YMMV: The Flash (2014)

  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Wells. Does he really care for Cisco, Caitlin and Barry? Or is he just faking it all to move them like pawns? In "Out of Time", Wells himself admits that it's some of both. At least that's how he feels about Cisco and Caitlin. He's the Reverse-Flash so his feelings for Barry are a little more....complicated.
    • Did Captain Cold really fall for Cisco's bluff? Did he suspect that he was bluffing but felt like he couldn't take the risk? Or did he want the Flash to live so he would continue to have a Worthy Opponent?
    • In respect to talking to (and flirting with) Iris as the Flash, is Barry taking the step he never took and is becoming more romantic and confident? Or is he a pathetic creep who's pining after a woman who already has a boyfriend and encouraging (instead of discouraging) Iris to continue writing about him?
  • Anti-Climax Boss: Deliberately invoked with Weather Wizard/Mark Mardon: After accidentally travelling back in time roughly a day whilst trying to stop a tsunami Mardon was sending to Central City, Barry uses his knowledge of what was going to happen to apprehend him before Mardon do anything he did in the first timeline.
  • Arc Fatigue: Everyone's insistence on keeping Iris Locked Out of the Loop gets pretty tiresome as Barry becomes more and more casual about his secret, especially in light of the increasing number of people in the know.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Iris West is changed from a journalist to a criminal psychologist, likely to avoid Lois Lane comparisons. However, in the second episode, we learn she's taking a journalism class for an elective, and she's soon doing articles about the Flash, ultimately being offered a job as a reporter.
    • In "Rogue Time" after learning Barry's Secret Identity, Captain Cold makes a deal with Flash. He gets to be a super-villain like he wanted, and doesn't tell Barry's secret, but he won't kill anyone anymore.
  • Awesome Music: Any time the Flash's Leitmotif starts up, which is slightly less often than Once an Episode.
  • Base Breaker:
    • Iris. Either she's a good female lead who cares for Barry in a heartwarming way, or a bland character who has all of the trappings of the CW's other forced love interests.
    • Cisco. Either an Adorkable nerd who loves his job and good comic relief, or someone not annoying enough to be The Scrappy, but still annoying enough to let the show down. It doesn't help that Cisco keeps getting handed the Idiot Ball, leading to many Nice Job Breaking It, Hero moments. His rivalry with Hartley Rathaway, owing to Hartley taking a dislike of him because of his unprofessional exterior (which is, really, a perfectly valid criticism to make in the real world), also makes him more contentious thanks to Hartley's popularity and the fact Cisco's role in the show-inventing gadgets for the Flash-is the role Hartley traditionally played to Wally West's Flash, making some feel he stole Hartley's job.
  • Broken Base: The identity of the Reverse-Flash: Harrison Wells. He was a very popular candidate, some fans having guessed it long ago. But some were hoping he'd just be a Red Herring, given the complexity of the character before the reveal.
    • Anyone familiar with the comics knows that Cisco and Caitlin are alternate versions of Vibe and Killer Frost, before they become metahumans. However, the fandom is divided on whether or not the two become who they were in the DC Universe because some people like the two as who they are now while others feel that them gaining superpowers is what would make them better.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal:
    • The stinger at the end of "Flash vs Arrow" - Ronnie being alive as a fire-wielding metahuman - was not a surprise at all, even for those who don't read comic books, as Genre Savvy fans figured out the twist given that they Never Found the Body.
    • The stinger that reveals who is "The Man In the Yellow Suit": Harrison Wells. The guy we've known was evil from the very first episode turns out to be evil? What a twist!
    • The revelation that one of the speedsters from the night Nora died was a time-traveling Barry. Given that time travel was established back in the pilot, most viewers had already guessed that even without being familiar with Flashpoint.
  • Cargo Ship: Cisco is way too attached to Barry's suit.
  • Counterpart Comparison:
    • The depiction of Barry Allen as a geeky young man with relationship issues has reminded many of Peter Parker, more than (at least in older comics) his comics self who was more of a typical square-jawed hero in the Superman mold. Grant Gustin also looks somewhat like Andrew Garfield from the The Amazing Spider-Man Series.
    • Caitlin has been compared to Simmons from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., as both have similar roles.
    • The show's version of Girder (Tony Woodward) looks more like Colossus than comics Girder, who looks like a man made of rusty scrap metal.
    • The Pied Piper's weapon is changed to sonic blasting gloves, which together with his deafness makes him quite similar to Shriek from Batman Beyond.
    • The show's version of Grodd has many parallelisms to Koba from the Planet of the Apes reboot films due to both of them being experimental apes who eventually revolts against humans (sans Wells, for now).
    • Plastique's power allows her to overcharge inanimate object to the point of explosion with a glowing purple energy, giving her a lot of aesthetic similarities to Gambit of the X-Men.
  • Creepy Awesome: The Reverse-Flash.
  • Demoted to Extra: Eddie Thawne has become less and less important to the plot as the season progresses.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Hartley Rathaway. That he was disowned by his parents for being gay and was betrayed by his surrogate father figure Dr. Wells is enough for some viewers to look the other way at his evil doings. It helps that he started out as a Well-Intentioned Extremist (trying to expose and punish Wells for deliberately endangering the city) and that he did go through a Heel-Face Turn in the comics (and subsequently became a major figure in the Flash mythos, making it all the more likely he'll do so here as well).
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Linda Park has become one before she even appeared, simply because it was announced she was being played by Malese Jow. Technically she's The Other Darrin because Linda has had a brief cameo played by another actress, but still.
    • Captain Cold seems to already be gaining popularity as he has been the most effective villain so far combined with his intelligence, Nerves of Steel and cool factor. Some people consider him to be the show's first interesting villain.
    • Gorilla Grodd. His first appearance was one of the best scenes in the series up to that point. The buildup to a full appearance by Grodd has been driving the fandom absolutely crazy.
    • Likewise, the Trickster. It helps that he's being played by Mark Hamill and that he played the role twice before.
    • Add Pied Piper to the list of villains with a large following before they even appeared on the show.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Captain Cold, (no pun intended) just like in the comics.
    • Grodd gets the fans cheering every time he appears. In fact, the scene of him attacking two innocent sewer workers seems to have been thrown in specifically so we'll understand he's one of the bad guys.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Lisa Snart. So much that both Cisco and Barry find her very attractive.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Barry and Caitlin seems to have a slight edge of Barry and Iris at this point.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
  • Foe Yay:
    • "Revenge of the Rogues" can be summed up as Captain Cold and Reverse-Flash competing for Barry's attention.
    • Nearly every confrontation between Pied Piper and Flash. Definitely one-sided though.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • Oliver's speech to Barry becomes just a little less inspiring when you know that Sara Lance was being murdered at the time.
    • At the end of "Flash vs. Arrow", Felicity mentions that Oliver hopes to team up again, just one (or so) episode short of Oliver getting possibly killed in "The Climb".
    • In the same episode, it is said a few times that Ollie is a better superhero than Barry because despite not having powers, he has much more experience. In the next episode Ra's Al Ghul, a guy with hundreds of years of experience, '"kills''' Oliver.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Everything about Wells' relationship with the team becomes this once we find out that he's the Reverse Flash, and is just using Barry as a means of regaining his own powers.
  • He's Just Hiding:
    • Plastique/Bette, due to Never Found the Body (albeit, given what happened to it, of course they didn't), and while we see their death, being a metahuman, coming back from something which should be fatal isn't that much of a stretch. There's also the character's noted history with the Suicide Squad (see below on that) leading to some thinking that they might turn up alive later.
    • General Eiling, last seen dragged away by Grodd after just a couple appearances despite being set up as the show's equivalent to Amanda Waller. It helps that Grodd would likely want to do far more than just kill him.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Oliver Queen, the trope namer for The Cape, advises Barry to become one.
    • "The Flash is Born" had a flashback with a kid Barry practicing boxing with Joe; the Gotham episode that aired the day before ("Harvey Dent") had a similar scene with kid Bruce and Alfred.
    • The "Did Flash run backwards twice?" meme becomes this in "Going Rogue", when Barry does try to run backwards on the treadmill and is promptly thrown into the wall.
    • In the first Flash series, Barry Allen gets Ship Tease with Tina McGee, one of Wally West's love interests (at the time). In this series, starting with "Crazy for You", Barry does it "again", when he starts going out with Linda Park...Wally's wife.
    • In Glee, Grant Gustin's character has a knack of throwing red slushies really fast.
    • In the Justice League Unlimited cartoon, Lex Luthor, voiced by Clancy Brown, ultimately ended up killing Gorilla Grodd, whose last words were that he'd have his revenge. Here we have Clancy Brown playing General Eiling, who first experiments on Grodd and is later taken to the now very powered and very intelligent (and also very angry) Grodd by Harrison Wells/Reverse Flash, thus technically giving Grodd a chance at revenge in two ways.
    • This isn't the first time Plastique was killed off in her debut episode.
    • In Sky High, Danielle Panabaker's character decided to date a Pyrokinetic guy to make The Hero of said film (whom her character is in love with) jealous. Here, her character is in a relationship with Firestorm. Additionally, one of her enemies in that film has Super Speed. Here she's an ally of the Flash. Further, when her Sky High character finally ends up with The Hero, the Pyrokinetic guy ends up with a female character with ice-based powers. Caitlin's comic counterpart is Killer Frost.
    • Mark Mardon, the Weather Wizard, is set to be played by Liam McIntyre. McIntyre played the titular Spartacus whose Red Baron is "The Bringer of Rain" (though it may be intentional).
  • Ho Yay:
    • Eddie's reaction to the Flash getting beat up by Captain Cold and Heatwave definitely seemed to be more than cop instinct.
    • Not to mention that Barry got flowers for Eddie when he wound up at the hospital.
    • Eddie enthusiastically hugs Barry after he's told that Barry is suffering some mental conditions that made him so forward from Iris (and caused Eddie to punch Barry).
    • The relationship between Hartley Rathaway and Harrison Wells comes off as less paternal and more as a romantic relationship, making the present day Hartley Rathaway/Pied Piper come off a spurned lover towards Dr. Wells. The fact that Hartley is openly gay certainly adds fuel to this...
  • Holy Shit Quotient:
    • The end of the first episode, with The Reveal that Dr. Wells is not only not crippled, but also from the future.
    • Dr. Wells' reveal as the Reverse-Flash. Especially as there was a scene where the Reverse Flash was beating Wells to a pulp.
    • Dr. Wells using the Tachyon device because his connection to the Speed Force isn't strong enough.
    • Bloodstains are found in Barry's house from the night of Nora's murder and neither of them belongs to Dr. Wells. But one of them is a match for an adult Barry.
    • The Reveal in Fallout that Gorilla Grodd and the Reverse-Flash are actually working together.
    • The entirety of Out of Time, Barry reveals himself to Iris after they declare their love for each other, and Wells reveals to Cisco (and by extension Caitlin as well) that he is indeed Eobard Thawne and from the future (and that Eddie is a "distant relative"); he's been stuck in the past for 15 years, and Barry's speed is the only thing that can send him back to his own time. He was there the night of Nora's murder but he didn't meant to kill her, he was after Barry instead. Then he speeds up his arm fast enough to go inside Cisco's body and right to his heart. Topped off with Barry unintentionally time traveling at the end of the episode.
  • Iron Woobie:
    • Henry Allen. Was sentenced to life being wrongfully convicted of killing his wife, separating him from his son. He takes it all in stride and is happy to just remain in prison while Barry lives his life.
    • His son Barry also qualifies - he took a moment of tragedy in his childhood, and it became a defining moment that motivated him to become a forensic scientist in pursuit of justice, largely because he wants to free his father. His response to getting superpowers is not to angst and feel isolated from other people, but to genuinely appreciate life all the more and use those powers to help other people. Furthermore, despite his own flaws and internal insecurities, he strives to be a genuinely upbeat and kind-hearted young man and isn't unwilling to learn from past mistakes or admit fault when it's due.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks:
    • Being a Spiritual Successor of the divisive Smallville, several elements that some feel are too similar has came under fire, such as red kryptonite and Bivolo's rage-inducing ability.
    • There's also some fans who feel the show follows the formula of Arrow too much; from the Fish out of Temporal Water-style origin, the Power Trio format for the hero, the love interest who helps the hero without knowing that their secret identity is a close friend in love with them, a love rival who they get along with but shares the name with a comic-book villain and in both cases, serve as a Red Herring, a mysterious older figure who's got the same skills as the hero only better and is responsible for the death of their parent, and the revelation of their identity in the Christmas mid-season finale, among other similarities. This has led to the show being a bit predictable for some.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Blackout, who's only evil because his powers killed his friends, disfigured him, and wrecked his mental state. Not only that, but he constantly has to feed on energy and feels perpetual hunger.
    • Tony Woodward in episode 7. He may be a huge bully and jerkass, but he didn't deserve to get manipulated by Wells and then murdered by Blackout like that.
    • Hartley Rathaway. Child prodigy who was rejected by his parents when he came out as gay, was betrayed by Harrison Wells when he tried to warn him about the dangers of the Particle Accelerator, and was left suffering from constant, chronic pain and deafness as a result of the explosion. He was fairly antisocial beforehand, but its easy to sympathise with the guy.
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Cisco's death. Less because fans think the writers wouldn't kill him, but because the same episode has Flash accidentally travel back in time and getting stuck several hours before Cisco's death. Not to mention that the trailers for the following episodes show Cisco being threatened by Leonard Snart & interacting with Laurel Lance.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Captain Cold, a Badass Normal full of Crazy-Prepared plans, who ascends to a worthy superhero foe when he gets his hands on Star Labs technology. He's also the one who comes up with the idea of the various bad guys in Central City teaming up to take on the Flash. Also, despite his team-up of him and Heat Wave failing, he had a backup plan, His main goal of Flash being forced into the open is accomplished. His sister breaks them out of prison. The Glider appears, the Rogues are on there way to being formed.
    • Harrison Wells. From the beginning everything he has plotted has gone according to plan. He planned and manipulated his way to get the collider to explode and give Barry his powers, and keeps everyone out of the loop about this, going so far as to create fake records of himself so that no one could get too nosy. He has since continued conducting his covert experiments with Team Flash none the wiser despite working with him. The closest anyone has come to discovering his plans was Rathaway discovering that there was "a chance" of the collider exploding, and when he leaked this out to the public, Wells just turns it around and makes it so that little damage is done.
    • Hartley Rathaway, AKA Pied Piper, sure tries to be this. Like Cold, he's got plans-after-plans, takes advantage of his Glass Cannon status to lure Barry into traps, and was Crazy-Prepared enough to hide explosives in his hearing aides; however, he's too arrogant and cruel to be more than a high-functioning Smug Snake.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "Lightning gave me abs?", from the scene where Barry wakes up from his coma and discovers his powers have made him more physically fit.
    • "Did Flash run backwards twice?", from the posters showing him running with a lightning bolt shaped speed trail, suggesting he just randomly decided to run backwards twice for some reason.
    • "Every episode of The Flash should end with Harrison getting up from his wheelchair and doing/revealing something unexpected.", from the episodes were Harrison would stand up from his wheelchair and perform some sort of plot twisting-reveal while smirking menacingly.
    • The answer to absolutely anything? "Speed Force".
    • "Caitlin gets hotter every episode" or some variant thereof.
    • "IT WAS ME, BARRY!"Explanation 
    • Barry and Caitlin's rendition of "Summer Nights".
    • "Not God, GRODD."
  • Mondegreen: In "Flash vs Arrow," Wells pronounces "that man" (referring to the Arrow) in such a way that some fans thought he was namedropping Batman.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Wells has never killed an innocent until we learn he did kill Nora. And then he kills Cisco in an extremely violent manner. Though if you believe him, Nora's death was actually an accident. He was actually there to kill Barry. Then when the timeline's rewritten he kills Mason Bridge (the reporter who's been researching him) in the same way he originally killed Cisco.
  • Narm:
    • When Multiplex gives a group beatdown to Barry, you don't even have to be paying attention to notice that at least one of his clones was literally punching thin air. Not even punching, more like slowly swinging his forearm.
    • The Kid!Barry flashbacks can cross into this, largely due to the weak dialogue the kid actors are given and how the scenes play out.
    • "Flash vs. Arrow" has an interesting splitting the difference with Roy G. Bivolo. He keeps that cringe-inducing name, but they draw the line at calling him the Rainbow Raider, turning it into Caitlin's pitiful attempt at giving him a supervillain name.
    • Dr. Stein transmitting a Morse code message via Ronnie in "Fallout." To clarify: Dr. Stein has been captured by Eiling and uses Morse code to reveal his location to Ronnie through their Psychic Link. Ronnie then says, in a completely serious voice, "Tap, tap. Tap, tap. Tap..." and so on. It's as narmy as it sounds.
    • The show generally does a good job at giving little nudges and such to the counterparts some characters have in the comics (and may turn out like in the future). But Caitlin saying that Ronnie thought they were so different that they were "like fire and ice" is just a little too narmy to hear.
    • Eddie's shouting Joe's name when Mardon pulls Joe out of a window by controlling the wind in "Out Of Time." It lasts too long and his weird pronunciation make it impossible to take seriously.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Oliver's line in the pilot about the lightning bolt "choosing" Barry. Even if electricity isn't sentient, the whole scene is momentous enough with Oliver then telling Barry how he can be a different kind of hero from him and making the first ever Title Drop in the show, that it just works in context.
    • Barry's speech in Episode Two to the STAR Labs gang about how "they all got struck by that lightning" can be a little cringe-worthy to viewers, but Grant Gustin sounds earnest enough (and Barry is enough of a dork) to make it heartwarming enough to work.
    • The titular battle in "Flash vs. Arrow" is both cheesy and awesome, what with Oliver having to duck under Barry's super-fast punches.
  • Older Than They Think: Many feel that Barry seems somewhat younger than the Barry of the comics when he becomes the Flash. He is usually drawn to look older, like early to mid-30s, and in the fifth episode, he is stated to be 25 years old. Though the passage of time in the Silver Age comics was always wonky, modern stories such as "The Flash: Rebirth" establish the fact that Barry was a rookie CSI tech when he became the Flash, and so was in the early-to-mid 20s range at the time.
  • Rewatch Bonus:
    • Cisco realizes that when the Flash and the Reverse-Flash fight each other, they produce red and yellow lightning. He recalls that there was red and yellow lightning the night Barry's mother died, which means that there were two speedsters that night. Rewatch the pilot and you can see it for yourself.
    • Even more of a bonus. The lightning that the Flash produces is yellow (even though he wears red) and the Reverse-Flash produces red lightning (even though he wears yellow). If you rewatch the pilot, when Barry is wisked away from home, he's covered in yellow lightning. This seems to imply that whatever speedster was with the Reverse-Flash was the one who teleported Barry away. It seems that Wells/Reverse-Flash does have access to time travel given his knowledge of the future. And there's also that news article "Flash Missing, Vanishes in Crisis".
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: Like Arrow, there are complaints that the hero has no chemistry with the designated love interest, at least romantically speaking. Strangely, the episode "Going Rogue" went out of its way to present Felicity as the perfect companion for Barry, making his attraction to Iris seem even more like this. This even gets lampshaded at the end of the episode right before the two kiss:
    Felicity: What is wrong with us? We are perfectly perfect for each other.
    Barry: Yet we're sitting here pining for people we can't have.
    • It's been getting worse as a lot of fans don't particularly care for Barry constantly meeting and flirting with Iris as the Flash. Lampshaded by Caitlin herself who doesn't care for it either. Said meetings thankfully stopped after Caitlin's comments.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat:
    • The battle between the Westallen and Snowbarry shippers started before the series has even begun.
    • There's also the previously established Baricity from Barry's initial appearances on Arrow.
  • Squick:
    • Depending on how you see Barry and Iris' relationship, but at least some viewers are squicked by Barry having a crush on someone who can be seen as his (foster) sister.
    • Eiling's Kryptonite Ring for the Flash, in which a grenade fires hundreds of sharp needles, piercing him all at the same time. And Wells mentions that they should pull them all out, before Barry's healing would kick in. Who wouldn't wince at a situation like that? It gets worse: Comments indicate that the fragments have tiny splinters inside to lock them in place once they break the skin, which would be even more painful, and more messy to remove.
      • In a bit of a Mood Whiplash, Cisco decides to mention an incident about having stepped on a sea urchin before, and Barry not wanting Cisco to urinate on him; Cisco thankfully says that "cure" is just an urban legend.
    • The Reverse-Flash's preferred method of killing people involves impaling people with his arm. It raises the Nightmare Fuel of the show to a whole new level.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks:
    • The changes made to the Flash's costume from the comics have received some criticisms - namely the Chest Insignia lacking the white centrepiece; and that the character nicknamed the Scarlet Speedster isn't actually wearing his distinctive scarlet/bright red, but rather a darker maroon or burgundy. However, the final shot in the pilot reveals that in the future the Flash will have a costume that has these alterations.
    • The portrayal of Captain Cold as being more of a straight villain has received some criticism from those who prefer his Anti-Villain portrayal from the comics canon. However, it should be noted that Cold mainly became an Anti-Villain when Wally West was the Flash, not while fighting Barry. Furthermore, in "Rogue Time" he gets his first nudge towards it: Barry challenges his pride by telling him if we was really as good a supervillain as he claimed then he could perform his heists without killing anyone, and Cold accepts the challenge.
    • As to be expected, there was some people who were bugged, or at least befuddled, by the show giving a Race Lift to Iris and the West Family. Less so because she was no longer white, but moreso because it meant that, should he appear, Wally West, Iris' nephew and the second-most well-known person to become The Flash after Barry, who has historically appeared as a red-headed Caucasian, would have a Race Lift too. The fact that this lead to DC reintroducing Wally in the New 52 with a similar Race Lift (despite the rest of the West family so far not having one, among other differences) probably helps with that. Further on that, the West family was already white in the New 52 (well before the show started), and so in the comics it's established that Wally - now biracial - gets his non-Caucasian from his non-West parent (as opposed to a theoretical TV-verse Wally), which makes one wonder why they're bothering (ie: if the West family is different in both continuities, why can't Wally be white in one, non-white in the other?) The timing of both the show's pre-production stages also align with Wally's (re-)introduction, making one wonder which continuity pushed the other into causing the Race Lift in the first place.
    • Pied Piper's Weapon of Choice being sonic frequency-producing gloves rather than a pipe with sonics and hypnotic technology. It raises the question as to why he'd go by the name 'Pied Piper', if he doesn't even use a pipe. There's also his lack of any Socialist leanings, which were a big part of his character in the comics, but that might just be due to only appearing twice so far.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Many weren't expecting Plastique to be written out so quickly because of the character's history with the Suicide Squad aka Task Force X, which already exists in Arrow. It becomes even worse since the character was built up as a very interesting meta-human and potential ally of Barry before dying.
    • Roy Bivolo suffers from this, probably due to being caught in the same episode as the crossover with "Arrow". In fact, he's so under-utilized that his nickname, "Prism" (or Caitlin's suggestion of "Rainbow Raider"), ends up making no sense—all he does is induce rage with his red-glowing eyes, never demonstrating any of the other color-based emotional manipulation possessed by his comics counterpart. It seems like he's just there as an excuse to put Barry and Oliver into a Let's You and Him Fight situation. At least, unlike Plastique, he is still alive.
    • The fans unhappy about Barry and Linda's relationship seem to fear this happening to Linda. Linda is Wally West's wife in the comics, and with that, a major part of the Flash mythos, and with him one of the most popular and developed superhero couples in DC. Because she's being used as a pretty obvious Romantic False Lead to keep Barry and Iris apart, people feel that it makes it unlikely her and Wally's relationship will be kept should Wally eventually appear, unless she becomes an Ascended Extra in the show.
  • Uncanny Valley: Some of Multiplex's clones move in a shuffling and unnatural way after he spawns an entire army of them to deal with Barry. The show justifies this by noting that the more he spawns, the weaker the original becomes and his control over them gets spotty. The result is easy-to-miss, but rather spooky when noticed.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: The CGI is remarkably well-handled for a TV show, allowing the depictions of superpowers (particularly Barry's super-speed) to reach almost cinematic quality. Fire is notoriously tricky to get right in CGI, but Firestorm's powers always look great.
  • The Woobie:
    • Plastique. She can barely touch anyone or anything without making it explode and has Eiling hounding her to try and exploit her powers.
    • Ronnie Raymond + Martin Stein = Firestorm. The two are clearly disturbed and hurt by their fusion and both are desperate to reunite with their fiancÚ and wife respectively.