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Series: Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries

Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries is an Australian television drama series, first broadcast in February 2012. The series is based on author Kerry Greenwood's Phryne Fisher murder mystery novels and was created by Deb Cox and Fiona Eagger. Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries revolves around the personal and professional life of Phryne Fisher (played by Essie Davis), a glamorous private detective in 1920s Melbourne.

Two series have been produced so far; a third series is expected to air in 2015.

The series contains examples of:

  • Action Girl: Phryne Fisher
  • Actor Allusion: In the season 2 episode Framed for Murder, Jack's childhood dream is said to have been "to ride the Tour de France". Nathan Page was a teenage champion cyclist.
  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the novels, Inspector Jack Robinson is a middle-aged man whose major physical trait is that he is instantly forgettable. Here he is ruggedly handsome. And Dot, who is described as plain in the novels, is played by the very cute Ashleigh Cummings.
  • Aerith and Bob: Phryne and her sister, Jane.
  • Always Murder: The case might start out as locating a missing hat, but someone's going to die soon enough.
  • Ambiguous Disorder: Beatrice Mason, one of the suspects in "The Blood of Juana the Mad" is generally agreed by most characters to be suffering from some kind of 'mental affliction'. Exactly what is not clear, although it seems to combine aspects of Aspergers syndrome, OCD and Hates Being Touched.
  • Asshole Victim: The blackmailer from the Green Mill Murder episode.
  • Banana In The Tail Pipe: In "Blood at the Wheel", Phyrne sabotages Jack's car by stuffing her stocking into the exhaust pipe.
  • Battle Butler: Mr. Butler's time in the military has left him with useful hand-to-hand combat skills and an impressive arsenal of weapons.
  • Bedsheet Ladder: In "Unnatural Habits" a bedsheet ladder is planted to make it look like the murdered girl had escaped from the confinement cell through the window. Phryne sees through it because the knots used would not have held the girl's weight.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: Phryne and Jack in series one; by series two they're well into Will They or Won't They? territory.
  • Blithe Spirit: Phryne changes everyone in her corner of Melbourne. Except maybe Aunt Prudence.
  • Broken Pedestal: Georges Sanderson to Jack, in the second to last episode of the second season.
  • The Boxing Episode: "Deadweight".
  • Christmas Episode: "Murder Under the Mistletoe", which aired at Christmas, but in-universe wasn't actually set at Christmas. However, the characters are celebrating 'Christmas in July', an Australian tradition where Christmas-style celebrations are held during the southern hemisphere winter, which falls in the middle of the year.
  • Click Hello: In "Unnatural Habits", Phryne is searching the ship and has just discovered the missing girls when she is interrupted by the click of an automatic being cocked behind her.
  • Cool Car: Loads of them! Phryne's Hispano-Suiza, Jack's '28 Graham-Paige, Bert & Cec's '29 Hudson, a '28 Alfa Romeo worth over a million, even the '16 Overland Amulance seen in a flashback.
  • The Cutie: Dot.
  • Cut the Fuse: Phryne shots a burning length of film that is being used as an improvised Powder Trail in "Framed for Murder". However, the burning film flips and lands on the piled celluloid, reigniting it.
  • Deadpan Snarker: How Jack deals with the chaos Phryne brings into his world.
  • Dirty Harriet: Phryne goes undercover as a Spanish fan dancer at a gentleman's club in "Murder Most Scandalous".
  • Drowning My Sorrows: Jack tries this after the accident in "Blood at the Wheel".
  • Engineered Public Confession: In "Dead Air", Phryne confronts a murderer in a radio studio. She switches on the microphone so that the killer's confession is broadcast live.
  • Ethical Slut: In the "Green Mill Murder", Phryne plainly states her opinion: "Everybody should be allowed to marry whomever they choose, although, personally, [she is] not the marrying kind". For context, that episode figures a mixed-race marriage as well as a gay couple.
  • Fair Cop: Jack Robinson and Hugh Collins.
  • Fake-Out Make-Out: Happens between Phryne and Inspector Robinson in "Murder in Montparnasse", with a dash of Kiss of Distraction: Jack needs to distract her from looking at a murderer and thus blowing their cover.
  • Good Bad Girl: Phryne, again. We don't see all that many partners (especially as compared to some series with male leads and many a Girl of the Week), but she still has a pretty scandalous reputation. It is the 1920's after all.
  • Gorgeous Period Dress / Costume Porn: A lot of attention is devoted to Phryne's gorgeous outfits.
  • Hat Damage: Jack Robinson has his hat shot off his head in "Death on the Vine".
  • Hates Being Touched: Beatrice Mason, as part of her Ambiguous Disorder, in episode "The Blood of Juana the Mad".
  • Hero Stole My Bike: In "The Blood of Juana the Mad", Jack and Phryne jump on a conveniently placed motorcycle (in a university quad) to chase a fleeing killer.
  • Iris Out: Used at the end of every episode, to match the time period of the show.
  • Kensington Gore: Subverted in one episode of the first season when Hugh asks if some red stuff on the bottom of a boot is blood and Jack shakes his head saying that it's "too red". It turns out to be paint.
  • Knife-Throwing Act: Phryne goes undercover as the target girl in a knife-throwing act in "Blood and Circuses".
  • Lip-Lock Sun-Block: Hugh and Dot in "Ruddy Gore".
  • Non-Idle Rich: Phryne
  • Not-So-Fake Prop Weapon: In "Framed for Murder", the killer swaps the prop knife being used in a movie for the real knife used for taking stills. When the director demonstrates to the actress how he wants her to stab the leading man, he stabs himself in the heart.
  • Perfectly Arranged Marriage: Lin and his bride.
  • Phoney Call: In "Death on the Vine", Phryne makes a call to Jack and pretends to be talking to her mechanic so the people eavesdropping on her call won't know who she is really talking to.
  • Powder Trail: In "Framed for Murder", the murderer uses a long line of celluloid film like a powder trail to ignite a huge pile of unspooled film he is planning to use to burn his victim to death.
  • Pretty in Mink: Phryne has a fondness for fur wraps and fur-trimmed coats.
  • Promoted to Love Interest: Jack Robinson. In the novels he is a Happily Married middle-aged man Phryne has no romantic interest in. Phryne's canon love interest in the novels, Lin Chung, only appears in one episode of the series ("Ruddy Gore").
  • The Roaring Twenties
  • Sauna of Death: In the very first episode.
  • Sexless Marriage: Jack and Rosie, as implied by the former in "Raisins and Almonds".
  • Sexy Coat Flashing: In "Blood and Circuses", Phryne reveals her circus costume to Inspector Robinson in this way.
  • Shipper on Deck: Jack, Phryne and Mr. Butler all ship Hugh/Dot because Everyone Can See It. Jack is surprisingly unsubtle as he leans on Hugh.
  • Shoot the Rope: In "Framed for Murder", Phryne shoots the rope holding a sandbag, causing it to drop and extinguish a fire.
  • The Stoic: Jack Robinson.
  • Throw the Book at Them: In "Raisins and Almonds", Phryne confronts an intruder in a bookstore. The intruder tips over a bookshelf and dumps a pile of books on her.
  • Town with a Dark Secret: Maiden Creek in "Death on the Vine".
  • Vehicular Sabotage: In "Blood at the Wheel", the wheel nuts on a female rally driver's car are loosened, causing the wheel to come off at high speed.

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