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Characters: Classical Mythology Minor Deities
Eros

The god of love, he was dainty and non-threatening, but still managed to best even the greatest of gods (usually by taking potshots from far away with his bow, which had arrows that could inspire both love and hate). Early sources thought of him as a protogenos who emerged self formed from an egg at the beginning of creation, but later ones saw him as the young son and/or servant of Aphrodite. His more famous Roman name is Cupidus (Cupid).

  • Anthropomorphic Personification: Of love.
    • That is the minor god version, Eros as a Protogenoi is seen as procreation and desire more than the feeling of love.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Eros was known to be pretty coldly unforgiving against those who slighted and insulted him and he shows a darker side in these moments, despite being one of the most benevolent and good natured gods towards mortals. Just ask Apollo how much hurt this guy can lay out towards you
  • Bi the Way: While assorted mythology is rather vague, his works were often distinguished from Aphrodite's by installing homoerotic love while his mother went with heterosexual romance. The Sacred Band of Thebes even homages this aspect of Eros.
  • Eternal Love: With Psyche.
  • God Couple: With Psyche by the end.
  • Happily Married: With Psyche, even though Aphrodite is a real bitch to her daughter-in-law.
  • Heart Beat-Down: If he has anything to say about it (and he does) you will feel the love tonight, no ifs, ands, or buts. Just ask Hades.
  • Like Mother, Like Son: He had a lot in common with Aphrodite; he was one of the most beautiful of the Gods, wasn't coy about taking his clothes off, had a dominion over love and lust, etc.
  • Love at First Sight: Inspires this. Also ends up a victim of this: see Psyche's entry directly below.
  • Love God
  • Love Potion: His arrows.
  • Momma's Boy: He was his mother's constant companion.
  • Mr. Fanservice/Hot God: Like mother, like son it appears; he was very often depicted as an extremely handsome young man and he was very rarely depicted as wearing clothes.
  • Non Human Lover Reveal
  • Opposites Attract: Golden-winged, joyful protogenos Eros mated with dark, unsmiling Khaos and created all birds. Also, in some of the myths where he's a protogenos he brought all the elements of Khaos together to create the world.
  • Parental Favoritism: Aphrodite obviously liked him better than her other children.
  • Pet the Dog: Towards mortals as whole he was more compassionate and good natured in comparison to the majority of the other gods. This is seen in the fact that he shows his Beware the Nice Ones side with them quite less than towards immortals.
  • Physical God
  • The Power of Love: Not even the king of the gods himself is immune to love. Ironically, not even Eros himself is immune to it. Cue Psyche's myth.
  • Pretty Boy: Pretty much every version of him is described as 'the fairest of the deathless gods'.
  • Sadly Mythtaken: The whole "love is blind" thing. He was originally considered superior to Ananke (Necessity) because he did value beauty and drove people and gods to do more than just what was necessary.
  • Spoiled Sweet: While definitely spoiled by his mother and that fact that Beware the Nice Ones is in full effect with him, Eros is actually one of the friendliest and most benevolent gods towards mortals. He did have his temper, but it seem reserved more to the immortal side of the family
  • Theme Twin Naming: With Himeros, and sometimes Anteros.
  • Thicker Than Water: Despite Aphrodite being shallow, unreliable, and all around bitchy, he still served her faithfully.
  • The Trickster: Shows subtle elements of this.
  • Walking Shirtless Scene: Shirtless, pantsless, underwearless...he wasn't too into clothing.
  • What Kind of Lame Power Is Heart, Anyway?: Apollo thought this, but he quickly found out that Heart Is an Awesome Power and Love Hurts.
  • Winged Humanoid

Psyche

Former mortal princess of Sicily, and now wife of the God of Love and personification of the Soul. Very beautiful and insatiably curious, both traits tend to get her into (and occasionally out of) trouble. Gained her immortality through completing several tasks on behalf of her mother-in-law after giving into her curiosity and betraying her husband’s trust. Longer synopsis here.

Pan (Faunus)

Son of Hermes. God of nature, mountains, shepherds and sexuality (especially males). A satyr-like Trickster Archetype who is mainly concerned with the preservation of Nature and the enjoyment of earthly pleasures such as music and sex. The panflute is named after him. An overall "free-spirit" who often pals with his uncle Dionysus, but generally doesn't interact with other gods simply because he doesn't care about political schemes unless it concerns him directly. His name is the root of the word "Panic".

  • Beast Man
  • Beauty Equals Goodness: Invert, see Hephaestus's. Pan actually has worse reputation.
  • Bigger Is Better in Bed: According to the many nymphs he chased.
    • Notably, this is one of the few cases in Greek mythology, as the Greeks felt smaller was better.
  • Carpet of Virility: Always represented as shaggy.
  • Depraved Bisexual: Went for both nymphs and shepherds.
  • Fauns and Satyrs: Shares the appearance associated with them, partially responsible for the trope name and their association with that shape, though regular satyrs are seperate entities from him in classical mythology.
  • Friend to All Living Things: As the protector of livestock, especially supernatural ones or those belonging to gods. Generally friendly, if mischievous and lecherous, with women.
  • Magical Flutist: He could induce fear and panic with his pipes.
  • Missing Mom: His nymph mother ran away after his birth. Fortunately, his dad Hermes thinks he's awesome and really loves him.
  • Musical Assassin: His primary weapon is his flute.
  • Names to Run Away From Really Fast: In a rather literal sense, as he is the one that spreads Panic. Greek warriors never knew why thousands of men would stand bravely for a long time and then suddenly stampede with no warning. All they knew was it was a great mystery, so they attributed it to Pan.
    • Of course, his name means 'everything'. That was also a riddle, why a god of fear would be named after everything.
  • Physical God
  • Really Gets Around: At least as much as Zeus himself.
  • Speaks Fluent Animal

Thanatos (Thanatus)

A personification of Death(considering how his being in chains stopped people from dying in wars he embodies both peacefull and violent death), son of Nyx and Erebos and twin brother of Hypnos. Because he is Death, he was hated by mortals and even the deathless gods - rather moot since he hated them as well. His Roman counterpart is Mors.

  • Broke Your Arm Punching Out Cthulhu: Sisyphos once managed to cheat death by putting Thanatos in shackles. Eventually Ares rescued him, and Sisyphos died and was compelled to roll a huge rock up a steep hill, the rock would roll back down, forcing him to begin again...for eternity.
  • Death Takes a Holiday: With Thanatos in chains, death was impossible and war became entirley pointless, which is why Ares rescued him.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: Got beaten by Herakles once.
  • Grim Reaper: Although some texts give his role as Psychopomp to Hermes. He also lets his sisters, Keres, take those who died by blood loss.
  • Hates Everyone Equally: In the original depictions, he is despised by mortals for being and bringing death and he hates them back, plus he hates the gods because they're immortal and outside his power (and it doesn't help that most of them are Jerk Asses).
  • The Heartless
  • Physical God
  • Pretty Boy: Despite the modern depiction of Death, Thanatos was generally shown as a winged, bearded man, or as a handsome, winged youth, depending on the artist and period.

Kharon (Charon)

The Ferryman of the River Acheron, where he helps the souls of the dead to cross, for a small price. Coins were placed in the mouths of the dead to pay the ferryman's toll. Modern interpretations have changed it to the River Styx instead of Acheron that he ferries souls across, or perhaps both. The River Acheron is also known as the river of pain and Styx as the river of hate, so you don't want to fall into or try wading through either.

Iris

The goddess of the rainbow and messenger of the gods, as well as a goddess of the sea and sky. She links the gods to humanity and travels with the speed of wind from one end of the world to the other, and into the depths of the sea and the underworld.

Hekate (Hecate)

Goddess of magic, crossroads and ghosts. Had three appearances, or sometimes just three heads. Lived in the Underworld with Hades and Persephone and was a close friend to the latter. Feared and revered by night travelers, but worshiped by about-to-deliver mothers. She was identified with the Roman goddess Trivia.

Erinyes (Furies)

Alecto, Megaera and Tisiphone, the godesses of vengeance. Born from the blood of the castrated Ouranos. They were depicted as ugly, winged women with hair, arms and waists entwined with poisonous serpents. They wielded whips and were clothed either in the long black robes of mourners, or the short-length skirts and boots of huntress- maidens.

Horkos (Horcus)

A rather obscure character. The god or daemon of oaths who inflicted punishment upon perjurers. Most peeple are more familiar with his Roman counterpart: Orcus.

Hypnos (Hypnus)

The personification of Sleep, son of Nyx and Erebos and twin brother of Thanatos. Generally not shunned like his twin brother, who is always at his side in visual art. In Homer he allowed Hera to harass Heracles by putting Zeus to sleep. Zeus was understandably angry when he woke up but found Hypnos already hidden in Nyx's place, so he held the Bolt of Divine Retribution back since it risked an angry Nyx. Apparently, Hypnos disturbed Zeus a few more times, but always ran behind his mom for protection afterward. His Roman counterpart is Somnus.

Endovelicus

A less known deity worshipped by the Romans, he actually came from the Lusitanian Mythology, but after the Romans conquered the Iberian Peninsula he became quite a popular deity, until of course the arrival of Christianity. He was a god of healing and light, and was often referred to as Deus, a title now used when referring to the Christian God in Portuguese.

Flora

Roman goddess of spring, grain and flowers with no Greek equivalent, first worshipped by other Italic tribes. Her feast, the Floralia ran from April 28 to May 3 and was a bit raucous.

The Moirai (Fates)

A trio of godesses: Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. They are the daughters of Nyx and Erebus, or of Zeus and Themis. They determine fate and control the life cycle. Clotho would determine when someone is born by spinning a length of thread on a spinning wheel, Lachesis would allot the length of time a person had to live by measuring the thread, and Atropos would sever the thread with a pair of shears when it was time for them to die. By the Romans, they were known as Nona, Decima and Morta respectively, and collectively called the Parcae. Their collective title is where we get words like moirallegiance and its derivative moirails.

  • Action Girls/Badass Bookworms: They fought in the war between the Gods and Giants and killed Agrios and Thoon with bronze maces.
  • Cool Old Ladies
  • Dark Is Not Evil: They sided with Zeus in his battle against Typhon and even tried to hinder Typhon by feeding him a useless fruit and telling him that it was a Power-Up Food.
  • Death's Hourglass: The Thread of Life.
  • The Dreaded: All three of them were feared by mortals, especially Atropos.
  • Meaningful Names: Clotho, the name of she who spins the thread of life, means "the weaver". Lachesis, the name of the one who measures the thread, means "the distributor of lots". Atropos, the name of she who cuts the thread of life, means "the inevitable".
  • The Omniscient Council of Vagueness: Basically their role in any story they appear in. Their main purpose seems to be to just sit there, weaving the Tapestry of Fate and discussing the exploits of the Gods and heroes, as well as knowing everything.
  • The Omniscient: They know everything. This of course, comes with the territory of being the Goddesses of Fate.
  • Physical God
  • Sadly Mythtaken: Often they're portrayed as the goddesses of past, present, and future, like Kronos, or as a maiden, mother, crone trio. Neither is true to the original depictions.
  • Seers: As the Goddesses of Fate, they are capable of seeing the future.
  • Women in White: Commonly remembered as women in black, but the original myths say that they wore white.
  • You Can't Fight Fate: It's in Atropos' name. This was a big deal in Ancient Greece.

Asklepios (Asclepius)

In Greek mythology, the patron of medicine and son of Apollo. He not only cured the sick, but recalled the dead to life. This rare authority over Hades may have derived from the circumstances of his own birth. Koronis, a lake nymph, was impregnated by Apollo, yet dared to take in secret a human being as a second lover. So furious was the god on discovering the infidelity that he sent his sister Artemis to slay Koronis. This she did with a pestilence. When the fire was already blazing round the lake nymph on the funeral pyre, Apollo felt compassion for his unborn son, and removed him from the corpse. In this manner Asclepius came into the world and was taught the art of healing by Chiron, the wisest of the Centaurs, beast-like monsters who dwelt in the woodlands. The success of this instruction was so great that Zeus, fearing lest men might contrive to escape death altogether, killed Asclepius with lightning; but at Apollo's request he was revived, according to some authors. Was associated with the Roman god Vejovis and his staff, The Rod of Asclepius, remains a symbol of medicine to this day.

Hebe

Goddess of youth and the original cupbearer for Olympus. She was a daughter of Zeus and Hera, and later married Heracles, after which she gave up her job as cupbearer; she was succeeded in that role by the Trojan prince Ganymede. Her name comes from a Greek word that means "youth" or "prime of life". She was also worshiped as a goddess of forgiveness and pardons. In Roman mythology, she is known as Juventas.

The Charities

Also know as the The Graces in Roman mythology, these goddesses (Aglaea ("Splendor"), Euphrosyne ("Mirth"), and Thalia ("Good Cheer")) were the patrons of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility. While Charis is technically the single form of their name and what they could be referred to as individually, in some stories, Charis is the name of a fourth member of their group and not the singular form. There are also sometimes mentioned other members, such as Pasithea, but the first three are always included. Have many possible parents, most notably Zeus and Eurynome, but also Dionysus and Aphrodite, or Helios and a naid named Aegle.

The Muses

Completely unlike the gospel singing, Ambiguously Brown character of the Disney Hercules film, the Muses were the Greek goddesses of the inspiration of literature, science and the arts. One of the largest groups in Olympus, their members were: Calliope, Clio, Erato, Euterpe, Melpomene, Polyhymnia, Terpsichore, Thalia, and Urania. Each goddess represented a different domain (for example, Calliope represented Epic Poetry) and the goddesses were said to be the source of knowledge passed through the oral legends and myths.

The Horae (Hours)

The goddesses of the seasons and the natural portions of time. Started out as general personifications of nature itself in its different seasonal aspects, but later evolved into being the goddesses of order in general and natural justice in particular. Were noted to guard the gates of Olympus, promote the Earth's fertility, and rally stars and constellations. If all of this sounds a little confusing it is. Lack of unity among the myths has lead to disagreement on some things about these goddesses, including their exact number and even who they are. The most agreed upon number is that there are three of them at any given time, and there are two generations: Thallo, Auxo and Carpo, who were goddesses of the order of nature, and Eunomia, Diké, and Eirene, who were law and order goddesses.

Argos had its own duo of Horae, Damia and Auxesia. Hyginus, a Latin author identified yet a third set made up of Pherousa (goddess of substance and farm estates), Euporie or Euporia (goddess of abundance), and Orthosie (goddess of prosperity). Nonnus, a greek epic poet, mentions yet another set of four Horae, Eiar, Theros, Cheimon and Phthinoporon, whose names were the Greek words for spring, summer, winter and autumn.

And then, finally, there was a completely different group of Hours, who personified the twelve hours, (originally ten) of the day.

Pietho

Greek goddess of persuasion and seduction. Was known in Roman mythology as Suadela. Was an attendant and/or companion of Aphrodite and thus is very connected to her. The two were so intertwined, that sometimes they were combined into one character, a reflection of how closely connected the Greeks saw persuasion and love (or lust). Her ancestry is disputed but she maybe the daughter of the titans Tethys and Oceanus.

Eileithyia (Ilithyia)

As her overly weird name might attest to, this goddess is not a native Greek one, but a transplant from Crete, who became the Greek goddess of childbirth and midwifery. She was the divine helper of women in labor, and, though its agreed upon generally that her mother is Hera, her father's identity is disputed.

  • Flat Character: was well known among Greeks, but has few stories and little is developed of her character
  • Canon Immigrant: More than likely did not originate from Greece but with the Minoans of Crete.

Phobos

The son of Ares and Aphrodite, his name means "fear" or "terror". That should tell you all you need to know about him. For those who are a little slower than most, he is a personification of fear for the Greeks, in particular, the fear brought about through war. He notably rode into war with his father Ares, the Goddesses Enyo and Eris, and his brother Deimos. His association seems to have made him unpopular with the Greeks, as he doesn't appear in any major Greek myths as a character. His Roman equivalent is Timor. It is from his name that we get the word "phobia".

Enyo

A war goddess alongside Ares, she was his companion and counterpart. May have had a son by him named Enyalius in earlier legends, but that name was later conflated with Ares himself (helps that Enyalius was also a war god). Enyo, a daughter of Hera and Zeus, was responsible for orchestrating the destruction of cites, much to her enjoyment, and often accompanied Ares directly into battle. Alongside Eris, Deimos, and Phobos, she instigated the horrors of war. Tied to the Roman goddess Bellona whose name is related to the Latin word for war, bellum. The older form of Bellona's name was "Duellona" and she was sometimes identified as Mars's wife, sometimes as his sister. When Rome declared war on someone, the Fetial priests had to throw a spear from a column in front of her temple. Bellona was later identified with the Cappadocian Earth and Mother goddess Ma.

Eris

The goddess of Strife and Discord, she is found in Roman mythology as Discordia and has a dwarf planet named after her. Is widely considered a less than pleasant goddess with even more than unpleasant children. She is the daughter of Nyx, which may explain how she got her job. Homer equated her with Enyo, though they are clearly not the same god. Actually escorted the monster Typhon into his battle with Zeus and had a hand in causing the war between Greece and Troy. Has become a deity in the modern religion of Discordianism.

Deimos

Brother of Phobos (and, like him, had a moon of mars named after him), and the son of Ares, Phobos is the god of fear who commonly accompanied his father, brother, Aunt Enyo, and Eris into war, along with his father's attendants, Trembling, Fear, Dread, and Panic. More of an abstract personification of sheer terror, especially that which is brought on by war, he doesn't really appear in any tales. His Roman equivalent is Formido or Metus.

Harmonia

The opposite of Eris, she is the goddess of Harmony and Concord, and, fittingly, her Roman counterpart is named, Concordia. Generally thought to be another child of Ares and Aphrodite (or a daughter of Zeus and the Pleiad Electra), she married the Phoenician prince, Cadmus. Most well known for necklace, the Necklace of Harmonia, which, ironically, brought misfortune to all who came in possession of it.

Homonoia

A minor goddess of concord, unanimity, and oneness of mind. Was so similar to Harmonia as to sometimes be equated with her.

Nike

Probably one of the most well known of the minor goddesses, she was the goddess of victory (and strength and speed) and was the daughter of Styx and Pallas. Her siblings were Kratos (not that Kratos), Bia, and Zelus. She and her companions were close to Zeus, and she herself was Zeus's divine charioteer who led him into battle with the Titans. Is noted for having wings, even into classical times and being a friend of Athena. While she doesn't have a planet, moon, or other celestial body named after her, she does have a brand of shoe! Her Roman counterpart was Victoria.

The Erotes

A group of little love gods that resembled little boys with wings, they were part of Aphrodite's retinue. Four of them (Eros, Anteros, Himeros, and Pothos) were the sons of Aphrodite and Ares.

Anteros was the god of requited love (i.e. returned love or "counter-love') as opposed to just love in general (or unrequited love, or lust) and was a punisher of those who scorn love or other's advances and the avenger of love unrequited. He was given to his brother Eros as a playmate, with the idea that love must be answered if it is to be proper. He physically resembles Eros, except with longer hair, and beautiful plumed butterfly wings. Unlike his brother, he said to be armed either with a Golden Club or arrows of lead.

Himeros was the god of sexual desire and unrequited love. Pothos was the god of longing and yearning.

Nemesis

This goddess with a hell of a name was the personification of revenge, in particular, that of divine judgment for hubris before the gods, and was the daughter of Nyx. Her Roman equal was Invidia.

Adrestia

Another goddess of revenge, she was also a goddess of balance and appears to have been tied with war, like her father Ares.

Tyche

This goddess is a unique one within the pantheon. While every god was usually heavily worshiped only in specific places, like Athena was the patron god of Athens, Tyche had a unique role, in that was the deity that governed the prosperity and fortune of a city state (aka, its destiny or fate). As such, she was a tutelary goddess: a protector of a specific locations, but every city had their own iconic version of her and considered her their protector. She is believed to have controlled the fortunes of humanity.

Astraea

A Greek goddess of justice(similar to the Horae, Dike, who she is sometimes equated with) and also of innocence and purity. She is not to be confused with the goddess Asteria. Called the Celestial Virgin, she is said to be one of the last goddess to come to Earth during man's Golden Age,and, according Ovid, abandoned Earth during the Iron Age. Fleeing humanity's wickedness, she fled to heaven and became the constellation Virgo, her scales of justice becoming the constellation Libra. Like Dike, she is associated with the Roman goddess Justitia (also known as Lady Justice). One day, it is said that she will return to Earth, bringing with her the return to the utopic Golden Age.

Praxidike

The goddess of judicial punishment and the exactor of vengeance, she is closely related to Nemesis in that regard, and also related the the Horae Dike, also a goddess of order and justice. Her daughters Homonoia and (especially) Arete, are more well known.

Arete

At its basic level, Arete was a concept that was extremely important to the Greeks, commonly thought of as meaning "virtue", its meaning is closer to something like, "being the best you can be," or "reaching your highest human potential." So its natural that there was a goddess that represented the concept. Arete, as a goddess, was the personification of this idea, and was the daughter of Praxidike and the sister of Homonoia. Her contested Roman equivalent is Virtus. The only know tale of her has her and her counterpart Kakia, offering Herakles a Secret Test of Character, which he of course passed.

Kakia

The counterpart to Arete, Kakia was the goddess of vice and, literally, "moral badness" (as in sin or crime). She's generally depicted as a vain, plump, and heavily made up woman who wears revealing clothing. Her job was to try to lead others to fall into evil.

Apate

The daughter of Nyx and Erebos, Apate was the Greek personification of deceit and was one of the evil spirits released from Pandora's box. Her Roman equivalent is Fraus, from which we get the word fraud. She had many siblings, including Nemesis and Keres. Her counterpart is Dolos, the god of trickery, who was also a spirit released from pandora's box.

Geras

The god of old age, and the counterpart to Hebe. It was said that the the more geras a man had, the more kleos(fame) and arete (excellence and courage) he had. Generally considered a son of Nyx and Erebus, he was usually portrayed as a shriveled up old man. His Roman equivalent was Senectus. In vases, he's usually portrayed alongside Hercules, but the story that inspired these illustrations has been completely lost.

Oizys

Goddess of Misery, daughter of Nyx, and twin of the god Momos. Her Latin Counterpart is Miseria, from which the word miseryis derived.

Moros

Brother of the Moirai (Fates) and son of Nyx, whom she conceived without any male help. He is the god of impending doom, and actively drives mortals to horrible, deadly fates.

Momus (Momos)

Yet, another child of Nyx, Momus was the god of satire, mockery, censure, writers, and poets. Which basically means he was evil! He was, however, a twisted god of evil-spirited blame and unfair criticism, because apparently the Greeks didn't appreciate satire, or overly critical views. He notably mocked Hephaestus for not having made man with a doorway in his heart so that his thoughts may be seen. He also mocked Aphrodite for being talkative and having creaky sandals, and even mocked Zeus for being a violent bastard and unrepentant womanizer, and for having children as violent as he was. For his constant stream of critiques, he was booted out of Olympus (According the a fable by Aesop, he was actually booted out because he was jealous of the creations of three gods, and criticized them for it). For his wily ways, Momus has become quite popular (unsurprisingly) with writers.

The Keres

The Keres (singular Ker), were goddesses and sisters, the daughters of Nyx and Erebus (how many kids do these two have?) Their Latin counterpart was the Tenebrae (The Darkness) or Letum (Death). They were dark beings with gnashing teeth and claws, and a thirst for (human) blood. They favored death from bleeding out(over the other forms of death which are Thanatos' domain including as Sisyphos's chaining of Thanatos had shown other more instantanous forms of violent death) and hovered over battlefields looking for wounded and dying men to devour and send to Hades.

Achlys

One of the goddesses suffering from a Multiple Choice Past due to Continuity Snarl, Achlys is either a primordial god that predates possibly even Khaos, or a daughter of Nyx, in which case she is sometimes portrayed as one of the Keres. Achlys is the goddess of the eternal night, aka the Mist of Death, which clouds the eyes of the dying. She is depicted as a pale, emaciated, and weeping woman, with chattering teeth, swollen knees, long nails on her fingers, bloody cheeks, and her shoulders thickly covered with dust.

Ate (Aite)

The daughter of Zeus and Hera, she was the goddess of mischief, delusion, and folly. In Homer's Iliad, she is said to be Zeus's oldest daughter, and her mother is not mentioned. Hera used Ate to make Zeus swear that, on that very day, a mortal son of his would be born who would be a great ruler. Afterward, Hera sought to delay Hercules's birth and to birth prematurely Eurystheus, Hera's hero and direct counterpoint to Hercules. In anger, Zeus punished Ate by throwing her down to Earth and forbidding her from ever returning to Heaven or Mt. Olympus. Ate wanders the Earth now, making hell for everybody who meets her. Supposedly followed by the Litae (Prayers), who act as her healers, but cannot keep up with Ate, who runs too fast.

Zelus

Son of Pallas and Styx, brother to Nike, Kratos, and Bia. Had wings like his siblings and was an enforcer for Zeus that stood about his throne. He is the personification of dedication, emulation, eager rivalry, envy, jealousy, and zeal, and the word Zeal is derived from his name.

Bia

The goddess and personification of force, Bia, had four other siblings (already mentioned dozens of times now, just see Zelus above) and was the daughter of Pallas and Styx. She and her siblings were Zeus's constant companions, as they, along with their mother, help Zeus fight the Titans. In Aeschylus' Prometheus Bound, she along with Hephaestus and Kratos bound the Titan Prometheus.

Kratos

No, not that Kratos. This Kratos (the final child of Pallas and Styx's children) was the god and personification of strength and power, and, along with his siblings, was a winged enforcer of Zeus. Helped to bound Prometheus.

Agon

Greek god of competition and competitive games, in particular, the Olympic Games. Among the words we get from his name are agony, antagonism, protagonist, etc.

The Oneiroi

More than likely children of Nyx (though Multiple Choice Past strikes again here) these gods were the gods of dreams, and were close siblings to Hypnos. There were three (or just three prominent ones depending on the myth), and they were Morpheus ( a god who appeared in dreams as human figures), Phobetor, also called Icelus, (a goddess who appeared in dreams as various animals and monsters, being the personification of nightmares), and Phantasos (a god who appeared in dreams as inanimate objects). Together, the siblings lived together in the Dream World, a realm located somewhere in the Underworld.

Penia

Called Penae in Latin, Penia was the Greek goddess of poverty and need, sometimes considered the mother of Eros.

Porus (Poros)

The Greek god of plenty and son of Metis, making him the brother of Athena. He was seduced by Penia at Aphrodite's birthday celebration while drunk, and from that sexual escapade, its possible that Eros was born. Porus is also a god in the Roman pantheon, the personification of abundance.

Amechania (Amekhania)

Sister of Penia and Greek goddess of helplessness. Often traveled around with her sisters.

Ptocheia (Ptokheia)

Greek goddess of beggary, who was a sister of Amechania and Ptocheia. She ofter traveled around with her sisters

Ploutos

Probably more well known by his Roman name Plutus. Ploutos was the ancient Greek god of wealth and was the son of Demeter and the Demigod Iasion. Has a complex relationship in the Roman pantheon with the god of the underworld, Plouton (Pluto), who is also a god of riches, leading to conflation. Was blinded by Zeus so that he could dispense of his riches without prejudice. He is also lame, but has wings, so he arrives slowly, but leaves quickly (sounds like there's significance to that). In the play Plutus, his sight is restored, thus raising hell as he is now able to determine who is most deserving of wealth. From the root of his (and Plouton's) name, we get the words like plutocracy, plutonomics, plutolatry, and plutomania.

Euthenia

Greek goddess of prosperity, who had three sisters: Eucleia, Philophrosyne, and Eupheme. Sometimes regarded as a younger Charity, along with her sisters. her and here sisters' parents were Hephaestus and Aglaea

Eucleia (Eukleia)

The Greek goddess of glory and good repute, sister to Euthenia. Often shown alongside Aphrodite as an attendant, where she represents the good repute of a young bride.

Philophrosyne

The Greek goddess of welcome, friendliness, and kindness.

Eupheme

Greek goddess of words of good omen, praise, acclaims, shouts of triumph, and applause. Her opposite was Momus. Was the nurse of the Muses and the mother of Krotos with Pan, who became the constellation Sagittarius.

The Anemoi

These beings were Greek wind gods who were each ascribed a Cardinal direction from their particular special winds came, and each of them as ascribed to certain seasons and weather patterns. They were variously represented as gusts of wind, winged men, and as horses kept in the stables of the storm god Aeolus. Astraeus and Eos were their parents. Their Roman equivalent was the Venti.

There are four main gods, each representing a cardinal direction, and four secondary gods representing the other directions. They were: Boreas, Greek god of the cold north wind who brought Winter, known in Roman religion as Aquilo or Septentrio; Notus, Greek god of the South wind who brought the storms of late summer and autumn, known to the Romans as Auster, embodiment of the sirocco wind; Zephyrus (Zephyr) who was the Greek god of the West wind, the gentlest wind that brought light spring and early summer breezes, known in Rome as Favonius, who held domain over plants and flowers; and then there was '''Eurus''', god of the unlucky east wind who was not associated with a season and known in Rome as Vulturnus, a tribal river god who became god of the river Tiber.

The four minor gods were: Kaikias, Greek god of the northeast wind, represented as a bearded man with a shield of hailstones, known as the "dark wind" whose Roman equal was Caecius; Apeliotes (Latin spelling, Apeliotus) was the Greek god of the southeast wind who brought good rain that helped farmers, and thus is usually depicted in farmers's attire carrying fruit, clean shaven, with curly hair and a pleasant disposition, and his Roman equivalent was Subsolanus, who was sometimes considered the east wind by the Romans; Skiron (Skeiron), Greek god of the Northwest wind, depicted as bearded man tipping over a cauldron, representing the coming of winter, and his Roman equal was Caurus (Corus), the oldest Roman wind deities; Lips was the Greek god of the Southwest wind, usually depicted holding a ship's stern, whose Roman counterpart was Afer ventus (African wind), also called Africus, because Africa is southwest of Italy, natch.

Epione

The Greek goddess of the soothing of pain, the wife of Asklepios, and the mother of some of his children.

Hygieia (Hygiea, Hygeia)

As her name more than amply implies, Hygieia is the goddess and personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation, the daughter of Asclepius and Epione. Of course, her name is obviously the root for hygiene and its associated words. While Asclepius was associated in healing illness and injury, Hygieia was associated with prevention of disease. in Rome, she was initially identified with the goddess of personal health Valetudo, but she was eventually identified with the goddess of social welfare, Salus.

Iaso (Ieso)

Daughter of Asclepius and the goddess of recuperation from illness.

Aceso

The daughter of Asclepius and Epione, and goddess of the healing process.

Panacea (Panakeia)

Greek goddess of the Universal Remedy, daughter of Asclepius and Epione. Always carried a potion around with her that could heal the sick, and this idea was the beginning of the idea of the panacea in medicine (i.e. a substance that could cure all disease)

Thetis

An ancient sea goddess within the Greek pantheon, she is most well known for being the mother of the Greek hero, Achilles, whom she had with a mortal, Peleus. Is generally thought to have been a powerful goddess at one time, and it is even mentioned that she helped stop a rebellion against Zeus on Olympus, but is not mentioned much in Classical Greek works.

Proteus

An early Greek sea god, sometimes called the god of "elusive sea change", reflecting the sea's constant changes. Like many gods and goddesses, he suffers from Multiple Choice Past, but he is a herdsman of Poseidon's seals. He has the ability to predict the future, but constantly changes his shape, so that only those who can catch him will get the prediction. From this we get the word protean. He lives on the island of Pharos off the coast of the Nile River Delta and his primary purpose was to be caught by other heroes and used to help them solve their problems.

Amphitrite

Sea goddess most well known for being Poseidon's wife, in Rome she was conflated with Neptune's wife, Salacia, goddess of saltwater. Multiple Choice Past strikes again: Some call her a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, thus making her an Oceanid and possibly a Titan, while other tales identify her as the daughter of Nereus and Doris, making her a Nereid, and still others say she is a personification of the sea itself. She and Poseidon had a son, named Triton, and at least one daughter, named Rhode and possibly another, named Benthesikyme. Though originally a very powerful, important goddess, she lost her importance to the Olympic pantheon.

Rhode

Sometimes considered a sea nymph, Rhode was the goddess of the island of Rhodes and daughter of Poseidon. Consort of Helios, she considered the little island under her own protection.

Triton

No, not that Triton. This Triton is the most famous son of Poseidon. A Greek god, he was a messenger of the sea, similar to how Hermes was a messenger of Olympus. One thing the Disney film got right is that Triton is usually represented as a merman, having a human's upper body and the tail-end of a fish, and he, like his father, carried a trident. He also carried a conch shell, which he blew like a horn to control the waves. had a daughter named Pallas (not the same Pallas mentioned farther up) and raised Athena as his own daughter. Athena would later accidentally kill Pallas. Triton would be the progenitor of an entire race similar to himself, called Tritons.

Ceto (Crataeis, Trienus)

An early, powerful sea goddess, sometimes conflated with Hecate. Mother of a race of monsters with Phorcys, called the Phorcydes, which include Echidna, and (sometimes) The Gorgons (including Medusa), Ladon, Scylla, and The Graeae.

The Graeae

Also called the Grey Witches, the Graeae were three sisters who shared one eye and one tooth amongst themselves. Though usually depicted as old, grey haired women, sometimes, storytellers would portray them as beautiful, and in some legends they were portrayed as being half-swan. They were apparently so old that they couldn't grasp the concept of human childhood. Their names were Deino (dread), Enyo (horror, not the same Enyo as the goddess of war), and Pemphredo (alarm). There is sometimes also a fourth named Persis (destroyer, slayer) or Perso. Perseus was able to get the women to tell him how to kill Medusa by stealing their one eye.

  • Affably Evil: Often depicted as such.
  • Blackmail: Perseus persuaded them into telling him where Medusa was by stealing their eye. Some versions say that he threw their eye into a river afterward.
  • Body Horror: They share an eye and a tooth. One eye, and one tooth.
  • Born as an Adult: An extreme example; they were born old women (although some say that they were pretty).
  • Eyeless Face: Whenever one is wearing the eye, two of them are eyeless.
  • Mystical White Hair: The stories that depict them as beautiful say that they were only called "old" because they had white hair.
  • Physical God
  • Sadly Myth Taken: The Disney Hercules film gave their defining trait, sharing one eye, to the Moirai (Fates), causing confusion.
  • Wicked Witch: Generally depicted as such.

Phorcys (Phorkys)

God of the mysterious dangers of the deep, identified as a son of Gaia and Pontus or a son of Tethys and Oceanus. Married Ceto and had many "nice" children. Is depicted as a fish-taled merman, with crab claws for fore-legs and red-spiked skin.

Circe

A minor goddess of magic, sometimes called a witch, sorceress, enchantress, or nymph. Multiple Choice Past again, however, she is usually seen as a daughter of Helios and Perse, though some see her as the daughter of Hecate. Called "The loveliest of all immortals", she was known for turning people she didn't like into animals and having a truly massive knowledge of drugs and herbs. She lives in a large mansion, which she surrounded with feral predators she culled with her magic. She is most well known for her run-in with Odysseus: She turned some of his crew into pigs and Odysseus set out to rescue them from her, using advice given by Athena as an aid. Following Athena's advice, Odysseus succeeded in freeing his men and gaining Circe's trust, and she helped him on his journey.

Glaucus

A god of the sea, Glaucus was one of the very few mortals who attained immortality and godhood. It is believed that he comes to the rescue of fishermen and sailors caught in storms; this is because he was one himself. One day, when Glaucus was still mortal, he came across a weird herb that could resurrect dead fish, an tried eating it himself. The herb made him immortal, but at a steep cost: in place of his arms, he had fins, and his legs were replaced with a fish's tail (though there are versions of the story that say he just became a merman), forcing him to live in the sea forever. Though initially saddened by these turn of events, Oceanus and Tethys took Glaucus in as one of their own, teaching him the gift of prophecy and making him a god of the sea. Glaucus later fell in love with Scylla (who was a beautiful sea nymph at the time), and tried to marry her, but Scylla was repulsed by his physical appearance and ran away from him. Glaucus went to Circe for help in getting Scylla to fall for him, but Circe fell in love with him instead. Though Circe tried her best to win his heart, Glaucus was too in love with Scylla to go with her. Circe, in rage, poisoned the water where Scylla bathed, and turned her into the horrible monster we all know.

Eurynome

Ancient Greek sea goddess, worshiped in the form of a mermaid, she was a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, and was the third wife of Zeus, with whom she had her daughters, the Charities. When Hephaestus was cast from Olympus by Hera, it was Eurynome and Thetis who caught him and nursed him back to health. This Eurynome is closely associated with the Titan Eurynome, wife of Ophion, the first ruler of Olympus.

Dike

Goddess of mortal justice and fair judgement. She is sometimes counted among the Horae. As a daughter of Zeus and Themis she was sent to Earth to help maintain order among mankind. She would reward virtue and punish the guilty. Eventually, she grew tired and disgusted with humanity's wickedness. She fled back to Olympus where she reports to Zeus the evil deeds of man and the perverted judgements of justice so he can punish them accordingly.

Nerites

God of Shellfish and in some versions, charioteer of the sea. He was the son of Nereus and Doris and the only brother among the Nereids. Some versions say that he was Aphrodite's lover, and that he offended her by declining an offer to go to Olympus. Others say that he was a lover of Poseidon, only to offend Helios for unknown reasons (some say Helios wanted him for himself, others say that Nerites boasted about his chariot skills). Either way, no version of Nerites doesn't get turned into a shellfish.
  • Baleful Polymorph: Into a shellfish.
  • Happily Married: They weren't officially married, but his relationship with Poseidon was considered such a beautiful spectacle that it could easily be considered this.
    And so, as I am told, of the rest the favourite spent his time with his lover, and moreover when Poseidon drove his chariot over the waves, all together great fishes as well as dolphins and Tritones too, sprang up from their deep haunts and gambolled and danced around the chariot, only to be left utterly and far behind by the speed of his horses; only the boy favourite was his escort close at hand, and before them the waves sank to rest and the sea parted out of reverence to Poseidon, for the god willed that his beautiful favourite should not only be highly esteemed for other reasons but should also be pre-eminent at swimming.
  • Homosexual Reproduction: His union with Poseidon spawned Anteros, God of Mutual Love. All together, now; Awwwww!
  • The Power of Love: His and Poseidon's union was one of mutual love. Mind you, that alone is huge by Greek Mythology standards.
  • Pretty Boy: Famous for his beauty.
  • The One Guy: The only male Nereid.
  • Winged Humanoid: In the Aphrodite version of the myth. His wings were given to Anteros after his transformation.

Lyssa and the Maniae

Lyssa, yet another daughter of Nyx, was the Greek spirit/goddess of mad rage, frenzy and rabies in animals. Whether or not that makes her the goddess of the Hate Plague or the Crossed is up for debate. Her Roman equivalent had multiple names, including Ira, Furor, or Rabies. She was sprung from the blood of Ouranos after he was castrated by Cronos and is the one who inflicted the insanity on Hercules, at Hera's behest, that caused him to murder his own family. She's also used her mad skills on several other occasions. Connected to her are the Maniae (singular Mania) who are spirits that personify Insanity, madness and crazed frenzy and are presumed to be daughters of Nyx as well.

  • Always Chaotic Evil: Subverted, in that despite what she represents, Lyssa maybe one of the nicest of Nyx's children, in sharp contrast to Eris, and never uses her powers on friends. To whit, she only ever uses her powers at the behest of other gods and goddesses, usually to right some perceived wrong, or, in Hera's case, because they are the assholes.
  • Anthropomorphic Personification
  • Noble Demon: Not exactly a demon, but unlike most of the other less than likable beings on this page, Lyssa takes no pleasure in what she does and even tried to talk Hera down from her original plan before relenting.

Ponos

God of hard labor and toil. Son of Eris, he is that which we all do and hate.

Algos

A lesser known god or goddess who personifies grief and sorrow. Child of Eris.

Lethe

Not the river in the Underworld, though the river has power over memory and is associated with her, she is the Greek Goddess of forgetfulness and oblivion. Usually seen as a child of Eris, some identify the river with her. It was said those who went to Hades had to drink from the river before reincarnation so that they wouldn't remember past lives.

Limos

Daughter of Eris, Goddess of Starvation. Was opposed by Demeter and Plutus, who was also the god of plentiful harvest. Ovid states that she finds her homes in the frozen wastes near Scythia where nothing grows in the barren soil. Demeter once asked her to take revenge on someone, as Greek gods and goddesses are want to do, and it turned out horribly for the target.

The Androktasiai (singular: Androktasia)

The female personifications of manslaughters, which is to say, the slaughter of battles, and daughters of Eris.

The Neikea (singular: Neikos)

The Goddesses of Arguments and daughters of Eris. They are probably the patrons of Insane Troll Logic and logical fallacies.

The Pseudologoi (singular: Pseudologos)

The Gods of Lies and sons of Eris. In Aesops fables, he characterized them as a singular female being a created by Dolos as an imitation of Aletheia (Truth) who gained her name by being an incomplete replica of the truth.

The Amphilogiai (Singular: Amphilogia)

The goddesses of Disputes, daughters of Eris, and no doubt the patrons of Flame War.

Dysnomia

Daughter of Eris, and goddess of Lawlessness (though some call her a daemon), and was considered similar to Ate. Didn't figure much in Greek myth.

The Phonoi (singular: Phonos)

The sons of Eris who presided over murder, killing, and slaughter out of battles. The patron gods of those who think Murder Is the Best Solution.

The Makhai (singular: Makhê)

The gods or goddesses or spirits (daemons) of battles and children of Eris.

The Hysminai (singular: hysmine)

Also represent battle, or, more closely, fighting and combats, which may include singular duels and non-pitched warfare. They were apparently present at the battle of Troy.

Kydoimos

Another god of battle, though he also represents confusion, uproar, and ruckus in general.

Homados

God of the noise of battle. And all the blood-curdling screaming that implies.

Proioxis and Palioxis

The gods of the onrush of battle and the backrush of battle respectively.

Alala

Goddess of the war cry, and daughter of Polemos, she was an attendant of Ares who used her name as his war cry, and Greek soldiers used this battle cry before battle. Greek soldiers used a similar cry in World War II

Polemos

Where as Ares is the god of war, Polemos is best described as its personification. Unlike Ares, he has no known cults or myths because of this. Opposes Dionysus, a god of life, and was the brother of Enyo.

Dolos

God of trickery and guile, the master of master at cunning deception, craftiness, and treachery. A patron to would-be chessmasters everywhere. Was an apprentice to Promethius. Possibly a child of Nyx or Gaia.

Classical Mythology OlympiansCharacters/Classical MythologyClassical Mythology Monsters

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