Characters / Harry Potter – Hogwarts Teachers

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Heads of houses

    Albus Dumbledore 

    Severus Snape 

    Minerva McGonagall 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/minerva_mcgonagall.png
"What? Do nothing? Offer him up as bait? Potter is a boy! Not a piece of meat!"
Portrayed by: Dame Maggie Smith, Sandy McDade (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, first West End run), TBD (Cursed Child, first Broadway run)

"We teachers are rather good at magic, you know."

Professor of Transfiguration, Deputy Headmistress, and Head of Gryffindor House. She is the third professor Harry encounters (after Hagrid and Quirrell), and he promptly decides that she is someone "not to be crossed." He's right. Stern but fair, McGonagall is protective of her students and really dislikes it when Snape wins the Quidditch Cup from under her nose. Though she takes no crap from anyone, she does have a sense of humor.

She is Dumbledore's right hand, deputy leader of the Order, and a powerful witch in her own right, and she is probably the teacher Harry trusts the most. Her Animagus form is that of a tabby cat with spectacle markings around her eyes, reminiscent of her glasses. She has a fondness for tartan and Ginger Newts. If she walks into a scene and is startled, expect her to drop the stack of books she is always carrying.
  • Adults Are Useless: Subverted during the final book, where she's shown to be thoroughly competent when it comes down to it. She and the other teachers ready various defenses in preparation for Voldemort's siege, and she, Slughorn, and Flitwick together duel Voldemort to a standstill. In the films, she is able to thoroughly batter Snape, and the collateral damage of her attack takes out the Carrows.
  • Age Lift: This ended up being the case for her portrayal in the films. Though she acts very stern and grandmotherly, her age at the start of the series is 56, which isn't actually all that old (much less for a powerful witch like herself). Maggie Smith was in her late sixties when filming started on Philosopher's Stone, and as such McGonagall looks like she's about seventy.
  • Alliterative Name: Minerva McGonagall.
    Minerva: I always wanted to use that spell!
  • Animorphism: She is an Animagus, a witch who has mastered the ability to transform into an animal (in her case, a cat) through strenuous study of magic.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: And there is a lot of asskicking.
  • "Awesome McCool" Name: Shares a name with the Roman goddess of wisdom and warfare, and there isn't a single scene in the series where she appears the least bit unworthy of it.
  • Badass Boast: "We teachers are rather good at magic, you know." This was her nonchalant response when asked if it was possible to secure the school against Voldemort. Yes, you read that right; that response was against VOLDEMORT.
  • Badass Bookworm: Smart enough to prove her knowledge to the Ravenclaw Dormitory door (who only lets you in if you answer a knowledge quiz correctly), and able to hold her own against Lord Voldemort.
  • Badass Teacher: Unquestionably one of the biggest in the series. Madame Pomfrey confirms it, saying that four Aurors would have had no chance in hell of striking McGonagall if they hadn't attacked her without warning in a theoretically noncombat situation.
  • Berserk Button: Don't be a Dirty Coward. She will not stand for cowardly behavior. After all, she's the head of Gryffindor House. And God help you if you threaten or harm any of her students. However, the biggest berserk button of the lot is this: Do not be Dolores Umbridge.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: While Dumbledore takes top spot on the "list of things you do not fuck with if you wish to live", McGonagall easily takes second place.
  • Big Good: She serves as this at Hogwarts in Dumbledore's absence: she protects the students from the sadistic Carrows, overthrows Snape, and leads the resistance against Voldemort when Harry returns.
  • Big "NO!": Her reaction to Harry's Disney Death in Deathly Hallows.
  • Big Sister Instinct: Minerva held a deep love for her two brothers.
  • Birds of a Feather: Besides Harry, McGonagall almost immediately takes a liking towards Hermione due to their similarities (intelligent, rule-abiding, logical).
  • Bothering by the Book: In the fifth book, she shows a side of this when Umbridge takes over, as it becomes her mission to torment Umbridge as much as possible. When one of the Weasley Twins' firecrackers disrupts her class, she lets it do its thing while having one of her students request Umbridge do the removal, similar to Flitwick.
  • Bring It: McGonagall gives Snape a silent one of these when she fights him, by doing just that.
  • Career Versus Man: Pottermore reveals she turned down a proposal from her Muggle love in favor of a job at the Ministry that she ended up unhappy with. She might have chosen him, but she feared he would not take kindly to learning she was a witch.
  • Cats Are Magic: She is a skilled and accomplished witch who can transform into a cat.
  • Cold Ham: Manages to be the center of attention while staying calm and collected.
  • Cool Teacher: She's a strict taskmaster but a warm and loving teacher who will put her life on the line to defend her students, especially those in her own house. This is particularly prominent in the fifth and seventh book.
  • Daddy's Girl: According to Pottermore, she was very close to her Muggle father.
  • Deadpan Snarker:
    • She implies that a coward, a fraud, a werewolf and a wizard Nazi are all more competent than Umbridge.
      "I should have made my meaning plainer," said Professor McGonagall, turning at last to look at Umbridge directly in the eyes. "He has achieved high marks in all Defense Against the Dark Arts tests set by a competent teacher."
    • She mocks a prophesy of Harry's death in monotone:
    "You look in excellent health to me, Potter, so you will excuse me if I don't let you off homework today. I assure you that if you die, you need not hand it in."
  • Do Wrong, Right:
    • Her first major moment in Order consists of Harry being sent to her for some kind of punishment, and her cautioning Harry to be careful how he subverts her authority.
    • In moments of dire need, she will approve of rule breaking. Most notable is telling Peeves the chandelier he is trying to drop unscrews the other way.
    • Also, the way Jim Dale reads the audio book implies that rather than "steal" her walking stick, Peeves came up to her and told her exactly what he intended to do with it and that she gave it to him freely.
  • Foil: The Sorting Hat had difficulty sorting her and Flitwick in the same way; both were toss-ups between Gryffindor and Ravenclaw.
  • Hidden Depths: Who would have expected stern Professor McGonagall to be so into Quidditch? Pottermore reveals that she received a bad Quidditch injury in her final year at school which left her with a life long desire to see Slytherin crushed! Thankfully, she gets to see this happen on several occasions. When Harry's team finally breaking Slytherin's winning streak in the third book, she's seen drying her eyes on a large Gryffindor flag.
  • Honest Advisor: She's never afraid to criticize Dumbledore, and he values her for it.
  • Hypocritical Heartwarming: Despite openly questioning Professor Trelawney's competence in front of the students, she is the first to comfort the erstwhile Divination teacher upon her dismissal at the hands of Dolores Umbridge.
  • I Always Wanted to Say That: A variation in the final movie. After summoning an army of stone statues and ordering them to protect the school she looks pleased with herself — indeed, almost reminiscent of Hermione after getting to use a particularly cool bit of magic — and notes that she's "always wanted to use that spell."
  • I Was Quite a Looker: While there are very few drawn pictures of McGonagall throughout the series, Pottermore provides a look at her during her Quidditch days and wow.
  • Iron Lady: Most definitely. Though she does have rare emotional moments.
  • The Lost Lenore: That tends to happen when you marry someone much older than yourself. She keeps her chin up though.
  • The Maiden Name Debate: She kept her maiden name out of respect for her Muggle father. Considering that he was Muggle and her mother was a pure-blooded witch, this was met with some derision in the magical community.
  • Mama Bear: She will fight to the death to defend any one of her students, especially Harry, Ron, or Hermione.
    • Lampshaded especially in the fourth book, when fake Moody confronts Harry. After fake Moody's been stunned into unconsciousness, Snape and Dumbledore are all over him, but McGonagall goes straight to Harry to make sure he's okay. When he isn't, she even argues with Dumbledore in order to send Harry to the hospital wing.
    • She even shows shades of this towards Malfoy when she tells off fake Moody for turning him into a ferret as a punishment.
  • May–December Romance: Her late husband, Elphinstone Urquart, was much older than her. This did not matter one infinitesimal jot to either of them.
  • Meaningful Name: In Roman mythology, Minerva is the goddess of wisdom, strength, and skill. Now why does this sound familiar, again? Her surname is taken from Giftedly Bad poet William McGonagall, apparently only because Rowling found the idea of someone as brilliant as Minerva being a distant relative of someone as talentless as William to be amusing.
  • Minored In Ass Kicking: Though it may not be expected, McGonagall holds her own in every battle at Hogwarts. Most notably, attacking a guy with a fire-lasso and a swarm of knives in Deathly Hallows. She also has an army of galloping desks.
  • Morphic Resonance: Her Animagus form is a cat with square-shaped markings around its eyes, exactly like the glasses she always wears.
  • My Greatest Failure: It's implied that she deeply regrets not listening to The Trio when they attempted to warn her about the Philosopher's Stone's attempted theft in their first year.
  • Never Mess with Granny: She is not a woman you want to cross.
  • Not Afraid of You Anymore: Before the final battle in The Movie, she finally says Voldemort's name, telling Flitwick "You may as well use it, he's going to try to kill you either way."
  • Not So Above It All: Hilariously hinted at in Book Five; when people and particularly Peeves start pranking Umbridge, she suddenly displays much more tolerance to breaking the rules. Especially funny when she actually seems to help Peeves pull a prank on Umbridge.
    • The fact that it's implied that Peeves didn't steal her walking stick and that she actually just gave it to him freely when he told her what he wanted it for.
    • During the Christmas break of Harry's first year at Hogwarts, an incredibly drunk Hagrid kisses her on the cheek. To Harry's surprise, rather than being angry at the action she blushes and appears rather girlishly embarrassed.
    • One of her most badass scenes in the movies is when she animates all of Hogwarts' statues at once, rallying them with hue and cry to defend the school and fight Voldemort! She then turns to Molly Weasley, not even disguising her glee, and admits that she's always wanted to try that spell.
  • Not So Stoic: Has an expressive side. In the books, it's most prominently shown when a drunk Hagrid kisses her cheek (and she becomes embarrassed) or anytime Umbridge is involved (where there's a good chance she starts yelling). After the use of "Piertotum Locomotor" in the final film, she looks giddy as a schoolgirl when she remarks that she always wanted to use that spell to Molly Weasley.
  • Number Two: As Deputy Headmistress, she'll follow through on helping Dumbledore with whatever course of action he decides, but not before voicing her objections, improvements, and alternatives to the plan ''du jour''.
  • Old Master: She's old enough to be Harry's grandmother and is one of the most capable, demanding, and intimidating of his magical mentors. She's also one of the few characters able to fight against Voldemort for any length of time; even with help (she was fighting alongside Shacklebolt and Slughorn, both of whom are extremely powerful wizards themselves), the fact that the three don't die in all of five seconds speak worlds of their power.
  • Parental Substitute:
    • One of many to Harry. It says a great deal about their relationship that when, in Deathly Hallows, Harry uses an Unforgivable Curse against Amycus Carrow, all he has to say about it is, "He spat at you." Nobody requires (nor expects) further explanation.
    • Also one to Hermione due to their similar dispositions, and is clearly distressed when she is petrified in the second book.
  • Pet the Dog: Mama Bear nature notwithstanding she's a stern authority figure who doesn't hesitate to severely punish students for infractions. She still has several of these:
    • In The Sorcerer's Stone when she catches Harry flying to save Neville's Remembrall she could have expelled him. Instead she recommended him for a position on the Gryffindor Quidditch team, gifted him with what was at the time one of the finest racing brooms available and told Harry that his father would have been proud of him.
    • Given her strict adherence to rules one might expect her to be angry at Harry for his name appearing from the Goblet of Fire and assume that he had magically fooled the Age Line. Instead she immediately believes him when he insists that he didn't do it, evidently realizes that someone is out to get him and defends him from Snape and Karkaroff's insinuations. It's played up further in the film where she's aghast at Snape's suggestion that they simply let the events unfold to determine the culprit.
    McGonagall: Do nothing? Offer him up as bait? Potter is a boy, not a piece of meat!
    • In Half-Blood Prince Neville is crestfallen that he won't be able to take Transfiguration at the N.E.W.T. level. After conceding that it's only because his grandmother wants him to McGonagall suggests that Augusta Longbottom be more proud of the grandson she has, something that shocks Neville, as McGonagall had never complimented him in such a manner before. She even offers to drop Augusta line reminding her that because she failed her own Charms N.E.W.T. that it isn't a "soft option."
  • Playing Hamlet: If it's not an Age Lift and McGonagall is still supposed to be 46, then 56-63, then this applies to Maggie Smith, who was 66 when filming started on Philosopher's Stone and 76 at the end of Deathly Hallows, Part Two.
  • Prim and Proper Bun: She always has her hair up in a tight bun. It's even slightly lampshaded in Goblet of Fire when several students giggle at her describing the Yule Ball as a "chance to let our hair down."
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: While she's quite strict and doesn't favor Gryffindor with the same devotion that Snape favors Slytherin, she is the one teacher to go to when you need help. She might scold you later, but she'll help whenever you need it.
  • Running Gag: Dropping a stack of books whenever something shocking happens.
  • Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right!: Her resistance to Umbridge in Book Five includes encouraging mutinous, rule-flouting anarchy among the students. In which she participates. "It unscrews the other way," anyone? Usually, she wouldn't approve of sassing a teacher, but when Harry does it to Umbridge, she offers him a biscuit.
  • Star-Crossed Lovers: Her first love was a Muggle named Dougal McGregor. She accepted his eventual proposal, but had to go back on it after considering how her mother's revelation as a witch hurt her father and home life.
  • Stern Teacher: Defeat a troll all by yourselves? 5 points added, after subtracting points for punishment and rewarding points for the impressive act. Caught out of bed in the middle of the night, and then questioning the teacher's punishment? 50-point penalty! Each!
  • Straight Man and Wise Guy: Try as she might to avoid it, every time Lee Jordan did Quidditch commentary she'd hopelessly try to correct his rambling, only to eventually fall into his pace and begin playing the Straight Man to him in something resembling an unintentional comedy routine. This is averted in Prisoner of Azkaban when Malfoy jumps onto Harry's broom; McGonagall flips! She can be seen shaking her fist at Malfoy with her hat now lopsided. When Jordan graduates and the commentating position goes to Luna Lovegood, she falls back into the habit; this time trying to keep Luna on topic while she trails off on Cloud Cuckoolander rants.
  • Tranquil Fury: In Deathly Hallows, she silently counters all of Snape's attacks while firing back with a flurry of magic. Her expression hardly changes.
  • Teen Genius: Had one of her papers published in Transfiguration Monthly while she was still in school.
  • Undying Loyalty: She follows Dumbledore's orders faithfully, although she will not hesitate to question him if she feels he is doing something wrong.
  • Voluntary Shapeshifting: As an Animagus, she can transform into a cat whenever necessary.
  • Witch Classic: Similar to Dumbledore being a Wizard Classic, McGonagall fits this trope, especially in the film version. She was seen on the Quidditch Plaque in Philosopher's Stone, which meant she must've had skill with a broomstick, not to mention she turns into a cat, and her image is never complete without her hat.

    Pomona Sprout 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/pomona_sprout.png
Portrayed by: Miriam Margoyles

"Tentacula. Devil's Snare. And Snargaluff pods...yes, I'd like to see the Death Eaters fighting those."

The short and plump professor of Herbology and Head of Hufflepuff House, Sprout doesn't mind getting dirty when dealing with dangerous plants. Like Flitwick, she is cheerful and fair to her students. Not a member of the Order, but loyal to Dumbledore even through Umbridge's reign and she played a significant role in the Battle of Hogwarts.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: For some strange reason, the GBC games made here a surprisingly good looking redhead.
  • Back for the Finale: Sprout disappeared after the Chamber of Secrets film, but returned for the final part of Deathly Hallows for a few cameos.
  • Badass Teacher: Though not as noticeable as some of the others, she's quick to help Mc Gonagall and Flitwick fight against Snape. She also takes part in the final battle.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Don't mistake her sweetness nor Head of Hufflepuff status for weakness. She can handle tough and dangerous plants without much fuss, and she rebelled against the tyranny of Umbridge and Voldemort before using her knowledge of magical plants in the Battle of Hogwarts.
  • Covered in Mud: She is described as having lots of earth on her clothes and fingernails that would make prim and proper Aunt Petunia faint. Justified, since Herbology is her specialty and she would naturally be around lots of plants and dirt.
  • Fluffy Tamer: Apparently, the only person the Whomping Willow won't attack.
  • Green Thumb: She weaponizes her plants in the Battle of Hogwarts.
  • Meaningful Name: Pomona is a Roman goddess in charge of fruit trees and gardens.
  • The Southpaw: At least, according to her picture there on the right.

    Filius Flitwick 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/filius_flitwick.jpg
"A little extra wisdom never goes amiss, Potter!"
Portrayed by: Warwick Davis

"Now, don't forget that nice wrist movement we've been practicing! Swish and flick, remember, swish and flick. And saying the magic words properly is very important too—never forget Wizard Baruffio, who said 's' instead of 'f' and found himself on the floor with a buffalo on his chest."

The short professor of Charms and Head of Ravenclaw House. A cheerful man who usually stands on a pile of books while addressing his class. Like Sprout, cheerful and fair to his students. Not a member of the Order, but loyal to Dumbledore and a former Duelist. He displayed the former under the rules of both Umbridge and the Carrows and the latter in the Battle of Hogwarts.
  • Alliterative Name: The first letters of his first and last name are "F".
  • Ambiguously Human: He's actually part goblin.
  • Badass Mustache: Film Flitwick sports a 'stache that looks like it came straight out of the early 1900s.
  • Badass Teacher: It's infrequently mentioned that he's a former dueling champion. Come Deathly Hallows, the readers get to see why.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: Prof. Flitwick is one of Hogwarts's nicest teachers. However, he used to be a dueling champion, as several Death Eaters would find out.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: A tiny one; the Gryffindors think he will lead the Dueling Club because of his reputation as an expert fighter. This gets revealed in the Battle of Hogwarts.
  • Early Installment Character-Design Difference: In the movies. Despite being played by the same actor, Flitwick's appearance dramatically changed between the second and third films, from an older-looking, bald and grey-bearded appearance to a much younger one with black hair and mustache (seen above).
  • Face Palm: His reaction when Lockhart tells the students to ask him about Entrancing Enchantments.
  • Foil: The Sorting Hat had difficulty sorting him and Minerva in the same way; both were toss-ups between Gryffindor and Ravenclaw.
  • Funny Background Event: Is treated as this in the book at times. If the trio are having a discussion during his class, count on Flitwick being victimized by someone's spell going awry.
  • Lethal Joke Character: Part of the reason he was a dueling champion. He primarily used Charms, rather than the more usual destructive or offensive spells, and most of his opponents didn't know how to counter his attacks. Carried over into the Battle of Hogwarts, when a number of Death Eaters found that the tiny teacher who runs the school's music program is not someone to be trifled with.
  • Miniature Senior Citizens: Somewhat justified in that he has some goblin ancestry, and goblins are shorter than humans.
  • Nice Guy: An all-around pleasant and amiable fellow.
  • Old Master: He is the expert on charms and is extremely powerful. Case in point is in "Order of the Phoenix" where Umbridge is entirely incapable of removing the swamp Fred and George left behind before they left; once she is no longer in charge, it takes Flitwick less than a minute to remove it.
  • Our Goblins Are Different: J. K. Rowling envisioned him as just a tiny old man, but his appearance in the first two movies made her rationalize he has a dash of goblin ancestry.
  • Pint-Sized Powerhouse: Don't let his small stature fool you. He was a master duelist prior to teaching at Hogwarts, and in Deathly Hallows he personally takes down Antonin Dolohov, arguably one of the most dangerous Death Eaters.
  • Retired Badass: A dueling champion in his youth.

    Horace Slughorn 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/horace_slughorn.jpg
"These are mad times we live in, mad!"
Portrayed by: Jim Broadbent

"Please don't think badly of me when you see it. You have no idea what he was like... even back then."

An old friend of Dumbledore's and, until 1981, the Potions Master and Head of Slytherin House. In 1996, he returned to his post as Potions Master, and in 1997, resumed his post as Head of Slytherin. He runs an informal organization nicknamed the Slug Club, which is an invitation-only club of students whom Slughorn believes will be successful. He's taken a liking to Harry, Hermione and, decades in the past, Tom Riddle.
  • Absent-Minded Professor: He is shown to be a bit of a bumbling old man when not practicing his trademark Slytherin smooth elitism. More pronounced in the films, where he often appears baffled and weak-willed, especially when confronted by assertive people like Harry or Tom Riddle.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: Slughorn is described in the books as being very short and enormously overweight to the point that buttons on his clothes are constantly threatening to pop off. Jim Broadbent is 6"2 and nowhere near as portly as Slughorn is described as being.
  • Ambition Is Evil: Subverted with Horace Slughorn, who's a member of Slytherin. Up to Slughorn's introduction to the series, all Slytherins played this trope straight, so the audience and Harry expect Slughorn to play it straight, too. His ambition comes in the form of favoritism and singling out talented or well-connected students he expects to benefit from in the future. What subverts this ambition being bad is that he's equal-opportunity and doesn't hold much prejudice against other houses or non-pure bloods. He's also nicer and more likable than all other Slytherins, and he is genuinely ashamed of accidentally helping Tom Riddle's rise to power.
    • The level of "favours", he expects back from people are usually along the lines of Quidditch tickets or having an opinion published in the paper, or some sweets - basically, not very harmful stuff.
  • Apathetic Teacher: Only those students who Slughorn prejudges of being of great talent and skill, or having connections, get his undivided attention. Those students who don't might try and work hard and get by ok in his class, but they will never get invited to his parties.
  • Berserk Button: He flips out when Harry asks him about Horcruxes. In part this is because of his regret over telling Tom Riddle about them.
  • Catch-Phrase: "Merlin's beard!"
  • Combat Pragmatist: Left with his students to make sure they escaped Hogsmeade safely, then gathered up enough forces to go back to the castle and guarantee victory.
  • Cool Teacher: For all his favoritism, Slughorn does deliver an impressive first Potions lesson and he can make the course seem fun. Ethically though, he's not a very good teacher.
  • Cowardly Lion: Is utterly terrified of the Death Eaters and Voldemort. He still returns after evacuating the underage Slytherins in the book. In the movie, with the Slytherins sent to their dorms in the dungeons, he helps cast the protective spells over Hogwarts, terrified but determined to protect Hogwarts.
  • Crazy-Prepared: Despite being skilled in the art of Occlumency, Slughorn carries around an antidote for Veritiserum which can be resisted through Occlumency.
  • Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass: He takes on Voldemort in the last book along with McGonagall and Shacklebolt, and all three hold their own. Horace Slughorn fights Voldemort head-on. In his pyjamas. Many characters have commented on his skill, including Dumbledore and it's implied that Voldemort recognizes Slughorn as a powerful wizard.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: Not all Slytherins are evil. Though whether he escapes their reputation of all being assholes may be subject to some debate, as he still plays favorites with his students and singles out those that are famous or well-connected for special treatment. But to give him his due, he doesn't bully or abuse those who fail to catch his attention either, even if he can be a bit dismissive of them.
  • Defector from Decadence: Returns near the end of the Battle of Hogwarts, leading the Slytherins in battle against the Death Eaters and dueling Lord Voldemort. Not bad considering he was too comfortable to move at the start of the last book...
  • Enlightened Self-Interest: As a Nice Guy from Slytherin House, whose Hat is ambition and self-interest, he'll often help people he thinks would have potential to become great so that he will gain some benefit some way or another later (although, he remains a sympathetic figure despite this considering that, as a general rule, he tends to help his proteges more than they help him). This backfired with Tom "Lord Voldemort" Riddle, to whom he provided information on dark magics such as the Horcrux, and he regards it as My Greatest Failure.
  • Informed Ability: Dumbledore refers him as a extremely talented wizard, and Slughorn in fact is one of the three people who personally face Voldemort in the Battle of Hogwarts (and it's implied that they are the three most powerful wizards in the good side, given that the other two are powerhouses like McGonagall and Shacklebolt), but he's never explicitly shown performing any particularly impressive feats of magic aside from his mastery of Potions. Even his supposedly renowned Dark Arts knowledge looks somewhat vague when Riddle questions him about the Horcruxes.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: While hardly a jerk in the true sense of the word, Slughorn's definitely got his moments, including his shock that a Muggle-born would be better at magic than a pureblood and his favoring of certain students over others. Nevertheless, he is overall a decent guy, and he genuinely adores his favored students. Remember that he also happily invited Hermione into his club when he learned about her skills, and that his all time favourite student was Lily Evans, Harry's mother, who was a Muggle-born.
  • Knowledge Broker: Tom Riddle was able to get him to reveal what Horcruxes were with some flattery and a gift of crystallized pineapple, but this went down in his mind as My Greatest Failure.
  • Lovable Coward: He's highly averse to risking life and limb, but his open self-interest and affability keep his cowardice from being galling.
  • The Mentor: A couple of lines from Book 6 and some simple math imply that Slughorn took Snape under his wing during the latter's N.E.W.T. years.
  • My Greatest Failure: Telling Tom Riddle about Horcruxes; both because it casts him in a bad light and because it led to the death of Lily Evans, "one of my all-time favorite students."
  • Noble Bigot: Downplayed. Though he's one of the most sympathetic Slytherins in the series, there are hints that he holds to some aspects of 'blood purity' ideology, such as his assumption that Voldemort must be a pureblood and his surprise at Muggle-born wizards with above-average talent. He doesn't hold it against them, though, and tends to adore them even more in the face of their "minor problem".
  • No Good Deed Goes Unpunished: After he cures Ron from love potion effects, he offers him a drink as a pick-me-up and birthday present, one he was saving for Dumbledore. The mead ends up being poisoned, and Ron nearly dies. Slughorn is horrified and gets help after Harry remembers to use a bezoar.
  • Papa Wolf: In book seven, McGonagall orders him to evacuate all the Slytherins before the final battle. He doesn't argue and gets out as many as he can, except for Malfoy who slips away. Once the students are safe, he returns with an army.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Especially when compared to Snape; unlikely the former Potions master, Slughorn actually cares about teaching his students. Even for the ones that he ignores, he makes sure that they can learn the material, and challenges the ones in his advanced classes. He has no reason to believe Harry is cheating, since Snape was that terrible a teacher and Harry managed an Exceeds Expectations on his OWL. Then in the seventh book, after he evacuates all of the students in his house, he comes back with an army to defend Hogwarts.
  • Redeeming Replacement: Even though he has flaws, he can be considered one for Snape when he takes his place as Potion teacher, at least as far as teaching is concerned. Indeed, he's shown to be far more sympathetic towards his students, doesn't bully them and doesn't give preferential treatment to the students of Slytherin. It's a testament to how bad Snape is, that Slughorn's ethically dodgy approach to teaching seems an improvement. He also ends up being the one professor who tries to do his best to break the House Divisions among Hogwarts.
  • Some of My Best Friends Are X: Makes it a point to bring up his famous Muggleborn students as proof that he is not prejudiced, even while, as Harry put it, "still seeming much too surprised that a Muggle-born should make a good witch.” To his credit, he IS genuinely kind towards Muggleborns who display talent, he simply seems to have a subconscious expectation for purebloods to usually be better.
  • Sweet Tooth: His favorite treat is Crystallized pineapple.
  • Token Good Teammate: He embodies the traits of Slytherin before Voldemort showed up: genuinely ambitious and cunning but not destructively so, and considering blood purity to be little more than a curiosity.
  • Trademark Favorite Food: Crystallized pineapple. To the point where Tom Riddle used it as part of a ploy to flatter him into spilling the secrets of what Horcruxes were.
  • Vicariously Ambitious: He doesn't have any big ambitions for himself, only for his students, and only some of his students, i.e. those with connections, skill, family ties, and those who he thinks might make it.
  • You Are a Credit to Your Race: Harry notes that while Slughorn lacks the overt anti-Muggleborn bigotry of the rest of Slytherin, he still seems a bit too surprised that Lily and later Hermione were such talented witches, and generally frames his view of them in this manner.
  • You Owe Me: Given his habit of taking promising students under his wing and giving them their initial "foot in the door" to high-flying careers, almost every person of note in the Wizarding world owes him a favour. Although Slughorn is too lazy to take advantage of this beyond asking for free concert tickets and sweets.

Other teachers

    Rubeus Hagrid 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rubeus_hagrid.jpg
"I shouldn't have told yeh that..."
Portrayed by: Robbie Coltrane (films), Chris Jarman (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, first West End run), TBD (Cursed Child, first Broadway run)

"I am what I am, an’ I’m not ashamed. ‘Never be ashamed,’ my ol’ dad used ter say, ‘there’s some who’ll hold it against you, but they’re not worth botherin’ with.’ An’ he was right."

The Hogwarts Keeper of Keys, gamekeeper, groundskeeper, Care of Magical Creatures professor and a half-giant as well. Hagrid introduced the wizarding world to Harry, and remains his friend throughout Harry's years at Hogwarts. He also has an unusual affection towards vicious beasts, including Norbert (dragon), Fluffy (three-headed dog), Aragog (acromantula), and Blast-ended Skrewts. Also has a weakness for alcohol.
  • Adaptational Wimp: In the fifth book, he is able to shrug off several spells of nearly half a dozen Aurors, whereas in the seventh film a single spell is enough to render him unconscious.
  • Admiring the Abomination: Which invariably leads him to trying to make it a pet.
  • All Genes Are Co-Dominant: He splits the difference between giant and human in size.
  • Badass Beard: Hagrid sports a wild mane that immediately strikes fear into the well-kept Dursleys' hearts.
  • Badass Biker: For two short periods during the series. It doesn't hurt when the bike in question can shoot dragon flames at enemies and conjure freaking brick walls out of its exhaust pipe.
  • Badass Teacher: Deconstructed Trope; Hagrid's ruggedness and love for dangerous monsters make him ignorant to the fact that his classes terrify his students and do little to educate them about anything practical.
  • Bear Hug: He does this to Harry, Ron, and Hermione frequently.
  • Berserk Button:
  • Beware the Nice Ones: While Hagrid is a lovable chap, don't anger him. If you insult Dumbledore or attacking his friends, he will force you to repent.
    • When Vernon Dursley insults Dumbledore, Hagrid loses it and aims a curse at Dudley, intending to turn him into a pig. It probably doesn't help that Hagrid is described as looking like he could "explode"; remember... Hagrid is HALF-GIANT. Now imagine Hagrid as truly angry. Scary thought, eh?
    • In the fourth book, when Karkaroff, mistakingly believing that Dumbledore arranged an attack on Viktor Krum, spits at Dumbledore's feet, Hagrid promptly flies into a rage, pins Karkaroff to a tree by the neck, and demands that he apologize.
    • Umbridge and four Ministry-trained Aurors found this out the hard way when they tried to ambush him one night. Umbridge, sadly, was the only one who escaped conscious. (Although, in another example of this trope, Hermione made her wish she hadn't.)
  • Because You Were Nice to Me: His undying loyalty to Dumbledore and to a slightly lesser degree McGonagall stems from their respecting and valuing his input, even as gamekeeper.
  • Big Brother Instinct: Hagrid loves his half-brother very much. In The Order of The Phoenix, he brought him to the Forbidden Forest where Grawp can be free in the open air. His one request for the trio was to look after him while Hagrid was away. The scene is even more touching when he says he's the only family Grawp has.
  • Bruiser with a Soft Center: He's more soft spot than bruiser unless you make him mad. Which is not advised.
  • The Cameo: In Cursed Child, he appears in one of Harry's Bad Dreams and again in a time travel scene which shows how he found baby Harry among the rubble of the Potters' house in Godric's Hollow.
  • Cannot Keep a Secret: Trust Hagrid with your business, trust him with your treasures, trust him with your life, heck, trust him with taking care of Harry Freaking Potternote , but for the love of all that is holy, don’t trust him with your secrets. A habit of slipping into Did I Just Say That Out Loud? mixed with being a chatty drunk ensures nothing in his knowledge stays with him alone for long.
    Hagrid: What that dog is guarding is strictly between Professor Dumbledore and Nicolas Flamel.
    Harry: Nicolas Flamel?
    Hagrid: I shouldn't have said that. I should not have said that. I shouldn't have said that.
    • It should be noted, that, with one exception, a lot of what he "shouldn't" have said was actually beneficial. For example, the instance of Nicolas Flamel above led to them finding out that the treasure Fluffy was guarding was in fact the Philosopher's Stone, and once Firenze tells Harry about the properties of unicorn blood, they deduce that the thief's goal is to somehow use the Elixir Of Life to bring back Voldemort.
    • This is notably highlighted in Deathly Hallows. After the Battle of the Seven Potters Fleur suspects Hagrid of letting slip the real date that Harry was being moved to the Burrow, though in this particular instance Hagrid was innocent.
  • The Cloudcuckoolander Was Right: Hermione, Harry and Ron regard his decision to bring Grawp to the forest as his most insane action yet, something which Madame Maxime was reluctant about, and which Firenze notes is doomed. This should have been the one to finally kill him off, yet it turns out that Hagrid was right about his brother after all, and his efforts to teach him English and civilize him, proved to be a big success.
  • Cool Teacher: Inverted. He really wanted to be one and did what he could to succeed. But Draco gets hurt by one of the magical creatures he was showing and after that, his confidence is gone. His class becomes particularly unpopular among Harry's year, even among the Gryffindors, to the point where no sixth year students sign up for his class.
    • It's worth noting that certain lessons demonstrate that Hagrid is capable of being this when he splits the difference between having enough confidence to teach about interesting creatures and stopping short of teaching about flat out dangerous creatures like Blast-Ended Skrewts. Everyone has fun when he teaches everyone about Nifflers and baby unicorns, and even the hippogriff lesson goes well until Malfoy is injured, mostly by Bullying a Dragon.
  • Did I Just Say That Out Loud?: Occurs many times, especially when he's drinking. It even provides the one exception mention above. A disguised Quirrell deliberately gets him drunk before offering him a dragon egg (possibly to get him out of the way when he would inevitably have gotten caught) in exchange for information on how to neutralize Fluffy.
  • Disney Death: He is apparently overwhelmed by acromantulas during the Battle of Hogwarts, but is merely taken prisoner by the Death Eaters.
  • Does Not Know His Own Strength: Played with. He certainly knows his own strength when it comes to doing heavy physical labor or fighting — and he puts it to good use. But the problem comes in when he tries to use normal 'human' signs of affection, like hugs or pats on the shoulder and winds up bruising people or tossing them about.
  • Dogged Nice Guy: The class and cultural divisions between him and Olympe Maxime, despite their status as Half-Giants, prevents any real relationship.
  • Emotional Bruiser: He's perhaps about ten feet tall, can bend metal with his bare hands, and most spells will simply bounce off him. Are you going to tell him it's not manly to cry in public? Didn't think so.
  • Fluffy Tamer: One of the best known examples, and even named one of his pets (a gigantic three-headed dog, to be precise) "Fluffy."
  • Frame-Up: In Book 2, it's revealed that he was expelled, with his wand and magical education permanently prevented from developing, because Tom Riddle framed him for attacks which he had committed. Riddle exploited the fact that he cut a dashing Villain with Good Publicity figure while Hagrid was a half-giant weirdo who got into trouble.
  • Friend to All Living Things: As such, he knows a great deal about various creatures, magical and non-magical. He seems to consider "normal" creatures (as in, anything that isn't a walking death trap) relatively boring, but he loves them just the same.
  • Funetik Aksent: If yeh want ter sound like Hagrid, talk like this, o' course. I shouldnta told ya that.note 
  • Gentle Giant: Hagrid has a heart of gold, and wouldn't hurt a fly. But as noted under Beware the Nice Ones, it isn't wise to anger him.
  • Half-Human Hybrid: Dad was a human wizard, and reportedly a short one; mom was a giantess.
  • Herald: In Philosopher's Stone.
  • I Coulda Been a Contender!: Being expelled by Hogwarts for a crime he didn't commit, framed by the young Voldemort no less, has essentially prevented Hagrid from having any other meaningful job in the wizarding world aside from being Groundskeeper and general Magical Creatures Expert for Dumbledore. Considering his wide knowledge and interest in magical creatures, he probably could have written a book like Newt Scamander or become a giant researcher if he had been given the chance.
  • Intergenerational Friendship: As the younger of the two with Dumbledore, who, in his own words, would trust Hagrid with his life. Heartwarming in Hindsight once you get a bit deeper into Dumbledore's character. He forms a friendship with the Trio, and even seems to have a special bond with Harry's children as of the epilogue.
  • In Vino Veritas: He has a penchant for drink, and at one point accidentally tells Quirrell how to get past Fluffy to get to the Philosopher's Stone.
  • Last-Name Basis: For some reason, nobody ever calls him "Rubeus" regardless of how close they are to him. Even Dumbledore, who's in First-Name Basis with everyone. Even Grawp calls him "Hagger", indicating Hagrid instructed his own brother to call him by his last name.
    • One of the few people who called him by his first name was Mr. Ollivander.
    • The book Chamber of Secrets has Riddle address Hagrid by his given name in the memory he shows Harry of "arresting" him; the movie changes it back to the surname form of address. This case is exceptionally odd, as students are more often than not on a Last-Name Basis with students not in their year and/or House, and what's even more peculiar is that Slytherin students in particular, like Riddle was, almost never use anyone's first name.
  • Lethal Chef: His food is not so much inedible as it is simply unchewable, often described as having the consistency of solid rocks. Well, his stew is enjoyable enough until they find a talon in it.
  • Manchild: He's in his sixties, but the trio have surpassed him in maturity and common sense by the time the third book starts, if not earlier. This doesn't mean that he is beyond saying What the Hell, Hero? on the rare occasions where he's got a more sensible view of things — Harry's suspicion of Snape, or Ron's short-lived estrangement from Hermione over the 'death' of Scabbers, for instance.
  • The Mentor: He is the one who gets Harry himself started on his journey as The Chosen One. He is also the Obi-Wan to Harry's Luke. Except he actually manages to survive.
  • Missing Mom: His mother, a giantess, left him when he was three. Hagrid mentions her death casually, as he hardly even remembers her and didn't consider her a model mother.
  • Morality Pet: Hagrid is the only one Aragog won't eat or let his children eat.
  • Naïve Animal Lover: He is infamous for his love of dangerous creatures, from dragons, to flesh-eating books. Although they really don't harm him (much), his monsters are often a danger to the heroes.
  • Nice Guy: Skewed priorities and slight Berserk Button tendencies aside (even those tend to be fairly harmless), Hagrid is one of the friendliest, most well meaning and honest characters in the whole series.
  • Nightmare Fetishist: Considers dragons, Acromantulas and huge, three-headed dogs to be "cute."
  • No-Sell: Spells have very little effect on him due to his giant blood, since giants are highly resistant to magic.
  • Older Than They Look: Possibly, due to his Giant ancestry. During Harry's first year, he was in his mid-sixties, yet looks like he might be in his thirties and acts a third his age (it's easy to forget that, while you might assume he was a contemporary of the Marauders, or Arthur and Molly Weasley, he actually attended school with Voldemort). The fifth book implies he's looked the same way almost his entire life.
  • Open Mouth, Insert Foot: He's prone to revealing knowledge of things he shouldn't admit to knowing anything about, especially to students like Harry.
    "Ooh, I shouldn'a said tha."
  • Papa Wolf: Towards the children of Hogwarts.
  • Parasol of Pain: His wand, which was snapped when he was expelled, is actually in one piece and hidden in his now magical umbrella.
  • Pietà Plagiarism: At the end of Book 7, Hagrid carries a Not Quite Dead Harry out of the forest in this fashion.
  • Plot Armor: Many readers worried about possibly losing Hagrid over the course of the books. Rowling admits that with his kindness, Hagrid's loss would have been a serious blow to Harry, and would be an obvious choice — however she says that from the beginning she had an image of Hagrid being the one carrying supposedly dead Harry out of the forest in Book 7 that she was writing towards.
  • Politically Incorrect Hero: Hagrid occasionally displays overt prejudice towards Muggles, Squibs, and foreigners. However, this is usually only when he encounters a particularly unpleasant example of one of these groups (i.e. Vernon Dursley, Argus Filch, and Igor Karkaroff) and is angered.
  • Real Men Wear Pink: He's a hulking bruiser who tames monsters and often doesn't know his own strength. He's also prone to tears, baking (admittedly badly), gardening, knitting, sporting flowery aprons, and keeps what remains of his wand in a pink umbrella. JK Rowling said she got the inspiration from overhearing an intimidating burly biker worry about how his petunias weren't doing very well that year.
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story: His offscreen expedition with Madam Maxime to meet the Giants was revealed to be this, something even he laments. The only positive outcome for him was Grawp, rescuing his brother from being picked on by the other Giants.
  • Shoo Out the Clowns: Hagrid was apparently one of these; his role getting smaller throughout the series is due to the series becoming darker. He has a notable role carrying Harry out of the forest in the final chapter of the series, however.
  • Skewed Priorities: Sometimes places the safety and well-being of some of the bloodthirsty monsters he is so fond of above that of other people. In book 4 he frantically tries to instruct his students not to hurt the Blast-Ended Skrewts.
  • Stout Strength: Hagrid's ancestry makes him supernaturally strong and tough. His entire life as an employee of the school is spent doing physically taxing and highly dangerous tasks that other wizards would rather not (his predecessor left "to spend more time with his remaining limbs", according to Dumbledore). This is BEFORE one begins adding in the very dangerous situations he finds himself in as a result of his friendship with Harry. One of his first acts is to casually bend a shotgun barrel single-handed after knocking a barricaded door down. And in the fifth book, he's shown being able to send a full-grown human flying through the air unconscious with a backhand.
  • Tranquil Fury: In the first film Hagrid's voice lowers ominously when Vernon insults Dumbledore in front of him, which makes him seem even more livid than in the book.
  • Undying Loyalty: Hagrid will fight anyone who threatens or disrespects Dumbledore, even if it gets him fired.
  • Unskilled, but Strong: He never finished his schooling as a wizard and is not exactly the clever sort, but makes up for it by being massively strong and resistant to magic due to his Giant heritage. His standard fighting strategy amounts to walking up to whichever poor bastards he's fighting while shrugging off their spells and crushing them with his hands. It's pretty effective. However, there are hints he's a lot stronger with magic than he lets on, as his first two demonstrated uses of magic are done silently and using a snapped wand.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Averted. Hagrid politely gives Ron and Harry some good advice after alienating Hermione in the third book.
  • Wild Hair: The first thing mentioned about him after his size.
  • Would Hurt a Child: While it's staged as a Kick the Son of a Bitch moment, he vents his rage at Vernon Dursley's insulting the name of Albus Dumbledore by attempting to turn Dudley into a pig. The resultant instantaneous growth of a pig's tail causes Dudley to "howl with pain." Dudley is eleven at the time.

    Sybill Patricia Trelawney 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/sybill_trelawney.jpg
"How nice to see you in the physical world at last."
Portrayed by: Emma Thompson

"The Eye does not See upon command!"

The professor of Divination. Trelawney fancies herself a great seer "possessed of the Inner Eye", but is widely regarded by other characters as a fraud who makes up nonsensical prophecies on the spot, particularly because of her habit of predicting death to one student of every new class she teaches. She is able to make the occasional genuine prophecy, though. Lavender Brown and Parvati Patil seem to be the only two students who take her seriously.
  • The Alcoholic: It is apparent in Half-Blood Prince that Trelawney is rapidly descending into alcoholism over her employment problems and dire prophecies.
  • Animal Motifs: When Harry first sees her, his first impression is of a "large, glittering insect" because of all the bangles and beads she wears, as well as her enormous glasses.
  • Badass Boast: After braining Fenrir Greyback with a crystal ball.
    I have more, more for anyone who wants them!
  • Big Damn Heroes: In the book, she bludgeons Greyback with a crystal ball in the final battle to save Lavender Brown's life.
  • Blind Without 'Em: It's somewhat implied in movie 3 that her (physical) sight's actually quite awful.
  • The Cassandra: Well, often not to Dumbledore and occasionally not to Harry. Her mumblings, however, often contain actual predictions of the future that turn out to be true, such as her tarot vision of "the lightning-struck tower" and "calamity" in Book 6. The "lightning" turns out to be the blazing green Dark Mark and the "calamity" Dumbledore's death. Interestingly enough, her (great-?)grandmother's name happens to be Cassandra.
  • Chewing the Scenery: Courtesy of Emma Thompson's delightfully hammy performance.
  • The Chew Toy: She rarely gets through a scene without somebody making a joke at her expense. Even Harry, or rather especially Harry, can't quite help himself.
    Sybill Trelawney: Everything went pitch black and the next thing I knew, I was being hurled headfirst out of the Room!
    Harry Potter: And you didn't see that coming?
    Sybill Trelawney: No, I did not, as I say, it was pitch-[throws him a dirty look].
  • Drowning My Sorrows: She starts drinking a lot of cooking sherry after Umbridge puts her on probation. Implicitly, she seems to have had this habit before, and never quite gets out of it (she's seen with a bottle of cooking sherry and looking quite unstable in Book 6).
  • Fainting Seer: She enters into a trance whenever she makes a genuine prophecy, and doesn't remember it afterwards.
  • Fortune Teller: She deliberately invokes as many related tropes as she can, because she's not too confident in her own abilities.
  • Genius Ditz: She can see the future in her trance and it's hinted that she could foresee without trance but she only sees what she wants to see and being big on drama she tends to interpret everything as disaster.
  • Improbable Weapon User: Crystal balls.
  • Intergenerational Friendship: Implied to have one with Lavender and Parvati, who are the only two students shown as giving her much respect, let alone taking her class seriously. Which makes the blink-and-you-miss-it scene in Deathly Hallows Part II with her and Parvati mourning over Lavender's dead body even more heartbreaking.
  • Lady Drunk: After Umbridge repeatedly humiliates her, she can often be seen with a bottle of sherry. Even after Umbridge leaves Hogwarts it seems she still indulges in it.
  • The Maiden Name Debate: Her brief marriage ended because she refused to take her husband's surname of 'Higgenbottom'.
  • Mama Bear: In Deathly Hallows she saves Lavender Brown from being eaten alive by Fenrir Greyback by smashing his head in with her crystal ball! Poor Lavender wasn't so lucky in the movie though...
  • Not-So-Phony Psychic: The only real prophecies Trelawney has ever made (both of them) happen when she goes into a trance, and thus she can't remember them afterwards. Every prophecy she actually makes on purpose is made up. Of course, if you squint From a Certain Point of View they do come true, although the general underlying interpretation she takes is all wrong.
    • She claimed to be seeing a grim a lot in POA but was really seeing Sirius Black in his animagus form (a large black dog which is what a grim looks like). The problem is that she believed the Grim was a sign of death, and that it meant Harry's days were numbered. In actual fact, Sirius Black is Harry's godfather and innocent all along, and the Grim by the end of the book is someone who Harry goes out of his way to save.
    • Likewise in HBP she idly makes several prophetic comments while attempting to read some tarot cards, but dismisses them due to not recognizing their significance. She warns Dumbledore about being on any towers, and Dumbledore did end up dying on top of the tower, but as Book 7 reveals, Dumbledore planned and arranged his death with Snape all along, well before Trelawney's warning, and Draco's attack on Hogwarts famously did not include any other casualties aside from a man who was Secretly Dying and planned a Thanatos Gambit all along.
  • Prophecies Are Always Right: Subverted, then hilariously doubly subverted when all of her predictions eventually come true — almost never in quite the way she expects or the way anyone else thinks it will turn out anyway, which is in fact the point of the Screw Destiny theme of the series.
    Albus Dumbledore: "The consequences of our actions are always so complicated, so diverse, that predicting the future is a very difficult business indeed...Professor Trelawney, bless her, is living proof of that."
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Being a descendant of a famous seer and herself having some acuity to foreseeing she thinks of herself as an always right prophet. In truth she is really bad at it.
  • Ultimate Job Security: As a Seer, she's got only two accurate predictions under her belt sprinkled among numerous failures including predicting the deaths of a number of very much alive students over the years. As a teacher she's got a similar record. Save for Lavender Brown and Parvati Patil, every single student she teaches doesn't take her seriously and they've been known to make up fake predictions that she can't distinguish from real ones. She is by any reasonable measure terrible at her job. Dumbledore for his part straight up admits to Harry in the later series, that he not only doesn't respect Trelawney, he doesn't respect Divination as a subject and would have axed it from the curriculum if parents didn't keep demanding that Hogwarts teach it, and then when she did make her prediction about the Prophecy, Dumbledore hired her to protect her from Voldemort.
  • The Unfavorite: She is the only one of Hogwarts' staff that Dumbledore himself personally mocks and belittles in front of Harry. Even Snape gets an insistent "Professor Snape, Harry" whenever Harry invokes Last-Name Basis, Dumbledore straight up admits that he considers her a hack and never wanted to hire her to start with. This however does not stop him from treating her courteously and protecting her.

    Quirinus Quirrell 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/quirinus_quirrel.jpg
"Yes, (Snape) does seem the type, doesn't he? Why, next to him, who would suspect p-p-poor, st-st-stuttering Professor Quirrell?"
Portrayed by: Ian Hart

Dumbledore: "Keep an eye on Quirrell for me, won't you?""

The Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher during Harry's first year at Hogwarts (and a Muggle Studies professor prior to that). He initially comes across as unconfident and incompetent, stuttering constantly, but this is a facade: he is a servant of Voldemort, and the host to his spirit.
  • Alliterative Name: Quirinus Quirrell. His first name is never actually mentioned in-series, though.
  • Bald of Evil: Completely bald and in league with Voldemort.
  • Be Careful What You Wish For: According to Pottermore, Quirrell was intentionally seeking out Voldemort during his travels in hopes that he could use his power or at the very least get credit for his discovery.
  • Beware the Quiet Ones: Quirinus Quirrell is the nervous, mostly unnoticed and seemingly innocent character throughout the entire novel. However, at the end it turns out that he has been possessed by Voldemort all along and has been trying to kill Harry all through the book.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: He seems friendly to Harry when they first meet. However, he's been trying to locate the Philosopher's Stone and kill Harry under Voldemort's instruction. In the climax, he practically mocked Harry for thinking that he was harmless and nice.
  • Body Horror: He has Voldemort's face embedded in the back of his skull.
  • The Dog Was the Mastermind: He's set up as probably the least likely person to turn evil, mainly due to his sheer wimpiness.
  • Evil All Along: Seems to be nothing more than a meek, timid, perfectly benevolent teacher throughout the first book ... before the twist, anyway.
  • Evil Teacher: Turns out the timid teacher was working for wizard Hitler.
  • Freudian Excuse: According to Pottermore, Quirrell was teased as a child for his timidness, which factored into his desire to "make the world sit up and notice him".
  • Literally Shattered Lives: In the film, Harry kills him by touching him, causing his body to crumble to dust. This is a step further than in the book, where Quirrel is merely burned by touching Harry and is implied to not have died until Voldemort's spirit left him.
  • Master Actor: Though the true extent to which his nervous wreck persona was an act is somewhat unclear. It could either be his real personality prior to meeting Voldemort, with him foregoing it after the possession but continuing to act the part to avoid rousing suspicion, or it could be a direct consequence of sharing his body with Voldemort, and not entirely an act.
  • Meaningful Name: Quirinus was one of the epithet of Janus, the two-faced roman deity. In the Italian translation he's renamed Raptor which, fittingly enough, can mean "thief".
  • Nervous Wreck: How he usually acts. It's not entirely clear if this was his real personality before meeting Voldemort, a facade to divert suspicion, or a result of Voldemort's possession taking a toll on him. It's likely however that it's a combination of all three.
  • Speak Ill of the Dead: Unsurprising given the characters involved, but both Voldemort and Snape are shown as quite willing to insult Quirrell years after his death, calling him "a fool" and "greedy and unworthy" respectively.
  • Starter Villain: Though alongside Voldemort he's technically the main villain of the first book, he's less of a threat than most of the later series' antagonists.
  • Stutter Stop: Stuttering being used as an obfuscating tactic to deflect suspicion from himself as the culprit behind the nefarious events of the first year.
  • Who's Laughing Now?: According to the backstory on Pottermore, a major part of what drove him to seek out the fugitive Voldemort, though "all" he initially wanted was, if not to be known as the man who finally got him, then to learn such powerful magic from him to ensure "he was never laughed at again". In practice: Didn't go that way.

    Gilderoy Lockhart 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/gilderoy_lockhart.jpg
"Big smile, Harry. Together you and I make the front page!"
Portrayed by: Kenneth Branagh

"Let me introduce you to your new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher... me. Gilderoy Lockhart, Order of Merlin, Third Class, Honorary member of the Dark Force Defense League, and five times winner of Witch Weekly's Most Charming Smile Award. But I don't talk about that; I didn't get rid of the Banden Banshee by smiling at her!"

The Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher during Harry's second year at Hogwarts, Lockhart is a wizarding celebrity famous for his claimed defeats of various monsters like Yetis, banshees, werewolves, and trolls and his books detailing these exploits. When he arrives at Hogwarts, he completely fails to live up to his hype, proving himself to be quite untalented and incompetent, as well as vain and egotistical.
  • The Ace: He likes to maintain a public facade of being this, but he's really a Fake Ultimate Hero.
  • Adaptational Badass: Downplayed, but he is a little more competent in the video game version, teaching Harry the Rictusempra and Spongify spells, both of which are extensively used in both Chamber of Secrets and Prisoner of Azkaban. Harry even lampshades it!
    Harry, after defeating Aragog: "Well, at least I learned something in Lockhart's class: Rictusempra.
  • Adaptation Expansion: The Stinger of the second movie (the only HP movie to have one) shows Flourish and Blott's bookstore in Diagon Alley promoting Lockhart's last book, a ghostwritten autobiography called Who Am I?.
  • Added Alliterative Appeal: The titles of every book he's ever released (Holidays With Hags, Traveling With Trolls, Year With a Yeti...)
  • Age Lift: Lockhart was played by Kenneth Branagh, who was 42 at the time of the movie's release and appeared to play the character as being about that age. According to Pottermore, he was 28 at time of his first appearance in the books. This would have put him at Hogwarts only a few years below the Marauders' generation (Lily, James, Lupin, Pettigrew, Snape were all born in 1960-1961, Lockhart in 1964).
  • Attention Whore: Pottermore gives the impression that he was always this trope, due to being spoiled by his mother. His years as a student at Hogwarts can best be summarized as him trying his damnedest to be the center of attention, including (but not limited to) carving his name into the Quidditch pitch (for which he received a week's worth of detention), shooting an over-sized hologram of his own face into the sky, and mailing 800 Valentines to himself on Valentine's Day! That's not even mentioning that he went around telling people that he was going to create a Philosopher's Stone before he graduated, captain the English Quidditch team to World Cup glory, and then settle down to be Britain's youngest Minister of Magic. It got so bad that when he finally graduated (God knows how!), everyone in Hogwarts breathed a sigh of relief.
  • Bitch in Sheep's Clothing: Not that he isn't obviously an obnoxious egotist, but he does maintain a thin facade of sincere friendship with Harry, when in reality Harry is just one more way for him to draw attention to himself.
  • Brilliant, but Lazy: During his years as a student at Hogwarts, he did have the potential to be the expert he pretended to be later on, but his desire to achieve fame and fortune without any effort crushed all hopes of that happening. Just imagine how awesome he would have been if he had applied all that focus on being an Attention Whore and mastering Memory Charms to actually achieving something instead.
  • Broken Pedestal: Who initially seemed to be one of the most renowned celebrities in the wizarding world, turned out to be nothing more than a fraud who took merit for other wizards' achievements using his memory charm.
  • Butt-Monkey: He suffers various injuries and humiliations as he gets further in over his head, which for him doesn't take much.
  • Chick Magnet: His book signing at Flourish and Blotts is stated to have been full of middle-aged witches. On top of that, the vast majority of his female students have crushes on him.
  • Crippling Overspecialization: He's extremely good at performing Memory Charms, but incompetent at any other spell he tries.
  • The Dandy: He loves fine clothes and tending to his appearance.
  • Dirty Coward: He tries to make a run for it when the other teachers try to push him into finding the Chamber and battle the monster within. When Harry and Ron actually bring him there, he decides he'd rather let Ginny die and fabricate a story about arriving too late after modifying Harry and Ron's memories than attempt to help save her.
  • Evil Cannot Comprehend Good: He's such an Attention Whore that he can't even comprehend the idea of Harry being a Humble Hero.
  • Fake Ultimate Hero: He never does the amazing things he is credited for but takes credit for them by using the only magic he is good at: erasing memories.
  • Faux Affably Evil: After his secret is outted and he plans to erase Ron's and Harry's memories, as well as leaving Ginny to die, he still maintains his quirky attitude.
  • Feet of Clay: He manages to coast along fairly well on his own hype and stories stolen from the people that actually did them, who he magicked into forgetting and nothing else — at least until he runs into Harry.
  • Freudian Excuse: As revealed on Pottermore, Lockhart was a Spoiled Brat as a child, partly because he was also the only one of his siblings to be capable of magic. He came to Hogwarts expecting similar treatment and was disappointed to find he was treated as just another student.
  • The Friend Nobody Likes: Among the faculty at Hogwarts. Snape is (as one might expect) quite scathing, but even easygoing sorts like Professor Sprout are sick of hearing Gilderoy talk about Gilderoy.
  • Genius Ditz: Can't really do anything but memory charms, which he is implied to be a genius at.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: As lampshaded by Dumbledore, his signature spell doomed him.
    Dumbledore: Impaled upon your own sword, Gilderoy!
    Lockhart: Sword? Haven't got a sword. That boy has, though. He'll lend you one.
  • Hot Teacher: Hermione certainly thinks so during most of the second book, however much she tries to deny it.
  • Inept Mage: He's not very good at anything except memory charms — he even elects to just spout nonsensical gibberish when he can't think of a real spell to subdue the pixies he set free in his classroom. Pottermore states that Lockhart actually had the potential to be an above-average wizard, but he was more interested in gaining fame and attention than doing actual work.
  • It's All About Me: He begins his lectures by reciting all his awards, up to and including Witch Weekly's Most-Charming-Smile Award. Also, their first test is on the important information in his books. You know, stuff like, "What is Gilderoy Lockhart's favorite color?"note  and "What is Gilderoy Lockhart's secret ambition?"note 
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk: While he first comes off as an incredibly narcissistic and annoying Attention Whore, there seems to be nothing bad about him per se. That is off course until he reveals to have stolen his fame from others and plans to leave Ginny to die to save his own skin.
  • Large Ham: Especially in the film when he's got Kenneth Branagh playing him.
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: His real talent is Memory Charms.
  • Leitmotif: As usual, John Williams is awesome.
  • Meaningful Name: He pretends to be the king of fighting off Dark creatures, but it's all fake glamour. He does, however, have the knack of unlocking the hearts of his female followers. Specifically, to "gild" something means to cover it with gold, and indeed Lockhart cultivates an image of himself as handsome, talented, and brave to cover up the fact that he's a complete fraud.
  • Mentor Wannabe: Lockhart assumes that Harry is a narcissistic celebrity like himself and tries to mentor him accordingly. Harry, ever the Humble Hero, obviously finds this annoying.
  • Miles Gloriosus: He's admitted he didn't do the things he has claimed to have done.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Has in-universe fangirls, including Hermione and Mrs. Weasley.
  • Narcissist: His actor Ken Branagh wishes he could say that it's a cover for some gaping insecurity, but as far as he's concerned Lockhart's just that in love with himself.
  • Oh, Crap!: Happens a few times.
    • The first is when he lets the Cornish Pixies out of the cage and realizes that he cannot stop them.
    • The second occurs after he's easily knocked down by Snape and then has the audacity to brag to everyone in the room that had he wanted to he could've easily countered Snape's spell and defeated him. Snape gives him a murderous look that immediately ends their demonstration.
    • The last happens after the rest of the staff task him with saving Ginny from the Heir and Monster of Slytherin, sarcastically citing his bragging that he could easily get the job done. This actually causes him to attempt a Screw This, I'm Outta Here!.
  • Out-Gambitted:
    • Dumbledore knew a few of Lockhart's victims personally and, after accurately piecing together what was going on, invited Lockhart to teach at Hogwarts with the intention of exposing him as a fraud. When Lockhart initially refused, Dumbledore revealed Harry's presence at the school, knowing that the chance to "train" another celebrity would tickle Lockhart's ego and draw him into the headmaster's trap. As you can see, it paid off.
    • On the flip-side, it resulted in the DADA curriculum being wasted on learning nothing useful except to never let Cornish Pixies out of a cage. In fairness, Lockhart's fraudulence likely would have been exposed much sooner had the Chamber of Secrets not been opened. Not to mention, the jinx on the position ever since Voldemort tried to apply for it some thirty-odd years ago meant Dumbledore was probably having a hard time looking for a competent teacher anyway.
  • Parental Favoritism: He was his mother's favorite, because he was a wizard and his two elder sisters were Squibs.
  • Pet the Dog: In the movie, when Snape accuses Harry of attacking Mrs. Norris by noting that Harry was not at dinner, Lockhart gives Harry an alibi by pointing out that Harry was helping him answer his fan mail.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: When he's given the task of venturing into the Chamber of Secrets to save Ginny, the first thing he does is to pack up his bags. Harry and Ron, however, confront him and won't let him off scot-free.
  • Shameless Self-Promoter: He takes every opportunity to refer to his past exploits and point out how useful his skills are to a given situation. He claims several prestigious titles, repeating them throughout the book, and has written several biographical works based on his adventures.
  • Small Name, Big Ego: Of course, it could just be an act designed to keep his fraudulent reputation afloat. His vanity about his physical appearance is almost certainly genuine, though.
  • Smug Snake: He's very smug about himself despite being thoroughly incompetent in any real peril, and views most other characters as tools to gain more publicity.
  • Spoiled Brat: In his youth, his mother spoiled him rotten.
  • Unlimited Wardrobe: He wears quite a variety of colourful outfits throughout the book, and loves tending to his own appearance.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: A milder form of a "villain", considering his true nature.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Has no problem trying to wipe out Harry and Ron's memories as they go to rescue Ginny. His spell backfires on him, however, as he used Ron's broken wand to cast the Memory Charm.

    Remus John Lupin 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/remus_lupin.jpg
"Now fear makes people do terrible things, Harry."
Portrayed by: David Thewlis
"Your parents gave their lives to keep you alive, Harry. A poor way to repay them — gambling their sacrifice for a bag of magic tricks."

Harry's Defense Against the Dark Arts Teacher for his third year and one of James Potter's best friends during his time at Hogwarts. He joined the Order of the Phoenix alongside the other Marauders. Remus was bitten by a werewolf in his youth, but his condition was kept secret from the public until the end of Harry's third year.

He and Nymphadora Tonks fall in love sometime between years 5 & 6, marry sometime between years 6 & 7, and have a child (Teddy) towards the end of year 7.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the books, he is described having a pale face with premature lines, and light brown hair that is flecked with grey that both progress as his life continues. In the films, his hair is completely brown and does not look lined anywhere on his face.
  • Animal Motifs: Wolves, as indicated by his names, his status as a werewolf, and his Patronus- which according to JK is actually a normal wolf rather than a werewolf, implying it would be his Patronus either way.
  • Awesomeness by Analysis: His perceptiveness and his skill at reading people make him a great teacher.
  • Babies Ever After: In Deathly Hallows, Tonks is pregnant with her and Remus' child who she later gives birth to in the same book.
  • Badass Bookworm: While his friends James and Sirius were said to be naturals when it came to magic, Lupin seems to have gotten his tremendous skill through hard work and studying.
  • Badass Teacher: Regarded as the best self-defense teacher to teach Harry's year.
  • Bad Powers, Good People: Remus does not view his lycanthropy as a 'power', but as an incurable curse to be endured.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: When Sirius asked Remus "Shall we kill him together?" at the climax of the third book upon confronting, Pettigrew, Remus simply answers "Yes, I think so."
  • Byronic Hero: Lupin has many characteristics of a Byronic hero, though that's not his role in Harry's story. He is world-weary and ostracized by society, well-read but cynical, and forced to live outside the normal order. He is a less extreme version than Sirius, and after the sixth book he seems to be moving beyond this status.
  • Cool Teacher: Everyone in Harry's year, aside from those with prejudice against werewolves, wanted him as the official DADA teacher. The fact that he doled out chocolate as medicine didn't hurt.
  • The Disease That Shall Not Be Named: Rowling claims that she based Lupin's condition and his ostracism for it as an analogy for AIDS (rather than homosexuality as many assume). Like AIDS, being a werewolf is a problematic but perfectly survivable condition as long as they have appropriate treatment. But victims nevertheless face ostracism and fear.
  • Establishing Character Moment: The first we see of him he is napping on the train ride to Hogwarts. Not too long after that he shows up unexpectedly to save Harry and Ron's asses from a dementor that boarded the train. He remains a Cool Teacher and a Reasonable Authority Figure for the rest of the series.
  • Former Teen Rebel: He was one of the original Marauders. Not as bad as James and Sirius, but he did do time in detention.
  • Gentleman and a Scholar: Remus is a mild-mannered, pleasant, scholarly figure who genuinely cares about the children under his care and is generally well-liked.
  • I Just Want to Have Friends: His major character flaw. In Rowling's own words, "Lupin's failing is he likes to be liked. That's where he slips up – he's been disliked so often he's always pleased to have friends so cuts them an awful lot of slack."
    • Remus admits that he wishes he had taken a tougher stand with his friends' antics when they were at Hogwarts rather than serving as their enabler.
    • His lack of backbone with his friends was a genuine character flaw that he rightly criticizes himself for later in life, but never was it a Fatal Flaw that led to some sort of fall from grace. Then again, if he objected to it, he might have gotten James and Sirus to stop, so he had a moral duty which he ignored. And this in fact informs his decision to abandon Tonks and his unborn child, his self-hatred and insecurity of wanting to be liked has left him unprepared in a situation where he has to be in charge and take responsibility as a parent and husband, lapsing almost into a need to be part of Harry's gang much like he was with James' group rather than be his own man. Harry chews him out by reminding him of his father's example.
    • A scene set from when he, James, Sirius, Lily, Peter, and Snape were all still students at Hogwarts sums up things rather nicely. James and Sirius are bullying Snape, Peter is cheering them on, Lily is defending her friend, and Remus is trying (and failing) to pretend he is too busy reading a book to notice any of it, even though the frown clearly etched onto his face indicates otherwise.
  • Insecure Love Interest: Towards Tonks. Though he does care about her and ends up marrying her, he's still extremely insecure about their relationship since as a werewolf, he believes he's nowhere near good enough for her. It gets even worse when Tonks gets pregnant, since his fears that their child will either be a werewolf as well or be ostracized for having one as a parent nearly drive him to abandon her and try to join Harry, Ron and Hermione on their search for Horcruxes.
  • Intergenerational Friendship: Unsurprisingly with Harry, the son of his old friend James. Harry eventually becomes godfather to Remus's son.
  • The Lancer: In Deathly Hallows, especially the second half of the film, he becomes one to Kingsley.
  • Meaningful Name: Remus is a legendary co-founder of Rome who was raised by wolves; "Lupin" is Latin for "wolf-like." His codename on Potterwatch was Romulus, referencing the same legend. It gets to the point that those who are well-rehearsed in Latin and mythology can predict what he actually is early on in Prisoner of Azkaban.
  • The Mind Is a Plaything of the Body: He goes Ax-Crazy at the climax of Prisoner of Azkaban due to this trope being a trait of lycanthropy. Usually he's able to take a Wolfsbane potion to prevent this.
  • Nice Guy: He's unfailingly kind and considerate towards everyone. He even felt sympathy for the werewolf who bit him as a child, until he learned that it was Fenrir who attacked him. He's even nice to Snape, despite the Potions professor's open hatred of Lupin, to the point that Lupin has forgiven Snape within minutes of being fired based on Snape releasing his identity to the public.
  • Only Sane Man: As a youth, among the Marauders, but also as an adult, since he's the sanest Hogwarts professor to appear in the series. He could also be thought to be this amongst his fellow werewolves. While many of Lupin's kind turn against humanity and join Voldemort, he stays firmly on the side of good.
  • Perpetual Poverty: A side-effect of being a werewolf. James and Lily supported him financially while they were still alive, but for most of his adult life Remus has been prevented from gaining any form of employment by the Ministry's anti-werewolf laws.
  • Playing with Fire: The first time we see him use magic, he conjures flames in the palm of his hand.
  • Power Limiter: He can produce a corporeal Patronus, but he prefers to use a weaker insubstantial one. His Patronus takes the form of, well, a wolf, and he doesn't want to blow his cover.
  • Prophetic Name: Remus, as in Remus and Romulus, the legendary twin founders of Rome who were raised by a wolf in their infancy.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: The first really accessible teacher in the story. One of the first accessible adults to appear in the story. He also serves as one in the Order of the Phoenix, allowing Harry to know about some of the important things they discuss in their meetings, but not all of their secrets.
  • Save Our Students: After two useless Defense Against the Dark Arts teachers (and before two downright evil ones), he comes along and actually teaches them what they need to know.
  • Sins of Our Fathers: Was bitten by Fenrir Greyback as retaliation for Lupin's father offending Greyback. Expanded material in Pottermore reveals that the offense was the elder Lupin saying during a trial of Greybacknote  that werewolves were "soulless, evil, deserving nothing but death."
  • The Smart Guy: Of the Marauders; by smart, we mean "with common sense." Remus doesn't consider himself as much of a genius as James and Sirius, who were more Hard Work Hardly Works, coasting with high marks easily with little effort while Remus had to be more studious.
  • Team Dad: Remus Lupin fulfills a quite parental role towards his students, and it is especially obvious when he takes it upon himself to help Neville out with his confidence issues. He is also one of the first true father figures that Harry has ever had, and by far the most approachable teacher yet to work at Hogwarts.
  • Theme Naming: Remus coming from the story of Remus and Romulus, twins raised by a she-wolf.
  • Truth in Television: After the first Dementor encounter, he offers students chocolate, which has been shown to aid in the release of endorphins, or pleasure hormones. It really is quite useful if you've just had joy sucked out of you. When Poppy Pomfrey hears that he has done this, she comments "it's good to finally have a Defence Against the Dark Arts teacher who knows his remedies".
  • Unable to Support a Wife: His poverty was one reason that he thought he should never marry. (Albeit not the major one.)
  • Unwitting Instigator of Doom:
    • He was the one who brought Peter Pettigrew to the fold of the Marauders, encouraging James and Sirius, who he had befriended, to take in the Butt-Monkey and help him out. This did no one, including Peter, any good.
    • More directly, his failure to take the wolfsbane potion the night he confronted Wormtail had disastrous consequences for the entire wizarding world — not only did it massively endanger the lives of his friends and companions that night, but it allowed Wormtail to escape custody, meaning that not only did Sirius remain a fugitive, but also that Wormtail was able to rejoin Voldemort and play a key role in his return to power, effectively making all of the tragedies of Books 4-7 possible. Maybe you should have been a little less hasty there, Remus.
  • Werewolf Theme Naming: Lupin, as in Lupine, as in "wolf-like".
  • What Did You Expect When You Named It ____?: His surname, which is one letter away from a word meaning "wolf-like", could only fit on a werewolf. He's also named after Remus, the twin brother of Romulus, the legendary founder of Rome. Both twins were raised by the she-wolf, Lupa.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: The prospect of having a child, who could potentially inherit his lycanthropy and would face discrimination either way for being a werewolf’s son, sends him into such a fit of panic that he tries to follow Harry in the Horcrux hunt, arguing that Tonks and his child would be better off without him. Although his fears are justified, his response is certainly not, and unsurprisingly, Harry is very much not on board with the “Kids are better off without their parents” argument and calls him on it immediately.
    Harry Potter: If the new regime thinks Muggle-borns are bad, what will they do to a half-werewolf whose father’s in the Order? My father died trying to protect my mother and me, and you reckon he’d tell you to abandon your kid to go on an adventure with us? [...] I’d never have believed this. The man who taught me to fight dementors – a coward.
    • Earlier in the third book, he gave one to Harry:
    "Your parents gave their lives to keep you alive, Harry. A poor way to repay them — gambling their sacrifice for a bag of magic tricks."
  • When He Smiles: The books describe Remus after the birth of his child. The happiness radiates off the page.
  • Wolf Man: In the film adaptations...although not the case in the books.
  • Younger Than They Look: When he's first introduced, his hair is described as prematurely greying, and later descriptions mention his hair getting greyer and his face becoming more lined. Probably a consequence of being a werewolf or just his generally hard life.

    Dolores Jane Umbridge 

    Rolanda Hooch 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rolanda_hooch.jpg
Portrayed by: Zoë Wanamaker (films), Helena Lymbery (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, first West End run), TBD (Cursed Child, first Broadway run)

"Now, I want a nice clean game...from ALL of you!"

The Hogwarts flying teacher and referee for the school Quidditch matches. She doesn't appear much, but she seems to be very strict and serious, though she humorously went gaga over Harry's Firebolt in the third book.

While she is seen off and on throughout the books, she only appears in the first movie due to salary disputes with her actress.
  • Animal Motifs: Her eyes are constantly being compared to those of a hawk.
  • Catch-Phrase: In Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery, nearly everything she says is a warning on something to watch for while flying.... "or you will surely fall to your death."
  • Cool Old Lady: A throwaway reference to "The Great War" in one of the games reveals that she's at least ninety years old as of the start of the book series.
  • Not So Above It All: While most of the time she comes off as stern and impartial, seeing Harry's Firebolt makes her geek out quite a bit.
  • Stern Teacher: The penalty for flying a broom without her permission? Expulsion.
  • Unnecessary Roughness: She deplores the use of this trope in Quidditch, but is sometimes lackadaisical when it comes to enforcing against it.
  • Written-In Absence: Madam Hooch originally had a small part in the second film, but she got written out when a deal couldn't be reached with Zoë Wanamaker. Later on, Wanamaker was willing to come back for Deathly Hallows Part 2, but was never asked.

    Firenze 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Firenzeinharrypotter_1192.jpg
Portrayed by: Ray Fearon

"Unicorn blood will keep you alive even if you are an inch from death...but at a terrible price."

The Centaur that rescued Harry from Quirrell in the Forbidden Forest when he was serving detention in Philosopher's Stone. When Dolores Umbridge fired Sybill Trelawney in 1996, Dumbledore hired him to replace her so as to prevent the Ministry from installing another puppet teacher. After Umbridge's removal at the end of the year, Trelawney was reinstated and the Divination curriculum was split between them, much to her irritation.

Unlike other Centaurs, Firenze is polite and friendly to humans, even allowing the 11-year old Harry to ride on his back when taking him to safety. This made him unpopular among his kind and his herd attempted to kill him after his hiring as Professor for daring to spread the Centaurs' art of Divination to humans. Hagrid rescued him, but he was banished from the herd and the forest for his transgression.
  • Adaptational Ugliness: The book describes his human half as that of a handsome blonde man with striking blue eyes, whereas the movie made him look far more bestial and covered with grey hair.
  • Astrologer: Firenze and other centaurs use the position of the stars to see the future, though their views differ substantially from Professor Trelawney.
  • Badass Normal: He stood by the rest of the staff in the final battle, despite having no magic to fight with.
  • Big Damn Heroes: His debut in the series.
  • Blue and Orange Morality: He's slightly less blue and orange than his fellow centaurs and is regarded by them as a Category Traitor but he nonetheless has a view and perspective that is hard for Hogwarts students to understand.
  • Brutal Honesty: While Firenze concedes that Trelawney may or may not have seer gifts, he does not know and doesn't outright call her a fraud, he is brutally frank about what he thinks of her methods. Mostly anyone who spends any time with the woman usually agrees.
    Parvati Patil: Professor Trelawney did astrology with us! Mars causes accidents and burns and things like that, and when it makes an angle to Saturn, like now, that means people need to be extra careful when handling hot things—
    Firenze: [calmly] That, is human nonsense.
    • More broadly he's critical of people thinking that interpreting the stars can be used as a Mundane Utility when the universe has bigger fish to fry.
  • Demoted to Extra: Though he retains his minor appearance in the first film, his role as Professor Trelawney's replacement was left out of Order of the Phoenix.
  • Full-Name Basis: He always calls Harry Potter by his full name.
  • Hot Teacher: As mentioned above, his human features are very handsome, prompting Parvati Patil and Lavender Brown to put their grief over Trelawney's sacking aside to swoon over him.
  • I Owe You My Life: Downplayed, while he disagrees with Hagrid's attempt to raise Graup he won't do anything about it but asks Harry ti dissuade Hagrid. Firenze mentions that the other centaurs would have had killed him if Hagrid didn't interfere and he genuinely respect the half giant's love for every creatures he meet.
  • Magical Native American: Centaurs as a whole are very analogous to Native Americans, especially with the mentions of being allowed restricted territories by the government. Their main methods of Divination consist of stargazing and burning leaves to find patterns in the smoke.
  • My Species Doth Protest Too Much: Decidedly humbler and more accepting and appreciative of humans than any others of his herd.
  • Nice Guy: Never says a single harsh word to anyone in the series. Although he can be a bit condescending especially when he tells Harry that Hagrid's brother is a lost cause.
  • Only Sane Man: Among the centaurs, or at least in the eyes of Harry and his friends. In the eyes of his own species he’s a traitor to his kind.
  • The Stoic: Comes off as it, especially when factoring in his tolerance. Even after Dean Thomas unintentionally wonders if Hagrid breeds the Centaurs like cattle, he merely corrects him and continues the lesson, whereas far lesser insults send the other centaurs into violent indignant rage.

    Cuthbert Binns 

"My subject is History of Magic. I deal with facts, not myths and legends."

The History of Magic teacher and the only ghost teacher. Student legend has it that he died in his sleep while seated by the staff room fire and got up to teach the next day, leaving his body behind. Binns's lessons consist of him delivering lectures which are so boring that they put everyone to sleep, except for Hermione. But he doesn't care and just keeps droning on and on.
  • Accidental Misnaming: Whenever he addresses a student, he always gets their name wrong. He calls Hermione Granger "Miss Grant", Parvati Patil "Miss Pennyfeather", Seamus Finnigan "O'Flaherty" and Harry Potter "Perkins".
  • Adapted Out: He isn't present in the movies.
  • Agent Scully: He insists the Chamber of Secrets could not possibly be real.
  • Arbitrary Scepticism: Again, we're being informed the Chamber of Secrets and the existence of a monster therein is surely just a myth by a ghost who works teaching the history of magic at a Wizard's School.
  • The Bore: It's impossible for anyone other than Hermione to listen to Binns' lectures without falling asleep. This isn't a matter of the subject itself being boring — Harry notes at one point that the history Binns teaches could very well be quite interesting if it were being recounted by anyone other than Binns.
    It was amazing how he could make even bloody and vicious goblin riots sound as boring as Percy's cauldron-bottom report.
  • Captain Oblivious: He may not realize he's dead.
  • Composite Character: In the films, McGonagall explains the Chamber of Secrets instead of him and Flitwick does it in the video game, though the GBA one featured Binns doing it.
  • Lecture as Exposition: The one time he's useful in the series is when he explains the Chamber of Secrets. He thinks the legend is stupid, but he tells it anyway because the students are paying attention to him for once.
  • Nap-Inducing Speak: His lectures put everyone to sleep.
  • Passed in Their Sleep: School legend has it that elderly Professor Binns died while napping in the teachers' lounge. He then got up to teach his next class as a ghost, and it's entirely possible he hasn't actually noticed he's died. Presumably the rest of the faculty were unable to think of a tactful way to broach the subject. Though he does have a tendency to enter his classroom by passing through the wall.
  • Ultimate Job Security: He's the only teacher Umbridge doesn't interrogate. Not that there'd by any real way to fire a ghost teacher. Who you gonna call?

    Charity Burbage 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Burbage_5025.png
Portrayed by: Carolyn Pickles
Appears in: Deathly Hallows

"Severus... please... we're friends..."

The Muggle Studies teacher and an opponent of pure-blood prejudice. The first and only time we meet Burbage is in the Villain Opening Scene of Deathly Hallows, in which Voldemort murders her and then feeds her to Nagini.
  • Fantastic Racism: Burbage is outspoken against this. Shortly before the Death Eaters got her, she published an editorial against pure-blood prejudice in the Daily Prophet.
  • Names to Trust Immediately: Her first name is "Charity" for crying out loud.
  • Red Shirt: She exists to die and her death doesn't really have an emotional impact on any characters.
  • Remember the New Guy?: She was never seen or mentioned before her death. Justified since Muggle Studies was mentioned as an elective class in previous books.

    Septima Vector 

The professor of Arithmancy.
  • The Ghost: She is one of the less seen professors.
  • Meaningful Name: Both of her names have mathematical connotations and she teaches Arithmancy, a kind of number magic. "Septima", of course, comes from the Latin for "seven", while vector algebra is a rather high-level form of mathematics that will generally never be encountered by those who don't choose to study mathematics in university.

    Aurora Sinistra 

The rarely seen professor of Astronomy.
  • The Ghost: An unusual example, since unlike other rarely seen Hogwarts teachers such as Professor Vector or Charity Burbage, Harry does in fact take Sinistra's class — it's just that no scene in the entire series actually depicts one of these classes (except for the O.W.L. exam) and Sinistra is thus never given any description or characterization. Whenever she's named in the text, it's usually with "of the Astronomy department"' after, just in case you forgot who she was three books ago.
  • Meaningful Name: An aurora is a kind of astronomical phenomenon, like Aurora Borealis, aka The Northern Lights.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: Subverted. With a name like "Sinistra" you'd think she were cut out to be a Marvel villain, but the name has nothing to do with the contemporary English meaning of "sinister". It's a reference to the star Sinistra in the constellation Ophiuchus, and harkens back to the original Latin meaning of "sinister", "left".

    Wilhelmina Grubbly-Plank 
Portrayed by: Apple Brook

A substitute Care of Magical Creatures professor featured in the fourth and fifth books when Hagrid is indisposed.
  • 100% Adoration Rating: Even Harry, Ron, and Hermione (begrudgingly to varying degrees) admit that she's a good teacher, but lie to Hagrid about it because they clearly don't want to hurt his feelings. When Umbridge inspects her class, Wilhelmina effortlessly manages to pass even with her voicing open praise for Dumbledore. Hagrid himself ultimately feels she's a better teacher than him, and considered having her take over full time.
  • Cool Old Lady: She can be gruff and to the point, but the woman certainly knows how to keep her students interested in the class.
  • Cool Teacher: Many of Harry's classmates instantly prefer her to Hagrid, mainly because Wilhelmina makes the class enjoyable without putting everyone in danger with wild, unpredictable creatures like Hagrid does.
  • Demoted to Extra: She was never really that important to the plot beyond being a stand in for Hagrid at times, but the most she gets in the films is a cameo and acknowledgement in the fifth movie. Considering this was the movie that originally was 3 hours long, it's very possibly there were originally more scenes with her, especially considering that her actress has the good fortune to receive a credit.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Harry trusts her enough in the fifth book to bring Hedwig to her when she gets injured.
  • Redeeming Replacement: Most of the student body enjoy her classes far more than they do Hagrid's, but she clearly believes he himself is a competent professor and never badmouths his teaching skills. She even compliments his training of the school's thestrals, pointing out it's entirely unlikely that they would've attacked Hedwig because of Hagrid's care.

    Silvanus Kettleburn 

The Care of Magical Creatures professor before Hagrid.
  • An Arm and a Leg: By the time he retires, his remaining limbs consist of one arm and half of a leg.
  • Ascended Extra: In the series proper, he only receives a single mention. He has a somewhat larger role in Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.
  • Fluffy Tamer: In his capacity as the Care of Magical Creatures professor.
  • Remember the New Guy?: Technically. Care of Magical Creatures is mentioned in Chamber of Secrets, but its teacher is not specified until Prisoner of Azkaban, at which point he has already retired.
  • Ultimate Job Security: He underwent 62 periods of probation during his tenure as professor.

    Bathsheda Babbling 

The Study of Ancient Runes professor.
  • Adaptation Expansion: In the books, she does not appear, nor is she ever mentioned. In the films, an uncredited extra plays an unnamed professor who could be her.
  • All There in the Manual: Her name comes from a list of Hogwarts professors on JK Rowling's website.
  • Death by Adaptation: She is killed in the Battle of Hogwarts in the films.
  • Meaningful Name: Babbling is a way of describing language, typically that which is difficult or impossible to comprehend, and thus makes a fitting name for a professor of Ancient Runes.

Non-teaching faculty

    Argus Filch 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/argus_filch.jpg
"Students out of bed! Students in the corridors!"
Portrayed by: David Bradley

"A pity they let the old punishments die. Was a time detention would find you hanging by your thumbs in the dungeons. God, I miss the screaming."

The Hogwarts caretaker, he has an extremely antagonistic relationship with the students and mostly acts as an obstacle to Harry throughout the series. His bitterness towards the students probably stems from the fact that he is a Squib, that is, someone who while born into a magical family has no magical abilities on his own. He has a cat named Mrs. Norris, probably the closest thing he has to a friend.
  • Abhorrent Admirer: In the film, he has a crush on Umbridge.
  • Adaptational Heroism: Despite having more or less the same supporting-level role he had in the books, the films do take special care to show his love for Mrs. Norris, proving he's not all bad. His appearance in several background scenes during the final battle of Deathly Hallows, Part II indicates he stayed and fought the Death Eaters. He's very clearly distraught when all seems lost and Voldemort demands their surrender.
  • Arch-Enemy: Peeves the poltergeist and the Weasley twins.
  • Berserk Button: Hurting Mrs. Norris, as shown in the second book.
    • Track in mud or make a mess and feel his wrath. Or be Peeves.
    • Hell, be a student in his vicinity, and he will unleash the fury on you.
  • Black Shirt: He's the only Hogwarts employee who supports Umbridge when she takes the helm because she allows him to use harsher methods to discipline the students. Alas, he never gets to use them, because the school is too full of rebels by that point.
  • Butt-Monkey: The film version of Order of the Phoenix turns him into this, particularly emphasizing his bumbling, inept attempts to capture members of Dumbledore's Army.
  • Child Hater: He hates the Hogwarts students and revels in every opportunity to inflict the harshest punishments he's allowed on them.
  • Crazy Cat Lady: He's very attached to Mrs. Norris and flies off the handle when he suspects Harry of Petrifying her.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: While he has a case of Strawman Has a Point about the messes caused by the students as he's a Muggle Born of Mages, his idea of how they should be punished for it is not. His desired methods so line up with Dolores Umbridge, that he was the only one on her side as it meant he could use a horsewhip on rule-breakers.
  • The Dragon: Acts as Umbridge's right hand during her brief stint as Headmaster.
  • Familiar: It's implied, at least in the earlier books, that Filch shares a far deeper connection with Mrs. Norris than it seems. Apparently Mrs. Norris patrols the school on her own, and if she witnesses any rule-breaking Filch turns up shortly afterwards. In one encounter Harry actually had to tell Mrs. Norris he wasn't breaking any rules. Mrs Norris is the single closest thing to a familiar in the entire Wizarding World.
  • Flanderization: In the movies, Filch was used more and more for comic relief as the films went on, especially in Order of the Phoenix.
  • Foil:
    • To Hagrid. Both characters have care-taking roles at Hogwarts and are often looked down upon for their lineage (Hagrid for being half-giant, Filch for being a Squib). However, Hagrid is much more amicable and approachable (if reckless), whereas Filch spends most of his appearances berating students and generally being more bitter. Their pets are even contrasted, with the hawkish Mrs. Norris and the loyal but cowardly Fang.
    • To Mrs Figg. Both are cat-loving Squibs, but Mrs Figg holds no bitterness towards other wizards, and Ron suspects the reason Filch hates the students so much is that he's jealous.
  • Formally Named Pet: Mrs. Norris.
  • Freudian Excuse: He's part of an ostracized group that receives scorn or pity from most of the magical community. It's indicated that the caretaker position at Hogwarts is one of the only ways for him to stay in contact with his magical roots, which means spending every day surrounded by children who are studying the powers that he was denied.
  • Fun-Hating Confiscating Adult: Filch had a room full of things confiscated from students, including the Marauders' Map, which the Weasley twins liberated and then gave to Harry.
  • I Have This Friend...: His excuse when Harry finds a letter claiming to be a beginner's course in magic in his office, proving him to be a Squib.
  • I'll Kill You!: Threatens to end Harry after suspecting that he was responsible for petrifying Mrs. Norris.
  • Jerkass: He hates the student body, advocates corporal punishment, and is generally an unpleasant person to be around.
  • Loves the Sound of Screaming: Filch loves torturing misbehaving children, and misses the old days when he could hang kids from the rafters and hear them scream. A lot of that talk is probably wishful thinking (not that this is a huge improvement); Dumbledore seems to have hired Filch, and Dumbledore most likely did not allow thumb screws, chains, or any of the other implements Filch claims to miss. His paraphernalia could easily be left over from well before his time.
  • Meaningful Name: Argus was the hundred-eyed guardian of Io in Classical Mythology, using his multiple eyes to keep watch on her forever, and Filch is notorious for keeping a hawkish eye on students and showing up to bust troublemakers at inopportune times. "Filch" is British schoolkid slang for "to commit petty theft".
  • Muggle Born of Mages: He's a "Squib", a person born to a wizard family who doesn't have the ability to use magic.
  • Not-So-Harmless Villain: Filch almost manages to become this — after four books of being an empty threat, he's given the authority to hand out the sadistic punishments he's always dreamed of once Umbridge takes over. The only problem is that, by that point, there are so many troublemakers he doesn't know who to go after first.
  • Pet the Dog: Despite his unpleasant behavior, Filch loves his cat dearly. He becomes very upset when he thought Harry petrified/killed her.
  • Relative Button: Never, ever, try to harm a hair on Mrs. Norris if you don't want the life choked out of you.
  • The Resenter: His personality is at least partly caused by bitterness over being surrounded by children learning magic when he himself never could do it.
  • Ultimate Job Security: The man is a borderline sociopath who explicitly enjoys causing children pain and can't just magic away whatever messes the students cause. At no point is the option of firing him ever considered.

    Poppy Pomfrey 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/poppy_pomfrey.png
"Well, what did you expect, pumpkin juice?"
Portrayed by: Gemma Jones

"You should've been brought straight to me! I can mend bones in a heartbeat, but growing them back..."

The Hogwarts matron and nurse, expert in medical magic. While she is kind-hearted and always well-meaning, she's overprotective of the students in her care, which is Played for Laughs. She regards Harry, and his tendency to fall into dangerous exploits, with a kind of friendly exasperation. A frequent sight in the hospital wing is Harry, landed there after his latest crazy adventure, begging to be allowed to do something while Madam Pomfrey insists he needs to rest more.

Madam Pomfrey shows up in all the books, but appears very infrequently in the movies.
  • Alliterative Name: Poppy Pomfrey.
  • Berserk Button:
    • In the name of all that is holy and sane, do NOT walk into the hospital wing if you're covered in mud. Ever.
    • Be Gilderoy Lockhart, that'll do it.
    • Lay a finger on Professor McGonagall, that'll work too!
  • Combat Medic: While her main claim to fame is as a medic, she's also an effective duelist, as she demonstrates during the final battle.
  • Deadpan Snarker: She has moments:
    Pomfrey: Nothing to worry about, I mended it at once, but I'm keeping you in overnight. You shouldn't over exert yourself for a few hours.
    Harry: I don't want to stay here overnight, I want to find McLaggen and kill him.
    Pomfrey: I'm afraid that would come under the heading of 'overexertion'.
  • Don't Ask: She seems to know not to ask. In all her years at Hogwarts she probably has seen a fair share of students with injuries the result of things students shouldn't be doing, but her job is to see to the students' health. Just looking at Ron's dragon bite, there's no way that she bought Ron's story that a dog bit him. (Especially seeing as dogs aren't even a legal pet at Hogwarts.) Also, given her status as a healer, it's very likely she knew Hermione had a mishap with Polyjuice Potion. This attitude is standard procedure for medical professionals — if she reports their misdeeds then they're less likely to come to her for healing and will be at risk of their injuries getting worse or killing them.
  • I Can Still Fight!: She's the one who replies, "No, you can't. Go to sleep, Harry."
  • Mama Bear: The safety of Hogwarts' students is her first priority, to the point that she tells Harry that it's the only reason she hangs around during Umbridge's reign.
  • The McCoy: Working in the same field as the real McCoy, no less.
  • Meaningful Name: Her last name rhymes with 'comfrey', an herb traditionally used to dress wounds. It's also an alternate spelling of Pontefract, a Yorkshire town long famed for the growing of the medicinal herb licorice. Also, poppies contain opium, which from ancient times has had medical uses as well as recreational ones.
  • The Medic: She runs the school's nurse's office, and considering it's Hogwarts, she's got a LOT of experience tending to wounds, anything from standard scrapes and bruises to all of the bones in a student's arm disappearing.
  • Oh, No... Not Again!: Upon seeing Harry in the third book, "Oh, it's you, is it? I suppose you've been doing something dangerous again?"
  • School Nurse: Since Hogwarts is a Wizarding School, she specializes in medicinal magic and can heal cuts and broken bones in a matter of minutes.
  • Team Mom: Among the Hogwarts staff, though more to the students than her fellow staff members.
  • You Can Barely Stand: She's probably lost count of the number of times she's had to tell Harry this over the years and struggle to keep him in bed so he can recover from whatever injuries he's currently suffering from.

    Irma Pince 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/irma_pince.png
Portrayed by: Sally Mortemore
"Chocolate in the library! Out — out — OUT!"

The Scary Librarian who runs the Hogwarts library. Madam Pince doesn't trust students any further than she could throw Hagrid, and is known for putting odd jinxes on her books to protect them.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: Sally Mortemore hardly looks like any vulture.
  • Adapted Out: She is played by an extra in Chamber of Secrets, but, aside from that, is entirely absent from the film series.
  • Animal Motifs: Apparently she looks like an "underfed vulture". Lovely.
  • Berserk Button: Eat in the library or write in books and she'll attack you.
  • Continuity Cameo: Sally Mortemore plays her in the second film, though you'd only know her nonspeaking character is meant to be Madam Pince from the credits. She has no role and doesn't appear in any of the other films.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: She's placed dozens of curses on each of the books should they be mistreated, stolen, or vandalized. Dumbledore himself notes that he made the mistake of doodling in one of her library books, then found the book trying to beat him on the head. And he can not guarantee he's gotten off all the curses on the very copy of Quidditch Through the Ages that the reader is holding...
  • Living Prop: She has almost no role in the books other than occasional mentions of her unpleasantness.
  • Nice Hat: One of the few wizard hats you'll see in the films, but it's pretty cool.
  • Pair the Spares: In a possible parody of Shipping, students speculate about her and Filch in the sixth book.
  • Playing Gertrude: In the second film, she appears to be in early middle-age, but the books' description implies that she is an old woman.
  • Scary Librarian: She will curse you and hit you for the most minor infractions.

    The Sorting Hat 
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_sortinghat.png
"Oh you may not think I'm pretty, but don't judge on what you see, I'll eat myself if you can find a smarter hat than me."
Portrayed by: Leslie Phillips (films), Chris Jarman (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, first West End run), TBD (Cursed Child, first Broadway run) | Hogwarts Mystery

"Hmm, difficult. VERY difficult. Plenty of courage, I see. Not a bad mind, either. There's talent, oh yes. And a thirst to prove yourself. But where to put you?"

The Sorting Hat is a wizard's hat, formerly belonging to Godric Gryffindor, that has been empowered with the intelligence from the four founders of Hogwarts. It is sentient, converses with students who place it on their head, composes and recites songs, and can attack things by blinding them. So, despite being just a hat, it certainly is a character.
  • Animate Inanimate Object: Apparently outfitted with the personalities of all four founders of Hogwarts.
  • Deadpan Snarker: In the books, he slyly repeats "You would have done well in Slytherin" to Harry. In the films, they add a "raised eyebrow" when Harry insists the Sorting Hat is wrong.
  • Expository Theme Tune: The Sorting Hat sings one to the Hogwarts students at the beginning of Fall Term, describing the Four Houses and what they value, and occasionally giving warnings.
  • Hammer Space: Gryffindor students can pull Godric's sword out of the Sorting Hat. As the Hat himself sings, he once belonged to Gryffindor himself and sat upon his head.
  • Humanity Ensues: In Cursed Child, he is portrayed by a human actor since making an expensive talking animatronic hat for a character that appears in just a few scenes would be incredibly wasteful.
  • Large Ham: He bombastically shouts the decided house for every student, but his ham value is greatly increased for the films, where he voices loudly his reflections about every choice instead of whispering them to the sortee's ear, though it isn't made clear whether his decision process is audible to the school or just the audience.
  • Mr. Exposition: He loosely exposits the backstory of the founding of Hogwarts in song at the beginning term feast every year.
  • Telepathy: The Sorting Hat uses Legilimency to determine which house to place new students in.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: The last we see of the hat in the books, Voldemort has set it on fire. Cursed Child reveals it wasn't destroyed.
  • You Are Better Than You Think You Are: Pottermore reveals the reason Neville Longbottom's sorting took so long was that the while the Hat quickly decided to place Neville in Gryffindor House, Neville was intimidated by Gryffindor's reputation for courage and didn't feel he belonged there, and asked to be put in Hufflepuff House instead. The Hat refused to budge, and later events in the books proved it was right about him.

    Trolley Witch 
Portrayed By: Jean Southern (Film 1), Margery Mason (Film 4), Sandy McDade (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, first West End run), TBD (Cursed Child, first Broadway run)

The old woman who pushes the candy trolley on the Hogwarts Express.
  • Belated Backstory: Much like Dumbledore and Snape before her, the Trolley Witch gets some backstory long after her first appearance in Cursed Child.
  • Beware the Silly Ones: Though she initially appears innocuous, Cursed Child reveals that aside from selling sweets, her duty is to prevent students from leaving the train, which she accomplishes by transfiguring her hands into claws.
  • Everyone Calls Him "Barkeep": She is consistently called the Trolley Witch, and her real name is never revealed.
  • His Name Really Is "Barkeep": She has long forgotten her real name in favor of the nickname everybody uses.
  • Improbable Weapon User: Explosive pumpkin pasties.
  • Never Mess with Granny: The Marauders and the Weasley twins learned her terrible power, though Albus Potter and Scorpius Malfoy manage to evade her.
  • Really 700 Years Old: Cursed Child reveals that she is over 200 years old, having been hired by then-Minister for Magic Ottaline Gambol to work on the Hogwarts Express when it began in 1830.
  • Spikes of Doom: She can transfigure her hands into these.
  • Walking Spoiler: Though it has no plot relevance, discussing her role in Cursed Child is impossible without spoiling the surprise.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Characters/HarryPotterHogwartsTeachers