family pets, in the movies.
  • Deadpan Snarker: When you're the Only Sane Woman, it's kind of hard not to be. Both Pete and Goofy find themselves on her receiving end, though Pete tends to get it more.
  • Fiery Redhead: Has one hell of a temper, but only when there's reasonable cause to think wrongdoing is occurring.
  • Fur Bikini: In "Peg Of The Jungle" she wears one as part of her jungle queen costume.
  • Good Parents: Despite often being busy, Peg will not hesitate to step into action when she notices her husband acting out of line in regards to her children.
  • Happily Married: Kinda. Her and Pete don't have the most stable of marriages, but Peg makes it very clear on numerous occasions that she does genuinely love him, and wouldn't trade him for anything else. He may be a jerk, but he's her jerk.
  • Hartman Hips: Peg is probably among the curviest females in Disney history, with hips wider than her shoulders.
  • Mama Bear: She goes to great lengths to protect her children from both outside threats and her husband, though sometimes she'll get this way about Goofy and Max too, and even Pete when something outside the family threatens him. Basically, she's the Mama Bear for the whole cast.
  • Mistaken for Pregnant: In "And Baby Makes Three" everyone thinks she is pregnant, which comes as a surprise to Pete.
  • Mood-Swinger: She can be cheerful and sweet and then terrifyingly angry in the same sentence and effortlessly move back and forth between them.
  • No Accounting for Taste: So, what exactly is it about Pete she finds so attractive, anyway? He's not handsome or nice or responsible or even very competent, and she seems to be frustrated with him often. This was Lampshaded in "Gymnauseum."
  • Not so Above It All: Though she's usually the most level-headed person in the cast, she does also have her moments where she's being just as insane as everyone else.
  • Only Sane Woman: One of the two most levelheaded people in the cast, as well as the only voice of reason people actually listen to. She manages to push against the Competence Zone which is in full force for her husband and neighbor. Women Are Wiser, after all.
  • Parental Substitute: To Max on some occasions, notably in "Educating Goofy" when Pete convinces him that Goofy is humiliating him on purpose and Peg's the one to give Max advice.
  • Pink Means Feminine: Her default clothing includes a pink sweater. When she starts up a brief window washing business, her jumpsuit is also pink.
  • Pretty in Mink: Has a jacket with a white fur collar that she wears in some of the winter episodes.
  • Team Mom: Both by working as a Mama Bear for the entire cast and by exhibiting her wisdom.
  • Tsundere: She's very kind for the most part, but she also gets very angry. You do not want to see her when she's angry.
  • Ugly Guy, Hot Wife: With Pete, she's not just more beautiful on the outside.
  • Women Are Wiser: Peg is the brains of the operation. She's definitely more the voice of reason in the cast than anyone else, especially when compared with her husband.

     Pistol Pete 
Voiced by: Nancy Cartwright

The bratty and hyperactive daughter of Pete and Peg and sister of PJ. She is the next door neighbor to the Goof family. She is a supporting character on the show. She does not appear in the movies.

  • Ace Pilot: In "Hot Air", although everyone in the cast thinks she's too young.
  • Action Girl: She has her moments, especially in her limelight episodes "Hot Air" (in which she becomes an Ace Pilot) and "Three Ring Bind" (in which she breaks animals out of a circus).
  • Adorably Precocious Child: Despite being considerably younger, she has an intelligence on par with Max and PJ; it's just that she's usually much more wild and uncontrollable.
  • Alliterative Name: Like Peg, she was named after a deliberately alliterative incarnation of Pete.
  • Annoying Younger Sibling: To the point where PJ finds playing with her to be the most torturous chore of all.
  • Bratty Half-Pint: Seems to enjoy getting her brother in trouble.
  • Cheerful Child: In stark contrast to her neurotic and often morose brother, she's happy almost all the time. See Genki Girl.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Disappears with Peg and the family pets in the movies.
  • Daddy's Girl: Pete loves to dote on Pistol. Pistol in turn loves to spend time with her father... sometimes. Which is still significantly more often than her brother and mother do.
  • Fiery Redhead: Seems to be genetic, although generally Pistol isn't as hot-tempered as Peg simply because she's always happy.
  • Gender Equals Breed: Resembles her mother more than her father.
  • Genki Girl: She's so constantly hyper, the rest of her family finds her nearly impossible to keep up with.
  • Girlish Pigtails: Of the twin-ponytail variety.
  • Hair Decorations: Her ponytail holders.
  • Little Miss Snarker: Sometimes. Usually she and PJ have little snarking conversations.
  • Meaningful Name: A Pistol can be "a notably sharp, spirited, or energetic person".
  • Motor Mouth: Is the fastest talker on the show.
  • Sibling Yin-Yang: She's talkative, cheerful, hyperactive, and bratty, unlike her brother, PJ.
  • Spoiled Brat: She gets everything she wants from her father, unlike her brother. At least Peg attempts to discipline her, but it usually doesn't work.
  • Tiny Tyrannical Girl: Despite being tiny and very young, she's able to get most others to do what she wants, from her much older brother to her father, both of whom are physically quite large. While she doesn't normally threaten anything other than tattling, her persistence in asking for what she wants is enough for everyone in her family to either cave in or pass the baton.
  • Vague Age: The consistent factor is "considerably younger than PJ", but her age has been stated as four, five, and six in various episodes.

     Waffles and Chainsaw 
Voiced by: Frank Welker

Waffles

The Goofs' cat. Not present in the movies.

  • Ambiguous Gender: In some episodes, Waffles is male, and in others, Waffles is female. The female references happen early in the series, so it may have been a Retcon.
  • Big Eater: It's very common to see Goofy or Max making or eating dinner and Waffles sitting by and mooching.
  • Cats Are Mean: Reserved mainly for Chainsaw. Othewise he's mostly an ordinary cat.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Disappeared in the movies along with the Pete girls and Chainsaw.
  • Female Feline, Male Mutt: Usually inverted. Waffles is generally portrayed as male.

Chainsaw

The Petes' dog. Not present in the movies.

  • Ambiguous Gender: Chainsaw is normally female, but in "Cat's Entertainment" (which usually calls Chainsaw male) it goes Up to Eleven with this exchange between Pete and Pistol.
    Pete: But Chainsaw's my girl!
    Pistol: No he isn't! You gave him to Maxie, remember?
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Disappeared in the movies along with the Pete girls and Waffles.
  • Deathbringer the Adorable: Despite her violent name, aside from a few trickster habits, she's a mostly harmless cat-sized lapdog. Though who named her is never stated, it was probably Pete, and Peg usually refrains from calling her by name, opting instead to call her "Puppy."
  • Dogs Are Dumb: Lampshaded by Pete who often refers to her as "stupid Chainsaw" while speaking of her affectionately.
  • Female Feline, Male Mutt: Usually inverted. Chainsaw is generally portrayed as female.
  • Hair Decorations: Her bow.

     Robert "Bobby" Zimmeruski 

Voiced by: Pauly Shore

Max and PJ's airheaded and rambunctious new friend in the movies. In A Goofy Movie, he gets together with Stacey.

  • Advertised Extra: In the first movie he had a minor role, but got significantly more screen time in the trailer than Pete and Roxanne (and PJ, who didn't appear at all).
  • Ascended Extra: He had a minor albeit funny role in A Goofy Movie. Come the sequel he's promoted to a main character.
  • Attention Whore: Always tries to draw attention to himself. Despite knowing it would be a bad thing to get caught, he has no qualms shouting "A little smokeage!" and howling onstage during the "Stand Out" stunt, and the contrast between his and PJ's reactions to Beret Girl is huge, even keeping in mind that they both liked her. As is how they behaved when Max called them "serious athletes".
  • Breakout Character: Bobby is a very popular, quotable character within the A Goofy Movie fandom, especially for being a brand new Plucky Comic Relief character in about a fifth of the movie's scenes. Cue him being a main character in the sequel.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: A huge Cloud Cuckoo Lander but competent at both sports and stage productions.
  • Chromatic Arrangement: He plays the laid-back green to Max (red) and PJ (blue) in An Extremely Goofy Movie.
  • Cloud Cuckoo Lander: This is the guy who got turned down by the Gammas for putting spoons and straws all over his body. Also, the can of spray cheese.
  • Comic Trio: The stupid follower with Max (leader) and PJ (powerless) during the "Stand Out" stunt. Played With in that it was harder to get him to join than PJ.
  • Cool Shades: Which he usually looks over or pulls up when he is caught off-guard by something, but otherwise keeps them on, regardless of his mood.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: Max and PJ are both likely to see Bobby as weird more than they are to actually appreciate him being there in the first movie. In the second, though they are True Companions overall, Max and PJ are still obviously closer to each other than they are to him, and their new friend Beret Girl thinks Max and PJ are awesome while thinking Bobby is a "fool." He's generally kept around for being a Bunny-Ears Lawyer.
  • Fun Personified: Super enthusiastic about almost everything, and makes jokes a lot.
  • Hopeless Suitor: To Beret Girl, though he does seem to concede (begrudgingly) that he's not the one she wants.
  • Keet: One of the smaller characters (along with Max), very cheerful and loud, and colorful too. He's not too In Touch with His Feminine Side, but he's not particularly manly either.
  • Lennon Specs: He wears them to signal "unconventional but notable."
  • Life of the Party: In "I-2-I" who at the party speaks the most often and the loudest and sprays his Trademark Favorite Food all over the room? Oh, yeah, Bobby.
  • Perpetual Smiler: He grins and is generally cheerful in the principal's office. (Max moped and PJ looked like he was about to die of fright, for comparison.)
  • Plucky Comic Relief: Almost everything he says or does is some kind of joke. He is a tension reliever around the far more serious Max and PJ, as is shown most apparently in the principal's office (but also in the lead-up to the Stand Out stunt). Notably, he is the only one of the three with no visible conflict with a parent figure.
  • Redhead In Green: In An Extremely Goofy Movie as part of the Chromatic Arrangement, though he did have a very short cut.
  • The Stoner: Implied as a form of Parental Bonus: in addition to having a Surfer Dude personality, he is shown contemplating everyone's gloves, seems awfully eager to eat at odd times (like in the middle of the principal's office or at the beginning of school), and says that he and Beret Girl can make "beautiful bongo music" together (emphasis his). He's also played by Pauly Shore, who is known for playing stoner characters.
  • Surfer Dude: His easy-going, constantly calm personality and Totally Radical pattern of speech fit this perfectly, though the without-the-drugs part is... questionable.
  • Totally Radical: Uses this sort of slang far more often than the other characters.
  • True Companions: He becomes very close friends with Max and PJ in An Extremely Goofy Movie.
  • White Gloves: He even lampshades it in An Extremely Goofy Movie by contemplating them.

     Roxanne 
Voiced by: Kellie Martin (Age 14), Grey Delisle (Age 18+)

Max's sweet and cute girlfriend and Stacey's best friend in A Goofy Movie. Not present in An Extremely Goofy Movie.

  • Adorkable: She is just as socially awkward around Max as he is around her.
  • Beauty Mark: She has one on her left cheek, just below her eye.
  • Birds of a Feather: Like Max, she is fairly Adorkable and requires help from her friends to get together with him.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Disappears in An Extremely Goofy Movie, although she does later appear on House of Mouse.
  • Girl Next Door: Roxanne is awkward, quiet, and cute, and likes Max for who he is rather than for who he pretends to be.
  • Give Geeks a Chance: The entire purpose of Max pretending he knew Powerline in the first movie was to get Roxanne to like him. What he didn't know however, but the audience was already clued into, was that she already liked him.
  • Hartman Hips: Most of her maturity in appearance comes from her hips.
  • Heroes Want Redheads: Max's Love Interest.
  • Living MacGuffin: She doesn't have as developed a personality as some other characters, but she is the entire reason Max was motivated to change the map on the road trip.
  • Nice Girl: When everyone else laughs at Max for injuring himself, she instead asks if he's okay.
  • Only One Name: Despite having a parent onscreen, but of course he doesn't get a name at all.
  • Overprotective Dad: Her father is very physically intimidating, and only speaks to Max in angry grunts.
  • Redhead In Green: Her traditional clothing has her wearing a turquoise shirt.
  • Satellite Love Interest: For how much Max likes her, she doesn't really have much in the way of a personality, and exists almost solely to date him.
  • The Ugly Guy's Hot Daughter: Her father does not look as much like a Petting Zoo Person as most of the other characters, looking far more like an actual dog. Roxanne, meanwhile, is pretty close in appearance to a human.

     Stacey 
Voiced by: Jenna von Oy

Roxanne's popular and chatty best friend in A Goofy Movie. Gets together with Bobby at the end. Not present in An Extremely Goofy Movie.

  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Disappears in An Extremely Goofy Movie without explanation along with Roxanne.
  • Cool Loser: Inverted. Fairly geeky but one of the most popular girls in school.
  • Hollywood Nerd: Take away the glasses and braces and it's not hard to understand why she'd be popular—she's just as cute as Roxanne.
  • Like Is, Like, a Comma: A side-effect of her Motor Mouth tendencies.
  • Meganekko: Wears glasses but is seen as a target for affection by both Bobby and the black-haired Star Trek nerd.
  • Motor Mouth: She tends to speak quickly and for somewhat long periods of time. In one early conversation with Roxanne, she says a very long run-on sentence at an incredibly rapid rate (even compared to her other dialogue) before she finally notices that Roxanne isn't listening.
  • Nerds Are Sexy: See Hollywood Nerd and Meganekko. Her braces were also seen as an asset.
  • Nice Hat: She wears a floral hat.
  • Only One Name: But since she's the School Idol, everyone knows who "Stacey" is referring to.
  • Satellite Character: The vast majority of her role in the movie is just helping Roxanne get together with Max.
  • School Idol: She is student body president and receives continuous applause and hollering throughout her entire speech. A very friendly example who happily interacts with people everywhere on the popularity food chain.
  • Shipper on Deck: Very supportive of Max and Roxanne's relationship.
  • Spell My Name with an S: The movie credits list her name as "Stacey", but fans spell it as "Stacy" just as often, and sometimes "Staci," even when writing reference material.

     Powerline 
Voiced by: Tevin Campbell

     Bradley Uppercrust III 
Voiced by: Jeff Bennett

The main antagonist of An Extremely Goofy Movie, a snobby and vicious sports team leader.

  • Arrogant Kung-Fu Guy: He does have a posse, although he's not very loyal to them. He still wants to put the "losers" in their place.
  • Cheaters Never Prosper: The two biggest moments of cheating he does took what would have probably been an easy win and not only turned it into a loss but also ended up with him getting injured by his own teammate.
  • Dick Dastardly Stops to Cheat: One can't help but wonder if it was really in Bradley's best interest to blast PJ into the next state. And it definitely wasn't for him to drop the giant X on Tank and leave him there.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Tries to act polite to team prospects, though passive-aggressive to non-prospects and others, but never means any of it. He's ruthless enough to attempt to injure or kill his opponents so he can win and leave his right hand man to die.
  • It's All About Me: It's soon clear that he doesn't really care one lick about his teammates and only cares about getting attention for himself.
  • Jerk Jock: A college example, who also takes the jerk aspect to a downright ruthless level.
  • Lean and Mean: He's thinner than most of the other characters except Goofy, and is also the Faux Affably Evil Jerk Jock.
  • Preppy Name: His last name is "Uppercrust", and he even has the standard "III" legacy label.
  • Privileged Rival: He is implied to be a legacy as well as being considered "the King", to the point that the main characters knew who he was before actually meeting him, and apparently the leader of the most well-known, powerful fraternity on campus. He's also a judgmental Jerk Jock whose outright dismissal of Max's friends pushed him firmly into rival position, which is a good thing because he's also a dirty cheater.
  • Sir Not-Appearing-in-This-Trailer: Despite being the main antagonist, Bradley does not appear at all in the movie trailer.
  • Smug Snake: Treating his "friends" with disdain was definitely the cause of his downfall.
  • Soft-Spoken Sadist: He speaks in a calm, even affable, tone, but is not only a Jerk Jock and a dirty cheater but also willing to endanger the lives of other competitors, including his own dragon, just so that he can win.
  • They Call Me Mister Tibbs: Despises his name being diminished to "Brad".

     Beret Girl 
Voiced by: Vicki Lewis

PJ's snarky and artsy girlfriend in An Extremely Goofy Movie.

     Sylvia Marpole 
Voiced by: Bebe Neuwirth

Goofy's passionate and good-humored girlfriend in An Extremely Goofy Movie.

  • Birds of a Feather: She and Goofy are both Disco Dan types.
  • Closet Geek: She tries to retain a professional attitude, but when Goofy starts talking to her she switches into Fangirl mode.
  • Disco Dan: What made Goofy fall for her primarily is her passion for '70s memorabilia.
  • Fangirl: When anything '70s-related is mentioned she becomes very excited, to the point she ends up doing an embarrassing dance in the library and being caught.
  • Finishing Each Other's Sentences: She is able to finish Goofy's sentences early on, indicating their level of chemistry and aiding him with the awkwardness of asking her out.
  • Hartman Hips: Apparent when she dances at the disco.
  • Hello, Nurse!: Causes a collective Jaw Drop from every single male within her immediate vicinity when she shows up in her disco outfit.
  • Heroes Want Redheads: Goofy's Love Interest.
  • Hot Librarian: See Hello, Nurse!, though she does still look very good with her glasses and her normal hairstyle.
  • Nerds Are Sexy: Being a college librarian and fan of 70s memorabilia are attributes that get her to click with Goofy. The fact she's also a rather attractive woman seems to be a bonus in his eyes.
  • Redhead In Green: Her disco outfit is green from head to toe.
  • Significant Green-Eyed Redhead: See Heroes Want Redheads, and also one of the only characters with visibly colored eyes at all.

     Tank 
Voiced By: Brad Garrett

Bradley's loud and burly right-hand man in An Extremely Goofy Movie.


GoofyCharacters/Western AnimationHumphrey The Bear

alternative title(s): A Goofy Movie
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