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Fan Fic: Child Of The Storm
A story by Nimbus Llewelyn (author of The Wizard in the Shadows) that started on a What If?. In this case, what would happen if Thor had been incarnated as James Potter, as a first run on that humility thing and had died doing it, going mad with grief in a form of Gone Horribly Right combined with Gone Horribly Wrong, and Odin had had to wipe his memories.

So far, the answer appears to be a world of strange hijinks, constant snarking, lots of badassery, evil plots, Loads and Loads of Characters, creepy super zombies, an even creepier Necromancer and Loki's incredible coffee making skills.

Manages to take a Marty Stuish Wish Fulfillment based premise and turn it into something (so far) pretty good, largely by exploring the Butterfly Effect: while Harry is far better protected, loved and supported, it creates issues that weren't there before, both personally for Harry, and on a far grander scale for the rest of the universe.

Notable for its epic world building in a fashion somewhat reminiscent of The Last Son series (but, arguably, far beyond in scale) which Word of God has credited as part of the inspiration for the fic. Also credited are Smallville and X-Men: Evolution, in that it takes a similar concept of a young person discovering their powers and the issues that come with.

In short: Denser and Wackier and Darker and Edgier.

There are also constant hints by Word of God that he has the entire series mapped out.

Child Of The Storm contains examples of:

  • Absurdly Youthful Mother: Lily Potter, as per canon. Also, possibly, Wanda Maximoff, though she may have some kind of retarded ageing like Doctor Strange.
  • Action Dad: Thor.
  • Action Girl: Natasha and Darcy.
    • Carol Danvers has also shown signs of this.
    • Diana.
  • Adaptation Expansion: Most definitely. Related to the Alternate Universe entry below.
  • Adaptational Angst Upgrade: Zig Zagged. More than a few characters have more reason to angst than their canon counterparts, but don't all that much.
    • Warren plays this straight as an arrow. Though he has reason enough for that.
  • Adaptational Badass: Harry in particular, though pretty much everyone counts, as the story tends to take powers and extrapolate their logical capabilities.
    • This is what turns Sean Cassidy from B or C-List member of the X-Men famous for screaming really loudly, to a Badass Grandpa (who has the face and body of a man in his prime for reasons as yet only alluded to) who tore through an IRA cell that murdered his wife in such a fashion as to give Nick Fury himself nightmares, and whose name and codename scares a lot of people, so much so that he's shown up on Loki's radar. He's also a Nice Guy and Reasonable Authority Figure. However, you really don't want to make him angry.
    • Warren Worthington III is now not only in possession of impossibly sharp wings made of some as yet unidentified (but probably magical) metal that can take him to mach speed, he's also a low level superhuman capable of bench pressing a car, severe resistance to cold, incredible lung capacity (ergo, stamina) and with a Healing Factor close to Wolverine's. As Warren notes, he's basically a Living Weapon and a whole new level of Super Soldier. What depresses him is that he can slice loved ones to bits with a startled twitch.
  • Adaptational Villainy: Johnny and Sue Storm's father murdered their mother, whereas in canon, he was imprisoned for manslaughter after a fight with a loan shark (caused by gambling debts he ran up after the death of his wife in a car crash) and gets a Heroic Sacrifice.
  • The Ageless: implied for the Lady Knight.
    • Residents of Alfheim.
  • Alternate Universe: The author says that this won't be just a simple crossover, it'll be a new universe entirely. So far, he's not wrong.
  • Always Chaotic Evil: Averted with the Dark Elves. Odin states that not all followed Malekith.
  • Amazon Chaser: Harry, platonically and probably romantically, in the fullness of time.
    • Loki's in love with Sif.
  • Amicable Exes: Sif and Thor. Thor moved on with Lily and (after Lily's death) Jane, while Sif is clearly in love with Loki, who obviously has feelings for her but is too dense to act on them. Thor ships them, and often gets exasperated at his brother's obliviousness.
  • Animal Motifs: Mostly notably, Harry is closely associated with the Phoenix.
    • Thor is occasionally described in leonine terms.
    • Lucius Malfoy is generally associated with snakes.
  • Arch-Enemy: Voldemort to Harry, Thor and Loki (or rather, the first two. Loki simply vows eternal suffering on Voldemort because of what he did to his brother and nephew).
    • Malfoy to Fury. He took Fury's eye, Fury snapped his wand, gave him a limp and burned down his house. Using napalm.
  • Arc Welding: Played with. According to the author, a bit of this happens to bind stories together in the lesser story arcs. The major Myth Arc has been around since near the beginning, so that isn't so much of a problem. However, this is all being done to things which aren't posted yet.
  • The Archmage: Loki.
    • Albus Dumbledore.
    • Doctor Stephen Strange.
    • Wanda Maximoff.
  • Artificial Limbs: The Winter Soldier.
  • The Atoner: Loki. Very much so, feeling serious guilt about what he's done under a calm and relaxed façade.
    • Sif hints that this is, in fact, common to more people than he would think, including to her.
  • Attractive Bent-Gender: Lady Loki.
  • Author Appeal: The Sleep Cute and Badass Family tropes appear in other works by the same author.
  • Author Filibuster / Anvilicious: Occasionally takes on hints of this in response to assertions of wizarding power, in very pointedly (both in story and in notes) noting Wizarding flaws - an undeserved societal superiority complex, relatively limited power and, as a rule, a severe inability to come to terms with anything outside their frame of reference - but carefully avoids it.
  • Ax-Crazy: As is immediately obvious and regularly noted, Gravemoss is completely batshit insane.
  • Badass
    • Badass Adorable: Diana. Harry, to an extent.
    • Badass Boast: Several.
      • Thor:
      • "I am the God of Thunder and Lightning, not Reason and Understanding!"
      • "I am the God of Thunder and Lightning spoken of in ancient myth and whispered legend, Snape. I am he who battled Jormungand, the father of all great serpents, and fought the greatest Jotunheim had to offer when Merlin was but a suckling babe. I am Thor Odinson, God of the Vikings. Not a petty conjuror of cheap tricks. All the power of the storm, from all the world, flows through my veins. It can be summoned by my hammer at any time, wherever it is. A lightning storm in Japan? Mine. A hurricane off the coast of Barbados? Mine again. A brace of tornadoes in Kansas? Mine. All that might, all that destructive force, mine to command."
      • Bruce/The Hulk:
      • "Rest assured, Thor. We will find Harry. Well find the people who took him. And Hulk will smash."
      • Gravemoss:
      • "[I am] A man of magic, Callidus Nott. And a man of magic can do anything."
      • "Death is a gift, little mortal... and tonight I am feeling generous!"
      • "Darkspawn of London. You. Are. Mine."
      • Baron Zemo
      • [To Greyback after a Curb-Stomp Battle] "And to answer your earlier question, zer reason ve command you is because we are better than you."
      • Agent Wisdom gives a lengthy one (when asked by Betsy Braddock why he isn't letting the Avengers and various Asgardians deal with the villains.
    Because, Lady Elizabeth Braddock, hundreds of good men and women, loyal servants of the crown, died horrible deaths at the hands of these bastards. I watched friends and colleagues gunned down by the Winter Soldier, who’s now under HYDRA command. I had to identify the remains of old friends after the attack at MI6, and that was after I spent half a night running for my life from the Soldier. This was an attack on Britain and her people, Lady Braddock. We are not helpless little children, running to hide behind our big, tough friends after we get hurt. Any aid we receive is welcome. But this is our country, and our problem. And I intend to solve it by hunting down every single one of the bastards responsible for this and personally escorting them to whatever hell they believe in, Avengers and Asgardians be damned.
    • Natasha has a nice one.
  • Badass Cape: Thor.
    • Wanda Maximoff.
  • Badass Crew: The Avengers and Sif and the Warriors Three.
  • Badass Family: The Asgardian Royal Family. Includes Thor, Loki, Odin, Frigga and Harry.
    • And godparents Sirius Black and Wanda Maximoff.
      • The Avengers function as this.
    • Clint's family. His grandparents are Minerva McGonagall and Bucky Barnes/The Winter Soldier and his mother's adoptive brother was Jonathan Kent, father of Clark Kent. Yeah, Clint's first cousin is Superman. It's that kind of story.
    • Peggy Carter's family - her nephew is Brigadier Jack O'Neill, his daughter is Sharon Carter and his niece is Carol Danvers. That's a lot of badass.
      • And Lex Luthor seems to consider himself/be considered an honorary older brother to Carol...
    • The Maximoff family: there's Wanda, the Scarlet former apprentice of the Sorcerer Supreme and second most powerful wandless practitioner on the planet, her ex-boyfriend and father of her child John Constantine, her father, Magneto and her daughter, Hermione Granger.
  • Badass Grandpa: Odin and Dumbledore.
  • Badass Longcoat: John Constantine, Harry Dresden and Peter Wisdom, unsurprisingly.
  • Bad Future: Loki gets the briefest glimpse of one, courtesy of Karnilla to contrast the bright future Harry could bring. He'd be the one to bring about the Bad Future too, having morphed into a Blood Knight / Dark Messiah type.
  • Bait and Switch: Dresden's lengthy description of various types of vampire - which he suspects are involved - appears to be setting up another facet of the villainous alliance... until Coulson shoots that idea down, and points out that not all the bad guys out are there are part of Dresden's frame of reference.
  • Battle Amongst the Flames: the night after Lily's murder at Godric's Hollow, Nick Fury and Lucius Malfoy went toe to toe in Malfoy Manor, which was in the process of burning down.
  • The Beautiful Elite: Harry (fancast by the author as Tom Welling and repeatedly noted to be growing up into a handsome young man) and some of his newer friends seem to be shaping up to be this and Hermione is beginning to resemble her stunningly beautiful mother, Wanda Maximoff. That said, there is a hefty chunk of deconstrunction as it is repeatedly noted that both Carol and Diana are envied and/or dismissed because they're good looking, and in the former case, get a lot of unwanted attention, as per Truth in Television, and Jean-Paul has to endure more than a little homophobia.
    • And, it is noted, all of them are fairly lonely.
  • Been There, Shaped History: As near immortals Odin, Thor, Loki, Sif and the Warriors Three have all done this.
    • The Lady Knight. An involuntary time traveler who trained every great hero from William the Marshal to Cuchulainn. Exactly who she really is is something of a mystery.
    • Natasha is this on a smaller scale.
    • Ditto the Winter Soldier.
    • Apparently when the Manson family went after Sharon Tate, they ran face first into Magneto.
  • Berserk Button: For Thor, hurting his family or his friends. Particularly his family.
    • For Tony, hurting Pepper.
    Steve: Last time someone kidnapped Pepper, a domestic terrorist organisation and three blocks of flats got wiped off the map.
  • Beware the Nice Ones: As the author puts it, 'Bruce is small, sweet and cuddly... until, suddenly, he's not.'
    • Fitzsimmons explain to Skye in chapter 40 exactly why it is best not to annoy the lovely, warm hearted and somewhat motherly Wanda Maximoff. She can and will drop meteors on your head. And worse. You don't want to know what the worse is.
    • Loki muses that Reed Richards is far too absent minded to stay angry for long. But is Sue, Johnny or Ben Grimm were hurt... then, to use Loki's own words, 'the Nine Realms would tremble'.
  • Big Brother Instinct: Thor to Loki, and surprisingly, Clint to Harry.
    • Lex to Carol, to a nigh Knight Templar Big Brother extent. Boy refusing to take no for an answer? Simple! Put him on a plane to Guantanamo Bay and only turning around when the boy in question swears not to touch/bother/breathe in the direction of Carol ever again.
  • Big Good: Dumbledore (for the Wizarding World), Nick Fury (for the rest of the world) and Odin (for the rest of the Universe).
    • And Charles Xavier (for the mutants).
  • Bigger Bad: Recent chapters have hinted that Chthon is this, getting his first appearance when he psychically speaks with Harry Dresden.
  • Bi the Way: Howard Stark.
    • Darcy, to an unknown extent.
  • Black and White Morality: appears to be this at first, before progressing into Grey and Black Morality (though Steve is probably solidly in the White section of the moral scale - and even then, SSR did some fairly dodgy things in the War...) with the forces of good having a fair share of Anti Heroes, Magnificent Bastards and Manipulative Bastards. That said, it is a fairly light shade of grey, lightened further by Harry's Children Are Innocent (but not, in this case, naive) and the hinted presence of Clark Kent.
  • Black Eyes of Evil: The veidrdraugar. Very much so.
  • Blood Knight: Hippolyta and Hercules, according to their daughter, Diana, who pointedly averts this trope.
    • Thor, formerly.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: The Winter Soldier.
  • Bully Hunter: Harry, though the trope is somewhat deconstructed.
  • Bullying a Dragon: As Krieger finds out when dealing with T'Challa, this is a very bad idea.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: The British Foreign & Commonwealth Office.
  • Burn The Undead: Loki.
  • Butterfly Effect: the entire story is effectively an exploration of this.
  • Buxom Is Better: Averted as regards Carol. Being both buxom for her age and Younger than She Looks, she finds the unwanted attention it gets her rather wearing.
  • Byronic Hero: Loki.
    • Snape, technically.
    • Agent Wisdom. Oh so very, very much.
    • Warren takes it Up to Eleven, with the trope practically being quoted.
  • Call Back: Loki at the end of chapter 37 uses the same Discworld quote ("Do not let me/us detain you.") on Fudge as Dumbledore did.
    • 46 has a couple of them.
      • One all the way back to chapter 3, with Thor mentioning that he had, as James, compared Lily to a Phoenix.
      • Odin's favourite thing to hunt is Bilgesnipe.
    • Chapter 49 calls back all the way to a throwaway line in chapter 2 when it brings in Alan Scott.
    • Repeatedly to Goblins investing in the muggle world.
  • Calling the Old Man Out: Harry to Odin.
  • The Call Put Me On Hold: Harry compared to Asgardians and more powerful heroes - he's restricted to some third year magic, and unless he's being amped by Loki specifically to survive overenthusiastic Asgardian kids, that's it.
    • It's all but stated that Harry has a strong connection to the Phoenix force. Exactly how that connection will manifest, however...
  • Camp Gay: Jean-Paul Beaubier, to an extent. Very gay and very obvious about it, with some camp mannerisms that make him appear totally harmless, but he's far more observant and on the ball than his act would have you believe.
  • The Casanova: Fandral.
    Ladies, ladies, calm yourselves. There is more than enough of Fandral the Dashing to go around.
  • Casanova Wannabe: Thor when puberty hit, according to Loki. Then puberty really hit, in a He's All Grown Up sort of way, and he became far more successful.
  • Cast from Hit Points: The God Blast. Loki lampshades the unimaginative nature of the name.
    • A wandless Wizard's 'Death Curse' as ably demonstrated by Harry Dresden.
  • The Chains of Commanding: Odin. He isn't exactly fond of it.
    • Nick Fury, to a lesser extent.
  • Changeling Fantasy: Strangely zig-zagged. Sure, Harry's really the son of Thor... who also just happened to be incarnated as James Potter.
  • Character Development: Thor and James Potter are essentially blended together. The entire premise of the fic is based on the consequences of Thor's first shot at this.
    • Harry slowly begins to adjust to his new status and assert it, revealing a significantly snarkier side (and blaming it, not unreasonably, on Tony).
    • Uhtred.
    • Loki, has developed from a bitter, cruel, ruthless and possibly insane megalomaniac into a remorseful, Reformed But Not Tamed version of The Spymaster, as well as a Cool Uncle to Harry.
  • Chekhov's Armoury: Utterly revels in this trope, maybe even enough to rival J. K. Rowling herself.
  • Cheshire Cat Grin: Harry. He picked it up from Loki.
  • The Chessmaster: Loki. Dumbledore. Fury. Odin.
    • Doctor Strange.
  • Chivalrous Pervert: Jean-Paul. Happily flirts with Harry, but backs off immediately and apologises when he sees that Harry's a little bothered by being hit on.
    • Sirius.
  • Chronic Hero Syndrome: Steve and Thor.
    • Tony has his own Knight In Sour Armour variant.
    • Harry.
    • Harry Dresden - something that Coulson plays on to get him involved.
  • Clarke's Third Law: Applied (on Earth in regard to new Bifrost technology) and inverted (on Asgard).
  • Cloudcuckoolander: Sirius occasionally gives off this vibe - he's quite clearly not entirely there, but he's also a lot cleverer than he pretends to be.
  • Cold Sniper: The Winter Soldier.
  • Colony Drop: Apparently Wanda makes a habit of this, enough for it to be used as an example of why not to piss her off by Fitzsimmons.
  • Combat Pragmatist: SHIELD's hat in general.
  • Compelling Voice: Gravemoss.
  • Complexity Addiction: Loki
    • Probably the author too.
    • Apparently the fatal flaw of the Malfoy family - they're rather fond of misdirection and distraction, introducing lots of false leads for investigators to follow while they go to work. The Fatal Flaw part comes in when they do it even when a simple course of direct action would be more appropriate.
  • Composite Character: Agent Wisdom combines Marvel's Agent Peter Wisdom with Regulus Black.
    • Many of the Marvel characters have elements of this, with different character traits/bits of backstory being drawn from different sources.
  • Continuity Lockout: Strenuously seeks to avoid this, with a reasonable degree of success, if only because a lot of the more obscure characters are explained in the text, many things are being changed anyway, as well as the fact that Word of God is entirely happy to give a Cliff Notes summary when required.
    • That said, the story makes much more sense first time round if you have an encyclopaedic knowledge of Marvel, DC and certain aspects of both mythology and world history.
  • Continuity Nod: Due to the nature of the universe, can be a little hard to separate one of these from a Shout-Out.
    • Wanda's habit of using the Colony Drop and her general badassery without resorting to outright reality warping calls back to Steve Englehart's depiction, which also tended to pull a Colony Drop or two with meteors.
    • The entire premise of Thor having been incarnated as a mortal prior to his more recent banishment and siring a child could be considered a Call Back to an obscure part of his comics history, in which he was incarnated as first Siegmund, then his son, Siegfried.
  • Continuity Porn / Shown Their Work: One of the main villains is a reworking of a minor villain from an Excalibur comic in the Nineties. This should give you a general idea.
    • The list of Asgardian ranks, all of which are drawn from Norse history.
    • Even down to the food which Thor buys Sirius, all of which was eaten by the Norse.
  • Contrived Coincidence: Takes it Up to Eleven, then, remarkably, explains it in a fashion that actually makes sense, Chapter 48: At the behest of Stephen Strange, Wanda casts a blessing on her godson, Harry, which means that 'he will never be alone and he will always have someone to turn to', causing Harry to having something of Winds of Destiny, Change effect (which is somewhat ironic, considering the Trope Namer is the one that causes it). And one gets the impression that this is all part of Stephen Strange's grand plan...
  • Cool and Unusual Punishment: Stephen Strange has a wicked sense of humour.
  • Cool Loser: Harry, Carol, Jean-Paul and, arguably, Diana suffer from this, each time being justified.
    • Harry isn't exactly the most social person on the planet to begin with and is still adjusting to his newfound status as a Prince of Asgard. Also, he has issues. Lots of them.
    • Carol has a realistic variation of So Beautiful, It's a Curse, her looks garnering jealousy from the girls and unwanted attention from the boys and from grown men. This is not helped by her outwardly abrasive personality and short temper, as well as the fact that she's better at athletics than all the boys and a talented all round sportswoman. In turn, her friendship with Jean-Paul is unlikely to do her social cred much good.
      • It is noted in chapter 50 that her teammates on the school football (soccer) team all like her.
    • Jean-Paul is extremely handsome (Harry describes him as beautiful), charming, witty and friendly. He's also very Camp Gay and very open about it, whose first appearance is him flirting with Harry, bantering with Carol, then zipping off to avoid the wrath of a homophobic father who feels that his son has been defiled. Later appearances reveal that this is a case of Crouching Moron, Hidden Badass and that he has considerable Hidden Depths, but the superficial appearance makes him a target for homophobes.
    • Diana is a pretty little girl who has the misfortune to be a very intelligent, thoroughly and uncomfortably insightful in a fashion reminiscent of a more down to Earth Luna Lovegood via her Empathy and genuinely badass pre teen goddess. Unfortunately, as noted in the text, her part in one of Harry's escapades is dismissed as 'aww, she's cute and those boys are so brave and clever, they must have rescued her', until Harry loudly sets the record straight.
  • Cool Big Sister: Sif is regarded as this by the Warriors Three, despite the fact that Volstagg is probably older than her.
    • She acts somewhat like this to Harry as well.
    • Jane to Harry, after a while.
  • Cool Gun: Ward's 'Deity Class' submachine gun, based on the Heckler & Koch MP 5, which is powered by reverse engineered Destroyer tech.
  • Cool Uncle: Tony, with an added dose of pure crazy thrown in.
    • The other male Avengers largely qualify.
  • Cosmic Plaything: Athena suggests that Harry might be this, in thoroughly cryptic terms. Karnilla's prophecy/warning may bear this out.
  • Costume Porn: Harry's Asgardian formal wear.
  • Crazy Enough to Work: Harry's plan in Chapter 34. It requires truly epic amounts of Refuge in Audacity, and the title of the chapter itself is 'Fool's Gambit'.
  • Cuddle Bug: Harry quietly develops into this, out of a mix of the free offer of such affection and a hefty dose of Author Appeal.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Zemo vs Greyback.
    • T'Challa vs Krieger.
  • Cuteness Proximity: Harry is very good at this.
  • Cynicism Catalyst: The attack on Godric's Hollow, most particularly Lily's death and the fallout (Harry being given to the Dursleys, Sirius being wrongfully imprisoned) was a fairly epic one for Nick Fury. Losing his eye to Lucius Malfoy probably didn't help matters. When he returned to the US, he devoted all of his energies into becoming Director in order to avenge Lily and protect people like her, managing it in under a decade. Everyone who knew him during the days of the First Order, when he was SHIELD's liaison to the Order and the protégé of Lily's parents ('the Black Widow and Hawkeye of their day'), as well as John Constantine and Sirius Black's drinking buddy, is shocked by the change.
  • Daddy Had a Good Reason for Abandoning You: In Child Of The Storm, Daddy had an excellent reason for abandoning Harry - he was Thor, incarnated as a mortal, whose violent death and grief had driven him stark raving mad, and Odin had to block off his memories to ensure that he stayed sane and Britain remained in one piece. As soon as he remembers, however, he comes in like the cavalry.
    • Wanda had an excellent reason for abandoning Harry and her daughter, Hermione. She was Doctor Strange's apprentice and her Rogues Gallery was stuffed chock full of one kind of Eldritch Abomination or another, while simultaneously having made enemies of Bellatrix Lestrange and Lucius Malfoy in particular, both of whom were still on the loose when Harry's parents were murdered, and one of whom commanded unparalleled political influence. As for her daughter, the situation was even worse. It was about two years before, the good guys were losing and Voldemort was at the height of his power. Plus, Hermione's father happens to be John Constantine, who is a) not exactly prime father material, b) public enemy number one for just about every hell dimension in existence. And in both cases, one has to take into account her father's enemies... Also, Doctor Strange said so and people tend to do as Strange says, if only because not doing it tends to make you wish that you had (not because of anything he does, but because the consequences of not doing it tend to be pretty horrible).
    • It's hinted that Jean Grey's family, Harry's maternal cousins, tried to adopt Harry when he was about seven or eight, and were stymied by a certain person who was very interested in keeping Harry at Privet Drive. This force has all but been confirmed to be Mister Sinister.
  • Dare to Be Badass: Agent Wisdom gives a speech along these lines out to Betsy Braddock.
    But in the end, Miss Braddock, it comes down to this. Are you the sort of person who would let something like this pass? Are you the sort of person who would let evil win? And above all, Miss Braddock: are you ready to serve your country?
  • Darker and Edgier: Compared to both Harry Potter and The Avengers.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: Several, including, surprisingly enough, Johnny Storm.
  • Dark-Skinned Blonde: Mar-Vell is blond and blue eyed like his Earth 616 counterpart, but is described as having tan (not tanned) skin, unlike his usual pale appearance.
  • Dawn Of An Age: Repeatedly suggested, with Harry being a major figure in it. Of course, as Mc Gonagall has noted, this isn't necessarily a good thing.
  • Dead Little Sister: Lily is this to Nick Fury. He was her surrogate big brother and Sirius considers him to have been better family to Lily than Petunia ever was.
    • Harry, though very few know, it, technically has one: as revealed by Sirius, Lily was pregnant when she died.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Everyone. Absolutely everyone.
    • Loki, Tony and Darcy stand out.
    • Natasha.
  • Death by Irony: A Tear Jerker variant. Loki hid his pregnant lover away from the feared - and non-existent - wrath of his parents, or rather, his father. If he hadn't, she would still be alive. And he knows it.
    • In a marginally lighter example, James Bond at the hands of the Winter Soldier. If he hadn't stopped for the Pre-Mortem One-Liner... well, the Soldier knew he was there, so he only might have survived, but it would have been a chance at least.
  • Deconstruction Crossover: Elements are beginning to emerge.
  • Deconstructor Fleet: Takes this approach to most aspects of Harry Potter fanfiction, particularly the ideas of Super!Harry, Lord!Harry, God!Harry Genius!Harry and Sex God!Harry. All of them are systematically subverted, and instead Harry is presented as reacting much as in canon when faced with fame (only magnified to match the circumstances), with justifications introduced for any change in character.
    • This all designed to remind people that though Harry is The Hero, he's still human (relatively speaking) and he's still a kid.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Everyone, at points, though Loki, Tony and Darcy reign supreme.
    • Jesus, apparently.
    • Even Odin has his moments, such as this one from Chapter 34:
    Thor: *after Harry's escape from the Disir* Well, I think this calls for a celebration, don’t you?
    Odin: And we don’t even have to worry about inviting guests. How fortuitous.
  • Denser and Wackier: Played With. Much, much denser than either of the two base canons, the Marvel Cinematic Universe and Harry Potter, but after the first nine or so chapters, it loses most of the wackiness for a decidedly Darker and Edgier approach. That said, elements of wackiness still persist.
  • Desperately Craves Affection: Harry, in a very quiet, reserved sort of way.
  • Determinator: Harry.
    • The Winter Soldier.
  • Deus ex Machina: Doctor Strange resurrects both Harry Dresden and Sif, underlining the facts that he is both obscenely powerful and has his own agenda.
    • Fury quotes the trope in reference to the above incident.
  • Disappeared Dad: Thor. Very definitely not by choice.
  • Disc One Final Boss: Lucius Malfoy.
  • Distracted by the Sexy: Carol uses this (offscreen) to give Harry time to spike the drink of Bolivar Trask.
    • Scott is distracted by Jean's sexy when she's bending over and wearing tight jeans.
    • Harry is distracted by the sexy of Lily, the Summer Lady.
    • Jean-Paul is distracted by the sexy of a man who is very heavily implied to be Doctor Strange.
    • Everyone is distracted by Warren's sexy.
    • Hermione is distracted by Sean Cassidy's sexy.
  • Door Stopper: Takes this Up to Eleven. By chapter 52, Book 1 has reached 427,334 words. The entire Lord of the Rings trilogy reached somewhere around 450,000 words.
  • Dope Slap: Pepper to Tony, on a regular basis.
  • Dork Knight: Steve, Thor and Harry all have their moments.
  • The Dragon: Gravemoss and the Winter Soldier are Co-Dragons to Lucius. Baron Von Strucker is probably supposed to be a third, but he really hasn't got any screen time.
    • And when he has, he's shown up as more of a Smug Snake.
  • Dragon with an Agenda: Gravemoss is beginning to look like this.
    • So is Von Strucker.
  • Dramatic Irony: The audience, Hank McCoy and Charles Xavier know that the real name of Tony's mother was Tessa, as in Sage of the X-Men and that Howard was the White King of the Hellfire Club - which he joined to keep an eye on it and feed information to the X-Men. Tony doesn't.
  • The Dreaded: The veidrdraugar. Since they nearly wiped out the Asgardians in the distant past, their mere mention terrifies Loki (and for good reason) and Odin went to great pains to obliterate them so thoroughly that all that remains are nursery rhymes and rumours and have so far lived up to the hype, they fit this trope very neatly.
    • The Winter Soldier. So feared, that even into the modern day, the age of superheroes, he is still considered to be the most dangerous man on the planet, despite being, for all intents and purposes, a low level superhuman like Steve (if even as strong as that) and an, admittedly very skilled, assassin. Loki even tells Sif that he may even by the most deadliest assassin in all of the Nine Realms.
    • The Darkhold. Loki had a Not So Stoic Oh Crap moment once Fury told him it was stolen. Normally, a book would not incite such a reaction, but then again, this is a book that contains the knowledge to create the veidrdraugar. To put this in perspective, Loki described the One Ring from The Lord of the Rings as an extremely watered-down version of the Darkhold. The scariest part is that the book is literally impossible to destroy, being untouched by time and referred to be Loki as a brother to entropy, it is essentially in the same state it was when it was first created.
    • Magneto. Everyone even vaguely acquainted with the dark side is terrified of him, including, so far, Sebastian Shaw II, pretty much all of HYDRA (as Fury notes, "They won't cross him. They wouldn't dare.") and Narcissa Malfoy. Even the good guys, Loki and Fury in particular, speak of him with respect. Since he apparently destroyed three successive Inner Circles of the Hellfire Club, this is unsurprising.
  • Drunk on the Dark Side: Gravemoss lives and breathes this trope, especially after he gets hold of the Darkhold.
    • Dane Whitman, the Black Knight, and wielder of the Ebony Blade, has a hint of this when he wields it in battle.
  • Ear Ache: Pepper is known for twisting Tony's ear when he does something stupid. Clint too, sometimes.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: Full of these, usually via an offhand reference. So far, we've had:
    • Reed Richards and Susan Storm
    • Hank Pym and Janet Van Dyne
    • J. Jonah Jameson and Marla Jameson
    • Mattie Franklin
    • T'Challa
    • Coulson and his team
    • Charles Xavier and Hank McCoy
    • Sebastian Shaw
    • Wanda Maximoff
    • Magneto
    • John Constantine
    • Doctor Strange
    • Harry Dresden
    • Gwen Stacy
    • Peter Parker
    • Flash Thompson
    • The Kent family (who Clint is related to by his mother's adoption)
    • Betsy Braddock.
    • Albus Dumbledore refers to, among others, Brian Braddock and Virgil Swann.
    • And many, many more.
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom: Krypton, as per usual.
  • Eerie Pale-Skinned Brunette: Sirius has shades of this. Bellatrix too, though she has yet to appear.
    • The Winter Soldier.
  • Enigmatic Minion: Lucius notes this about the Winter Soldier: he has no idea what motivates the man (and isn't entirely sure if he's actually a man.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Lucius Malfoy practically quotes the trope in respect to Gravemoss, who is more properly a Humanoid Abomination.
    • Chthon, however, seems to fit this like a glove.
  • Establishing Character Moment: The Winter Soldier makes his entrance in complete silence, carrying the heads of Lucius Malfoy's guard animals - a Chimera and a Nundu. Both possess Nigh-Invulnerability. One has only successfully been killed once (Bellerephon and Pegasus) and the other takes at least a hundred wizards to bring down. He doesn't take a scratch, or, apparently, even slow down. And he doesn't say a single thing as he does it.
    • On a lighter note, the first thing Jean-Paul does is decide that Harry is cute, hit on him, then immediately back off when it's clear that Harry isn't interested.
    • Arguably, Harry establishes his more assertive, more protective personality, which has steadily been coming to the fore, in chapter 34. The Disir threaten to kill Diana and Uhtred. Harry promptly tells them that if they do, they'd better kill him to, because it doesn't matter if it takes until he becomes the King of Asgard, one day, he will see them burn.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: Lucius may regard muggles as animals and pests, but there are some things that you don't do even to animals. Gravemoss has no such compunctions.
  • Even the Guys Want Him: Warren.
  • Everyone Can See It: Loki/Sif. Even Fandral can see it.
    • Scott Summers being hopelessly in love with Jean Grey. Even Harry Dresden, who was only at the Institute for telepathic therapy (though known for being fairly observant), sees it.
  • Everyone Is Related: Harry is second cousin to Jean Grey.
    • Clint is Minerva McGonagall and Bucky Barnes' grandson and related to the Kent family by his mother's adoption.
    • On a non-biological level, Charles Xavier is Tony's godfather and Nick Fury was Lily's surrogate big brother.
    • Brigadier Jack O'Neill is the nephew of Peggy Carter, and Carol Danvers is his niece (making her Peggy's Great-Niece).
    • By Chapter 45, it's all but been stated that Hermione is the daughter of Wanda Maximoff and John Constantine.
  • Evil Albino: Gravemoss.
  • Evil Is One Big Happy Family: seemingly played straight at first, in regard to Lucius and HYDRA in particular, but averted as it turns out: Von Strucker's playing his own game, Gravemoss is an Ax-Crazy Omnicidal Maniac and Lucius essentially used his fellow Death Eaters as decoys, keeping them in line with the threat of the Winter Soldier.
    • Utterly obliterated by chapter 50, as Lucius Malfoy enslaves Baron Von Strucker for long enough to find out how to control the Winter Soldier. Afterwards, he is disposed of.
  • Evilutionary Biologist: Zola, the Red Room, and Gravemoss, in a weird sort of way.
  • Expospeak Gag
  • Expy: Gravemoss is a curious example - he's based on an Excalibur villain, but his death fixation and Omnicidal Maniac tendencies resemble Thanos (who he implies he has something of an acquaintance with), yet he also heavily resembles Malekith the Accursed in being a white haired sorcerer elf and a complete lunatic, particularly as he appears in The Accursed, about a year after Gravemoss was first introduced.
  • Eye Patch Of Power: Nick Fury.
  • Eye Scream: Nick Fury.
  • The Fair Folk: Lily and Fix from The Dresden Files make an appearance during the Asgardian party chapter and give Harry their take on going from mortal to superhuman. Maeve is also mentioned.
  • Famed in Story: Aside from the obvious, the Winter Soldier.
  • Fantastic Racism: A degree of this is behind Uhtred's dislike of/rivalry with Harry and is discarded as part of his Character Development.
  • Fantastic Science: Asgard tends towards this.
  • Fatal Flaw: For Loki, mistrust.
  • Fiery Redhead: Lily Potter. Takes on a whole new significance with her repeatedly teased connection to the Phoenix Force.
  • Fighter, Mage, Thief: Uhtred, Harry, Diana - she's probably the closest to a Fragile Speedster that they have.
    • Carol, Harry, Jean-Paul.
    • Ron, Hermione, Harry.
  • Fire-Forged Friends: the Avengers.
    • Wisdom specifically averts with Excalibur when it's brought up, pointing out that the Avengers all ended up living together because a) the unifying influence and leadership of Captain America, b) Tony Stark had a very large tower, c) Steve and Bruce had nowhere to go and Thor - then, later, Loki - were always going to adventure on Earth, with or without the Avengers. He may have a point, especially considering that he apparently blackmailed his ace in the hole Wanda Maximoff.
    • Or he could be lying to assuage the worries of British politicians, who saw just how off script the Avengers went and know that the same thing could happen again.
    • Harry specialises in this.
  • Five-Bad Band:
  • Five-Man Band:
  • Flying Brick: Thor.
    • Tony and Rhodey in their respective armours.
    • Mar-Vell.
    • With the confirmed existence of Clark Kent as Harry's contemporary, another example of this trope is approaching faster than a speeding bullet.
    • Loki, technically, as he can apparently fly when the mood takes him. Played with, however, as he isn't shown flying in combat, and, in any case, it's likely to be his last resort in battle.
  • Flying Firepower: Tony and Rhodey again.
    • Thor, tangentially speaking - he flies and throws lightning bolts around, if not exactly from his hands. Usually.
    • Mar-Vell.
    • Loki, sort of.
    • Sean Cassidy.
    • Wanda Maximoff takes this trope Up to Eleven.
  • Follow the Chaos: Where trouble is to be found, Harry is rarely far away.
  • Foreshadowing: Bucketloads of it. We've so far got Harry's blood connection to Jean Grey, Charles Xavier and Beast having an interest in him, Wanda Maximoff and John Constantine having a child, the voice in Draco Malfoy's head, the references to Magneto...
    • Harry's tendency towards forming a Power Trio, his association with imagery of a very particular cosmic entity, and Karnilla's prophecy.
    • Fury seems to be implying to Coulson in recent chapters that he's looking to 'take a leaf out of Xavier's book'. In other words, he intends to set up something along the lines of the Young Avengers/Avengers Academy and put Coulson in charge.
    • A very, very, 'very' sly one. Jane mentions in a throwaway line that her half brother is 'a real daredevil'.
  • For the Evulz: an effective summary of why Gravemoss does anything, beyond his usual Omnicidal Maniac tendencies, with the addition of a twisted scholarly interest and an apparent worship of Death itself. This is the guy who enslaved a bunch of Dementors and sent them into a cancer ward for kicks, after all.
  • Four-Star Badass: Nick Fury, Director of SHIELD, who is the reason that Lucius Malfoy is on his second wand, walks with a stick and a lot of Malfoy Manor isn't much more than ten years old...
    • Peter Wisdom, on his appointment as Director of MI13. He went toe to toe with the Winter Soldier and got away with his life.
  • Four-Temperament Ensemble:
  • Freudian Trio: Harry's female friends fall neatly into this dynamic. Hermione's The Spock / Superego (setting great store by logic), Diana's The McCoy / Id (being the youngest, most obviously idealistic and a freaking empath to boot), and Carol is The Kirk / Ego (being the most mature and most pragmatic).
  • Friendly Sniper: Clint.
  • Funny Background Event: Just after Jane has asked for and been given permission to throw a book at Loki (it bounces off) because he's being an Insufferable Genius, Fandral starts giving a chair and Loki's head speculative looks, as if wondering if he can get in on the fun. Sif doesn't even have to turn around.
    Sif: Fandral, stop that.
  • Gadgeteer Genius: Tony and Howard Stark.
    • The first Spitfire.
  • Generation Xerox: Clint ended up becoming a skilled marksman (possibly the most skilled in all of the nine realms) and assassin, just like his grandfather, Bucky Barnes, aka the Winter Soldier. While no one knows about the whole "Winter Soldier" part, Steve is able to deduce Clint's heritage from an offhand comment by Minerva (Clint's grandmother) and Clint's notable resemblance to his grandfather. The fact that Bucky is/was a good as shot as Clint himself helps as well, and it's implied that the only reason Clint's a better marksman than his grandfather is because of his magical heritage, which is enough to empower him with Improbable Aiming Skills but not enough to make him a full-fledged wizard.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: An in-universe example - Fandral alludes to Sif and Thor having got it on in the past in front of Harry, with suggestive references to moaning. Sif nuts him and knocks him out cold before he can go any further.
    • Slyly done every now and then in the narration, often through use of Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness.
    • Betsy's Cerebro remote access password? Fuck You rendered in the NATO alphabet.
  • Genetic Engineering is the New Nuke: Played straight.
  • Genre Savvy: Darcy in particular.
    • Harry. When Charles Xavier offers a little psychic counselling, he responds:
    • Dumbledore. On meeting Howard Stark and working with SSR in World War II, he realised just how powerful muggles were becoming, advancing at incredible rates in contrast to Wizarding stagnation, and has since spent much of his time and considerable intellect to understanding muggle science and trying to get the Wizarding World back into motion by fostering a desire for learning and helping their fellow man among his students, because he knows that they're being overtaken.
    • Sean Cassidy.
  • The Ghost: Doctor Strange. He's made a couple of very brief appearances and a cameo, but has otherwise been offstage.
    • His first lengthy appearance in chapter 48 leaves more questions than it answers, too...
  • Gilligan Cut: Pulls one when Lucius is mulling over the good guys preparing for the battle to come... as it turns out, they're settling in for a Doctor Who marathon.
  • Glowing Eyes: Doctor Strange tends to use this to emphasise his otherworldly nature.
  • Glowing Eyes of Doom: Thor's eyes tend take on an electric blue-white colour when he's really pissed off.
    • Harry's eyes have been known to briefly go a dangerous gold colour when he's angry. There's a couple of things it could be, and none of them spell anything but trouble.
  • Glowing Eyelights of Undeath: the undead warrior that the Black Knight duels.
  • God of Evil: Gravemoss has power levels roughly equivalent to Loki's - and that's pre Darkhold.
    • Chthon is the God of Black Magic.
  • God of War: Sif. Her viewpoint section in chapter 29 suggests that she has a fair few abilities to go with it.
  • Good Cannot Comprehend Evil: Harry is a literal reading of this trope - he knows evil exists, he knows what it can do better than most, but he quite simply doesn't understand it.
  • Good Is Not Nice: Odin, as a result of being King and The Chains of Commanding, which force him to make decisions for the good of his kingdom, not necessarily the people he cares about. He doesn't like it.
  • Good Parents: Thor. He may not be all that practised at it, he may have - against his own will - missed out on much of his son's childhood, but he quite clearly loves his son to pieces and does his very best to be a good father. And he succeeds.
    • Loki is a good uncle/pseudo parent to Harry as well.
  • The Good Prince: Thor. Harry.
  • Gory Discretion Shot: Occasionally used. Occasionally not.
  • Grin of Audacity: Harry, Loki, Thor when his James is showing.
    • Sirius Black.
    • Darcy Lewis.
  • Grey and Black Morality: Seems to have drifted into this, with the darker side of the forces of good being put on show, and the author's application of realism, but equally, there are a few Pillars of Moral Character, such as Steve, Harry (sort of, in a Children Are Innocent sense. Though this does not take into account his dangerous temper and occasional, admittedly vague, resemblance to a young Magneto) and Clark Kent.
  • Groin Attack: Feeling up Carol Danvers is a bad idea. As Krieger found out.
    • Harry to Uhtred.
  • Guile Hero: Loki, Fury, Natasha, Dumbledore.
    • Harry has developed into one by Chapter 34.
  • The Gunslinger: Clint is a classic type A.
    • the Winter Soldier is a type A and a type D with a touch of C.
  • Hair of Gold, Heart of Gold: Thor. Steve.
  • Half-Human Hybrid: Harry. The entire premise of the story, in some respects. He hasn't exhibited any powers from his dad's side. Yet.
    • He's starting to, now. Though some of them seem to come from his mother...
    • Technically Tony since his mother's real name was Tessa a.k.a. Sage of the X-Men.
  • Handicapped Badass: Charles Xavier. He may be in a wheelchair, but he's still the most powerful psychic on the planet and a man that even Odin regards with definite respect.
  • Harem: Explicitly, repeatedly and emphatically nixed by the author. Also occasionally mocked.
  • Has Two Daddies: Thor and Loki to Harry in an interesting platonic (brotherly) variant - Thor's the nurturing affectionate parent, while Loki is the firmer and more guidance based parent.
  • Have We Met?: Double-whammy in Chapter 45: The Winter Soldier notes that Minerva McGonagall is familiar (but he does not remember why) and Thor when he realizes that Hermione looks like Wanda Maximoff.
  • Healing Factor: Wolverine, of course.
    • Asgardians seem to have one.
    • Gravemoss has a ridiculously powerful one as of Chapter 44 - Sif lops off his arm. He doesn't even seem to notice and it starts growing back immediately.
  • Heroic Build: Steve. Thor. Clint's a more pocket sized version, but he has the muscles.
    • Harry is growing into this.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: Bruce and Remus are going this way.
    • Sciencebros.
    • The Avengers as a whole.
  • Hero Killer: The Winter Soldier really goes in for this. His rap sheet includes the killings of Spitfire I, Union Jack (implied to be, unlike his Badass Normal namesake, a previous Captain Britain), the Destroyer, and James Bond.
    • He also made a spirited attempt to add Wolverine to that list, and nearly succeeded. Spitfire II only escaped through her Super Speed.
    • He even killed John F. Kennedy.
    • Hell, Fury even calls him a "hero killer." Once he sets his sights on you, there's no stopping him.
  • Hidden Depths: Fandral. Sif notes that he's like a puddle over a pothole. He only looks shallow.
    • Jean-Paul Beaubier. He's far more observant and on the ball than he pretends, and that's just for starters.
    • The Winter Soldier. He appears to be a soulless automaton, but his brief point of view sections contain flickering hints of emotion, as well as Natasha strongly suggesting that there is far more to him than simply silent killing machine.
    • Volstagg, who immediately knows what's wrong with Harry (repressing) before he even meets him, going off an implication by Loki. Which is unsurprising since he's a father himself and Loki notes that Thor could benefit from his experience.
  • Hope Bringer: Harry is specially namechecked as potentially being this (the alternative is that he could turn into a Dark Messiah on par with/beyond Magneto himself).
    • Also a certain 'Last Son'. As in Kal-El, the Last Son of Krypton.
  • Hot Witch: Lily Potter, Wanda Maximoff, Frigga, Lady Loki.
  • Humanoid Abomination: If Gravemoss wasn't this to begin with, he is now.
  • Humans Are Special: Thor believes this, and so does Dumbledore.
    • Most non-humans on the good guys side think this to one extent or another. To be fair, if you'd met the Avengers, you'd think the same.
  • Humans Are Survivors: Dumbledore's view on humanity. Thor comes round to it once he considers the example of Tony Stark.
  • Humans Are Warriors: Thor believes this. Dumbledore disagrees, thinking that we're something far more dangerous: Survivors, with all the tropes that that entails, such as Determinator, Implacable Man, Action Survivor, Gadgeteer Genius...
    • Loki also subscribes to this theory, though his ideas are closer to Dumbledore's.
  • Human Mum NonHuman Dad: Harry, being the son of Thor.
  • Human Weapon: The Winter Soldier.
  • Humble Hero: Steve, of course. The serum amplifies both physical and mental attributes, and many (including Loki and Tony) compliment and/or acknowledge how great a man he truly is. Steve is notably embarrassed, because he still sees himself as that skinny kid who was too dumb to run away from a fight — which, if anything, verifies what everybody else says about him.
    Steve: I'm just another kid from Brooklyn. Nothing special about me.
  • I Have Many Names: The Winter Soldier.
  • Implacable Man: The Winter Soldier. When Tony was younger, his family's security detail was told that if the Soldier came after them, they were to basically throw themselves in front of him and die as slowly impossible, in hope that the Starks would have enough time to escape.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: Clint and the Winter Soldier. Which is unsurprising considering that the Winter Soldier is actually Clint's grandfather.
  • Indy Ploy: When in a practice swordfight with someone who is twice your size and extremely skilled, what do you do? Well, if you're Harry, the answer is to hurl yourself into a death defying leap over their head, land roughly on your feet (breaking an ankle) and then waiting for them to turn straight into your sword.
  • In Medias Res: Starts this way.
  • Internal Reveal: Very fond of these. For instance, the audience knows that Jean Grey is Harry's cousin, Bucky is the Winter Soldier, Tony's father was the White King of the Hellfire Club and his mother was really Sage of the X-Men, both of them working for Charles Xavier, and Lucius Malfoy personally murdered Harry's maternal grandparents. But the characters these facts pertain too don't know them. Yet.
    • Fury knows about Lucius Malfoy's culpability and uses it as a bargaining chip when suborning Narcissa.
  • Instant Expert: Pointedly averted with Harry.
    • Played straight with Sif, in regard to weapons, apparently, thanks to being a God of War.
  • Inter Generational Friendship: Too many to count.
  • In Vino Veritas: Loki mentions exploiting the Loose Lips variant of this in order to gather information.
  • It's Not You, It's My Enemies: A non-romantic variant between Wanda and Harry. She couldn't take him in because, frankly, her enemies are largely made up of one breed of Eldritch Abomination or another.
    • And also with Wanda and her daughter, Hermione.
  • I Want Grandkids: Frigga plays this straight as an arrow, though in a fairly laidback fashion - in other words, she wants grandchildren to spoil (and adores Harry), but she's not going to nag Thor day in, day out, over it.
  • Jesus Taboo: Averted and played straight. Jesus does exist, yes, and he is the son of God, but God is simply a very powerful Skyfather/Elder God. And he hasn't, and probably won't, appear.
  • Jesus Was Way Cool: According to Thor and Loki. They were something of a bad influence on him.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk: Snape.
  • Karma Houdini: Averted with Loki. He's very much The Atoner and seeks to protect what he swore once to destroy - Thor and Earth. He's now Asgard's spymaster and an Avenger, who, along with Clint and Natasha, is willing to do the dirty work behind the scenes.
  • Kick the Dog: Gravemoss in Chapter 21.
    • Referenced again in chapter 32. He enslaved some Dementors and sent them into a terminal ward for kicks.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: Krieger, in a non-lethal variant. While he gets an eyewatering kick in the balls and a brief but effective beatdown by T'Challa, the racist, sexist pervert kind of deserves it.
  • Kill It with Fire: An effective way of dealing with the veidrdraugar.
    • How Fury attempted to deal with Lucius Malfoy. While it failed, he gets points for trying - he used napalm
  • Knight of Cerebus: Lucius Malfoy. Also Gravemoss, though he appears before the Wham Episode. Up until chapter 21, the fic was a moderately serious family fic with some appropriately evil villains. Then he happened.
  • Knight Templar Big Brother: Lex to Carol. Deconstructed somewhat.
    Carol: Lex, there's sweet and there's borderline psychotic.
    • Since he'd just cheerfully confirmed that one boy who'd not wanted to take no for answer had been stuffed on a plane to Guantanamo Bay which had only turned around when he swore not to go near Carol ever again, this is in no way an exaggeration.
    • Further deconstructed when Carol points out the downside of this trope - the guy never bothered her again, but his friends and their girlfriends made her life hell, and the reason she didn't say anything about it was because she was honestly worried about what Lex would do next.
  • Lady of Black Magic: Wanda Maximoff.
  • Lady of War: Sif. Quite literally.
    • The Lady Knight.
    • Frigga.
  • Lampshade Hanging: Happens occasionally.
    • Chapter 40 has Thor note, puzzled, that Snowy Owls bark rather than hoot as Hedwig does, then just shrug and dismiss it.
    • A fairly epic one, again by Thor, in chapter 47, when he irritably notes that the amount of obscure connections in the cast is just utterly ridiculous.
  • The Lancer: Loki's specific purpose in relation to Thor, as appointed by Odin. He rather enjoys it.
  • Large Ham: Tony has his moments.
    • Thor.
  • Laxative Prank: pulled by Harry and Carol on a pre-Sentinel Bolivar Trask of all people, leading to an embarrassing incident in his limo. This earns him the nickname 'Crapper Trask', apparently. He more than had it coming.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: Fury, when he notes that everyone seems to forget that Logan is Canadian.
  • Lemony Narrator: Part of the author's Signature Style and source of much of the humour.
  • Light 'em Up: Harry's abilities and inclinations seem to be taking this route, blended with Playing with Fire.
  • Light Is Not Good: Gravemoss is a Light Elf, an albino, no less, with the requisite white hair. He's also a sadistic Omnicidal Maniac.
  • Lineage Comes from the Father: Played With, as far as Harry is concerned. While, obviously, being the son of Thor is the part everyone notices, his mother was related to the Grey family. As in, Jean Grey, who shares Harry's famous eyes. It is implied that they share more than that.
    • Inverted with Carol Danvers. She takes very strongly after her mother's side, being closest to her maternal uncle, Jack O'Neill, and taking very much after her great-aunt, Peggy Carter.
    • And logically speaking, Lily is an inversion as well, the Grey genes coming from her mother.
    • Also inverted with Hermione Granger who, Thor notes, is beginning to develop a greater resemblance to her mother, Wanda Maximoff, and is noted as being unusually powerful. Her father, John Constantine, is blond and not much more than average, magic wise.
  • Like Brother and Sister: Lex Luthor and Carol Danvers, of all people.
    • Jane treats Harry more as a little brother than a stepson as she's not even fifteen years older than him.
  • Likes Older Women: Clint, as stated by Natasha. He doesn't deny it.
  • Little Miss Badass: Diana.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: So far, the main casts from both The Avengers and Harry Potter, a good portion of X-Men and other Marvel groups, a few from DC, and some from The Dresden Files.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: Hawkeye learns that he is the grandson of McGonagall and her fiancé, Bucky Barnes. When Steve meets her again, he's able to figure it out by virtue of the physical similarities between Bucky and Clint. Another indication is that the only other person Steve has ever known that was as good a shot as Hawkeye was Bucky himself.
    • Unbeknownst to all three, however, Bucky is also the Winter Soldier, making this a double doozy.
  • Mad Scientist: Tony, occasionally. Usually for Rule of Funny purposes, but never OOC.
    • Jane is of the opinion that this happens to any scientist who works for the Pentagon.
    • The Red Room specialises in these.
  • The Magic Comes Back: Elements of this - mutants are appearing (off screen, by and large) in greater numbers, ancient monsters are being resurrected by dark magic, a demigod Prince walks the Earth once more, the Sorcerer Supreme is making his presence known, and the most ancient and deadly book of dark magic that has ever and will ever exist, the Darkhold, has been taken from its vault by a nightmare that everyone thought was dead: The Winter Soldier. And to make it all worse, the Darkhold's creator is on the move...
  • Magi Babble: Loki.
    • Harry Dresden.
    • Thor, usually when people are least expecting it. It's very easy to forget that he was a) a powerful wizard as James Potter, b) he's been around for fifteen centuries and has Loki for a brother. He's picked up more than a few tricks along the way.
  • Magic from Technology: Played straight with the Earth based Bifrost and inverted with the Asgard based Bifrost. As Tony notes, the two are coming at it from different angles.
  • Magnetic Hero: Loki notes this about Harry, Thor and Steve.
  • Making Love in All the Wrong Places: Thor and Jane, Tony and Pepper. Played for Laughs.
  • The Man Behind the Man: A brief paragraph suggests that Thanos is the man behind Gravemoss.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Loki.
    • Natasha.
    • Nick Fury raises this to an artform.
    • Agent Coulson.
    • Peter Wisdom is quite possibly the king of this trope. He got Wanda Maximoff out of retirement by telling her that he knew that she had a daughter - Hermione Granger. Then he threatened to tell Hermione. This minimised the danger to an innocent, while simultaneously threatening to do far worse emotional damage.
  • Master Swordsman: Sif and Fandral.
    • Zemo.
    • The occasionally referenced Lady Knight to a truly insane degree.
  • Meaningful Background Event: Really, really likes these. A very close reading of the story reveals a lot of juicy hints.
  • Mega Crossover: While primarily an HP/Avengers crossover, there are elements of numerous fandoms sprinkled in.
  • Memetic Badass: In-universe, the mysterious 'Lady Knight', who apparently, among other things, taught Sif and Fandral how to wield a sword. In wielding a sword, their only peers in all the Nine Realms are each other. Think about this for a moment. She taught a God of War how to swordfight.
    • Agent Coulson, naturally.
    • Wanda Maximoff, to an extent.
  • Men Don't Cry: Pointedly averted.
  • Modest Royalty: Harry.
  • Motive Rant: Dumbledore gives a rather dark one about how frustrated he is at the Medieval Stasis of the Wizarding World compared to the Muggle one, why he remains as just a Headmaster, explaining how he was and remains more than capable of becoming a Dark Lord far more terrible than Voldemort could ever hope to have been. This is why he remains as just a Headmaster: because one drop of power would be one too many.
  • Muggles Do It Better: The author takes pains to point out just how useless Wizards generally when dealing with something outside their frame of reference, noting the Medieval Stasis of the Wizarding World.
    • However, in the interests of fairness, it is pointed out in-universe by Memetic Badass Agent Coulson that wizards are a serious threat to people who don't know what they're dealing with, and more to the point, if the wizard is combat trained and familiar with non-magical technology, they can be extremely dangerous.
  • Multi-Melee Master: Sif.
  • Mundane Utility: According to Fury, Steve has, in the past, totally unaware of the significance of being able to lift it, used Mjolnir as a doorstop
  • My Greatest Failure: There is a reason that Loki does not talk about Hela...
  • Mysterious Protector / Mysterious Watcher: Strange fits both of these quite neatly. He's occasionally seen keeping an eye on the heroes, then pops up in chapter 45 to pull a Deus ex Machina, disappears again, then gives a few words of advice in chapter 47 and disappears again.
  • Myth Arc: There is one and it is going to be enormous.
  • Mythology Gag: you know how Ron mentioned in the second book that Molly Weasley has a cousin who is an accountant? Well, we finally learn his identity. He is Agent Phil Coulson.
  • Nazi Hunter: It is all but stated that Magneto, as per First Class canon, was, and possibly remains, one of these.
  • Nerdgasm: Occasionally inspires these.
  • Nice Guy: Thor and Steve. For the latter, it's getting to the point of a Running Gag.
    • Harry. It's one of his defining characteristics, right up to helping little girls he's only just met find their families, taking a precociously smart girl a couple of years his junior completely seriously, immediately standing up for people he barely knows and offering a servant girl who looked tired a drink, among many other things. He even suggests that he, Carol and Jean-Paul go talk to an injured Johnny Storm, about whom he has only heard bad or, at best, fondly exasperated things (and the latter only from Sue).
    Jean-Paul: You’ve done your good deed for the day. Why ruin it by making yourself a martyr?
  • Nice Girl: Gwen Stacy. Diana takes it Up to Eleven.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: Oh Loki... in short, when his first love got pregnant, he got scared and tried to hide her and the pregnancy from his parents, fearing their response, when, in fact, they could have helped her and wanted to. She died in childbirth, the child was stillborn and Loki dabbled in necromancy to bring his baby back to life. He half succeeded, but she turned out to be a half dead Psychic Vampire. She was called Hela. The rest is history. Basically, Poor Communication Kills.
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain: Twice in chapter 45.
    • First, Gravemoss' depredations under Paris have led to much of the area above his lair being deserted, meaning no civilian casualties when Harry Dresden unleashes his Death Curse.
    • Second, Chthon briefly talks to Dresden, then brushes him off. This pisses him off enough to break out of his terror and pull an attempted Taking You with Me.
  • Nightmare Fetishist: Gravemoss.
  • No-Nonsense Nemesis: Unlike Malfoy, Von Strucker and Gravemoss, The Winter Soldier does not grandstand. He'll kill you however suits him best, whether it's right up close, or if you're a Physical God, he'll snipe from the best part of a mile away with some Abnormal Ammo.
  • Noodle Incident: Apparently, Thor and the National Grid do not mix.
    • And the last time that someone kidnapped Pepper 'a domestic terrorist organisation and three blocks of flats got wiped off the map'.
    • And that time when Wanda told the First Order who her father was, Sirius refused to believe her in extremely tactless fashion and promptly got laid out by Lily. According to Sirius, she had a vicious right hook.
    • There was, apparently, an incident involving Clint Barton, Hal Jordan, Agent Sitwell and a bungee cord.
  • Not Enough to Bury: Spitfire I, after her last fight with the Winter Soldier.
    • However, it is not beyond probability that in fact this was a case of Never Found the Body and she was hurled through time became in-universe Memetic Badass The Lady Knight.
  • Nothing Is the Same Anymore: In respect to Harry Potter and Marvel Cinematic Universe. The Status Quo has been utterly destroyed.
  • Obfuscating Insanity: One interpretation of Tony's antics.
  • Oblivious to Love: While Loki is somewhat aware of his feelings for Sif, he's denser than a brick because he can't see that Sif is obviously in love with him. Even Thor pre- and post-James Potter picked up on it, and tends to give his brother exasperated looks whenever they don't act upon their UST due to said density.
  • Obviously Evil: The Winter Soldier. Technically a subversion, since he isn't actually evil.
  • Occult Detective: Harry Dresden is briefly employed by SHIELD (and not for the first time, judging by Fury's comments in Chapter 22) for his skills at this.
    • Apparently, Bruce Wayne of all people is shaping up to be one of these.
  • Oh Crap: The general reaction to the veidrdraugar.
    • A small one by Amora when she realises that Thor now Would Hit a Girl - due to his past as James where he fought plenty of female Death Eaters.
    • A larger one by Lucius Malfoy when he realises just how depraved Gravemoss is.
    • Loki absolutely lost it when he heard that the Darkhold had been stolen. Considering that the Darkhold is the book that contains the knowledge to create the veidrdraugar, this is highly understandable.
    • Harry Dresden has a couple.
      • First, when Gravemoss appears behind them in the tunnels.
      • Second, when he briefly - and accidentally - contacts Chthon through the Sight.
  • Old Flame: Amora to Thor. She wants to renew it, he regards it as one of the biggest mistakes he ever made. And tells her. To her face.
  • Omnicidal Maniac: Gravemoss, natch.
  • One Degree of Separation: Seems to going this way with Harry: his maternal grandparents were crack SHIELD Agents (to quote Nick Fury, "The Hawkeye and Black Widow of their day.") who mentored Nick Fury, who was the second candidate to be Harry's godfather after being a sort of big brother to Lily Evans. Doctor Strange was his paediatrician. Wanda Maximoff is his godmother. Jean Grey is his maternal second cousin. Clint turns out to be the grandson of Bucky Barnes and Minerva McGonagall and the first cousin (via adoption) of Clark Kent. Charles Xavier is Tony Stark's godfather. It only gets stronger and stranger from there.
    • And more generally: Coulson knows Harry Dresden and is Molly Weasley's "squib accountant cousin", Thor knew Betsy Braddock's father, Alastor Moody has crossed paths with Erik Lehnsherr enough to know his style, Wanda Maximoff, John Constantine and Doctor Stephen Strange were members of the First Order of the Phoenix, Wanda and John are Hermione's biological parents, Charles Xavier helped teach Wanda who was Stephen's apprentice...
    • A Justified Trope, however, as it is implied that Harry is a 'Nexus Being' like 616!Wanda or something similar, and Odin himself notes that destiny tends to warp in his presence.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Not strictly confined to one scene, but where the Winter Soldier is concerned, this applies.
  • One-Man Army: The Winter Soldier, natch.
    • Pretty much all of the Avengers qualify. It's probably why Fury, at the top of his head, can only think of three people who can beat the Winter Soldier at his own game. All three of those people are on the Avengers.
  • Only Sane Man: Lucius was this to the Death Eaters and Voldemort, making repeated reference to his being the one who guided Voldemort (who, though a genius, was not always one for tactical thinking) onto more sensible paths, being the Evil Chancellor.
    • It takes one to know one, apparently, as Lucius recognises Zemo as being HYDRA's. It is implied that Zemo sees the similarities too.
  • Opposites Attract: Why Loki - who does not so much think sideways as in corkscrews - likes the straightforward Sif. It is definitely reciprocated.
  • Our Zombies Are Different: Very much so.
  • Out-Gambitted: Von Strucker by Fury, effortlessly so.
  • Painted-On Pants: While not quite a case, Jean's jeans are definitely tight enough to distract Scott.
  • Papa Wolf: THOR
    (in reference to the Enchantress): If she had touched Lily, I would have killed her. If she touches Harry, I will kill her and if Skurge tries to stop me, I'll ram that precious axe of his up his sorely whipped arse.
    • Loki, though it's more Uncle Wolf.
    • Odin to Loki, big time, judging by his rage at what Thanos did to him. It wasn't mind control, but it wasn't exactly pleasant for Loki either. He may have made mistakes, but boy, oh boy, do you not want to hurt his kid.
      • Also, Hela's backstory. Odin did quite literally everything he could to help Loki protect his daughter.
  • Passive-Aggressive Kombat: Dumbledore, as in canon.
    • Loki is also pretty good at it.
  • Patchwork Story: On a micro level, the author occasionally makes reference to making chapters by stitching disparate scenes together.
  • Person of Mass Destruction: Wanda is more than capable of being this. If she doesn't incinerate you with a skyscraper sized pillar of fire, she drops meteors on your head. Even if your name is Nicodemus.
    • Harry Dresden, naturally.
  • Phosphor-Essence: Harry in chapter 44.
  • Physical God: Thor. Loki. Asgardians in general.
    • Hulk.
    • The referenced Juggernaut and Count Nefaria.
    • Gravemoss, technically. Like the Enchantress in the comics, he's pretty weak in the higher realms, like Asgard. On Earth, however, he's an incredibly fast killing machine who can rip through concrete with his bare hands.
    • Wanda and Doctor Strange arguably reach this level.
  • Playing with Fire: Loki and Wanda.
    • Harry is implied to be disturbingly good with fire. So much so, in fact, that he astonishes Loki, who refers to him as a prodigy in that particular discipline.
    • Harry Dresden, as usual, takes it Up to Eleven.
    Fury: The funny thing about Harry Dresden is that you can tell where he’s been because it’s always on fire.
  • Protagonist Centred Morality: Played With. At points, it seems that it's going like this with the semi regular humiliation of Snape and Harry developing significantly snarkier tendencies that vary from Deadpan Snarker to Stepford Snarker and, arguably, Fury's Disproportionate Retribution towards the Dursleys, but each is justified.
    • Snape isn't exactly Mister Pleasant and makes the mistake of antagonising those he shouldn't - Thor (who acknowledges what Snape has done for Harry and thanks him for it, apologises sincerely for the way he treated him as James and grudgingly acknowledges that, for all his faults, Snape is no coward), Huginn and Muninn, Tony and, possibly (she has yet to exact vengeance), Natasha, and even then, their response is reasonably constrained. Second, the publicly humiliating incident is noted by Word of God as possibly being over the top, but equally it is pointed out that Snape has gone out of his way to bully Harry since day one and he kind of has it coming.
    • Harry's snarkier and somewhat anti-authoritian tendencies are presented partly as a sign of his growing confidence (and Tony's influence) and partly as a reaction to the fact that his world has been tipped on its head and thoroughly shaken, so he has no idea which way is up. Not only that, but [his powers first flare up in chapter 31 and then again in chapter 44 and, in subtler forms, semi regularly since then the latter of which is depicted as genuinely unnerving him. Not only that, but he lives with the anti-authoritarian snark patrol that is the Avengers (Steve mostly excepted), one of which is his father, another of which is his uncle, and all of whom he idolises/admires.
      • And, as of Chapter 50, Sean Cassidy laughs at an off the cuff snarky remark Harry makes, then gently reprimands him for the snark by basically saying, 'careful kiddo, that tongue of yours will run you into trouble with someone who isn't as easygoing as I am'. When Harry not unjustly points out that trouble tends to find him anyway, Sean points out that that should be a reason for him not to seek out more. Harry quite visibly takes this onboard.
    • Chapter 54 features this in full force when Harry puts the entire Ravenclaw Quidditch team in St Mungo's with some creative Deadly Dodging - flying near to Bludger's, then leading them towards the Ravenclaws, with the full connivance of the Weasley twins - after he finds out about how Luna's been treated. Then Chapter 55 flips it on its head, and explores the ramifications of this, how it might do more harm than good (it's positively expected in Asgard, but everyone there has a Healing Factor and supertoughness. On Earth, not so much), and really, all Harry was doing was satisfying his anger, with Sean Cassidy, who though he supported it because he knew Luna's mother and is fond of Luna herself, noting that it was 'straight from Erik's playbook'. The eventual conclusion is that while it isn't too serious, because of magical medicine, and Harry's intentions were good, the long term effects could be problematic, especially if it's part of a trend. The chapter is appropriately titled 'Not Black And White'.
  • Power Floats: Harry.
    • Doctor Strange.
  • Power Glows: Harry again.
  • Power Trio: Harry is at the head of three of these so far... a trinity of trinities. Pretty much Faux Symbolism.
    • Harry generally serves as the leader of these trios.
  • Poor Communication Kills: Loki, to an extent, a long time ago.
  • Power Incontinence: Harry, briefly.
  • Power of Love: Lily's protection, is surprisingly, not a straight example like in the books. In this version, her love, however, does play a significant part, though we have yet to get the full story. It is heavily implied that she tapped into the Phoenix Force, which actually makes sense considering that the Killing Curse is a Death Ray. After all, what better to oppose death than Life and Fire incarnate?
  • Power Of The Storm: Thor
    • Storm of the X-Men, though she's only been mentioned.
  • Pre-Asskicking One-Liner: Michael Carpenter delivers a beautiful one in chapter 44.
    In the name of Almighty God, step away from that boy.
  • Pregnant Badass: Wanda Maximoff, apparently. She was pregnant during the first Wizarding War.
    • Lily Potter, of course.
  • Professional Killer: It does not do to forget that Clint and Natasha are both still two of the deadliest assassins the world has ever seen.
    • Loki has something of this vibe about him, even if he's more The Spymaster these days.
    • The Winter Soldier.
  • Protectorate: Harry is this to the Avengers, most particularly his father.
  • Psychic Nosebleed: Diana.
  • Psychic Powers: Charles Xavier, Loki (through Functional Magic), Jean Grey and Professors Dumbledore and Snape (through Legilimency).
    • Diana of Themyscira and possibly Harry.
    • According to Loki, Thanos has these on what is comfortably interplanetary scale, at the very least.
  • Psychoactive Powers: Harry, unfortunately. The unfortunate part is that Harry's a teenager with a hot temper and more than the usual amount of emotional turbulence, odd bit of psychic counselling by Charles Xavier aside, and those powers... well, they're either Super Strength or fairly serious Psychic Powers.
  • Rags to Royalty: Almost literally.
  • Razor Wings: Warren. And miserable about it.
  • Really 700 Years Old: Asgardians, Gravemoss, the Flamels and, on a smaller scale, Natasha and the Winter Soldier.
    • Steve also sorta counts. Sure, he may have been stuck frozen in a block of ice for seventy years, but he is, technically speaking, over ninety years old.
  • Really Gets Around: Fandral.
    • Betsy, apparently.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Nick Fury, Dumbledore, Odin, Loki and General O'Neill.
    • Sean Cassidy.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: Gravemoss, as part of his Evil Albino aesthetic.
  • Red Is Heroic: Tony (his armour) and Thor (his cape).
    • Harry's first Asgardian outfit is largely a dark red.
  • Reformed But Not Tamed: Repeatedly quoted in reference to Loki.
  • Refuge in Audacity: Harry with the Disir, ancient monsters who abducted him and his friends, snarking about their 'hospitality', mocking their looks, stating that they aren't scary and actually hushing them and telling them that he's getting to good bit: the Pre-Asskicking One-Liner.
  • Ridiculously Human Robot: Fury's LMD.
  • Right Hand Versus Left Hand: the evil alliance is slowly turning into this - Von Strucker has commandeered the Winter Soldier and Gravemoss basically does whatever the hell he likes.
  • Rising Conflict: A constant theme.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: The Asgardian royal family.
    • Harry.
    • Prince T'Challa.
  • Rules Lawyer: Loki, for fun and profit.
  • Running Gag: Thor's arch enemy: the microwave.
    • The narration periodically deconstructing metaphors and playing with Metaphorgotten before concluding something along the lines of 'but there is such thing as taking a metaphor too far'.
    • When in doubt, blame Tony. It helps in that it's likely it was his fault anyway.
    • Steve's Nice Guy status is offhandedly and amusingly referenced in the narration on a regular basis.
  • Sanity Slippage: According to Jane, this happens to any scientist that works for the Pentagon, swiftly descending into Mad Scientist territory.
  • Scary Black Man: Nick Fury.
    • T'Challa, if you piss him off.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can: The Winter Soldier, natch.
  • Sesquipedalian Loquaciousness: The author sometimes makes passing reference to going/having gone to a British private school, and boy does it show in the narration...
    • And in the character dialogue, sometimes.
  • Shipper on Deck: Fandral for Sif/Loki.
    • Thor for Sif/Loki.
    • Sif for Diana/Harry. She's just teasing him, however.
  • Ship Tease: Clint and Natasha.
    • Specifically averted with Harry and Carol.
    • Loki and Sif. Repeatedly.
  • Shout-Out: Very, very many, some in-universe, a lot falling under Early-Bird Cameo. And others, as Actor Allusion
    • Good Omens
    • Doctor Who
    • "His enemies will define him," paraphrased from Batman: Arkham Origins.
    • Repeatedly to Game of Thrones.
    • To Excalibur
    • "Always the tone of surprise."
    • James Bond
    • Die Hard
    • Tony is referred to as 'the Invincible Iron Man'.
    • Discworld
      • "Do not let me/us detain you."
      • The Nobbs and Colon expies in Chapter 37.
    • The line, 'does the Walker choose the Path, or the Path the Walker' from the Book of the Dead in The Old Kingdom Trilogy.
    • Gravemoss believes that life is wasted on the living.
    • To Kung Fu Panda, when Charles Xavier quotes Master Oogway's advice to Po at Harry almost word for word.
    • On a more meta level, Dresden brings up the original title of the first book in his series while making a bad pun - 'Semiautomagic'.
    • A pale elf slaying hundreds of black dragons with a necromantic spell? Sounds familiar. As a bonus, the original spell, which Gravemoss mentions, was called "familicide".
      • Further references to The Order of the Stick appear in Chapter 46, with the drunken use of magic to meld two creatures referencing both Vaarsuvius' irritation about the impracticality of the Owlbear and the creation of Roy's 'Bag of Tricks'.
    • A young Bruce Wayne is referred by Harry Dresden as having the potential to become 'The World's Greatest Detective'. Despite the author insisting that there is no Batman, this seems a touch too contrived to be anything other than a piece of Foreshadowing.
      • Not to mention that Dresden was the one that saved the Waynes from being killed.
    • In Chapter 31, Harry's notation that those with a great insight into human nature before kind, if they are good, and powerful, if they are bad, is a reference to Witches Abroad, in which much the same quote is used about Fairy Godmothers.
    • In Chapter 47, Clint's response when asked about his knowledge of the Divine Comedy? "Yes, I've read a poem. Try not to faint."
    • Lex makes reference to Susan being part of a brain trust called 'the Illuminati', which includes T'Challa, Charles Xavier, Reed Richards and a few other members of the comics Illuminati.
    • When mulling over the story of Hela's birth, Gravemoss references the opening chapter of Sabriel, specifically, the title character's being restored to life after apparently being stillborn by her necromancer father, the Aborsen, even down to the Nine Gates and the River of Death (which is referred to as an in-universe piece of folklore). This did not end half as well as it did for Sabriel.
  • Shown Their Work: In chapter 46, Hermione correctly notes that her name means earthly. It Makes Sense In Context.
    • Also, the sheer amounts of comics, historical and political trivia that are woven into the narrative.
  • Shrouded in Myth: The Winter Soldier.
    • Doctor Strange.
    • Asgardians, Olympians, Gods in general.
  • Sir Swears-a-Lot: Sean Cassidy, according to Thor. Apparently, he'd never heard so much inventive swearing from a human in his entire life.
  • Sleep Cute: Several instances, possibly down to Author Appeal
    • Harry and Thor after their first meeting.
    • Harry, Thor and Loki on the sofa at Avengers Tower - Steve actually puts a blanket over them and sketches a picture.
    • Harry and Thor on the plane back to Hogwarts.
    • A picture from Thor's photo album of him (as James) and a sleeping baby Harry. It is a reference to a work on deviantART, used with the creator's permission.
  • Sliding Scale of Idealism Versus Cynicism: Starts off firmly on the Idealistic side, then, after a bout of Cerebrus Syndrome and the odd Knight Of Cerebrus, is leaning towards the cynical side.
  • The Slow Path: The Lady Knight had a variant of this - she got hopped through time against her will, pretty much at random. In between, she had to live her life as best she could.
  • Smarter Than You Look / Obfuscating Stupidity: Darcy explicitly relies on this. No one expects a curvy pop culture obsessed brunette to be smart, let alone carry a taser. She is in fact very smart, mostly in a Genre Savvy sort of way.
    • Thor also has a little of this going for him, casually coming out with insightful observations and bits of Techno Babble when people least expect it.
  • Smug Snake: Von Strucker. Competent, yes, but he's not playing in Malfoy's and Fury's league, no matter what he thinks. This gets him killed by Malfoy, who's annoyed by his incompetence.
  • Stationary Wings: Warren has an unusual variant. They aren't usually stationary, but if he's hovering and not paying attention, they can be.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Loki is the grandmaster of this. It has been Lampshaded. Extensively.
  • So Beautiful, It's a Curse / Younger than They Look: cleverly done with Carol Danvers. Looking like a gorgeous High Schooler/College Student at age 14 is portrayed as very difficult for the girl in question.
  • The Spook: The Winter Soldier. A played with example. People know that he exists all right... but beyond that, nothing. One or two characters know more about him, but they don't reveal many of the details. He is, until he resurfaces, also believed to have been dead for nearly twenty years, having disappeared during the fall of the Soviet Union.
    • Doctor Strange is a well, strange example. Until chapter 47, we don't see more than glimpses of him. We know very little about his actions, and, where they are shown, his motivations for them. He appears and disappears pretty much at will, with those who know him indicating that he routinely drops off the face of the Earth for a decade or three.
  • The Spymaster: Loki and Nick Fury.
  • Statuesque Stunner: Carol Danvers.
  • The Starscream: The alliance of Malfoy, Von Strucker and Gravemoss being what it is, it's quite hard to tell who's in charge at times. However, Von Strucker was (until Chapter 42) looking to eclipse and backstab Malfoy, who is unlikely to take this lying down and is, at the same time, backstabbing his fellow Death Eaters, and Gravemoss is an Omnicidal Maniac, so his betrayal is inevitable.
    • As it turns out Lucius was this from the beginning. The alliance was simply a chance for him to gather finances (from the Death Eaters), control of a powerful organisation with global reach (HYDRA) to go with his nominal control of Gravemoss - though he himself admits that you don't control Gravemoss, you just make sure that he's pointed in the right direction.
  • Stepford Smiler: Harry, to an extent. He seems to have taken everything very well, when, in fact, he's headed for a crash of epic proportions.
    • He crashes. It is spectacular. Though he's bounced back, apparently.
  • Stupid Sexy Lady Loki
  • Superhero Gods: Thor and Loki, natch.
    • Implied to be the future for Harry and Diana - the former is obvious, and the latter, well, she is, after all Wonder Woman.
  • Superior Species: Asgardians. They're all Really 700 Years Old (or on course to get that way) and are Nigh Invulnerable, an ancient civilisation that was old when humanity was still figuring out that you couldn't eat rocks. They're also recognised as the Heavyweight Champions of the Universe, the pre-eminent superpower in intergalactic and interdimensional politics. Oh, and with their incredibly advanced Technology From Magic, they're basically the most advanced race in the universe, with their only peer being the Kryptonians before their planet went boom. That said, Fantastic Racism is (mostly) averted. While they seem to consider mortals in general as weak and primitive, which they were when Asgardians were last regularly knocking around the Earth, they admire and respect the Avengers, in particular Clint for his marksmanship - he's widely considered to be joint best in the Nine Realms - and Tony for his armour. And Steve. Everyone likes Steve.
    • In other words, they're like a version of The Ace that knows they're the best and doesn't feel the need to rub it in everyone's faces. Though, judging by what we've heard about Bor, Odin's father and predecessor, this is probably a relatively recent development. And this same niceness doesn't really apply to Frost Giants.
    • And as Thor notes in The Avengers, being more advanced doesn't make them better.
  • Supernatural Gold Eyes: Harry's eyes flash gold or become flecked with it when he gets angry. Whether this is his slowly emerging Asgardian powers or a mark of the Phoenix is up for debate.
  • Super Strength: As a Stock Superpower, it naturally crops up a lot to varying degrees, with examples including:
    • The Hulk.
    • Thor.
    • Loki.
    • Harry - temporarily granted by Loki for staying in Asgard and after chapter 44, recurring whenever he gets angry.
    • Diana.
    • Asgardians and beings from the rest of the Nine Realms in general.
    • The Iron Man and War Machine armours.
    • Beast.
    • Steve.
    • The Winter Soldier.
  • Superweight
    • Type 0: Ordinary People.
    • Type 1: SHIELD Agents and Agents of MI13, Tony Stark (out of armour), Carol Danvers.
    • Type 2: Natasha, Clint, Steve, the Winter Soldier, younger Hogwarts Students, James Rhodes (out of armour), the Lady Knight (bordering Type 3), Jean-Paul Beaubier, T'Challa.
    • Type 3: Adult Wanded Witches and Wizards, to varying degrees, most members of the White Council, Harry Dresden, Iron Man, War Machine, Sif, the Warriors Three, Clark Kent, Betsy Braddock/Psylocke, Peter Wisdom/Regulus Black, Jean Grey, Scott Summers, Metallo, Sean Cassidy, Warren Worthington III.
    • Type 4: Thor, Loki, the Juggernaut, Count Nefaria, Gravemoss (pre Darkhold), Frigga, Charles Xavier, the Shadow King.
    • Type 5: Thor and Loki (when truly cutting loose), the Hulk, the Darkhold and its owner, Magneto, Alan Scott with his ring, Charles Xavier with Cerebro.
    • Type 6: Odin, Other Skyfathers, Chthon (the latter being considerably more powerful than any Skyfather, but not quite able to warp the narrative), The Phoenix Force.
  • Take That: Several, usually aimed at fanfiction conventions:
    • The Harem concept is repeatedly mocked.
    • As is Harry immediately developing powers.
    • And so are the large Remus/Sirius and Tony/Steve slash fandoms.
    Fury snorted. Like that was ever going to happen.
    • On Harry/Hermione:
    Tony: *implying Harry may be attracted to Jane and Hermione* His best friend is a brunette brain box.
    Loki: Who he is about as sexually attracted to as he is to mould.
  • Taking You with Me: Harry Dresden's intention when he unleashes his Death Curse on Gravemoss. Gravemoss survives, though is quite clearly severely rattled by it (and floating in the North Sea), and Harry gets better.
  • Tall, Dark and Handsome: Thor (as James)
    • Sirius
    • Jean-Paul Beaubier
    • Loki
    • Harry is well on the road to getting this way.
  • Tall, Dark and Snarky: Loki
    • Snape
  • Talking Is a Free Action: Averted. Turns out that it's a bad idea to monologue at Nick Fury or rather, his LMD while he's holding a pistol.
  • Team Mom: Sif to the Warriors Three, who all regard her as something of a big sister.
    • Pepper.
    • Steve.
    • Sue Storm.
  • Technically a Smile: Lex's when talking about teaching a few of Carol's suitors manners. Harry notes that most people on the receiving end of that smile would do whatever its owner said, so long as the smile went away and left them intact.
  • Technician Versus Performer: This applies to the rivalry between Harry and Uhtred, where Uhtred is the Technician and Harry is the Performer.
    • Also applies to the brewing problems between Harry and Hermione. He may not have the head for theory that she does, but he can do most of the things she has to work her arse off to do with equal skill and minimal effort, when he actually puts his mind to it. The two are explicitly compared to Tony Stark (Harry) and Reed Richards (Hermione), one relying on intuition and inspiration, the other on logic and reason. Trouble is, Hermione's good, but not good enough to keep up with Harry's natural talent.
  • Teleport Cloak: Not exactly, but Strange disappears in Chapter 45 with a swirl of his cloak.
  • There Are No Therapists: Averted when Charles Xavier gives Harry a little telepathic therapy by giving Harry a friendly ear and helping him work through a few of his issues.
    • Harry Dresden is also mentioned as having been put into contact with Xavier to get over his pyrophobia (stemming from an incident involving a vampire thrall and homemade napalm).
  • Those Two Guys: Huginn and Muninn.
    • The Weasley Twins.
    • Sean and Warren have this vibe.
  • The Three Faces of Adam: Odin, Thor and Harry.
  • Three Successful Generations: Again, Odin, Thor, Harry.
  • Time Abyss: Odin. He's at least a thousand years older than Stonehenge.
  • Time Dissonance: Odin again. When explaining to Harry why he couldn't interfere in his raising, or let Loki or Frigga do it, among his other reasons, he points out that, for him, ten years, is about equivalent to a month. At most.
  • Tonight Someone Dies: Invoked at the end of Chapter 43 and followed through. Of course, as Word of God cheerfully states 'I never said it would stick'.
  • Took a Level in Badass: Lucius Malfoy is infinitely more dangerous than he is in canon, cast as Voldemort's spymaster who crossed swords with Nick Fury and not only lived to tell the tale, but was technically winning. He was holding all the aces when Godric's Hollow happened and Fury admits it.
    • The Winter Soldier is even more terrifying than in canon. This version never, ever speaks (though Black Widow implies that this is something of a recent development). And according to Narcissa Malfoy, he just looks at you as if figuring out the quickest and most efficient way to kill you.
      • His status as The Dreaded has elevated significantly — even now, in the modern age of superheroes, where you have everything from wizards, mutants, aliens, even gods, he is still considered to be the most dangerous man on the planet, even by Nick Fury. Loki states that he may even be the most dangerous assassin in all of the Nine Realms.
    • Gravemoss, an Ax-Crazy Omnicidal Maniac necromancer from Alfheim who can punch through granite, create nightmares that terrify gods and has gone toe to toe with Loki and Doctor Strange, as compared to his canon counterpart, a mortal necromancer who was swiftly dispatched by Excalibur and never heard of again.
    • Loki - from insane villain to a remorseful but untamed type III Anti-Hero who has become The Spymaster and is the power behind Thor's future throne as well as being hinted at being truly terrifyingly powerful.
    • Harry himself. On being kidnapped with two friends, both of whom are younger than him and swiftly formulate a plan that plays to all their strengths. He faces down his kidnappers, the Disir, beings that have slaughtered entire armies, who took Bor himself to stop - stop, not kill - bluffs them into giving back his wand, gets in a few choice insults, then takes a serious gamble that comes off. All of them get out without a scratch.
    • Nick Fury. During the First War, he was a young, cheerful, friendly Agent who is mentioned as having been drinking buddies with Constantine and Sirius, Lily's Big Brother Mentor, while her parents were his mentors - being former Agents of SHIELD - and they're the closest thing he ever had to family, being good with Harry (who, hilariously, referred to him as 'Unca Nick') and second placed candidate for godfatherhood (if Lily and James had had any more children, and Lily was pregnant when she died - James/Thor never knew, as she was planning to tell him after Halloween. Sirius also knew, though how is not elaborated, suggesting that Fury also knew).
      By the time of the story, he's become the Four-Star Badass of the films and comics, having risen to the Directorship in less than twelve years, after losing an eye to LuciusMalfoy and leaving him to die in his burning home (which Fury set alight with napalm) with a broken wand and a permanently damaged leg, and losing the closest thing to family he'd ever had. He's clever enough to play mind games with Lucius Malfoy and manipulate Albus Dumbledore, Baron Wolfgang Von Strucker and Nicholas and Perenelle Flamel into doing/saying things they otherwise wouldn't wish to, leaving people who once knew him (McGonagall, for example) stunned at the change. He's trained Peter Wisdom a.k.a. Regulus Black, Agent, then Director, of MI13 (SHIELD's British equivalent), who has 'a carefully cultivated and well earned reputation for being extremely dangerous to cross' who clearly learned all about being a Manipulative Bastard from his mentor.
      • Making this all the more impressive is that, he's explicitly mentioned as a young Agent when he first met Lily. Even accounting for time in the Marines, considering that he was hanging out and drinking with John Constantine and Sirius Black rather than older members of the Order, he can't have been older than Wanda when Lily was killed (31), and was likely closer to 25. This means that, at most, he's 43, and at least, he's 37. Not only that, but he'd been Director for at least two years, as (TheAvengers was roughly two years or more before the events of the story) and likely for at least a year or three before that if he can get away with what he does during the film. That means he rose to the Directorship at the age of between 32 and 39. To put this in perspective, Robert Gates was 48 when he was confirmed as head of the CIA and no chief of MI6 has been younger than 49 on appointment.
  • Took a Level in Kindness: Uhtred.
  • Too Spicy For Yog Sogoth: Fenris tried to eat a teenage Sif. She cut her way out. From the inside. With one hand. The other one had been been bitten off.
  • Torture Technician: Loki is implied to be this.
    • Gravemoss, though more in pursuit of his experiments than anything else.
  • Trapped in the Past: The first Spitfire.
  • Trenchcoat Brigade: John Constantine, Harry Dresden and Agent Wisdom.
  • Troll: Dumbledore. He contemplates Harry Dresden as DADA teacher just to see how badly Fudge would freak out.
    • Thor occasionally plays on/exaggerates his Fish out of Water tendencies just to screw with people.
  • Truer To The Text: As compared to the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
  • Uncle Pennybags: Tony. Everyone lives in his house, technically speaking, and he's completely cool with guests.
    • Thor. The Potter vaults make him a billionaire. He's not going to use them, so opts to doctor his will and give the Weasleys 100,000 galleons. Which they try to refuse to accept. Thor is having none of it.
  • Underestimating Badassery: While most of the audience realises that Diana the Olympian Ward is actually young Wonder Woman, most people do not realise this, seeing only an adorable 11 year old girl. They regret it.
    • Harry himself. Short, still a bit thin from the Dursleys mistreatment, a little shy, surely he's no problem. Guess again!
  • Undying Loyalty: Sworn by Uhtred to Harry.
  • Unfazed Everyman: Harry. Particularly has shades of this in how quickly he adjusts, though it is implied that his general freak out is merely postponed.
    • This is confirmed by Steve as of chapter 26.
    • And revealed by his spectacular meltdown in chapter 30.
  • Unresolved Sexual Tension: Loki and Sif. Everyone Can See It, but Loki's density and Sif's temper are in part why they're not together...yet.
  • Unspoken Plan Guarantee: Harry uses this in chapter 34.
  • Unstuck in Time: The Lady Knight.
  • Use Your Head: Sif. Knocks out Fandral - who had been in the middle of embarrassing her - this way. In one go. From a seated position.
  • The Vamp: Amora the Enchantress and Maeve, the Winter Lady. Amora's perpetually after Thor and Mar-Vell makes reference to barely escaping from Maeve with his virtue intact.
    • Naturally, Loki deals with them by teleporting Amora in front of Maeve and watching the fun.
  • Villainous Valour: While more Jerkass than out and out villain, Bor was no coward. Not by a long shot.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: Tony to everyone.
    • Loki, also to everyone.
    • The Warriors Three to each other.
    • Carol and Jean-Paul work this angle.
  • The Voiceless: The Winter Soldier. It serves to terrify everyone nearby.
  • Voice of the Legion: after the events of chapter 44 seem to give his powers a kick in the pants, Harry develops 'a dangerous double harmonic' along with the previously appearing flash of gold in his eyes when he gets angry. It even manages to shut the Weasley Twins up. Hermione notes the rarity of this (they don't even sneak in a quip, as they do with teachers, they just shut up), and says that the second part of the harmonic sounds older, powerful and authoritative. Harry himself is unnerved by it and suggests that he doesn't have any conscious control over it.
  • Walking Armoury: Moody suggests this about Sif, noting that the last time he saw that much weaponry on someone was when it was in them: a member of the Thule society that he'd been tracking. A man called Lehnsherr beat him to the man.
  • War Is Glorious / War Is Hell: Odin expresses both opinions, noting that there is 'a satisfaction in fighting a war for the right reasons, in protecting those who cannot protect themselves' and the camerarderie, which he misses, but ultimately, the latter opinion wins out.
  • Warrior Prince: Thor and Loki.
    • Prince Faradei of Alfheim.
    • Prince Hrimhari.
  • Was Once a Man: The Winter Soldier. Natasha has indicated that, once upon a time, he actually spoke and had a personality beyond a soulless murder machine. Dramatic Irony being what it is, the audience knows that he was once Bucky Barnes.
  • Wham Episode: Chapters 9 and 21.
    • Arguably, chapter 50.
  • White Hair, Black Heart: Gravemoss. Oh my god, Gravemoss.
  • Who Wants to Live Forever?: Harry has brought this up, being vaguely and horribly aware that he's going to outlive all his human friends.
    • Coulson points out that he's already done so many amazing things and he's still got forty or so years to go. One life, as he says, is enough.
  • Wild Card: Strange seems to be a mixture of The Chessmaster and The Unfettered in that, as Fury accurately notes and Strange doesn't actually deny, he's definitely playing his own game. Unfortunately, he hasn't appeared much as of yet, so what his intentions and aims are, other than broadly good, no one knows.
  • Winged Humanoid: Biblical angels are referenced, including Aziraphale and Crowley.
    • Warren. Since said wings are razor sharp, this is something of a problem for him.
  • Wish Fulfillment: Zig-Zags this trope. The premise is textbook Wish Fulfillment, but the execution is not. Harry has numerous issues coming to terms with his sudden elevation from Boy-Who-Lived to a demigod Prince in direct line to the throne of Asgard, along with his growing abilities and the responses to both of the above. The ante of the antagonists is swiftly upped, causing problems that weren't there before. Pettigrew bugs out of Hogwarts as soon as he hears about the presence of Loki and Thor and their interest in Harry (Word of God has indicated that he doesn't actually know that James Potter was really Thor, since he got the hell out of Hogwarts too quickly) and what appears to be a fairly ramshackle (but still dangerous, mainly due to control of The Winter Soldier) alliance of HYDRA, Lucius Malfoy (and some of the remaining Death Eaters) and Gravemoss. In chapter 50, it morphs into a lean, mean and excessively well financed terror machine under the sole command of Lucius Malfoy who had been manoeuvring towards this point from the beginning, having chopped out some of the dead wood in the form of Baron Von Strucker, former head of HYDRA, and a number of Death Eaters, whose finances Malfoy now controls. Oh, and not only is the Darkhold is on the loose, its author is taking an interest...
  • Writer on Board: Occasionally present in the text but not to the point where it is noticeably out of character. Much of it stems from the fact that the author is a self-admitted Insufferable Genius, and every now and then, it shows.
  • World of Badass
  • World of Snark
  • Worthy Opponent: Malfoy considers Fury to be this, respecting, even admiring, his capabilities. He still hates him, though.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Gravemoss. Gravemoss oh so very much.
  • Wouldn't Hurt a Child: A defining trait of the Winter Soldier, strangely enough.
  • You Can't Fight Fate: Quoth Athena, 'the path is always decided'. Loki disputes this.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: Malfoy loves this trope.
    • His fellow Death Eaters, those that answered his call, are quickly disposed of by being used as decoys for SHIELD's strike teams to deal with, while he takes control of their assets.
    • In chapter 50 he spends his POV section musing over how useless Baron Von Strucker has become and, really, he's only got one more thing to do in life: be enslaved and explain how to control the Winter Soldier.
  • Your Approval Fills Me with Shame: Lucius to Gravemoss. Lucius has standards. Gravemoss doesn't.
Child Of GraceFanWorks/Harry PotterThe Crow Phoenix Rising
Children of TimeFanFic/CrossoverChristian Humber Reloaded

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