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Brave Scot
The limbs of the Highlander are strong and sinewy, the frame hardy, and of great physical power, in proportion to size. He endures cold, hunger, and fatigue with patience.
Anon

The Scottish people are stereotypically brave fighters. Thus, a Scottish accent is sometimes used to emphasize the boldness of fantasy warriors.

Compare Violent Glaswegian. Often a characteristic of the Dwarves as well.

Examples:

Anime
  • Jonathan Joestar (AKA JoJo The First) of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure is a British Nobleman descended from a proud line of Highland Clansmen.
  • Colin MacLeod of Clan MacLeod in Highlander: The Search for Vengeance, although it's by adoption as he is ancient Celtic by birth.
  • Alexander Anderson of Hellsing is a Badass Catholic priest and Holy Hitman of Scottish descent who serves the fanatic Section XIII Iscariot, which is a branch of the Vatican that's 100% willing to sin in their eternal fight against all the nasty beasties that inhabit the Hellsing universe. And despite being human (albeit one with vast regenerative and supernatural abilities), Anderson himself goes toe-to-toe with the most powerful vampire in existence and even earns Alucard's nigh-impossible respect as his ultimate rival and a Worthy Opponent by the end. No one else manages to accomplish such a grand feat in the whole series.

Fan Fiction

Film
  • Braveheart has William Wallace.
  • The adults in How to Train Your Dragon have Scottish accents (although they are supposed to be Vikings), but the kids do not, for some reason.
  • Star Trek - Montgomery Scott, although he's more of a badass engineer than a true fighter. In the series, he didn't have a problem with the occasional Bar Brawl or defeating his foes by drinking them under the table.
  • In the Tim Burton film Alice in Wonderland, the Mad Hatter, during his occasional bouts of lucidity and badassery, slips into a Scottish accent.
  • Highlander: Connor MacLeod, and any other Scottish characters.
  • Pixar's Brave is set in Scotland, so naturally everyone has the accent. And they're natural accents, as all the major voice actors were scots.
  • Gutsy Smurf, portrayed as a kilt-wearing Smurf with a Scottish accent, in The Smurfs live-action movie series.
  • In Skyfall, Kincade, an Old Retainer who takes out a number of Silva's mooks.
    Kincade: [Boom!] Welcome to Scotland!
  • In LOCKOUT, the two main villains are Scottish and personify different aspects of baddassery. One brother is plotting, intelligent and in control, the other is psychotic, (ax-crazy), and passionate.
  • A pacifist version appears in the movie Joyeux NoŽl in form of Father Palmer, a clergyman serving as the stretcher bearer for a Scottish regiment who leads a midnight Christmas service for French, German, and Scottish soldiers between their trenches during a World War I Christmas truce in 1914.

Literature
  • The Nac Mac Feegle from Discworld combine this with Violent Glaswegian.
  • The Honor Harrington series has denizens of Gryphon in general and Anton Zilwicki in particular, from another Fantasy Counterpart Culture
  • Jamie and his True Companions in Outlander.
  • Battlefield Earth: Johnny Tyler recruits a band of genetically brave Scots: brave enough to mine gold for an Machiavellian alien who is viciously insane, then willing to attempt to bring down a pan-galactic empire using souped-up machines guns and some ancient atomic weapons.
    • How brave are these Scots? When a quiet outsider suddenly shows up and says a few words about wanting to wipe out the monsters of the lowlands, they quickly gather their clan and unanimously swear to follow him to victory, no matter the cost. Then they ask what the guy's name is. They mention that some of their ancestors used to go south to hunt for the aliens, which was considered very dangerous work.
  • David Weber and Steve White's Starfire has Angus MacRory from a Fantasy Counterpart Culture
  • And then there's Prince Roger Ramius Sergei Chiang MacClintock and his ancestors, who forged an interstellar empire and have held it against all comers (foreign and domestic) for centuries.
  • Although Lord Brandoch Daha from The Worm Ouroboros — mightiest swordsman in the world of Mercury — does not speak with a Scottish accent and has no other obvious Scottish traits, the motto inscribed above his castle's gate is surprisingly composed in (something that sounds like) Scots:
    Ye braggers an' 'a'
    Be skeered and awa'
    Frae Brandoch Daha!
  • Alex MacKay in 1632, the captain of a cavalry unit serving under Gustavus Adolphus that makes the initial contact with Americans.
  • Sir Walter Scot liked to write about these. Guess where he was from?
  • Fiery Redhead Nature Hero Cord MaKiy, in the Col Sec Trilogy. He's actually the descendant of people who retreated to the Scottish Highlands After the End, and pretty much plays the trope straight.
  • Harry Potter's Professor McGonagall, a certifiable Badass Grandma whose name (and, in the films, accent) would indicate a Scottish origin.
    • "McGonagall" is actually an Irish name, "Mac Congail", "son of Congail", originating from Donegal in Ireland. The character is named after famously bad Scottish poet William Topaz McGonagall, who was of Irish origin. She is, however, Scottish according to Pottermore.
  • Mediochre Q Seth. Lives in Edinburgh, confirmed to have a Scottish accent, regularly faces down disgruntled dragons and human criminals alike as part of his chosen career path. He also frequently hangs out with an equally-brave Englishman and vaguely-Slavic woman, and his American sidekick is hardly a coward.

Live-Action TV

Music
  • "Scotland the Brave."
    • As well as almost any patriotic song from Scotland ("Scots Wha Hae" and "Oh Flower of Scotland" come to mind). English and American anthems tend to emphasise their God-given moral superiority; Scottish ones prefer to emphasise sheer brutal badassery.

Tabletop Games
  • The Northwind Highlanders in BattleTech, a multi-regimental mercenary unit with their own homeworld (the eponymous Northwind), take this trope and run with it.
  • Mutant Chronicles: The Imperial faction is heavily based on Victorian Britain, fascination with all things Scottish included, and breeds kilt-wearing, woad-painted, claymore-swinging arsekickers, along with some of the setting's best assault troops, like it's no-one's business. Imperial's economic model is based on military expansion, so they're a necessity.
  • The Caledonians on the planet Dawn in the tabletop game Infinity are a nation of Scottish origin. Regimental groups like the Galwegian 45th, the 3rd Grey Rifles, miniatures with kilts, claymores and a huge number of the Wulvers and Dogfaces, the crossbred descendants of human settlers and hyena/wolf native descendants.
  • 7th Sea has the Highland Marches and the McDonald swordsman school, which teaches you all the skills needed to wield claymores.

Video Games
  • In Team Fortress 2, the Demoman is this when he's on your team. He's the Violent Glaswegian on the opposite team (just like the Heavy is the Big Guy and the sniper is friendly on your team while they are The Brute and cold on the enemy team, respectively).
  • In the Total War series the Scots, quite naturally, have troops with slightly higher morale than other armies. They're not exceptionally high, though, and if you charge a regiment of Highlander light infantry into a meatgrinder with powerful heavy infantry like Dismounted Knights, the Highlanders are still going to break pretty quickly.
  • Sebastian Vael of Dragon Age II is a Brave Starkhaven Religious Bruiser, with Starkhaven being a rather patchy Fantasy Counterpart Culture version of Scotland. Only he has the Scottish accent. The entire rival Harriman family he is fighting against has English (Flora) or French (Ruxtan) accents. And this is despite the Free Marches (which Starkhaven is a part of) being a fantasy analogue to the Holy Roman Empire.
  • Imperial Guard tank crews in Dawn of War 2 are a mix of this and a Star Trek Shout-Out.
  • In Europa Universalis 3, Scotland gets three unique, powerful combat modifiers when they're at war with England.
  • The Bangaa gained a scottish accent starting from Final Fantasy XII to replace their Sssssnake Talk they initially used in Final Fantasy Tactics Advance. Some of them blend it with Violent Glaswegian.
  • Capt. John 'Soap' MacTavish from Modern Warfare, no question about it given he managed to kill General Shepherd with a knife that Shepherd stabbed him with to begin with.
  • Mech Commander 2 gives us Mechwarrior Claymore, who, when the rest of his unit was shot down and destroyed, proceeded to jump out of the falling wreckage of the Drop Ship that had been carrying him, landed safely, then calmly hung out in enemy territory, unnoticed, until your unit links up with him to attack the airbase that shot him down. No mean feat. The real shock is that he did all this while sitting in an Atlas, meaning that not only was he piloting quite possibly the most visible Humongous Mecha in the entire area (while managing to escape the notice of numerous enemies in the area, all designed around superior sensor capabilities), he jumped out of an imminent crash in a 'Mech that had no jumpjets, and therefore no ability to slow its fall.
  • The tutorial campaign for Age of Empires II, where you control the forces of William Wallace, has a hilariously over-the-top narrator affecting a Scottish accent.
  • The Battle Fortress, an Awesome Personnel Carrier which can crush other vehicles, has a Scottish driver.

Western Animation
  • The Scotsman from Samurai Jack.
  • Duff Killigan from Kim Possible.
  • Hudson and Macbeth are the two most notable examples from Gargoyles. Interesting to note, even though most of the Gargoyles themselves come from Scotland, only Hudson has a Scottish accent, even though all human characters from Scotland do (Word of God states it's because he had the most interaction with humans).
  • Scrooge McDuck of DuckTales didn't make all that money sitting behind a desk; he did it by being "Tougher than the Toughies and Smarter than the Smarties."; and he made it square.
    • His accent was played for laughs in one episode where he got amnesia:
    Scrooge: Where am I? Who am? And why am I talking in this funny accent??
  • Donald and Douglas both from Thomas The Tank Engine And Friends.

Meta

Truth in Television
  • In the Ramada in York, the fire advisory signs say "Do not take unnecessary risks, but if possible, attack the fire with the instruments provided." In Edinburgh? "Attack the fire with the instruments provided."
  • The man who kicked a terrorist--who was on fire at the time--in the balls so hard that the kicker sprained his foot in the aftermath of the attempted Glasgow airport bombing.
  • The Gurkhas adopted the Highlanders as Blood Brothers after a joint Moment Of Awesome in the 1800's.
  • The Term "Thin Red Line" originated in the Crimean War, when a Scottish Infantry Regiment (the 93rd Highlanders in traditional red uniforms) held off a Russian Cavalry Charge in the Battle of Balaclava by stretching out in an only 2-deep infantry line (4-deep would be recommended for such an event) and thus being able to fire several volleys with their full force in complete disregard of their vulnerable formation. And then, their Commander had to hold them back from counterattacking: "93rd, damn all that eagerness!" are historically reported as his words.
  • The battle tactic known as the "Highland Charge" is nothing more than a loosely coordianted full-frontal assault towards the enemy, wielding really big swords and axes. Everyone yelling as loud as possible is highly encouraged during this. This managed to win quite a number of battles in various English civil wars in the 1600's and 1700's (against gunpower equipped opponents.)
  • Scotland gets hit by a powerful storm with winds of up to 165mph, and their first reaction? Laugh and make merry by nicknaming the weather system, "Hurricane Bawbag".
  • Fitzroy Maclean, adventurer, spy, soldier, Real Life swashbuckler, and historian.
  • George MacDonald Fraser
  • John Paul Jones, in American (and Russian) service against England.
  • The Highland Regiments were among the most effective units of the British Army (which on the whole was a bit crap compared to the Navy). It is also true that a disproportionate number of Scots (and Irish, but let's not get into that) served in the civilian administration of the colonies—no task for the lily-livered.
  • http://www.military-art.com/mall/more.php?ProdID=5759
  • This news story. Find a poisonous spider in your fridge? No problem! You're Scottish! Man-up and catch that thing yourself!
  • On a more poignant note, those who risked their lives to rescue others trapped in a Glasgow pub after a helicopter crashed into it.
  • The Canadian province of Nova Scotia, founded and settled by Scots, whose very name is Latin for "New Scotland", has as its motto Munit haec et altera vincit: "One defends and the other conquers", in reference to this trope.
  • This trope is probably what allowed Scotland to survive against Viking raids during the Dark Ages.

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