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Slut Shaming
Dorothy: Rose, what do you call a girl who's slept with a man she's known for less than one day?
Blanche: A damn good sport?
Dorothy: I call her a tramp.

People who don't live by the standard that Sex Is Evil are sometimes called "sluts", for good or ill. My Girl Is a Slut! No, My Girl Is Not a Slut! Or even Ethical Slut, when it's portrayed as a good thing. In the case of Slut Shaming, however, having sex is stigmatized (by a party that does not approve of it) as evil.

One 19th/20th Century Sino-European Double Standard is that if a man has sex, he's just 'being a man' - whereas if a woman has sex, she's a Defiled Forever font of moral corruption who will make the people around them lazy (and homosexual) hedonists. Thus, slut shaming is used against women far more often than against men. And the men are often free to admire or even have sex with the "sluts", while despising them at the same time. An alternative view is that (since the 19th century) because men are sometimes seen as innately slutty, calling one a slut doesn't mean much. Unfortunately, the male ability to be more cavalier about sluttiness has a downside in the idea that men are always willing to have sex and therefore cannot be sexually assaulted because every male will always to consent to any kind of sexual act with anyone (female).

In short, Slut Shaming is the act of making someone feel bad for the evil that they do, i.e. being promiscuous, though the degree of promiscuity (above the theoretical lower-limit of having zero sexual relations, desires, or thoughts throughout one's lifetime) required to be slandered a slut isn't universally agreed upon. The 'shaming' tends to be ruder and more hatred-filled for women than for men, who are required to have sex with far more people to draw the same level of ire from Moral Guardiansnote . The key to Slut Shaming is being nasty to people to make them repent from their evil ways, sexual evil consisting of:

  • Thinking about sexual matters.
  • Discussing sexual matters.
  • Having sexual desires.
  • Expressing sexual desires.
  • Owning or using 'sexy' things, like clothingnote , as this may encourage sexual thoughts or desires.

These next ones don't count as long as you only do them with your wife/husband.

In comparison, the tropes My Girl Is a Slut/My Girl Is Not a Slut are about how the girl's love interest reacts to her sexual activity or lack thereof. Slut Shaming is about how the girl suffers the disapproval of society in general and her family/friends/'friends'/acquaintances. You could play the two tropes against each other for drama.

Sensible Heroes, Skimpy Villains is a form of sister trope. See also Madonna-Whore Complex and My Girl Is Not a Slut. Compare Sour Prudes and Sex Is Evil and I Am Horny.

Note: Please refrain from virgin-shaming when adding examples. If people can sleep around without being judged, they should also be able to choose abstinence without being labelled a "prude".

Dirty, Shameful Examples

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    Anime and Manga 
  • Rosario + Vampire: Kurumu is absolutely pissed and decides It's Personal when Keito calls her a "dumb slutty airhead" to her face.
  • In Kaze to Ki no Uta, Gilbert is subjected to this by other students in his school. It is also a part of the discrimination against Serge's Romani mother Paiva, which has become something of a Berserk Button for Serge himself.
  • In Fruits Basket, Tohru's aunt, uncle, and cousin strongly imply that she was sleeping around and/or molested by the Sohma men she was staying with (granted finding out a high school girl was living with three unrelated men wouldn't be taken well by many people, but the Sohmas were perfectly respectable towards her and the relatives were clearly mocking poor Tohru). They also accuse her mother of being wanton and a slut, because she'd been in a biker gang in her youth. When Kyo and Yuki come to retrieve her, Tohru's cousin recognizes them as "the two guys the little tramp was shacking up with." In response, Yuki, in full Tranquil Fury mode, gets in his face, calls him a lowlife, and warns him to never talk about Tohru like that again, leaving Tohru's cuz speechless.
  • This is one of the things that crops up frequently in Bitter Virgin. Pretty much everyone who finds out that Hinako was raped by her stepfather and had a baby by him worries that Daisuki (her love interest) will consider her Defiled Forever. Later, when Daisuki's sister comes home pregnant and unwed, most of the town (including the mother) think the sister was shameful and slutty. In both cases, the manga treats the women as sympathetic - Hinako's experience is traumatic and Daisuki never thinks badly of her for it, and his sister is shown as being intelligent and friendly. Meanwhile, the mother comes around to accepting her grandchild and the people engaging in said slut shaming are portrayed as being ignorant.
  • Fasalina from GUN×SWORD does this to herself, hating herself for being a former prostitute/poledancer. She supports the Claw's agenda thinking it's the best way to atone for her "sins". The only other person who uses her past against her is Ray, who is portrayed as a Jerkass for most of the series.

    Comic Books 
  • A male example, Oliver Queen, AKA The Green Arrow, is often insulted and bashed by people In-Universe and out for cheating on Black Canary. The problem? He didn't exactly cheat on her, he was raped. Afterwards they did turn him into a regular womaniser in order to retroactively justify this, but not until after it brought out a load of Unfortunate Implications.
  • Word of God confirms that the first Terra from Teen Titans was shown in a sexual relationship with villain Slade Wilson specifically to emphasize how evil she was by showing what a slut she was, despite there being no evidence that she ever slept with anyone else. Add to that that she was 16 while Slade is significantly older and it crosses into Questionable Consent territory since technically Slade is the one who's committing statutory rape and emotionally manipulating a 16 year old girl. Later on, Slade actually gets written as an Anti-Hero while Terra is the one who eventually dies, so it falls into major Unfortunate Implications.
  • In another male example, Nightwing is considered by some to be a slut and horribly promiscuous due to being portrayed as a womanizer by some writers. This leads to the same fans dismissing the scene in which he was raped by Tarantula, with the reasoning that he was a man and must have wanted sex from her, even though he clearly refused and begged her to stop.
    • Years earlier, fellow Titan Mirage had committed rape-by-fraud by taking on Starfire's appearance, who at the time was Dick's girlfriend. When called on what she did, Mirage simply joked that Dick should've known something was off, and Pantha jokingly referred to Dick as a slut.
  • In Uncanny Avengers, the Scarlet Witch does this to Rogue, at one point calling Rogue one of her father's floozies. She brings up the relationship not in a way to necessarily shame Rogue for her "promiscuity" (especially since Rogue's powers make physical relationships difficult) but to remind her that she isn't exactly pure and noble herself, having a relationship with the X-Men's worst enemy.
  • In second series of Young Avengers avoids this in universe - Kate Bishop dismiss the idea that going to bed with a guy on first date makes her a slut - but faces it in real life - apparently the angry letter from issue #3, that was accusing both Kate and Noh-Varr of not being role models and saying having sex makes them "instantly unlikable" was actually one of the few printable letters and one of few not trying to put all the blame on her. Kieron Gillen addressed the thing on his Tumblr and made it clear that not only he disagrees with this line of thinking, but it personally offends him.
  • In Runaways, Nico has a dream where her parents berate her for being a "shameless whore" for "kissing" and "being with" multiple boys. Nico calls them out on the double standard, pointing out that her father probably dated women before her mother, and that she isn't going to listen to them. Given that Nico earlier expressed discomfort and shame over her tendency to use physical intimacy to cope with grief, the scene likely shows her overcoming her issues. Interestingly, Nico is the only one to think that way. No one else thinks badly of her for what she does.
    • In an arc where the group ends up in the 1800s, Victor falls in love with a lower-class girl named Lilli, who is very physically affectionate with him, by way of hugging, kissing, and being open about loving him. Nico later says of them, "She's a ho and you're a toaster. Let's just go." She later admits that she did want to let them be together, because she knew they really were in love, and her line was probably because she just recovered from being tortured by an ancestor.
  • In Sex Criminals, middle-school girl Suzie tries to get advice about sex from the group of 'dirty girls', but in a twist, she's the one who's ashamed to talk to them.

     Fan Fiction 

    Film 
  • Thanks to The Hays Code, Slut Shaming was enforced for many years in Hollywood.
  • Slasher Movies' obsession with the Death by Sex trope and the virgin Final Girl trope make this trope strongly implied. Good girls who don't want terrible things to happen to them better not have sex!
  • Ironically, Lifetime Movies, despite preaching "female empowerment", unapologetically enforce this trope by making any attractive, promiscuous, confident woman into a smug, shameless, homewrecking whore with no morals and no redeeming qualities whatsoever, fully derserving punishment in the form of humiliation, rape or death. Preferably all three of them.
  • Near the end of Moulin Rouge!, Christian, angry about being dumped by Satine, (she was trying to protect him from the Duke) publicly humiliates her by throwing money at her, saying "I have paid my whore!".
  • Easy A: The film is built around this trope: The protagonist pretends to have had sex once, and when the whole school starts to slut-shame her for not being a virgin she decides to make the most of it.
  • All the girls in The Magdalene Sisters are sent to the laundry because of this. Margaret was raped at a party, Rose and Crispina both had babies while unmarried, and Bernadette (although still a virgin) is pre-emptively judged a slut for her beauty and flirtation with boys.
  • Vivian in Pretty Woman escapes this from her main client, but civilized society views her as "trashy" and his friend clearly forgets that she's a person and not a sex object once he learns that she's a prostitute.
  • In Black Death, the protagonists scream "whore!" at the matriarch of an isolated village after she has them drugged and imprisoned (after they'd actually come to her village in the first place in order to hunt down and torture percieved witches). What makes it particularly hypocritical is that at no point during the film does she ever do anything that could be viewed as remotely "slutty" - even by the most exacting double standards. She never seduces anyone, she never takes her clothes off, she doesn't even flirt with anyone or show an inordinate amount of skin. Thanks to Deliberate Values Dissonance, "whore" is just the default choice for insulting a woman regardless of anything she says or does.
  • Kat Dennings' character Caroline in Daydream Nation gets this. She comes back epically:
    Jenny: Ugh, slut.
    Caroline Wexler: What did you call me?
    Jenny: I think I just called you a slut, slut.
    Caroline Wexler: Why?
    Jenny: Because everyone knows that you've banged, like, forty different guys since you came here.
    Caroline Wexler: Really? Forty? Okay, let's just say that I have banged forty guys. What's the problem? You're just jealous because you've been brainwashed by puritanical assholes who think sex is a sin. But then again, your little gerbil-sized brain has been reprogrammed by the media to believe that sex is the be-all, end-all. So now you're stuck, right? 'Cause on the one hand you love to fuck, but afterwards you feel overwhelmed by guilt and you're not sure why. Maybe it's because sex is neither as good or as evil as you've built it up to be.
  • Iron Man has Pepper Potts use this as revenge in her first scene, when Tony's latest flame insults her position.
    Pepper: I have your clothes, freshly drycleaned, and there is a car waiting out the front to take you anywhere you want.
    Everheart: You must be the famous Pepper Potts. After all these years, Tony still has you picking up the drycleaning.
    Pepper: I do anything and everything Mr. Stark requires. Including, occasionally, taking out the trash. Will that be all?
    • This continues in the sequel with the same reporter moving in on Tony's competitor Justin Hammer. Pepper mentions the reporter's "spread" on Tony in the first film.
  • In Another Time, Another Place, the other locals regard Else, one of the farmer's servants, as the village bicycle for being caught in flagrante on one occasion.
  • In Lucky Bastard, single mom/porn star Ashley finds herself tied up and Alone with the Psycho; when he tauntingly asks what her kids will think when they find out what she does, she bravely retorts "They'll think I'm a mom...who loved her kids."

     Humor 
  • There is a joke about a woman who complains to the doctor:
    Woman: After every date, I end up in bed. I can simply refuse no man, and afterwards, I feel like a slut and an idiot.
    Doctor: Very well, I'll give you some pills, and you'll have no problem refusing...
    Woman: No, doctor, not something to be able to refuse. Give me pills so I won't feel like a slut and an idiot.
  • More nastily, the book of insults and putdowns, Ouch by Dave Dutton has insults for men commenting variously upon ugliness, stupidity, arrogance, cruelty and so forth. All the lines aimed at women consist of either "she's a slut" or "she's frigid". Damned if you do, damned if you don't, ladies.

    Literature 
  • As punishment for having a child out of wedlock, Hester Prynne had to wear the eponymous Scarlet Letter, 'A' for 'adultery'.
  • Robin Hobb deals with the subject realistically and without condemnation (from the author, plenty from the societies she creates).
    • The Realm of the Elderlings features restrictive roles for women and plenty of slut-shaming.
      • Molly has to go to great lengths to hide her relationship with Fitz and flee the castle once she gets pregnant, Fitz is killed in disgrace, and the coastal duchies nearly collapse during the war.
      • Fitz himself meets with a great deal of disapproval for his dalliance, but the consequences for him would never be as severe. Sure, he got killed a few times, but never for sex.
      • Conversely, his relationship with Starling never met with the same disapproval, because she's a minstrel, and the rules are different for minstrels.
      • Althea in the second series, in a more conservative climate, is routinely shamed for her activities, which include pursuing a man's career (sailing) and a man's sexual appetites (having any). Her niece, Malta, is portrayed as a man-eater in bud, which may be budding sexuality in a young woman or simple starvation for mental stimulation.
      • In the third trilogy, Fitz shames Starling a bit when, on learning of her marriage, turns her out of his bed. He then shames his son for taking up with a young woman when he didn't have the ability to make an honest woman out of her, and gets in a fight with the girl's father over the same. Fitz receives some shame himself when the world at large believes he's gaying it up with his foreign-born employer. The Fool himself also seems to disapprove of Fitz sleeping around with women he doesn't love, but not on moral grounds; his reasons are more complex and more specific to their relationship.
    • The Soldier Son: The eponymous son becomes, thanks to a disease, grotesquely obese, which warrants disgust from everyone he meets, and colors their opinion of any desire he might express. His father's disgust is deepened when he believes the boy caught the disease from a prostitute (false), and he flees town ahead of a mob for supposed necrophilia (also false).
  • The Aubrey-Maturin series plays the Double Standard for all its worth.
    • Aubrey has never learned to keep it in his pants and frequently gets into trouble at home and abroad, not least when a miscegenated son by a favorite whore of his shows up later in the series and earlier when an unscrupulous woman blackmails him with threat of showing up, pregnant, to his wife. When, in the first book, his dalliance with a superior officer's wife costs him a small fortune and an important promotion, others defend him because, "It was her what set her cap for him! Everyone knows that!"
      • When Aubrey catches an STI in the first book, he's told by Maturin (acting as his physician) that "a lady of your acquaintance has been too liberal with her affections". Slut Shaming and the Double Standard in one sentence.
    • Meanwhile Maturin ardently pursues a widow whose reputation is thoroughly blackened by "doing what a woman must to get by alone in this world". Otherwise he was so chaste that his superiors in the intelligence community were for a time concerned that he might be susceptible to blackmail. For being gay.
  • Robert A. Heinlein loved My Girl Is a Slut and only made villains prudes. However, he frequently set his characters in a society similar to that he grew up in (early 20th century midwestern America), which meant there was plenty of shaming going on, and his characters had to be devious to get away with doing what they wanted, and never felt bad for it.
  • Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn has this in full effect. When a girl falls for a beautiful man's blandishments, she feels ashamed. When a young man she's been friends with forever finds out about it, he (still a virgin) is hurt and shames her, but eventually comes around.
  • Matrim Cauthon of the Wheel of Time series is another inveterate manwhore (though the text rarely implies that he does more than kiss women, and when he does he tends to be monogamous), upon whom shame is copiously heaped, mostly by the women in his life. Notably, Elaine is disgusted with his ongoing sexual relationship with a Queen of the country they are visiting. When he finally tries to explain/beseech to Elaine that his relationship with the queen began with being raped and he's powerless to get out of the situation, she laughs at him, saying something along the lines of him deserving it and getting a taste of his own medicine. This caused much fan hate towards Elaine.
    • Berelain, one of, if not the, most beautiful women in the series, has accrued a reputation for having many lovers and being a seductress, to which some of the female characters react to negatively. Perrin wanders if the devotion of her guards is possibly related to their hope of sharing her bed. Berelain later tells Perrin that, despite the rumours, she has actually only had sex with 3 people for non-political reasons. It can be assumed that her reputation and skills in seduction are another of her political tools as a very capable Queen of her very small and weak country, similar to her secret proficiency in martial arts.
    • Robert Jordan has also written historical fiction with the Double Standard firmly in place, usually in his native Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Common in the works of Jane Austen:
    • In Pride and Prejudice, Lydia's fling with Wickham almost ruins her entire family's reputation. They are saved only when Darcy pays off Wickham to marry her. Georgiana Darcy narrowly escaped the same fate when Wickham wanted to elope with her in order to get his hands on her fortune.
    • Mansfield Park's Maria Rushworth is forever ostracized from polite society after leaving her husband to run away with Henry Crawford, who then refuses to marry her. She ends up having to leave the country.
    • Invoked in Sense and Sensibility when Elinor cautions Marianne about getting too close to Willoughby for the sake of her reputation. Willoughby is also revealed to have caused disgrace to Colonel Brandon's ward, with whom Willoughby had an affair and abandoned her when she became pregnant.
    • Generally, any female character considered to be too flirtatious, or who breaks off an engagement to chase another man, is subjected to this (Isabella Thorpe, Lucy Steele, Elizabeth Elliot, and others.)
  • The Beautiful Slave Girls on Gor will use this to taunt and/or insult each other, at least when they're not taunting and/or insulting each other over how frigid the other is.
  • A Song of Ice and Fire plays with this trope; whores are a totally unremarkable fact of life for the lower levels of society, (and the only higher-ups concerned about this are considered religious fanatics by their peers) but the nobles can be a different matter; the shame attached to sex outside wedlock is totally dependent on who the people involved are, and whether it benefits their allies or enemies to go one way or the other.
    • Lord Tywin Lannister famously had his father's mistress stripped naked and paraded through the streets after his father died, but this is strongly implied to have been a case of putting the lowborn whore in her place, (since she had gained considerable political power and wealth,) rather than strictly because of moral objections to her being a whore. He frequently rebukes Tyrion for his use of whores, citing the shame he brings on his house, even though he is shown to (discreetly) use them himself, and may just object to Tyrion's flaunting his activities, rather than the activities themselves.
    • Cersei Lannister is forced to walk naked through King's Landing by the Church Militant as penance for her adultery, but this is only permitted by the nobles because the political situation makes this beneficial to various players.
    • In contrast, Oberyn Martell openly brings his "paramour" to court, and treats her very well, though it is stated that Dorne is generally more sexually liberal than the rest of the Seven Kingdoms. Daenerys likewise has no moral qualms about having a paramour, and (while wary of the political consequences of someone openly talking about the affair,) doesn't seem to mind that everyone knows about it.
    • Featured heavily in the prequels of Archmaester Gyldayn's Histories. Princess Rhaenyra's detractors, the Greens, use her sexuality as a weapon against her. They claim that her three eldest sons are bastards fathered by her supposed lover Harwin Strong, that her uncle would take her to Dragonstone to teach her about sex in private, and that she would turn the Red Keep into brothel if given the chance. In the opening paragraphs of The Princess and the Queen, her stepmother and half-brothers never miss a chance to call her a whore. One account claims she tried to seduce Ser Cristian Cole and he was so disgusted by her that he became one of her worst enemies. Another account claims she had threesomes with Laenor Valeryon and Qarl Correy. This could be a deconstruction of the trope, as this accusations are made with the intention of discrediting Rhaenyra as heir to the Iron Throne and have little proof to support them. Only the accusation that her sons were illegitimate has some basis in fact since they are Chocolate Babies. Either way, it should be noted that while Gyldayn goes on and on about Rhaenyra's promiscuity, he only makes a few brief mentions of her brothers' sex lives.
  • In Going Too Far by Catherine Alliott, the protagonist believes that she cheated on her husband while spending the weekend away with friends. It didn't happen. The guy drugged her and signed them both in at a hotel so he could use her as an alibi while he committed a burglary. Afterwards, she discovers she's pregnant. She is driven to despair, not only because her husband throws her out, but because of this trope she fears being rejected by her friends and family (who are largely sympathetic while acknowledging that her problems are her own fault) and struggles to tell her gynaecologist that she doesn't know who the father is. It's her husband's baby - the other man is infertile and didn't have sex with her anyway.
  • Tess of the d'Urbervilles shames herself far more cruelly than most other people shame her.
    • Tess' own community- who know her well and- it's implied- have seen this kind of thing happen before (and it was not uncommon for girls who went to work as servants) are quite understanding (and might have been even more kind if she hadn't become withdrawn from shame and emotional pain, which nobody seems to quite realize). It's when she gets involved with the middle-class Angel Clare (who had been working on the land and congratulating himself on fitting in and shedding his bourgeois values) that this trope ruins her life.
  • In A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Francie witnesses a girl named Joanna being harassed by a bunch of housewives because they believe she has no right to show her illegitimate child in public. They go so far as to throw stones at her, and the narrative explains that they only do this because they're bitter about their own loveless marriages.
  • In the Harry Potter series, Ron and the twins take a dim view of Ginny's boyfriends. Ron also reacts poorly to finding out that Hermione had snogged Viktor Krum. In Ron's case, it seems to mostly be jealousy due to his own inexperience, and Ginny calls him out for this when he comes dangerously close to using the word. Her brothers seem to be fine with Harry being her boyfriend, though.
    • Mrs. Weasley is mentioned as still calling overly flirtatious/promiscuous women as "scarlet women" (Hermione finds the term silly, probably showing how Mrs. Weasley is still kind of old-fashioned) and is rather cold towards Hermione, when Rita Skeeter paints her as playing with the affections of both Krum and Harry. Given that she sees Harry as a surrogate son though, it's likely her dislike of Hermione was more disapproval over her hurting Harry.
  • In The House of Night, Aphrodite is constantly put down by the narrator, Zoey, for being a "slut", despite only being involved with two guys in the whole series, the second with whom the relationship is incredibly serious. This despite the fact that the main character has had several boyfriends (some at the same time) throughout the series. The plot also occasionally derails to talk about how bad blowjobs are.
  • Marcie Miller, from the Hush, Hush series, is shamed for her alleged sexual exploits at every possible opportunity. When she goes out to a nightclub, Nora and Vee whisper about how her dress is so short, her thong can be seen from under it. At one point, Nora pointlessly brings up how Marcie is rumored to put a tennis racket in the window, so boys know when she's offering sexual favors. Even Marcie's own slut shaming is turned on her, when Nora tells how she spray painted the word "whore" on Nora's locker. Nora adds that Marcie ought to have done that to herself.
  • Somewhat inverted in Fifty Shades of Grey. Christian talks of Ana's virginity as an "issue" or "an obstacle to be removed". Kate also mentions that she has been waiting for Ana to lose her virginity for 4 years (as if she had nothing better to do).
    • On the other hand, Ana herself tends to be uncomfortable with women having casual sex. At one point, she even worries that she's being a "kept woman" for Grey.
  • In Doctrine of Labyrinths, both women and gay men receive this treatment: Mehitabel gets fired from her position as governess and later ordered by a spy "go trawling" among her lovers for information, while Thaddeus claims that Felix will "believe anything a man tells you when he's buried in your ass." Malkar even calls Felix a "slut" and a "cheap whore"... right after raping him.
  • At one point, Honor Harrington is maligned by her socially and religious conservative enemies on Grayson for having had a romantic relationship before marriage with her murdered boyfriend, Paul Tankersley. Being from a much more liberal culture, and having a mother who keeps insisting Honor needs to get laid more often, the criticism doesn't bother her personally.
  • In Sweet Valley High, Annie Whitman is called "Easy" Annie at school and has a "reputation" that the cheerleading squad thinks will make them look bad if they let her join. After Jessica and her friends spend the book bullying Annie to try to force her off the team, she tries to kill herself and they learn the moral that slut shaming is bad.
  • This is the entire plot of Blaze (Or Love in the Time of Supervillains) All the characters slut shame Catherine Wiggans, a large breasted girl known for her sexual exploits. She's not a slut. The rumours were started by the jealous girlfriend of a boy she attracted.
    • Blaze later slut shames Mark by giving him the name, Mark the Shark and writes a comic warning young girls not to date him. In retaliation, he posts a picture of her online, wearing lingerie in a flirtatious pose. Upon seeing it, the entire town slut shame her.

    Live-Action TV 
  • A Downplayed and more realistic example on Selfie, co-workers are gossiping about scantily-clad Eliza, who is seen flirting with another coworker. They criticize her revealing clothes, and one suggests she sleeps around to avoid being reprimanded by HR, and to increase her sales (she is the company's top-seller, which even she admits is based on sex appeal). Henry informs her she has to consider how she's perceived by other people, thinking they might get the wrong idea that she's sleeping with the guy she was flirting with. Eliza informs him she is sleeping with him, and has been for two and a half weeks. Henry is shocked by the short time-frame, and Eliza tells him not to get all "Slut-Shamey" on her.
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer:
    • Buffy doesn't have too many partners in her seven years on television — four, to be exact. Still, the show has a strong tendency to punish her for having sex, while the characters tend not to.
      • After Buffy sleeps with Angel, he loses his soul and turns back into the demonic Angelus, playing the hellmouth version of "I've slept with my boyfriend and now he's acting different". Punished by the show, nothing but love from her family.
        Buffy: [crying] You must be so disappointed in me.
        Giles: No, no I'm not.
        Buffy: This is all my fault.
        Giles: No, I don't believe it is. Do you want me to wag my finger at you and tell you that you acted rashly? You did, and I can. I know that you loved him. And he... has proven more than once that he loved you. You couldn't have known what would happen. The coming months are going to be hard... I suspect on all of us. But... if it's guilt you're looking for, Buffy, I'm not your man. All you will get from me is my support... and my respect.
      • After she sleeps with Parker, the situation is played quite a bit more normally, with him just not calling her afterward, and she got a lot of slut-shaming from Spike, who was happy to taunt her for youthful naiveté. And try to kill her.
      • After she sleeps with Spike, Buffy really hates herself (she had a lot going on, and he was just the cherry on the shitstorm sundae). At one point she cries in Tara's lap, begging not to be forgiven. Spike thoroughly humiliates her. Of course, he is a soulless, "evil" vampire. Yet even he tires of the casual sex before long, considering it to be more base than loving sex, and turns Buffy out unless she agrees to make love properly. Wow.
    • Xander is always punished for having or wanting to have sex, by the discovery that his partners are evil or amoral demons, mummies, giant bugs... Even Anya, his long-term love interest, is arguably a form of this.
      • And ironically, Xander is not one to shy away from making slut-shaming comments towards others, especially in the first three seasons, where Cordelia gets the brunt of them during their frequent sniping at one another.
    • Playing fast and loose with men is one of the reasons Faith is treated as evil, bad and just plain wrong. It is actually principle to her Moral Event Horizon.
    • In the season 8 comics, Dawn's ex-boyfriend Kenny (a thricewise) put a curse on her when he found out she cheated on him with his roommate.
  • Similar to Buffy, Angel punished Cordelia for one-night stands (with two mystical pregnancies, no less). However, characters tended to be more concerned with whether or not someone was having sex with Angel and unleashing his evil alter-ego.
    • In one of the cases, Cordelia suffers a Heroic BSOD over waking up magically pregnant and numbly says that she's "being punished". Wesley insists that she isn't. He and Angel direct their anger over what happened to Cordelia and several other women towards the human men who knowingly made a deal with a demon to knock up unsuspecting women with said demon's spawn.
  • Elsewhere in the Whedonverse, in the episode Shinding of Series/Firefly, Sir Warwick Harrow gallantly comes to Kayleigh's defense when the latter is being snarked at by some rich women... by insulting the ring-leader for her 'easiness':
    Harrow:Why, Banning Miller! What a vision you are in your fine dress. It must have taken a dozen slaves a dozen days to get you into that getup. 'Course, your daddy tells me it takes the space of a schoolboy's wink to get you out of it again.
  • As the most active member of the team, the eponymous Castle is the only one who really could be shamed, and his partner, Kate Beckett, is usually happy to do so. She's also more than willing to shame any suspects of the week she disapproves of.
  • Chuck's Sarah Walker frequently uses her body to get information, get past guards, and so on. This makes Chuck (entirely smitten) jealous and uncomfortable, and he occasionally attacks her for it.
  • Inverted by Community's Annie Edison. During the school's sexuality fair, it's revealed she's never seen a penis and everyone tries their best to make her comfortable about the word and the object, but she's proud to be uncomfortable about, thank you!
    • It's also gender-inverted on Community by Jeff and Britta. Both of them are shown to be quite promiscuous, but Jeff is more shamed for this than Britta. note  Britta is sometimes judged by the extremely Christian Shirley and extremely sexist Pierce, but the rest of the study group are non-judgemental about it.
    • In season 3, Pierce and Shirley use Britta's "free spirit" as part of a Batman Gambit to get the humanized Subway out of their school. They subtly tell Britta to fuck Subway every which way because she is a "liberal minded person" and comment constantly on her promiscuity.
    • Furthermore there is a Running Gag in season 3 where Pierce continuously implies Britta is a prostitute.
  • Doc Martin: After the surprise pregnancy, both Ellingham and Louisa get some guff. He for not doing the right thing and marrying her, her for having had sex and being Defiled Forever. Her pregnancy cost her a job in London, and the town pharmacist is snippy about it due to her own crush on Ellingham.
  • The first season of Dollhouse gives us the anonymous client "Miss Lonelyheart", an octogenarian who frequently contracts the use of the doll Victor, and who is mocked by the staff of the house for it. It turns out the octogenarian is a decoy and the real client is Adele.
  • Downton Abbey's first season shows a young lady of the upper class having a disastrous one night stand (he dies in the act). Her mother is shocked and disgusted, and her reputation suffers immeasurably when the rumor spreads to London. Everyone involved, including the young woman herself, treats it as though she had willingly seduced the man, although from the point of view of a modern audience she offered only Questionable Consent at best and was sexually assaulted at worst.
    • Subverted when she finally tells Matthew. While he's shaken at first, he tells her he doesn't forgive her, because he doesn't believe she did anything wrong.
    • Its second season gives us Ethel, a new maid brought in during the war, as Downton is converted into an adjunct of the hospital to help with injured, convalescing veterans. Ethel loves a man in uniform, literally. She's caught in the act by the head housemaid, and is sacked without notice and without references. When she winds up pregnant, the same head is sympathetic, and still helps as much as she can, even trying to shame the officer who got her pregnant (and who rebuffs the attempt).
    • In the fourth season, Edith fears this happening to her if she keeps her illegitimate baby (which was conceived with a man she loves and would be married to, if not for a legal issue he was in the process off working out when he disappeared). Her aunt tries to talk her out of an abortion on the grounds that Edith seems unable to cope with it and that it would be potentially dangerous to her health. In the end, Edith keeps the baby, but decides to have it secretly raised by a worker on the estate, who owes the family a favor.
  • The pilot to Friends gives us Monica sleeping with a man on the first date. The show didn't make too much hay of it, but the executives were worried the public would blame her, so the producers polled the live audience. However Phoebe wasn't made to feel bad for her sexual activity. Joey was given was only given a hard time for his rampant womanizing when he mistreated women.
  • How I Met Your Mother plays this straight, inverts it, and averts it.
    • Barney is a serial-user man-whore, and his friends tend to treat him as weird more often than heroic.
      Ted: You should be proud. You should be tested, but you should be proud.
    • When Barney reveals he has slept with 200 women, they're all disgusted by it.
    • Lily is Marshall's My Girl Is a Slut, with the pair of them having an incredibly active sex life, but Marshall makes a huge fuss about the possibility that he wasn't the one to take her virginity. At the same time, part of his problem was that he gave her his, and the revelation that they might not have lost it to each other "rewrites their history."
    • Ted's generally after true love and not one night stands. When he does have one night stands, the response is varied, from treating it as a trivial detail ("The Pineapple Incident"), to heroic ("The Third Wheel"), to despicable ("No Tomorrow").
    • Robin has fewer conquests than Ted, but she's had a one night stand with Mitch, inventor of The Naked Man!. After the gang spends a few minutes admiring Mitch's ingenuity, Marshall says, "I call slut!" Robin spends the majority of the episode trying to justify what she did so she doesn't feel bad, but Marshall ends up taking back the slut comment after Lily successfully uses the Naked Woman on him, showing that he's Not so Above It All.
  • Law & Order and its spin-offs provide a realistic treatment. One of the problems the prosecutions often faces is that while they're trying the defendant, the defense is trying the victim. Once a victim is shown to have had sex with more than one person, it becomes a concern that the jury will assume she deserved murder or rape.
  • Mad Men, thanks to Values Dissonance, has the Double Standard in full effect. The men are free to romp, so long as they're discreet, and other men don't particularly care, but if a woman steps toe over the line, she's torn apart. Peggy Olson gets it particularly bad from her family and her priest for having a baby out of wedlock.
  • Scrubs tended to treat characters badly if they had sex outside of a committed relationship. Men were ostensibly excused if it had been long enough, but they were portrayed (and treated) as somewhat pathetic.
    • Played with in a first season episode where Elliot has a one-night stand with a surgeon who turns out to be a jerk, telling everyone the juicy details and bragging about his conquest. At first she's mortified (and feels betrayed because Turk joins in with a few comments about how nice her butt is), but she ends up deciding that she likes at least being known around the hospital where she was previously invisible to everybody (plus it's so far off from her actual personality that it doesn't bother or shame her much).
    Elliot: (proudly) "I'm Elliot Reed… SLUT!"
    • Often played with from J.D. When catching up with a college friend, he proudly brags about having had sex with a girl "on a pile of coats with dozens of people watching. What a whore!" Or when Jordan tells J.D. and Kim about her abortion:
      Jordan: It was when I was working as a waitress on Nantucket. I was dating this guy named Kevin. He had the most beautiful blue eyes; they were either sky blue, or powder blue, I could never decide which. Anyway, his best friend knocked me up. [Beat] Don't look at me like that; it was my first time.
      J.D.: Oh, we're not judging. [thinking: Whore!]
    • Denise in the eighth season starts sleeping with Derek and calls herself a ho-bag. Ultimately subverted, as Elliot tries to reassure her.
      Denise: I don't know why I keep jumping into bed with him. My confidence is shot from screwing up that spinal tap last week, and then yesterday I misdiagnosed an ectopic pregnancy. I don't know, maybe I wanted to do something I knew I could do right, like bangin' a dude. I'm a giant ho-bag.
      Elliot: No, no you are not. So, is Derek a good guy?
      Denise: Derek? I thought it was Erik.
  • The Midsomer Murders episode "A Sacred Trust" involves some romantic liaisons, including one girl shamed for her involvement with a jock.
  • In the first season of Battlestar Galactica (Reimagined), after having a one night stand with Gaius Baltar, Starbuck gets thoroughly shamed by Apollo. The subtext makes it clear that it's because he's totally in love with her, but it takes the form of attacking her for promiscuity.
  • Lost in Austen: Darcy shames Amanda when he discovers she's previously lived with another man (although he is not aware that she's from the 21st century), emphatically stating that he cannot marry a woman who is "not a maid". Lydia elopes with Bingley rather than Wickham (see Literature below for Pride and Prejudice), but they avoid scandal when they admit nothing sexual happened between them. Jane ultimately annuls her marriage to Collins so she can be with Bingley, but her reputation is so damaged that they move to America. Wickham and the Darcys agree to pretend that Wickham raped Georgiana so she will be saved the shame from having made advances towards him.
  • Cougar Town loves to take the piss out of Lorie for being kinda slutty. The show really, really loves to give Grayson shit. In the third season, Lorie and Ellie get in argument over who's sexier and have to settle it by finding someone they've both slept with. Travis goes through their lists (multiple pages each), finds one person they've both slept with, then calls them both ho's.
  • A rare male example on Glee where Sue shames Will for his interest in Emma while still technically married to his wife.
    • In the episode "Bad Reputation," Emma calls Will out for making out with Shelby and letting April sleep over. "You're a slut Will, you're a slut you're a slut..."
    • While practicing for their duet, Brittany carries Artie to her bed and divests him of his virginity. He breaks up with her the next day because it was less important to her than to him; he thought she was just using him for his voice (to win a competition) and that sex was part of that.
  • On Once Upon a Time, after David and Mary Margaret's affair is revealed to Storybrooke, Mary Margaret is shunned for a couple episodes. She gets the worst of it from Regina, who has a vested interest in making Mary Margaret miserable.
  • Ordinarily, Bones is quite sex positive. However, in the first episode of the fourth season, when a victim's father described her as a very good girl, Bones said, "Not all the time" and showed him a tabloid rag with his daughter (wealthy heiress), topless, on the front page.
    • A few episodes later, she's dating two men at once, one with a purely physical connection, the other purely mental. Booth spends a significant amount of time attacking her for it.
  • Averted and subverted most of the time in The Golden Girls. Blanche Devereaux is an Ethical Slut whose reputation as a man chaser precedes her, though none of her housemates have a genuine problem with it. Despite the amount of slut jokes they make none of them are meant in malice, and are pretty much part of the chemistry between Blanche and her roommates, just as they'll joke about how dumb Rose is, how mannish and Hollywood Dateless Dorothy is, and how old and mean Sophia is. Blanche is actually very proud of her promiscuity and holds herself to the standard that she will never be a mistress and she always practices safe sex.
    • The one time this was played straight was in an early season episode "The Triangle". Dorothy's boyfriend made a pass at Blanche, and when she told Dorothy, Dorothy believed her boyfriend over Blanche. Dorothy believed Blanche was just jealous since Blanche is usually the one who gets the man, and in anger called her a slut. This also happens when Dorothy thinks Blanche is sleeping with Stan (Dorothy's ex-husband) and doesn't believe Blanche when she says that she isn't.
    • Also played straight in an episode where Rose's daughter, Bridget, and Dorothy's son, Micheal, have a one-night stand. Though Dorothy's anger and embarrassment is first directed at her son, she goes on to blame Bridget for the incident. Rose doesn't react much better, bemoaning that her daughter's first time was a meaningless fling and then shutting down further when told that it wasn't Bridget's first time at all. She also responds in kind to Dorothy, suggesting that Micheal was to blame. It takes all episode for everyone to come to terms with the fact that these are two grown adults who made the decision to have sex together. See the page quote.
    • In another moment involving Blanche, she's photographed leaving a political candidate's home late at night. She explains to the girls that she only spent a couple of hours talking with him, but at a press conference he flat out says he had an affair with Blanche. None of the girls believe Blanche because of her tendencies, and are mad at her for potentially ruining the guy's career. They finally believe her when the guy admitted he lied, and that he's a post-op transsexual.
  • A first season episode of Psych has Shawn and Gus acting as legal consultants to a murder trial, for the defense. As the defendant had sex with the victim the night of the murder, the prosecution and media attack her for that. As he slept around a lotnote , the defense ends up attacking him for that.
  • One episode of Have I Got News for You had Guest Host Alexander Armstrong call an MP "a bit of a shagger" and a Femme Fatale Russian spy "a bit of a slag". The rest of the panel was quick to call him out on this.
  • In the first episode of Sherlock, Holmes uses his Sherlock Scan to humiliate Donovan and Anderson by blatantly stating that they were sleeping with each other. In this case, the fact that Anderson was married was the main source of shame.
  • A rare male example that isn't Played for Laughs occurs in Boy Meets World. A girl goes out with Shawn and spends the entire evening making out with him before blowing off his offer of a second date. The next day, she goes out with Cory and doesn't kiss him once, but asks to see him again, as she wants to take things slow and be serious. When Shawn questions her on this, she bluntly tells him that she might actually consider Cory as a potential boyfriend because he's a "nice boy", whereas Shawn is only good for casual fun and only gets dates from so many girls because he's good-looking and has a reputation for being easy.
  • In the second season of Scandal, Pope's team are investigating a missing girl and as soon as it becomes clear that she was the anonymous blogger outing the sexual prowess (or lack thereof) of various members of the DC power elite, one declares, "Oh boy; let the slut-shaming begin." As far as some news outlets are concerned, this isn't a missing girl, but a missing whore.
  • This is what most of the jokes about Laurie Foreman boil down to on That '70s Show. If she acts mean or nasty to her brother Eric or anyone else, they'll retort with a joke about how's she a whore. Because apparently her nastiness and her tendencies to sleep around are one and the same.
  • The George Lopez Show: Carmen gets this after a boy tells everyone he had sex with her. The bullying (from the girls) and sexual harassment (from the guys) gets so bad that her parents have to pull her out and enroll her in a private school.
  • Grey's Anatomy:
    • After Derek hears about Meredith having slept with George and dating Finn, he tells her she should hook up with Alex since he also likes to sleep around. Her response? She delivers her "You Don't Get To Call Me a Whore" speech.
    • A patient who hears about Derek's affair with Meredith starts acting like a jerk to her. Derek's wife Addison tells her to stop and that Meredith didn't do anything wrong.
    • Izzie also gets this when Alex finds out that she used to be a lingerie model. Izzie refuses to feel ashamed about it, saying it helped get her through med school and she was the only intern there who wasn't in financial debt because of it.
    • Alex sleeping with his interns and having only one night stands in season 9 is treated as proof that he hasn't grown up since everyone else is settling down.
    • April does this to herself in season 9. After losing her virginity before marriage, she feels extremely guilty and like she's a bad person, even though everyone else tells her that's not the case.
      • Of course, the real reason for her guilt is because she enjoyed it so much.
  • Surprisingly, given that the show's main character is a succubus, Lost Girl didn't deal with any slut-shaming, meta- or in the show, until near the end of the first season, when the monster of the week was one that fed off sexual shame and drove its victims to suicide after covering their homes with graffiti like "SLUT", "DIRTY WHORE", and "SKANK". This bad guy's species is the natural enemy of succubi.
  • Greg House, M.D., oh my god. In the early seasons, he won't shut up with harassing any woman who shows even a mild sign of being attractive, for being attractive, bouncing back and forth between calling it unprofessional and just sexually assaulting them with words.
    • In the sixth season, a patient of the week is a porn star, as is his wife, and he's quite proud of his job. Cameron spends the entire episode attacking him for it, and even compares him negatively to someone who committed murder... because the murderer feels bad about it.
  • An episode of Supernatural starts with this. A cheerleader is shamed during lunch at school for sleeping with a guy and even for her choice of position (after all, only a slut faces away from the guy during sex). It's never revealed if the rumors are true or not, but it does cause her to lash out at a random nerdy girl and subsequently get beat by the girl (possessed by a vengeful spirit) to death in the bathroom.

    Music 

    Theatre 
  • Goethe's Faust gives details of the slut shaming costumes of rural Germany at that period. The bride's bridal garland being ripped from her head and stamped underfoot by the village boys, the "slut" having to sit in a particular pew in church and so on. Nothing was done to the man, of course.
  • In the stage production of Les Misérables, the song "At the End of the Day" ends with the factory workers and foreman condemning Fantine for being a "whore" for having Cosette out of wedlock. Given that Fantine had retaliated earlier by saying that she's not the only worker with a sexually clean history and given that she's been refusing the foreman's advances, more than a little of the accusations are them just trying to get rid of her out of spite.
    Workers: While we're earning our daily bread/ She's the one with her hands in the butter!/ You must send the slut away/ Or we're all gonna end in the gutter!/ It's us who'll have to pay/ At the end of the day.
    Foreman: I might have known the bitch could bite/ I might have known the cat had claws/ I might have guessed your little secret./ Ah yes, the virtuous Fantine/ Who keeps herself so pure and clean/ You'd be the cause, I have no doubt/ Of any trouble hereabout/ You play a virgin in the light/ But need no urgin' in the night!
  • Grease has a song about this, "There Are Worse Things I Could Do". After Rizzo has a pregnancy scare, everyone starts gossiping about her.
    "There are worse things I could do/Than go with a boy or two/Even though the neighborhood/Thinks I'm trashy and no good".

    Religion and Mythology 
  • Subverted somewhat in The Bible. While it doesn't think highly of sex outside of marriage ("No adultery" is one of the Ten Commandments, for starters), it treats adulterers as people instead of dirty whores; with A) Jesus big on redemption and atonement, not punishment, and B) shamers being reminded that their sins aren't any better than those of the shame-ee.
    • The Pharisees bring an adulteress before Jesus and ask what he thinks should be done with her. According to traditional law, she should be stoned to death. Jesus said to the crowd "Let he who is without sin cast the first stone." When everyone in the crowd realized they were sinners, they all left. Jesus then told the woman Go and Sin No More.
      • Some have claimed that Jesus was actually calling them out on the Double Standard- under the Mosaic Law, both adulterer and adulteress should both be put to death- but where was the man?
    • A similar story appears in Genesis—Judah condemns his widowed daughter-in-law, Tamar, to death for getting pregnant out of wedlock. It turns out the conception was when Tamar dressed as a prostitute and slept with Judah, who was trying to weasel his way out of a levirate marriage. When Tamar reveals this, Judah admits that she is more righteous than him; they don't become a couple, but the twins she gives birth to become Judah's heirs.
    • As with the above Jesus example, there was another incident with a woman at a well who gave Jesus water. Jesus asked her to draw a cup for him and she tried to refuse the request for being both a Samaritan and an adultress (an adultress at the time could mean a number of things). Jesus knew this and didn't mind either one.
  • After the dice game in the Mahabharata, Karna calls Draupadi a slut for having five husbands (even though, as stated earlier in the narrative, she is not the first woman to do so...and men were permitted to take multiple wives, mistresses, and concubines), and uses her "sluttiness" as justification for why she should submit to his and Duryodhana's sexual advances in front of his court. Later, she tells Krishna what went down, and he says he'll make it right, that no woman (especially one as pious as Draupadi) should be treated that way.
  • In "Sorli's Tale", Freyja, who in this tale is Odin's concubine, sleeps with four dwarfs in exchange for a necklace. Odin makes Loki steal the necklace and when Freyja goes to Odin to get it back, he calls her out for her bargain. Meanwhile, our knowledge of Norse Mythology suggests Odin is simultaneously married to Frigg and had plenty of extramarital affairs even besides Freyja.
    • Subverted in the older Lokasenna, where Loki attempts to slut shame Freyja, only for her father Njord to defend her by saying that there is nothing wrong with a married woman having a lover. Said adultery is about Freyja sleeping with Freyr.

    Professional Wrestling 
  • While commentators like Jerry "the King" Lawler and Tazz get to drool over the Divas/Knockouts and beg them to get their "puppies" or "pigeons" out (being euphemisms for breasts), it's a guarantee that if the ladies in question actually did so, they would be considered sluts.
  • Furthermore, wrestling is a form of media in which women whose only crime is being a heel (as in less likeable than the face, for any reason) can loudly and incessantly chanted at with calls of "SLUT" or "SHE'S A CRACK WHORE". Mostly, the heels will do something to "earn" slut chants but not always.
  • While not a crack whore, TNA, perhaps because it has been chanted before, introduced Claire Lynch, a drunken crackhead falsely claiming that AJ Styles was the father of her child, which is about as close as one can get without actually being.
  • On the August 8th edition of Sunday Night Heat, Ivory attacked Tori from behind and wrote "Slut" on her back as punishment for Tori having previously posed in body body paint instead of clothing. Trish Stratus would later imitate this on Monday Night Raw, spray painting "Slut" on Christy Hemme's back after Christy posed for Playboy magazine.
  • Trish Stratus was used as a play thing that Vince McMahon eventually discarded, causing her to rebel against him. Molly Holly and Victoria would hold this against her long after the fact, insisting Trish had slept her way to the top.
  • Eve Torres kind of earned her Hoe-ski chants by trying to cheat on Zack Ryder. The only problem here might be that the chants persisted long after that storyline had faded from relevance.
  • Stephanie McMahon was frequently referred to as a slut but only after she turned on her father and sided with Triple H (with whom Vince had been feuding) and took control of his company. She never did anything remotely whorish though so it's more of a case of fans not knowing what other insult to chant at her ("Gold Digger" and "Manipulator" not exactly being easy for wrestling crowds to chant).note 
  • Trish Stratus got showered with chants of "slut" after she turned on Chris Jericho, an admitted arrogant ass but one who genuinely liked and defended her, for Christian, who physically assaulted her for eventually returning Jericho's affections and then bragging to Jericho about how she slept with Christian while planning Jericho's downfall. Trish would go on to hypocritically tease Lita for sleeping and getting impregnated by Kane in an effort to defend Matt Hardy from him.
  • Unfortunately for Lita her run as a "slut" came across as legit Slut Shaming in real life. Behind the scenes she had cheated on boyfriend Matt Hardy with Edge and fans became aware of this and began to chant insults at her on TV so the writers used it as a storyline to turn her heel. The unfortunate part (in story) came where she turned on her husband - who was only her husband because he had scared her into sleeping with him.
  • AJ Lee managed to completely avoid this, and it was epic. After being dumped by Daniel Bryan, she snapped and turned her attentions to CM Punk and Kane, as well as continuing to flirt with Daniel Bryan. It was quite clear she was manipulating them for her own desires and she ended up getting the job as Raw General Manager.
    • She also had a brief dalliance with John Cena and is now (April 2013) with Dolph Ziggler, and has been for several months. Interestingly, though some fans and the commentators like to slut-shame AJ and call her names, her current and past love interest(s) are reluctant to do so — even Daniel Bryan, the ex with the biggest beef with AJ, is catty about her choice of romantic partner, not her having pursued those romantic partners. Her current boyfriend, Dolph Ziggler, is completely unperturbed about her romantic history and is very proud to be with AJ. Only CM Punk threw their relationship back in her face. Of course, on commentary Lawler just can't stop harping on the fact that she (gasp) has had several boyfriends.
  • During feud between Shawn Michaels and the British Bulldog, the later's wife was hitting on Shawn Michaels to make him look bad, which lead to Jim Cornette accusing Shawn Michaels of being a fornicator who was trying to make Diana break her marital vows. So, this wasn't an example on screen but off screen, Stu Hart did not like how it made Diana look, making it this trope retroactively.
  • While working at the IWA Mid-South ticket booth, Mickie Knuckles was constantly harassed by then IWA World Champion Jimmy Jacobs, who at one point held up challenger Delirious after putting him in a sleeper hold and screamed "You want this Mickie? You want this you slut!"
  • Strange case in Ring of Honor, where Steve Corino brags that Matt Hardy has slept with way more women than "our" hero, CM Punk. Thing is, "CM Pussy" and "CM Hump" were not chanted at Punk in congratulation, so this comment did absolutely nothing to endear anyone to Hardy.

    Video Games 
  • Assassin's Creed II provides us with an example of shaming by legislation. The extra, in-game index describes how courtesans (by that time, a word meaning, essentially, "whores") were by law more and more circumscribed and sharply defined in dress and hairstyle in an effort to eliminate their profession from polite society.
    • Revelation gives us yet another example. A senator complains that his organization has been demoted to useless functions, like legislating the length of women's sleeves (a real thing). The heralds also make announcements about that same recent legislation. Wearing their sleeves too short was a punishable offense for women.
  • The criminal inmates of Batman: Arkham City are slightly misogynistic to the same degree they're also trying to slightly hurt Batman's feelings. There are a lot of taunts thrown at Harley and Catwoman.
  • During Miranda Lawson's loyalty mission in Mass Effect 2.
    Captain Enyala: I was just waiting for you to finish getting dressed. Or does Cerberus really let you whore around in that outfit?
    • Engineers Kenneth Donnelly and Gabriella Donnelly
    Gabriella: I've got green across the board. The forward tanks are bouyant and elevated.
    Kenneth: Are you talking about the Normandy, or Miranda?
    Gabriella: I'm talking about the one that's covered and protected, not bouncing in the breeze.
  • Some Fire Emblem fans don't like Tharja for many valid reasons, but one of the more minor reasons tend to be her outfit. Tharja herself, however, is mortified when she realizes how revealing her outfit is, which makes the choice of clothing sound less about any conscious choice on her part and more about catering to the Male Gaze.

    Web Original 
  • The Nostalgia Critic and The Nostalgia Chick use "slut" and "whore" freely to describe anyone they don't like, but they've both admitted to enjoying being slutty themselves. More to the point, they both have a very dim view on shaming women for having for having sex or enjoying it.
    • In the Critic's case, his doing this less as time goes on is very likely a result of his actor getting rape and death threats for invoking Female Gaze on himself so much.
    • In-universe, Critic gets some from Douchey. First he's just called a whore, but then he's called a “war whore”, an insult for a woman who cheats while her husband is away fighting.
    • The Nostalgia Chick criticizes Moulin Rouge! for this.
    • The Brows Held High review of The Girlfriend Experience was removed because Kyle was accused of this, given he frequently mocks the background of Sasha Grey and her too-sexual-for-its-own-good character.
  • This joke.
  • In the second season of The Guild, Codex is interested in a hot stuntman neighbor and dresses up (showing cleavage) to get his interest when Vork shows up out of the blue and asks "Why are you dressed like a harlot?" Then he invades her home and peruses her belonging before randomly turning to her and saying "Cover yourself, woman."
    • At the end of the third season, Codex and Fawkes have sex and she discusses it with the guild at the opening of the fourth. In addition to yelling at her for sleeping with the enemy, they call her a slut and attack her for doing so after one date. Then, when he makes it clear it was a one time thing, she starts calling herself a slut.
  • Inverted to hell in Six Billion Secrets; any secret that features a proud female virgin will sure as hell elicit at least 50 "angry" essays within the comment section.
  • Angela and Esmeralda on The War Comms do this like breathing, which has gotten them more than a few punches to the face.

    Webcomics 
  • Inverted in Questionable Content, after Faye sleeps with her boss's brother, Sven. She immediately begins to freak out, but is reassured by her therapist that she's not a slut, and that a casual sexual relationship can be healthy, and is perhaps exactly what she needs at that point.
  • Magick Chicks: Invoked by name when Faith, calls Tiffany out on it. Also counts as a mild What the Hell, Hero? moment, since Tiffany is the school's resident superhero. However, Faith did say she'd stop seeing other girls if Tiffany asked her to; assuming, of course, that Tiffany was consenting to go steady with her.
  • In-Universe example: Kankri from Homestuck at one point criticises Porrim for sleeping around. She is not pleased. As Kankri is intended to be an example of the worst forms of social justice while Porrim is the opposite, the readers are definitely expected to side with her.
  • Oglaf parodies this a few different ways. Once is with a city full of virgins terrified of sluts, who don't know what sluts or sex are. Another is with a misogynistic smith who gives a man stereotypical lady armor for not being "manly" enough, with the word "SLUT" emblazoned across the chestnote . A third is the garden of Eden, with God actually being okay with the apple thing, but telling them they have to cover up the tits. No... just the lady tits.
  • In Sin Fest, Seymore gives a scathing comment to Monique for dressing provocatively. Later, Xanthe does too, indicating her dress is the work of the Patriarchy. Since the Sisterhood arc, pretty much any expression of male sexuality is literally demonized to the point where the porn industry is an extension of the devil himself.

    Western Animation 
  • Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated had the puritan "ghost" of Hebediah Grimm, who attacked women with a giant mallet for their "painted faces, exposed necklines, and skirts that rise above the ankle!" It turned out Hebediah was being played by two teens who would "rescue" his victims, who they found hot for exactly the reasons Hebediah was attacking. This is probably why Velma was spared, despite her short skirt, with Grimm calling her a homely "model of purity."
  • Adventure Time got away with it in "Sky Witch", with Princess Bubblegum reassuring Marceline The Vampire Queen that Raggedy Princess could be her new cuddly toy, and that she'd be happy to do it as "she's got zero self-respect".


Sliding Scale of Gender InequalityGender and Sexuality TropesThe Smurfette Principle
Shapeshifter Guilt TripIndex Of ShameSudden Humility
Sensible Heroes, Skimpy VillainsWomen Are DelicateSomeone to Remember Him By
Sleeps with Everyone but YouSex TropesSmells Sexy
Slobs Versus SnobsThe Only Righteous Index of FanaticsStay in the Kitchen
Spot MonkeyProfessional WrestlingTag Team
Slipping a MickeyAdministrivia/No Real Life Examples, Please!Something Else Also Rises

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