YMMV / The Flash (2014)

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  • Counterpart Comparison:
    • The depiction of Barry Allen as a geeky young man with relationship issues has reminded many of Peter Parker, more than (at least in older comics) his comics self who was more of a typical square-jawed hero in the Superman mold. Grant Gustin also looks somewhat like Andrew Garfield from The Amazing Spider-Man Series.
    • Caitlin has been compared to Simmons from Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., as both have similar roles.
    • Eddie Thawne's role in the first season follows a very similar trajectory to Tommy Merlyn's in Arrow. Throughout the first seasons of their respective shows, both characters romance the main characters' primary love interests, both are vocally against the methods of their cities' respective heroes, and both end up performing heroic sacrifices in the finales of the first season.
    • The show's version of Girder (Tony Woodward) looks more like Colossus than comics Girder, who looks like a man made of rusty scrap metal.
    • The Pied Piper's weapon is changed to sonic blasting gloves, which together with his deafness makes him quite similar to Shriek from Batman Beyond.
    • The Trickster is pretty much the Joker here. Helps that the older one is played by Mark Hamill. For that matter, the character originated in the comics as a Joker Expy, anyway.
    • The show's version of Grodd has many parallels to Koba from the Planet of the Apes reboot films due to both of them being experimental apes who eventually revolts against humans (sans Thawne, for now).
    • Plastique's power allows her to overcharge inanimate object to the point of explosion with a glowing purple energy, giving her a lot of aesthetic similarities to Gambit of the X-Men.
    • Due to how his powers work, That's So Cisco jokes have been gaining steam within the fandom.
    • The fact that, in Season Two, Zoom aims to become the sole speedster in existence, Atom Smasher was implied to have killed his Earth-1 counterpart, and Doctor Light attempted to pull a Kill and Replace on hers has led to frequent comparisons to The One.
    • Due to what The Turtle's ability allowed him to do as well as how the visual effects department displayed Russell's metahuman ability in action, it wasn't long before the internet drew parallels between it and Dio Brando's "The World", leading to a somewhat amusing mash-up of the two.
  • Crossover Ship:
  • Draco in Leather Pants: Hartley Rathaway. That he was disowned by his parents for being gay and was betrayed by his surrogate father figure Eobard Thawne is enough for some viewers to look the other way at his evil doings. It helps that he started out as a Well-Intentioned Extremist (trying to expose and punish Thawne for deliberately endangering the city) and that he did go through a Heel–Face Turn in the comics (and subsequently became a major figure in the Flash mythos, making it all the more likely he'll do so here as well); he did so with "Flash Back".
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Linda Park has become one before she even appeared, simply because it was announced she was being played by Malese Jow. Technically she's The Other Darrin because Linda has had a brief cameo played by another actress, but still. She ended up proving popular enough some fans were hoping she'd avoid being a throw-away temporary love interest, leading to excitement when it was announced she'd return in Season Two.
      • Even more so when she was revealed to be a metahuman on Earth-2, leaving fans hoping the original gets powers as well.
    • Gorilla Grodd. His first appearance was one of the best scenes in the series up to that point. The buildup to a full appearance by Grodd has been driving the fandom absolutely crazy.
    • Likewise, the Trickster. Mark Hamill reprises the role after playing it twice before and completely steals the show with his hammery.
    • Add Pied Piper to the list of villains with a large following before they even appeared on the show. Being played by Andy Mientus helps, as many of his fans from Les Misérables, Spring Awakening, and Smash are willing to check out The Flash just to get more of Mientus.
    • Even with just 45 seconds of screen time, King Shark became a big hit with fans and is one of the most well liked villains to have appeared so far.
    • Earth-2 Iris is also very popular in the fandom. Many see her as much more badass than her Earth-1 counterpart.
    • Fans immediately fell in love with Killer Frost the moment she appears.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • It depends on what social media you frequent. Facebook and Instagram might seem more pro-Barry and Caitlin (Snowbarry).
    • From when it was first advertised, Cisco and Laurel (Blackvibe) has gained some supporters, largely due to the fact Cisco has no current love interest and Laurel and Oliver's relationship is so despised, fans are happy to have her with anyone else. It helps that their scenes together are cute.
    • KillerVibe (Cisco/Caitlin) has fans too, given their close friendship.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Everything about Thawne's relationship with the team becomes this once we find out he's just using Barry as a means of regaining his own powers. It gets worse when we find out the real Harrison Wells died ages ago, Thawne killed him and took his place.
    • In the pilot, Oliver gives an unsure Barry a Rousing Speech, telling his friend that Barry can inspire people in a way Oliver never could. All throughout Arrow's third season, Ra's al Ghul has been orchestrating a city-wide smear campaign against the Arrow to force Oliver to become his successor in the League of Assassins. Come "The Fallen," Ra's now has Ollie in his clutches and is taking steps to snuff out any signs of empathy or humanity within him, making him renounce his old life and take up the title Al Sah-him, the heir to the Demon. Thankfully, this doesn't stick and Season 4 sees Oliver taking the steps to become a symbol of hope for Star City in his civilian and vigilante personas.
  • He's Just Hiding:
    • Plastique/Bette, due to Never Found the Body (albeit, given what happened to it, of course they didn't), and while we see their death, being a metahuman, coming back from something which should be fatal isn't that much of a stretch. There's also the character's noted history with the Suicide Squad (see below on that) leading to some thinking that they might turn up alive later.
    • General Eiling, last seen dragged away by Grodd after just a couple appearances despite being set up as the show's equivalent to Amanda Waller. It helps that Grodd would likely want to do far more than just kill him. Confirmed, as of Grodd Lives
    • No one actually believes that Eobard Thawne is truly gone. Not only are there some loose threads about his character (how he got his powers, why he hates Barry, and how he discovered his identity), but he's just too iconic to truly be gone. It also helps that he returned in Season Two.
    • Eddie could return since his body was swept into the timestream.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Right around the time the pilot leaked online, a video on the Nerdist website claimed to have obtained a clip... then pulled a Bait and Switch by showing a clip of the 1990 Flash fighting the Trickster, joking they were impressed the show was able to get Mark Hamill since he was likely really busy with the new Star Wars movie. A few weeks later, they revealed they really did get Hamill back to play the Trickster.
    • Oliver Queen, the Trope Namer for The Cape, advises Barry to become one.
    • "The Flash is Born" had a flashback with a kid Barry practicing boxing with Joe; the Gotham episode that aired the day before ("Harvey Dent") had a similar scene with kid Bruce and Alfred.
    • The "Did Flash run backwards twice?" meme becomes this in "Going Rogue", when Barry does try to run backwards on the treadmill and is promptly thrown into the wall.
    • In the first Flash series, Barry Allen gets Ship Tease with Tina McGee, one of Wally West's love interests (at the time). In this series, starting with "Crazy for You," Barry does it "again", when he starts going out with Linda Park... Wally's wife.
    • In Glee, Grant Gustin's character has a knack of throwing red slushies really fast.
    • In the Justice League Unlimited cartoon, Lex Luthor, voiced by Clancy Brown, ultimately ended up killing Gorilla Grodd, whose last words were that he'd have his revenge. Here we have Clancy Brown playing General Eiling, who first experiments on Grodd and is later taken to the now very powered and very intelligent (and also very angry) Grodd by Reverse-Flash, thus technically giving Grodd a chance at revenge in two ways.
    • Danielle Panabaker's stint in Sky High, namely;
      • Her character decided to date a pyrokinetic guy to make The Hero of said film (whom her character is in love with) jealous. And when her character finally ends up with The Hero, the pyrokinetic guy ends up with a female character with ice-based powers. Here, her character is in a relationship with Firestorm and her character is Killer Frost.
      • One of her enemies in that film has Super Speed. Here she's an ally of the Flash.
      • Her Sky High character is a heroic Captain Ersatz of a well known female DC villain, whereas here she's playing an actual DC villain, but is also portrayed heroically. For now.
      • The fact that the aforementioned pyrokinetic guy having almost the exact same build as Ronnie and the exact same hairstyle as Cisco.
    • Mark Mardon, the Weather Wizard, is set to be played by Liam McIntyre. McIntyre played the titular Spartacus whose Red Baron is "The Bringer of Rain" (though it may be intentional).
    • James Jesse (Mark Hamill) references Breaking Bad in "Tricksters". In a script reading for The Empire Strikes Back, Luke Skywalker (originated by Hamill himself) was played by Aaron Paul.
    • In The Mask of Zorro, Matt Letscher plays Harrison Love, a Historical-Domain Character who was given Historical Villain Upgrade. Here, he plays a character who came from the future who killed and replaced a character from the past also named Harrison and deliberately portrayed him much amoral than what the person was supposed to be. Additionally, Zorro marked him twice; once with "Z" and the last one with "M." Letscher's character here is Eobard Thawne aka Professor Zoom.
    • Back when she was still on The Walking Dead, Emily Kinney's (Brie Larvan/The Bug-Eyed Bandit) character briefly dates a character played by Kyle Gallner, the actor who played Smallville's version of The Flash.
    • Katie Cassidy's (Laurel Lance/Black Canary) real life father, David Cassidy, played the Mirror Master in the 90s Flash series.
    • Back when his true identity is still a secret, some fans have speculated Wells to be Vandal Savage. They were eventually disproven (of course) but Savage was later billed to be the main villain of Legends of Tomorrow.
    • Speaking of which, Tom Cavanagh's stint as the titular Ed becomes a lot funnier if you re-watch it after watching this show. Specifically;
      • The fact that the name "Ed" can basically pass as a shortened version of "Eobard".
      • It was shown in the year 2000, the same year Eobard Thawne killed and replaced him.
      • The title character lives in Stuckeyville. Eobard Thawne is Trapped in the Past.
      • An episode in its second season, ironically and prophetically titled "Nice Guys Finish Last," has him helping a man named Barry and repeatedly encourages him by saying things like, "That guy is playin' you Barry, that guy is playing you!"
      • One of his first cases as Stuckeyville's "pro lane lawyer" is against a young man named Howard Pissle running around exposing the secrets behind the tricks of a locally famous magician. This exchange takes place when he has the kid on the stand in response to him questioning his integrity:
      Pissle: "No, sir, I do not think there is anything wrong with what I'm doing."
      Ed: "Nothing at all?"
      Pissle: "Nothing at all."
      Ed: "I see. Then why in the world do you wear a mask?"
      • In retrospect, Cisco is essentially a more endearing, less comically annoying version of Ed's second-in-command at his bowling alley, Phil Stubbs.
    • In the Season One finale, Dr. Stein is revealed to be an ordained rabbi. Victor Garber's first big movie role was Jesus in Godspell.
    • In the pilot, Oliver Queen advises Barry that he could be better than the Arrow. An oddly prophetic line, in light of the first season of The Flash being much better received by both fans & critics than the third season of Arrow which it aired alongside.
    • Hartley Rathaway/Pied Piper is a hard-of-hearing, gay, sarcastic smartass played by Andy Mientus, who went on to play Hanschen Rilow (same initials, too...), a sarcastic smartass in a relationship with another boy, in the American Sign Language revival of Spring Awakening.
  • Ho Yay:
    • Eddie's reaction to the Flash getting beat up by Captain Cold and Heatwave definitely seemed to be more than cop instinct.
    • Not to mention that Barry got flowers for Eddie then he wound up at the hospital.
    • Eddie enthusiastically hugs Barry after he's told that Barry is suffering some mental conditions that made him so forward from Iris (and caused Eddie to punch Barry).
    • In "The Trap," Eddie pulls Barry aside and shows him an engagement ring. It's meant to be for Iris, but out of context it looks like Eddie proposing to Barry.
    • In "Grodd Lives," Eobard taunts Eddie with the knowledge that Iris and Barry end up together. Amusingly, the way he phrases it is "Barry marries Iris...and not you."
    • Grant and Rick have certainly been fueling things.
    • The relationship between Hartley Rathaway and Eobard Thawne comes off as less paternal and more as a romantic relationship, making the present day Hartley Rathaway/Pied Piper come off a spurned lover towards Thawne. The fact that Hartley is openly gay certainly adds fuel to this...
    • The nature of Firestorm's powers can lead to this and is lampshaded numerous times In-Universe. When Ronnie and Prof. Stein were still learning that they're connected after being separated from each other after over a year of an unwanted Fusion Dance, the latter stated that "he's still inside Ronald" causing Cisco and Barry to laugh. During Ronnie and Caitlin's wedding, Stein volunteers to do the rights as he's a Rabbi. When Ronnie questions his legitimacy, Stein says "Let's not argue on our Wedding Day."
    • Meta, from the bloopers:
      Grant Gustin: (confronting the Pied Piper, forgets his line) Your eyes are beautiful. (releases Andy and pushes him away slightly) But we're not gonna kiss!
      Andy Mientus: (offscreen) Please?
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks:
    • Being a Spiritual Successor of the divisive Smallville, several elements that some feel are too similar have came under fire, such as Red Kryptonite and Bivolo's rage-inducing ability.
    • There's also some fans who feel the show follows the formula of Arrow too much; from the Fish Out of Temporal Water-style origin, the Power Trio format for the hero, the love interest who helps the hero without knowing that their secret identity is a close friend in love with them, a love rival who they get along with but shares the name with a comic-book villain and, in both cases, serves as a Red Herring, a mysterious older figure who's got the same skills as the hero only better and is responsible for the death of their parent, and the revelation of their identity in the Christmas mid-season finale, among other similarities. This has led to the show being a bit predictable for some.
      • This continues in Season Two. At first the season seems like a repeat of the first season, with Barry meeting an Older and Wiser mentor who is from another time/world who turns out to be the Big Bad, the Big Bad is another Speedster with a similar costume and is more powerful, annd is trying to get Barry to run faster for his Evil Plan. However, after that, it awkwardly morphs into a repeat of Arrow's second season, with the villain, who's stronger than the hero thanks to ingesting a drug that's warped his mind and made him stronger, knowing the hero's secret identity from the beginning, defeats them every time they fight, seemingly beats them for good towards the end, and then takes over the hero's town with an army of superhumans loyal to him. Meanwhile, a young, somewhat reckless man is introduced who's connected to the hero's family, who is, in the comics, the hero's sidekick and founding Teen Titan and after being saved by them, tries to help them.
  • More Popular Spin-off: In its first season alone, this show surpassed Arrow for being the most watched CW show. Arrow took some time to settle into its groove, and was often criticized for being excessively dark and drama-filled. The Flash received acclaim almost immediately for having a better balance between humor and drama, leading many critics and casual viewers to consider it to be the better show.
  • Narm: In general, any time in the series when characters express doubt about whether or not "Barry could run that fast". In the early episodes of the show it is somewhat understandable, but in only the 15th episode of the first season Barry runs back in time, implying his speed has exceeded that of light itself. From then on, we often hear of "Mach-2" or "Mach-3" as being some pie-in-the-sky speeds, which again make no sense when Barry has already traveled faster than light.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • Vibe/Cisco Ramon provides a cross-media example. In the comics he was seen as a lame, faddish and ethnically stereotypical character, being a breakdancing Puerto Rican superhero with Totally Radical lingo. In the TV series Cisco is one of its most beloved characters, though the difference in popularity may be because he was changed radically from the comic book version.
    • Though not a full-on Scrappy, Iris was a mild Base Breaker, as some believed he had better chemistry with Caitlin or Linda. However, Character Development for both of them, together and apart, and Iris becoming a supportive part of the team made her more universally liked, which, combined with the Barry/Caitlin ship essentially dying out in favour of Caitlin/Ronnie, allowed Barry/Iris to become popular enough that when the two finally get together near the end of Season Two, it's considered a huge Heartwarming Moment.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks:
    • The changes made to the Flash's costume from the comics have received some criticisms — namely that the Chest Insignia lacks the white centerpiece and that the character nicknamed the Scarlet Speedster isn't actually wearing his distinctive scarlet/bright red, but rather a darker maroon or burgundy. However, the final shot in the pilot reveals that in the future, the Flash will have a costume that has these alterations.
    • The portrayal of Captain Cold as being more of a straight villain has received some criticism from those who prefer his Anti-Villain portrayal from the comics canon. However, it should be noted that Cold mainly became an Anti-Villain when Wally West was the Flash, not while fighting Barry. Furthermore, in "Rogue Time" he gets his first nudge towards it: Barry challenges his pride by telling him if he was really as good a supervillain as he claimed then he could perform his heists without killing anyone, and Cold accepts the challenge.
    • As to be expected, there was some people who were bugged, or at least befuddled, by the show giving a Race Lift to Iris and the West Family. Less so because she was no longer white, but more so because it meant that, should he appear, Wally West, Iris' nephew and the next person to become The Flash after Barry, who has historically appeared as a red-headed Caucasian, would have a Race Lift too. The fact that this lead to DC reintroducing Wally in the New 52 with a similar Race Lift (despite the rest of the West family so far not having one, among other differences) probably helps with that. Furthermore, the West family was already white in the New 52 (well before the show started), so in the comics it's established that Wally — now biracial — gets his non-Caucasian side from his non-West parent (as opposed to TV-verse Wally), which makes one wonder why they're bothering. (I.E: If the West family is different in both continuities, why can't Wally be white in one, non-white in the other?) The timing of both the show's pre-production stages also align with Wally's (re-)introduction, made people wonder which continuity pushed the other into causing the Race Lift in the first place. Eventually, Andrew Kriesberg revealed that, yes, the show caused the comics to do the Race Lift.
      • Averted with Wally getting a slight Age Lift in the comics to being similar in age to Barry instead of being young enough to have a father/son dynamic as they were in the comics, largely as it makes him old enough to still date Linda Park in the series, and puts him at a similar age to Roy Harper, his comic book teammate.
    • Pied Piper's Weapon of Choice being sonic frequency-producing gloves rather than a pipe with sonics and hypnotic technology. It raises the question as to why he'd go by the name "Pied Piper," if he doesn't even use a pipe. There's also his lack of any Socialist leanings, which were a big part of his character in the comics but that might just be due to only appearing twice so far. The removal of his status as the Rogues' Token Good Teammate by making him just as villainous as the rest of them is also a point of contention with the character's fandom.
    • Doctor Light being a Composite Character between the villainous Arthur Light (a particularly detestable villain) and the heroic Kimiyo Hoshi (one of the few Asian female heroes who aren't stoic martial artists), resulting in a villainous female Doctor Light (albeit a sympathetic one), while when this was done in the New 52, it resulted in a sympathetic heroic male character. More so because she's also a Composite Character of Linda Park, being her Earth-2 counterpart, which is a particularly odd choice that feels like they only did so because Hoshi and Park were both Asian women.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Sometimes the villain of the week (or others) is killed off, to the dismay of fans/viewers who wanted more of them. Season One started with that, then Team Flash started locking them up, which came back at them with a vengeance. Then Season Two started with that again.

    Season One 
  • Accidental Innuendo: "The Trap" reveals that Thawne has spy cameras in everyone's homes, including one in Eddie and Iris' bedroom...
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Does Thawne really care for Cisco, Caitlin and Barry? Or is he just faking it all to move them like pawns? In "Out of Time," Thawne himself admits that it's some of both. At least that's how he feels about Cisco and Caitlin. His feelings for Barry are a little more... complicated.
    • When Captain Cold spared the Flash's life in "Going Rogue," was he really tricked by Cisco's fake cold gun? Did he suspect that Cisco was bluffing but felt like he couldn't take the risk? Or did he want the Flash to live so he would continue to have a Worthy Opponent? Continued when he doesn't kill a helpless Barry again in "Rogue Air," where he claims it's just so Barry will owe him a favor, but also could come off as realizing his crime spree is no fun without someone who might be able to beat him.
    • In respect to talking to (and flirting with) Iris as the Flash, is Barry taking the step he never took and is becoming more romantic and confident? Or is he a pathetic creep who's pining after a woman who already has a boyfriend and encouraging (instead of discouraging) Iris to continue writing about him?
    • Speaking of Iris, what about her dad and Barry's foster dad, Joe West? The show makes him out to be The Paragon but with keeping his daughter out of the loop and constantly putting down Eddie, you can't help but think he is a manipulative jerk who comes off as more of a Designated Hero.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: Deliberately invoked twice.
    • Prism/Roy G. Bivolo: After Barry was cured from the Hate Plague he caused, the Flash and the Arrow handle him entirely off-screen.
    • Weather Wizard/Mark Mardon: After accidentally traveling back in time roughly a day whilst trying to stop a tsunami Mardon was sending to Central City, Barry uses his knowledge of what was going to happen to apprehend him before Mardon could do anything he did in the first timeline.
  • Arc Fatigue: Everyone's insistence on keeping Iris Locked Out of the Loop gets pretty tiresome as Barry becomes more and more casual about his secret, especially in light of the increasing number of people in the know. Especially considering she is literally the only main character to not know at this point, barring the Cosmic Retcon]]. In-universe as well. Joe West tells Eddie Thawne, now in on the secret, that keeping it all secret is for Iris's own good. To Eddie's credit, he wants to tell her and disagrees with Joe's sentiment. And considering the main person they're trying to protect Iris from already knows about her through Barry, some agree with Eddie and find keeping her in the dark to be ultimately pointless. "All Star Team-Up" even throws a lampshade on how she's getting close to being the only character in the show (plus some from Arrow) who still doesn't know. She finally finds out at the end of the episode "The Trap," then calls Joe and Barry out on the issue in "Grodd Lives."
  • Ass Pull: Boy, Oliver, it sure is convenient that Ray, who knows next to nothing about how Barry's powers work and absolutely nothing about the Speed Force, was able to make power-be-gone arrows to cancel out Reverse-Flash's speed so you could contribute and actually do the most damage in the fight against Reverse-Flash. It would've been a lot harder for you guys otherwise.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Iris West is changed from a journalist to a criminal psychologist, likely to avoid Lois Lane comparisons. However, in the second episode, we learn she's taking a journalism class for an elective, and she's soon doing articles about the Flash, ultimately being offered a job as a reporter.
    • In "Rogue Time" after learning Barry's Secret Identity, Captain Cold makes a deal with Flash. He gets to be a super-villain like he wanted, and doesn't tell Barry's secret, but he won't kill anyone anymore.
    • For those who think Barry is depicted as too young compared to the comics (see Older Than They Think below) "Tricksters" reveals the in-universe justification for this, as Thawne completed the Particle Accelerator — and caused Barry to become the Flash — at least 7 years earlier (2013) than the real Wells did in his original timeline (2020).
    • After Iris finally finds out the big secret, she unloads on Barry and Joe with everything the fans had been saying for months about how silly and counter-intuitive their insistence on keeping her in the dark had gotten, for which we're clearly supposed to be on her side.
    • After fans had debated on the legal and moral ramifications of the Pipeline, "Rogue Air" has Joe claim he's not been comfortable with it since the beginning even though he never voiced any complaints before, and when the DA hears of it (as a "hypothetical" situation, mind), she reacts with realistic concern and disgust at the idea.
  • Base Breaker:
    • Iris. Either she's a well-rounded female lead who is the heroine of her own storyline and cares for Barry in a heartwarming way, or she is an annoying character who's nothing but a love interest.
    • Cisco. Either an Adorkable nerd who loves his job and good comic relief, or someone not annoying enough to be The Scrappy, but still annoying enough to let the show down. This largely went away as the series went on and he was given more things to do beyond being the comic relief.
    • Eddie. Either he's one of the most likable characters on the show or he's a scumbag who's probably going to turn out to be Evil All Along. The many obvious similarities to Tommy Merlyn also make a lot of his story arc predictable, adding to some fuel. Of course, after the events of the Season One finale, the latter argument was moot.
    • Caitlin, largely due to her rather quick rush to abandon Ronnie, even wishing he was dead, after finding out he became Firestorm, which irked many of the fans, while others consider her a much better female lead than Iris and should replace her in the role, similar to Tina McGee in the 90s series or even Felicity in Arrow.
    • Pied Piper. Either he's a badass Chessmaster who should replace Cisco as the Flash's gadget guy (his common role in the comics), or an annoying little Smug Snake; it largely comes down to if you think he's as smart as he thinks he is. There's also the numerous changes from his comic book self which has irked some people.
    • Captain Cold. This is largely due to the Adaptational Villainy (similar to Piper above) irking some fans, but there's also the split on if he's really a competent Chessmaster or everyone else just becomes an idiot around him while he gets off scot-free, then gets rewarded for it by becoming a hero in the spin-off.
  • Broken Base:
    • The identity of the Reverse-Flash: "Harrison Wells". He was a very popular candidate, some fans having guessed it long ago. But some were hoping he'd just be a Red Herring, given the complexity of the character before the reveal.
    • Anyone familiar with the comics knows that Cisco and Caitlin are alternate versions of Vibe and Killer Frost, before they become metahumans. However, the fandom is divided on whether or not the two become who they were in the DC Universe because some people like the two as who they are now while others feel that them gaining superpowers is what would make them better.
    • Borders on Ship-to-Ship Combat, but the Ship Tease between Barry and Caitlin has both fans and detractors, some adoring the idea of them as a couple and finding their moments together far more enjoyable than Barry and Iris, others finding it an unfortunate reminder to how much influence the Olicity ship had on Arrow (which has caused a lot of grief for those who didn't ship the pair), or just generally finding it awkwardly written and rather annoyingly cliché for the hero's female friend to develop feelings for him rather than remain platonic.
    • For comic fans, how much the show takes from Geoff Johns' Flash work and the New 52 Flash run. Johns is heavily involved in the show's writing and production, and a number of his additions to the franchise are very apparent (particularly Barry's mom's death and the situation with his father). However, Johns' contributions are highly controversial due to how it handled Barry's character (who became a Creator's Pet for Johns) at the expense of Wally West, so the fact these aspects are present in the show burns some fans while others enjoy the show all the same due to how well they handle the contributions.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal:
    • The stinger at the end of "Flash vs. Arrow" — Ronnie being alive as a fire-wielding metahuman — was not a surprise at all, even for those who don't read comic books, as Genre Savvy fans figured out the twist given that they Never Found the Body.
    • The stinger that reveals who is "The Man In the Yellow Suit": The guy we've known was evil from the very first episode turns out to be evil? What a twist! Subverted in that the real twist was that he was really Eobard Thawne and had killed the real Wells to take his place.
    • The revelation that one of the speedsters from the night Nora died was a time-traveling Barry. Given that time travel was established back in the pilot, most viewers had already guessed that even without being familiar with Flashpoint.
    • The Season One finale tells the audience that Cisco is a metahuman and Caitlin will eventually be one too because of their exposure to the particle accelerator. However, anybody who has read the comics or even read their characters on the internet was aware of where their characters would be heading the whole time.
  • Cargo Ship:
    • Cisco is way too attached to Barry's suit.
    • Captain Cold is "intimately familiar" with his gun.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • In "Fast Enough", Barry refusing to let Eobard Thawne escape scot-free to the future, and then Eobard's death moments later by his ancestor's Heroic Suicide. Especially since this comes right after both Barry and the viewer have to heartbreakingly relive the murder of Nora Allen.
    • Several fans noted that as aggravating as Iris being Locked Out of the Loop for almost the whole first season was, it was worth it when she finally did learn the truth and was allowed to be just as angry about not being told as they were hoping for.
  • Creepy Awesome:
    • The Reverse-Flash.
    • The Trickster, with a dash of Crazy Awesome as well.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Captain Cold, (no pun intended) just like in the comics.
    • Grodd gets the fans cheering every time he appears. In fact, the scene of him attacking two innocent sewer workers seems to have been thrown in specifically so we'll understand he's one of the bad guys.
    • The Reverse-Flash mainly due to being a Badass Magnificent Bastard.
    • Pied Piper, who also crosses into Evil Is Sexy for fans who swing that way, but damn is the little bastard smart.
    • The Trickster.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Lisa Snart. So much that both Cisco and Barry find her very attractive.
    • And even though we see a brief glimpse of her, Killer Frost is at least trying to invoke this trope with her new black costume and dye-job.
  • Foe Yay:
    • "Revenge of the Rogues" can be summed up as Captain Cold and Reverse-Flash competing for Barry's attention.
    • Nearly every confrontation between Pied Piper and Flash. Definitely one-sided, though.
    • Lisa Snart seems to be intentionally doing this to Cisco in Rogue Air from flirting with him, asking for a cool nickname, and calling him sexy a few times. Although whether she's genuinely attracted to him or trolling him after what happened the last time they meet remains to be seen. For his part though Cisco certainly looks like his trying very hard not to enjoy it.
      • Season Two reveals that her romantic interest in him is quite real. It helps that Lisa considers Cisco to be the very first friend she ever had.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • Oliver's speech to Barry becomes just a little less inspiring when you know that Sara Lance was being murdered at the time.
    • At the end of "Flash vs. Arrow," Felicity mentions that Oliver hopes to team up again, just one (or so) episode short of Oliver getting possibly killed in "The Climb."
    • In the same episode, it is said a few times that Ollie is a better superhero than Barry because despite not having powers, he has much more experience. In the next episode Ra's al Ghul, a guy with hundreds of years of experience, kills Oliver.
    • Seeing "Caitlin" (actually Everyman) fight Barry, and later at the Pipeline trying guilt Team Flash into releasing "her", would be a little more poignant when you consider Caitlin might potentially go down the route of a supervillain, as per her comic book counterpart Killer Frost.
    • In the pilot, Oliver gives Barry an uplifting speech about how "the lightning didn't strike him. It chose him." We later find out that Oliver is indeed correct, but there are much more sinister reasons behind it.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • While many praised the show from the start for being Lighter and Softer (or rather, balancing levity and seriousness better) than recent DC live-action fare, it was also criticized early on for having a Monster of the Week setup with mostly lackluster main villains, some of whom weren't even linked with the Flash in the comics. But this lessened once major enemies like the Reverse-Flash (the overall Big Bad), Captain Cold, and Gorilla Grodd, not to mention the hero Firestorm, started showing up or having more time devoted to them, showing a stronger sense of plot.
    • The crossover with Arrow also helped reinforce that there is a shared live-action DC Universe for the first time, beating the DC movies to it. On a similar note, the character-building involved with Firestorm has been speculated as possibly being a backdoor pilot due to how strong it was. Indeed, the character is one of several appearing in the next spin-off, Legends of Tomorrow.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: The episode Rogue Air features all of the Flash's super powered villains escaping from a prison bus and wandering into Central City to destroy it. The second season finale of Gotham ended on this exact same premise.
  • Holy Shit Quotient:
    • The end of the first episode, with The Reveal that "Dr. Wells" is not only not crippled, but also from the future]].
    • "Dr. Wells'" reveal as the Reverse-Flash. Especially as there was a scene where the Reverse Flash was beating what would eventually be revealed to be himself to a pulp.
    • Thawne using the Tachyon device because his connection to the Speed Force isn't strong enough.]]
    • Bloodstains are found in Barry's house from the night of Nora's murder and neither of them belongs to Thawne. But one of them is a match for an adult Barry.
    • The Reveal in "Fallout" that Gorilla Grodd and the Reverse-Flash are actually working together.
    • The entirety of "Out of Time," Barry reveals himself to Iris after they declare their love for each other, and Thawne reveals to Cisco (and by extension Caitlin as well) that he is from the future (and that Eddie is a "distant relative"); he's been stuck in the past for 15 years, and Barry's speed is the only thing that can send him back to his own time. He was there the night of Nora's murder but he didn't meant to kill her, he was after Barry instead. Then he speeds up his arm fast enough to go inside Cisco's body and right to his heart. Topped off with Barry unintentionally time traveling at the end of the episode.
    • In "Tricksters," we learn that Eobard Thawne is really blonde and built like Eddie. But as soon as he left the Allen House his speed ran out. Desperate to return to his own time, he stalked Harrison Wells and his wife Tess. He was the one who caused the car crash that killed Tess, so he could get Wells alone and use some device to make himself look like Wells so he could build the Particle Accelerator early (it was supposed to be built by Wells and Tess in 2020). So who knows how Thawne screwed the Timeline up by doing that.
    • "The Trap" had a few. It starts off with Barry meeting Gideon and finding out not only does he disappear in the future, he's the director of the CSI division of the PD as well as married to Iris and Gideon's creator. Later on it's revealed that Harrison Wells had been spying on everyone the whole show (and earlier, as he had watched Barry grow up), with cameras placed around the city. Thawne then abducts Eddie, reveals his identity and mentions that they're related. Finally, Iris finds out Barry is The Flash after brushing hands reminded her of something that had happened while he was in a coma. Hoo boy.
    • And of course, "Fast Enough:" Thawne convinces Barry to try and turn back time in exchange for letting him get home as well. On the way backwards, Barry sees the Flash Museum, the Legends of Tomorrow, and Killer Frost. But when Barry goes back, the future version of himself sees him, and waves him off, so Barry ends up only saying good-bye to his mother. Meanwhile, in the present, Wells sees a metal helmet with wings like Jay Garrick's come out of the time portal, and takes that as a sign to leave. Barry comes through the portal and superspeed punches Thawne and his machine, trapping Thawne in the present. Thawne proceeds to hand Barry a No-Holds-Barred Beatdown, starts making with the threats towards the rest of the cast... and then Eddie shoots himself to erase Thawne from existence. Oh, and now there's a black hole that Barry has to run into to try and stop.
  • Idiot Plot: The A plot of "Who Is Harrison Wells?" features a shape-shifting metahuman named Hannibal who can turn into anyone he's touched, leading to two big Idiot Ball moments to keep the plot going. First, Hannibal frames Eddie by turning into him, and yet Barry fully accepts Eddie abruptly showing up at his door with a half-baked story about the judge just deciding to let him go. Then he turns into Barry and gets to Star Labs, where Caitlin's suspicions are just barely piqued by his increasingly odd behavior which ultimately includes making out with her.
    • An even stupider plot occurs in "Rogue Air." With the particle accelerator in danger, Barry somehow can't reach Firestorm and the Arrow... even though they show up not three hours after the attempt to remove the Pipeline prisoners. So, who do they reach out to? Captain Cold and Lisa Snart. You can guess how well that goes.
  • Iron Woobie:
    • Henry Allen. Was sentenced to life being wrongfully convicted of killing his wife, separating him from his son. He takes it all in stride and is happy to just remain in prison while Barry lives his life. Caitlin rightfully offered to give him a hug during his brief visit at S.T.A.R. labs.
    • His son Barry also qualifies — he took a moment of tragedy in his childhood, and it became a defining moment that motivated him to become a forensic scientist in pursuit of justice, largely because he wants to free his father. His response to getting superpowers is not to angst and feel isolated from other people, but to genuinely appreciate life all the more and use those powers to help other people. Furthermore, despite his own flaws and internal insecurities, he strives to be a genuinely upbeat and kind-hearted young man and isn't unwilling to learn from past mistakes or admit fault when it's due.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Blackout, who's only evil because his powers killed his friends, disfigured him, and wrecked his mental state. Not only that, but he constantly has to feed on energy and feels perpetual hunger.
    • Tony Woodward in Episode 7. He may be a huge bully and jerkass, but he didn't deserve to get manipulated by Thawne and then murdered by Blackout like that.
    • Hartley Rathaway. Child prodigy who was rejected by his parents when he came out as gay, was betrayed by Thawne when he tried to warn him about the dangers of the Particle Accelerator, and was left suffering from constant, chronic pain and deafness as a result of the explosion. He was fairly antisocial beforehand, but its easy to sympathise with the guy.
    • Shawna Baez has shades of this. In her first episodes, she tries to broke her boyfriend out of jail who ends up abandoning her. Even after that she can't stop loving him. In "Rogue Air", the captivity appears to have an impact on her sanity.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Anyone noticed how many times Caitlin's name was listed on every Shipping tropes in this page?
    • Barry might qualifies as well: in two seasons he has Iris, Felicity, Linda and Patty as canonical love interrests but he also have been shipped with Caitlin, Oliver, Captain Cold and Kara from Supergirl.
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Cisco's death. Less because fans think the writers wouldn't kill him, but because the same episode has Flash accidentally travel back in time and getting stuck several hours before Cisco's death. Not to mention that the trailers for the following episodes show Cisco being threatened by Leonard Snart and interacting with Laurel Lance.
  • Love to Hate: Pretty much every villain, but the takers are The Reverse-Flash, The Rogues (Captain Cold especially), Gen. Eilling, Hartley Rathaway, and James Jesse.
  • Magnificent Bastard:
    • Captain Cold, a Badass Normal full of Crazy-Prepared plans, who ascends to a worthy superhero foe when he gets his hands on Star Labs technology. He's also the one who comes up with the idea of the various bad guys in Central City teaming up to take on the Flash. Also, despite his team-up of him and Heat Wave failing, he had a backup plan, his main goal of Flash being forced into the open is accomplished. His sister breaks them out of prison. The Glider appears, the Rogues are on there way to being formed.
    • Eobard Thawne. From the beginning everything he has plotted has gone according to plan. He stole the identity of Harrison Wells in order to build his accelerator to return to his future sooner. And when the lab was built, he managed to get it to explode and give Barry his powers with everyone involved completely unaware. He has since continued conducting his covert experiments with Team Flash none the wiser despite working with him. The closest anyone had come to discovering his plans while secrecy was still paramount was Rathaway discovering that there was "a chance" of the collider exploding, and when he leaked this out to the public, Wells just turns it around and makes it so that little damage is done. In fact he gradually tipped the hand of his own secret while both preparing his own clean getaway and mentoring the Flash's link to the Speed Force to the point of accessing time travel, all the while making use of his own secret link to every CCTV camera in the city to monitor and manipulate events.
    • Hartley Rathaway, AKA Pied Piper, sure tries to be this. Like Cold, he's got plans-after-plans, takes advantage of his Glass Cannon status to lure Barry into traps, and was Crazy-Prepared enough to hide explosives in his hearing aides; however, he's too arrogant to be more than a high-functioning Smug Snake.
    • James Jesse, aka the Trickster. The man's bonkers but he's able to use that to his advantage by running rings around the police by having an accomplice pose as a copycat Trickster, so the police will go to him for help and he can pretend to be outraged that somebody stole his gig, when in truth it's all one big distraction so he can be broken out of Iron Heights. He then holds an entire gala hostage using poisoned champagne, and when the Flash shows up he pulls out a kinetic bomb. The only thing that ruins his plans is he doesn't realize there's more to the Flash's powers than just running fast.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "My name is Barry Allen and I'm the fastest man alive" has been used as a Mad Libs Catchphrase for everything in the form of "My name is X and I'm the Y-est Z alive." For example, "My name is Matt Murdock and I'm the blindest man alive" (after an error with IMDB switched around the shows' descriptions), "My name is Sonic and I'm the fastest hedgehog alive", "My name is Barry and I'm the most enraged rune dragon alive."
    • "Lightning gave me abs?", from the scene where Barry wakes up from his coma and discovers his powers have made him more physically fit.
    • "Did Flash run backwards twice?", from the posters showing him running with a lightning bolt shaped speed trail, suggesting he just randomly decided to run backwards twice for some reason.
    • "Every episode of The Flash should end with Eobard Thawne getting up from his wheelchair and doing/revealing something unexpected," from the episodes where Thawne would stand up from his wheelchair and perform some sort of plot twisting-reveal while smirking menacingly.
    • The answer to absolutely anything? "Speed Force."
    • "IT WAS ME, BARRY!" Explanation 
    • "X is not like Y at all. Some would say it's the reverse."
    • "Not God, GRODD."
    • "Barry is so fast he ran himself back into the friend zone," after Barry time traveled back a day and negated Iris' Love Epiphany and their Big Damn Kiss.
    • Immediately after "Tricksters" aired, clips of the opening scene of said episode (the one where Future!Flash and Reverse-Flash are having a slug fest) were uploaded in YouTube and commented on by various users with the "My name is Eobard Thawne" Opening Narration similar to that of this show and Arrow.
    • "X has been Y for centuries."Explanation 
    • "A speed mirage, if you will."Explanation 
    • "Hi, I'm Ray!"
    • While everyone agrees Eddie's death was completely heartbreaking to watch, many fans are now joking on how this could have all been fixed if he just got a vasectomy.
    • Oliver's line from the team-up ("Barry, how can you have Super Speed and still be late?") has been used to mock his lateness for nearly everything.
    • Speed Weed, co-executive producer and writer of later Arrow episodes, being likened to the Speedforce or an actual drug with various superspeed-related effects.
  • Moral Event Horizon: The Reverse-Flash passed this long ago. First, he traveled back in time to kill a young Barry Allen, but failed thanks to interference from the Flash. Instead, he settles on killing Barry's mother then leave. However, he discovers that he's Trapped in the Past. He knows exactly what happens in history so he kills Wells' wife for no reason, takes the genetic code of the real Dr. Wells, and creates all the events of Central City on purpose, with complete disregard for all the lives of others. All so he can get revenge on Barry and steal his speed for himself.
  • Narm:
    • When Multiplex gives a group beatdown to Barry, you don't even have to be paying attention to notice that at least one of his clones was literally punching thin air. Not even punching, more like slowly swinging his forearm.
    • The Kid!Barry flashbacks can cross into this, largely due to the weak dialogue the kid actors are given and how the scenes play out.
    • "Flash vs. Arrow" has an interesting splitting the difference with Roy G. Bivolo. He keeps that cringe-inducing name, but they draw the line at calling him the Rainbow Raider, turning it into Caitlin's pitiful attempt at giving him a supervillain name.
    • Dr. Stein transmitting a Morse code message via Ronnie in "Fallout." To clarify: Dr. Stein has been captured by Eiling and uses Morse code to reveal his location to Ronnie through their Psychic Link. Ronnie then says, in a completely serious voice, "Tap, tap. Tap, tap. Tap..." and so on. It's as narmy as it sounds.
      • That scene has multiple levels of narm. It starts with Ronnie asking Stein his location by breaking a glass and carving "WHERE" into his own arm. Then Stein responds with Morse code, making Ronnie look like a complete idiot for going the self-mutilation route.
    • The show generally does a good job at giving little nudges and such to the counterparts some characters have in the comics (and may turn out like in the future). But Caitlin saying that Ronnie thought they were so different that they were "like fire and ice" is just a little too narmy to hear.
    • Eddie's shouting Joe's name when Mardon pulls Joe out of a window by controlling the wind in "Out of Time." It lasts too long and his weird pronunciation make it impossible to take seriously.
    • By just the end of the first season, the idea that the Flash is Barry's secret identity is a complete joke, with an exponentially increasing number of people learning about it until Joe is literally calling him "Barry" in front of criminals they just took down. And yet they still insist that Iris is apparently the one person in the entire world who can't possibly know, acting like it would kill her on the spot.
    • The ending scene of the episode "Who is Harrison Wells?" loses its drama for non-fans of Battlestar Galactica (2003) when, upon seeing the future newspaper feed, Cisco mutters, "What the frak?" Those not familiar with the sci-fi series don't recognize that Cisco is just being a geek per usual.
    • Iris asking the meaning of the radar dots representing Barry and Grodd probably worked on paper. Unfortunately, the effects guys decided to make the dots clearly labelled on the screen, giving the impression that she can't read.
    • The much-advertised return of Firestorm and Arrow to help Barry against the Reverse-Flash in "Rogue Air" becomes this. Largely because their intervention wasn't set up or foreshadowed at all in the episode, and then after the fight they just... leave. Literally just walk off and leave, barely saying goodbye, as if they never showed up (and really not helped by Ronnie's skip to catch up to Oliver, looking like the Amell boys were splitting a cab or something). It feels like a Deus ex Machina or an Ass Pull, only far more silly because this was the one moment they advertised the episode by the most.
      • Plus, it feels like the episode was knocked off its expected air date a bit, resulting in Oliver apparently running out on his wedding, and leaving all his friends to die from Alpha Omega, the second Barry calls.
    • The finale of Season One features the inexplicable use of Caitlin as The Watson to explain what singularities are, instead of non-scientists like Iris or Joe. And that's assuming they even needed one at all, given the kind of people who'd be watching a show like this in the first place.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Oliver's line in the pilot about the lightning bolt "choosing" Barry. Even if electricity isn't sentient, the whole scene is momentous enough with Oliver then telling Barry how he can be a different kind of hero from him and making the first ever Title Drop in the show, that it just works in context.
    • Barry's speech in Episode Two to the STAR Labs gang about how "they all got struck by that lightning" can be a little cringe-worthy to viewers, but Grant Gustin sounds earnest enough (and Barry is enough of a dork) to make it heartwarming enough to work.
    • The titular battle in "Flash vs. Arrow" is both cheesy and awesome, what with Oliver having to duck under Barry's super-fast punches.
    • From "The Man in the Yellow Suit", Reverse-Flash saying "Merry Christmas" in his otherwise terrifying Voice of the Legion should sound ridiculous, but being part of the big reveal that of the Reverse-Flash, and a definite Wham Line from the character saying it, it works perfectly, and even gets a Call Back in Season Two.
    • James Jesse telling the new Trickster that he is his father. It comes right out of nowhere, serves little to no bearing on the plot and is never mentioned again. However, since it's Mark Hamill saying "I am your father" in a tone that makes it clear he's wanted to say that line for years, the end result is gloriously cheesy.
    • Grodd speaking through General Eiling seems like it ought to be funny — after all, it's a middle-aged man talking like a gorilla and saying things like "Caitlin... good" and "Eiling... bad". As it turns out, though, Clancy Brown is such a seasoned voice actor that he actually manages to pull it off.
    • The lines "Why'd you kill my mother?" being replied with "Because I hate you" would seem absolutely childish if said by someone else but Tom Cavanaugh manages to deliver it with sounding completely genuine.
    • Nearly every line out of Pied Piper's mouth, especially when he uses chess metaphors. Helps that Andy Mientus' acting is awesomely magnetic.
  • Nightmare Retardant: "Grodd... hate... banana!"
  • Older Than They Think: Many feel that Barry seems somewhat younger than the Barry of the comics when he becomes the Flash. He is usually drawn to look older, like early to mid-30s, and in the fifth episode, he is stated to be 25 years old. Though the passage of time in the Silver Age comics was always wonky, modern stories such as "The Flash: Rebirth" establish the fact that Barry was a rookie CSI tech when he became the Flash, and so was in the early-to-mid 20s range at the time.
    • Later episodes reveal that, thanks to Reverse-Flash messing with the timeline, Barry has indeed become the Flash at a younger age than was originally the case.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • Much like The Originals, the show has quite a talent for doing this with characters from its parent show. Ray and Laurel's guest spots were both better received than just about anything they've gotten up to on Arrow, as has Felicity's (who many fans had turned on due to the way her character developed).
    • Barry himself wasn't very popular among comics fans at the time the show premiered, due to having become a Creator's Pet who completely overshadowed the people to don the costume after him. This show portrayed him well enough that those fans were largely able to forget their feelings about comics Barry.
  • Rewatch Bonus:
    • Cisco realizes that when the Flash and the Reverse-Flash fight each other, they produce red and yellow lightning. He recalls that there was red and yellow lightning the night Barry's mother died, which means that there were two speedsters that night. Rewatch the pilot and you can see it for yourself.
    • Even more of a bonus. The lightning that the Flash produces is yellow (even though he wears red) and the Reverse-Flash produces red lightning (even though he wears yellow). If you rewatch the pilot, when Barry is wisked away from home, he's covered in yellow lightning. This seems to imply that whatever speedster was with the Reverse-Flash was the one who teleported Barry away. It seems that Wells/Reverse-Flash does have access to time travel given his knowledge of the future. And there's also that news article "Flash Missing, Vanishes in Crisis."
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: Like Arrow, fans are divided on the lead female and designated love interest. While the romance is popular, some fans would rather focus on action while others would rather Barry romance some other female.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: Many fans of the original Flash series pair Henry Allen and Dr. Tina McGee.
    • A somewhat understandable example would also be Wally West and Linda Park, which many have taken to pushing despite Wally not even being in the show yet. Justified as the two were Happily Married in the comics, and that Linda is returning for Season Two as Wally is introduced as a regular.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat:
    • The battle between the Westallen and Snowbarry shippers started before the series has even begun.
    • There's also the previously established Baricity from Barry's initial appearances on Arrow.
    • Throw in SnowStorm (Caitlin and Ronnie) in the mix.
  • Special Effects Failure: Though it is understandable that the series doesn't have a Hollywood movie budget, the fact that Grodd is an obvious CGI character is just... both unsettling and ridiculous at the same time.
  • Squick:
    • Depending on how you see Barry and Iris' relationship, but at least some viewers are squicked by Barry having a crush on someone who can be seen as his (foster) sister. Flipping the characters around doesn't help matters, as while viewers could buy Barry already having feelings for Iris before the West family took him in, it's creepy for some fans to see Iris go from seeing Barry as a brother since they were kids to suddenly showing hints of maybe having romantic feelings for him.
    • Eiling's Kryptonite Ring for the Flash, in which a grenade fires hundreds of sharp needles, piercing him all at the same time. And Thawne mentions that they should pull them all out, before Barry's healing would kick in. Who wouldn't wince at a situation like that? It gets worse: Comments indicate that the fragments have tiny splinters inside to lock them in place once they break the skin, which would be even more painful, and more messy to remove. In a bit of a Mood Whiplash, Cisco decides to mention an incident about having stepped on a sea urchin before, and Barry not wanting Cisco to urinate on him; Cisco thankfully says that "cure" is just an urban legend.
    • The Reverse-Flash's preferred method of killing people involves impaling people with his arm. It raises the Nightmare Fuel of the show to a whole new level.
    • Eobard Thawne "absorbing" Harrison Wells, especially the end result for the latter.
    • The brief moment in "Tricksters," where James Jesse comes on to Iris, a girl easily young enough to be his daughter. Eww.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Many weren't expecting Plastique to be written out so quickly because of the character's history with the Suicide Squad aka Task Force X, which already exists in Arrow. It becomes even worse since the character was built up as a very interesting metahuman and potential ally of Barry before dying.
    • Roy Bivolo suffers from this, probably due to being caught in the same episode as the crossover with Arrow. In fact, he's so under-utilized that his nickname, "Prism" (or Caitlin's suggestion of "Rainbow Raider"), ends up making no sense—all he does is induce rage with his red-glowing eyes, never demonstrating any of the other color-based emotional manipulation possessed by his comics counterpart. It seems like he's just there as an excuse to put Barry and Oliver into a Let's You and Him Fight situation. At least, unlike Plastique, he is still alive.
    • The fans unhappy about Barry and Linda's relationship seem to fear this happening to Linda. Linda is Wally West's wife in the comics, and with that, a major part of the Flash mythos, and with him one of the most popular and developed superhero couples in DC. Because she's being used as a pretty obvious Romantic False Lead to keep Barry and Iris apart, people feel that it makes it unlikely her and Wally's relationship will be kept should Wally eventually appear, unless she becomes an Ascended Extra in the show. To their relief, the second season would see Linda return with a greater degree of prominence.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Remember that episode where Flash was infected with a Hate Plague that led to not only Eddie starting a manhunt on Flash but also Flash losing Iris's trust? Neither does anyone else.
    • Fans initially assumed that with Firestorm and Arrow returning at the same episode that the Pipeline's inmates are going to run loose, there will be a battle royale of heroes vs. villains. Nothing of the sort actually happens in the episode in question.
    • The last episode of the first season. They build up everything and leave us wondering how the future is going to be after he changes it, but then Barry decides not to, leaving things worse than if he hadn't done it in the beginning. Eddie kills himself to stop the Reverse-Flash, Nora is still dead, and a black hole is consuming the city. Where they end it on a cliffhanger.
    • The Reverse-Flash's reveal. Specifically... Eobard Thawne was a mentor and even father figure to the entire team for years. You'd expect this to have more of an impact than it really does. The show explores this a little bit, insofar as the team is initially slow to believe, but once they do believe it he's instantly relegated to "generic evil guy who must be stopped" status. Shouldn't the team still have some loyalty toward the guy they thought of as a father figure? Shouldn't they still want to trust him, and want him to be redeemed, even if they know it's an empty hope? Shouldn't his time with them have changed him in some way, and if not then why not? There's an entire mountain of emotional and ethical dilemmas here that the show could have mined, and totally let pass by.
  • Uncanny Valley: Some of Multiplex's clones move in a shuffling and unnatural way after he spawns an entire army of them to deal with Barry. The show justifies this by noting that the more he spawns, the weaker the original becomes and his control over them gets spotty. The result is easy-to-miss, but rather spooky when noticed.
  • What an Idiot: Really Barry? You're chasing after a shapeshifter, after he just framed Eddie for murder, and you don't think it's a little suspicious that he turns up on your doorstep after just giving you a lecture about clearing his name through legal means?
    • In the very same episode, Caitlin heads off to confront Thawne about Barry's allegations, which she admittedly doubts but would have gotten her killed if she'd managed to get through with it.
    • The plot of "Rogue Air." Sure, trust a murderous criminal to help you, what could possibly go wrong? Everyone, even Captain Cold, calls him out on it.
      • Made worse by the fact that he didn't need Captain Cold's help at all. Literally all he provided (besides betrayal) was... someone licensed to drive the truck. Admittedly, Barry didn't know Cisco would come up with a solution when he approached the villain, but it's hard to fathom why he thought Captain Cold or his cold gun would be of much help in the first place.
  • The Woobie:
    • Plastique. She can barely touch anyone or anything without making it explode and has Eiling hounding her to try and exploit her powers.
    • Ronnie Raymond + Martin Stein = Firestorm. The two are clearly disturbed and hurt by their fusion and both are desperate to reunite with their fiancé and wife respectively.
    • The real Harrison Wells. He was happily living with his wife only to be killed by Eobard Thawne and have his identity taken by him. His good name and life's work is then ruined by Thawne as part of the latter's plans. By extension, Tess as well, who was killed by Thawne and had her significance to history swept under the rug, when originally she was evidently an equal part in STAR Labs' success.

    Season Two 
  • Alas, Poor Scrappy: Hunter Zolomon's time remnant was not really hated enough to be considered a Scrappy, but wasn't well-received by most fans either for essentially being a Replacement Scrappy and an Adaptational Wimp; still, many were shocked to see him fulfill his role of getting Impaled with Extreme Prejudice by Zoom right in front of his Love Interest and friends, before having his slowly dying body forcibly dragged into Earth-2 by the villain as they were Forced to Watch in horror.
  • Angst? What Angst?:
    • Caitlin moving on from Ronnie's death by the time she meets "Jay". Some have complained it's too soon after Ronnie's death, others have pointed out it's been six months since his death and she spent a entire year mourning Ronnie after the Particle Accelerator explosion.
    • Zig-zagged. Even though Iris reacted with heartbroken disbelief that her mother abandoned her because of a drug rather than passed away, she was very understanding and quick to forgive Joe for keeping a secret from her for 20 years, as opposed to when Joe lied to her about Barry being the Flash for months. Justified by context: with the Flash secret, everyone around her knew but her, including the very villain they were trying to protect her from, yet Joe and Barry had insisted on keeping her in the dark. She had to find out through an incidental sensation at the end of a rescue, and after chewing them out and watching them almost die against Grodd, she and Joe came to the understanding he needed to start telling her the truth more often. This time proved that Joe had learned his lesson, as he confessed himself before Iris was any the wiser about her mother's return, and he was already in tears assuming that he'd once again earned her anger before she even reacted.
      • That said, some fans are happy because this trope is in effect, pointing out that at least it means Iris's plot isn't more soap opera angst.
    • The real Jay Garrick doesn't seem too adversely affected by his time as Zoom's prisoner. Apart from destroying the mask Zoom kept him in and keeping Zolomon's helmet for himself, Jay seems perfectly fine.
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
    • Once again, Weather Wizard is defeated with unsatisfying ease. After Team Flash defuses the Weather Wizard and the Trickster's evil plan, the Flash effortlessly beats them up. It may be justified in the Trickster's case, since Mark Hamill is too old to perform his own stunts, but that doesn't let his younger, superhuman cohort off the hook.
    • Geomancer, who singlehandedly brought Central City to its knees, fought off Zoom, and tracked down the Flash's base ends up getting defeated by Caitlin using the "Boot" on his neck.
    • Trajectory, who was a fully badass Dark Action Girl who outran the Flash and defeated him every time they fought, ends up killing herself by Velocity overdose and disintegrates.
  • Anvilicious: Thanks to the introduction of the Velocity enhancer, basically a steroid for Super Speed, the show really hammers it in how Drugs Are Bad. At least three characters have become addicted to Velocity drugs because they feel that they need more and more of it to feel powerful, and it's caused Trajectory to die from overdose and provided Zoom a super disease that's slowly killing them due to their overexposure to the drug. Taken Up to Eleven when Barry attempts to try out the drug himself only for Wells to confront him about it and give him a pep talk about why it's bad for him like some after school special.
  • Arc Fatigue:
    • The whole mystery of Zoom's identity being dragged out way too long. While the characters in-universe don't seem to be interested in finding out who he is, the lack of resolution or even solid hints as to the man behind the mask is grating on the nerves of fans as the season goes on. This is not helped by the fact that the Reverse-Flash's identity was revealed by the winter break of Season One, and solidly confirmed a few episodes later. Even when Zoom's mask finally comes off in "King Shark", the reveal came almost out of nowhere, and ultimately raises more questions than it answers, which is only made worse by the fact that this episode is followed by a month-long hiatus. To make matters worse, the reveal comes very near the end of the season, meaning that they have to then rush through the rest of the required developments (Team Flash learning the truth themselves for instance, which comes about rather awkwardly, as well as Zoom's backstory, which is narmtastically dark).
    • To a lesser extent, building up to the introduction of Wally West, since it takes until the Winter Finale before Wally even makes an appearance, particularly for fans of his character from the comics as it means it takes even longer for him to potentially develop into a Speedster himself, so for Wally fans who only watched the show in the hopes of seeing Wally West as the Flash/Kid-Flash, it becomes a huge slow burn to get to him. Just to rub salt in the wounds, Wally never becomes Flash's sidekick in his debut season, meaning that his character arc will extend into another season.
      • There's also the fact that he's also been Locked Out of the Loop for too long, with just about everyone knowing Barry is the Flash except him (Patty found out not long after he was introduced and then she was Put on a Bus). Even though he had less time than Iris did last season, many people thought he would find out around the same time that she did (You'd think the others would have told him after he was taken by Zoom), but he didn't until just before the second season finale.
    • The man in the mask who Zoom has imprisoned. Episode after episode after episode of the guy banging out coded messages, and the occasional coy hint that we just won't believe who it is, until just about everyone has given up hope that any reveal could possibly be worth dragging the mystery out this long. He finally is revealed in the season finale, and only has a few scenes before leaving. And being imprisoned and forced to wear that mask doesn't seem to have an impact on his emotional state despite previous episodes making it seem like otherwise.
    • Cisco's metahuman abilities also seems to be progressing too slowly for some fans. It started off well in the first half of the season, but after his Earth-2 counterpart/Reverb demonstrated powers closer to his comic counterpart, people expected that he would learn to use these soon. He didn't until the second to last episode, and even then it was by accident. There are even some episodes where it's easy to forget his powers are still a thing, with quite a few missed opportunities where he could have used them to find people. And any chances of this developing further next season may be delayed for longer now due to the Cosmic Retcon at the end of season Two.
  • Ass Pull:
    • Having Henry released from prison, only for him to decide to leave Central City. As noted on the WMG page, it feels like a convenient way for Barry to be able to abandon his original motivation and thus story arc in Season One, but also prevent Henry's presence from messing up the character dynamic of Team Flash (and the writers either having to make the effort to give Henry decent screen time, or otherwise frequently Hand Wave his absence).
    • Patty's decision to leave Central City in "Potential Energy", as her dream to become a CSI had never even been casually alluded to prior to this episode.
    • Caitlin's discovery that "Jay" has a potentially terminal illness, which wasn't foreshadowed even in that very episode.
    • "The Reverse-Flash Returns" pulls some especially nonsensical Timey-Wimey Ball shenanigans to explain how Eobard Thawne can still exist after Eddie's death. It also suddenly pulls out the idea that Nora Allen's death is a fixed point in time that can't be changed, which everyone talks about like they knew it all along, despite the whole climax of last season being based around Barry trying to stop it. In fact, the writers seemed to anticipate how the audience would tend to reject this, as the episode of Legends of Tomorrow that aired two days later clarifies how something can become a fixed point in the Arrowverse.
      • This gets worse in "Versus Zoom" as the same explanation is trotted out to explain how Zoom pulled off the trick of appearing to kill himself in front of the team, making even less sense as there's no reason he would have a time remnant like Eobard did. And even if you accept this, the remnant being killed should start unraveling time like Eobard's did. "The Race of His Life" fixes this to some extent by showing that the time remnant is actually the version of Zoom who appears from the future, explaining how he could die without the original being harmed.
    • "Flash Back" introduces the time wraiths, Dementor-like beings who track down anyone who travels through time without taking certain precautions. While based on the Black Flash from the comics, it's still quite weird how Barry is told it was simply dumb luck he never ran into them on his previous trips through time, and they were never even referenced on Legends of Tomorrow where time travel is central to the plot. Although Eobard does specify that they hate it when Speedsters mess with the timeline, so this may be justified.
    • The reveal that "Jay Garrick" was Zoom all along and his real name is Hunter Zolomon comes off as this. Though there's some hints such as his Adaptational Wimp stays and the fact his Earth-1 counterpart's name is different, and according to his actor he knew all along about the twist, it really feels like it came out of nowhere just to be a shock to viewers, and raises a lot of questions that aren't properly answered. Doesn't help that it involves major They Changed It, Now It Sucks.
    • Zoom punches a hole through the universe to escape back to Earth 2 in the penultimate episode, an ability he never demonstrated prior, and raises the obvious question as to why he needed to wait for Cisco to re-open the breaches previously.
      • It's possible that he gained this ability after Barry gave him his speed. It still would have been nice to have an explanation, though.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • The Flash gets a white background on his logo in place of red, as many had clamored for the suit to be closer to the comics.
    • Characters comment on the lax security of STAR Labs, which viewers and reviewers noticed, and Cisco claims to have made improvements to the system so nobody can just walk in. Then Hunter Zolomon does just that.
    • After all the fan debate about the legal and moral implications of the Pipeline prison, Joe reveals that Iron Heights is now equipped to house metahuman inmates. The Pipeline itself seems to only be used during the second season to house the metahumans who know too much about the team, and only until they can be persuaded to keep quiet.
    • Many complained that Cold was just too powerful in Season One, as he always managed to wriggle his way out of justice in every one of his appearances. In his first appearance in Season Two, he finally gets sent to Iron Heights and stays there a good long time until the mid winter finale.
    • Barry is now far less cavalier about his secret identity than in the first season, to the point where Caitlin almost blowing it to Lisa Snart is treated as a shocking moment.
    • They seem to be using Earth-2 as a placeholder to introduce elements they couldn't squeeze into Season One, like Atlantis (although the character associated with it might still get Exiled from Continuity) and Gorilla City (an important part of the Flash mythos in general and Grodd's backstory in particular).
    • A common complaint after Season One's finale is that the writers killed off Eobard Thawne without explaining the origins of his grudge against Barry. "The Reverse-Flash Returns" takes the time to do exactly that, with Thawne's motives being almost identical to his origin from the comics.
    • Due to the outrage of Deadshot's death due to blatant Executive Meddling during Arrow Season 3, an Earth-2 version of him shows up.
    • Barry has caught a lot of flak from fans for claiming to be "the fastest man alive" while every enemy speedster introduced so far has been much faster than him. It was later revealed that Zoom, like Trajectory, is using the deadly V9 drug to increase his speed, while Reverse-Flash fueled his powers with a tachyon device, meaning that Barry may well be faster than them without their enhancements.
    • In Season One, Hartley got a lot of hate for being a far cry from the Hartley people wanted to see: namely one who was a good guy or at least Affably Evil and a friend of the Flash. Well, "Flash Back" is basically one long apology for that and retcons Hartley's current personality into what fans wanted, so he's now a stable guy who helps the Flash and is far less of an asshole even in the "original" story.
  • Base Breaker:
    • The portrayal of Patty Spivot is very popular with some viewers, while others call it a contrived attempt to give the show its own version of Felicity whose Adorkableness is forced (being a fan of Barry's lab reports, seriously?). Not to mention she's just another Romantic False Lead to keep Barry from being with Iris.
    • "Jay Garrick" was originally anticipated eagerly when his helmet appeared in the Season One finale, but has become divisive ever since he made a physical appearance. Some sympathize with a man who lost his speed and in a world he doesn't know, while others find him useless most of the time he is on screen since he hasn't done much to train Barry since teaching him to throw lightning which happened very early on in the season and just seems to stick around to either comment on how dangerous Zoom is or get into fights with Earth-2's Harrison Wells. Add on the fact he has a Broken Base romance with Caitlin (see below) as well as how people fear the show might drag him out his lack of speed for a majority of the season and the Crimson Comet doesn't have much of a middle ground of fans or haters.
    • Zoom, depending on who you ask, is either a Generic Doomsday Villain with an anti-climactic Evil Plan and a poor substitute for the more engaging Reverse-Flash, or a terrifyingly intimidating Badass villain and worthy successor to Thawne. While he does become more nuanced after his true identity is revealed, fans remain split on whether he's an awesome villain with a tragic backstory or a cheap Replacement Scrappy who just retreads the same ground as Reverse-Flash and ruins the comics' versions of Hunter Zolomon and Jay Garrick with his Adaptational Villainy.
    • Jesse was anticipated by Flash fans and her own fans since she's long been in limbo in the comics, due to the edict that Barry not have a Flash family. The show's version of her however... Either she's another poor attempt to make yet ''another' Adorkable girl character in a franchise that already has too many, and her workaholic personality was removed for no reason to make her yet another Damsel in Distress who needs to be rescued... Or she's a good character who grounds Harry and gives the viewer not only a more normal character in general, but also a more normal Earth-2 character, in terms of how she reacts to everything. Even supporters want her to eventually move more in-line with her comic counterpart, however.
  • Broken Base:
    • The sheer number of speedsters, potential or confirmed, that are going to be in Season Two (Jay Garrick, Wally West, Zoom, Thawne, Jesse Quick, Eliza Harmon) has some people concerned that it will be too crowded. Others, especially those who follow the comics, are happy to see the Flash Family on screen.
    • Though many a comic fan are excited to see Wally West finally get a live-action debut, there's plenty who're concerned about how similar he's going to be to his New 52 counterpart (who's an Angry Black Kid who needed Barry's help to mature, which many found to be In-Name-Only and somewhat racist due to how it played the White Man's Burden completely straight), especially after he was described under similar circumstances. The fact Wally is going to get an Age Lift to be closer to Barry's age does indicate it won't quite be as bad, but many are dreading he'll be a far cry from the classic Wally West, who is the one they've been wanting to see. Surprisingly, the actual Race Lift itself seems to have mostly been accepted, though.
    • "Jay" and Caitlin getting Ship Tease together. Either it's a cute dynamic that gives Caitlin a break and the two could be good together or it's coming out of nowhere (neither were ever involved in the comics, where Jay has a wife) and that Caitlin should be given more than a single episode to grieve Ronnie. Although In-Universe it's actually been six months. There's also one camp that isn't exactly annoyed at them having moments but more annoyed that a potential romance with "Jay" seems to be Caitlin's only arc during Season Two.
    • Trailers for Episode 4 showing Jefferson Jackson as the new host body for Firestorm. Some fans welcome the new character, while others see him as a Replacement Scrappy not only for Ronnie, but also for Jason Rusch, who is Ronnie's successor in the comics and has already made an appearance during Season One.
    • Iris' reaction to Francine's return, in particular the revelation that she has a brother she never met before. On the one hand, what her mother did in the first place was a very shitty thing no parent should do and it's clearly traumatized Joe, but it's hard not to feel sorry for the woman when she clearly regrets what she did, especially knowing she's dying. There's also the fact that Iris acts like Francine not telling her and Joe immediately that she had another child is an unforgivable betrayal, when in reality Francine hasn't had much opportunity to even tell them about Wally given every conversation she's tried to have with them they shut her out immediately.
    • In the mid-season finale, we find out that Zoom isn't sending the bad guys from Earth-2 to kill Barry, but to help make him stronger so he can steal his speed. Some see it as a potentially interesting premise to work with while a number of others find the motivation lacking, and that this means that until Zoom decides Barry is fast enough to take his abilities, he won't likely be a threat to Barry anytime soon. There's also a third camp that don't necessarily mind the reveal but think that as The Stinger for the mid-season finale for Season Two, it's lackluster compared to the first season's mid-season finale in which we find out "Harrison Wells" is the Reverse-Flash.
    • Some fans are disappointed that, rather than our Caitlin getting powers, pulling a Face–Heel Turn, and becoming Killer Frost, her already evil Earth-2 counterpart will be filling the role. Others like it better this way, since it means our Caitlin won't end up becoming a villain and can stay a part of the STAR Labs team. Still others are just happy to see Danielle Panabaker's deliciously hammy and evil performance as Killer Frost, no matter which Caitlin it is.
    • The closing minutes of the second season finale has caused a huge rift among fans. Barry goes back in time to rescue his mother from the Reverse-Flash, undoubtedly altering the course of space and time due to his selfishness. Fans question whether this was a good choice, which will lead into potential future story arcs next season (many are hoping for a version of the Flashpoint storyline to happen), or absolutely hate him for making this choice since it kind of derails not just his Character Development, but that of all the other characters too. And potentially all of the other characters in the Arrowverse.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • After all of the hell that Eobard Thawne put The Flash and all of Central City through back in the first season, it's extremely gratifying to see Barry finally kick his ass.
      • The scene where Cisco later confronts him and gloats his victory over him is quite cathartic on its own, given Eobard killed him in an alternate timeline.
    • From the same episode as the above, Patty using her detective skills to deduce that Barry is The Flash is extremely cathartic to viewers feeling frustrated by Barry insisting she be Locked Out of the Loop.
    • He's nowhere close to beaten, but after Zoom has spent the entire season appearing all but invincible, it's very satisfying to see him held off by Killer Frost while Harry finally saves his daughter and slips through Zoom's fingers in "Escape from Earth-2".
    • Barry successfully overpowering Zoom twice in "The Race of His Life", with the latter being capped off by two Time Wraiths dragging Zoom to a very well-deserved fate.
  • Counterpart Comparison:
  • Creepy Awesome: Zoom is described as "an unstoppable demon with the face of death." His terrifying presence and the savage beating he dishes out to Barry in "Enter Zoom" solidifies his status as the show's scariest, yet most Badass villain.
  • Cry for the Devil:
    • The episode "Family of Rogues" shows the Snart siblings at their most sympathetic portrayal by introducing their abusive father, Lewis.
    • Zoom's backstory reveals that he was abused as a child, saw his mother get murdered before his very eyes, was sent to an orphanage before becoming a crazy serial killer, and was eventually driven into becoming Zoom because he felt nothing but hate all of his life.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • King Shark proved extremely popular and memorable for his brief appearance. Positive fan response even led the creators to bring him back as the main villain in a self-titled episode later in the season.
    • The man in the iron mask in "Escape From Earth-2" has gained a lot of interest for his mysterious background.
  • Evil Is Cool: Zoom, wearing a black version of Flash's suit, with a monstrous face and the addition of Tony Todd's voice. He also easily defeats Barry in their first fight, temporarily cripples him, and publicly humiliates him by showing his broken body in front of his friends, allies, and the entire city in order to crush their faith in the hero. An impressive feat that not many DC supervillains have accomplished.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • The show drops a tantalizing starting point for stories about the Earth-2 versions of the Arrow cast, with Robert being the Hood after Oliver died in the shipwreck.
    • "Welcome to Earth-2" reveals that the 1990 Flash series is part of the show's multiverse. Have fun with stories of Barry meeting another Flash with his name who looks like a younger version of his dad.
    • After the reveal of the man in the mask being the real Jay Garrick, fanfics of his adventures before being captured by Zoom and his post Season Two adventures on Earth-3 are bound to appear.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • After "Versus Zoom", virtually every scene with Hunter Zolomon as Jay Garrick (and his time remnant in the Earth-2 two-parter) has a much darker feel to it.
    • The seemingly heartwarming moment in "Flash of Two Worlds" wherein Caitlin returns the winged helmet to "Jay" and the latter mentions that it belonged to his father takes a much darker turn in "Versus Zoom" where it's revealed that Hunter's father did give his helmet to his son — shortly before murdering his mother right in front of him, setting off a chain reaction which eventually led to Hunter becoming Zoom.
    • After "Versus Zoom", Jay helping Barry defeat Sand Demon comes off as Zoom bringing Sand Demon to Earth-1 just to kill him.
  • He's Just Hiding:
    • Many doubt Ronnie Raymond is truly dead because they Never Found the Body like last time, and especially because the involvement of alternate Earths]] leaves it open for him to have been transported elsewhere instead.
    • Atom Smasher to a lesser extent; while it's largely unquestionable that he's dead, the fact a) he's from an alternate universe, b) it's confirmed there are more than just two worlds, c) Smasher in particular, along with others, existed on both Earth-1 and 2 (albeit, he was a powerless muggle on Earth-1), meaning he could exist in one of the other universes as well, and d) Smasher is usually a hero in the comics while the one encountered in the show was a villain all mean it's likely there's a heroic version of the character floating around somewhere.
    • Trajectory's death looked suspiciously like being absorbed into the Speed Force.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • After The Reveal in "Versus Zoom", Jay describing Zoom as "an unstoppable demon with the face of death" comes off as some rather subtle Evil Gloating on Zoom's part.
    • The show's version of Wally West is a Composite Character of the original note  and New 52note  versions. This is a few months before an adult Wally West returns during the DC Rebirth event to coexist with the New 52 Wally, causing him to become a Decomposite Character.
  • Holy Shit Quotient:
    • Zoom's entire performance in "Enter Zoom": catching lightning and throwing it back at Barry, beating Barry senseless, breaking his back, and parading his broken body around town in an extended Kick the Dog moment.
    • From "Welcome to Earth-2", Zoom coming out of nowhere to kill Deathstorm and Reverb, kidnap Barry, lock him in a cell next to Jesse's, and brag about it'll be the last place he ever sees.
      • Not to mention the trip to Earth-2 that offers a glimpse of "everything," meaning the likes of Jonah Hex, the Legion of Super Heroes, the 1990 Flash, and Supergirl.
    • "Versus Zoom" reveals Zoom's true identity: Hunter Zolomon of Earth-2, and he (and a time remnant in the Earth-2 two parter) has been posing as "Jay Garrick" all along. Hand in hand with that is the reveal that Hunter created the persona of Earth-2's Flash to give people hope just so he could rip it away as Zoom.
    • THEN it turns out in the finale that Jay Garrick actually does exist…on yet another Earth. He has a bright red and blue suit and is the Earth-3 counterpart of Barry's father. And HE's the man Zoom kept locked up in the iron mask —- as a trophy.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • Season Two's darker tone has been criticized not only because The Flash is supposed to be a lighter show in comparison to Arrow but becasue the show going darker just took the fun out of it.
    • The whole concept of a "time remnant" has been widely mocked for its sketchy logic and abuse of the Timey-Wimey Ball. Especially since the previously established Speed Mirage works just as well for what they want to use it for — a speedster being in two places at once.
    • Zoom killing Henry. Barry spent all of the first season trying to get his dad exonerated for Nora's murder and Henry's murder pretty much means that was all in vain. The fact Henry died just as sparks were flying between him and Dr. McGee makes it more irritating. Plus a hero losing both parents seems to work better on a darker show like Arrow than The Flash.
    • Barry saving Nora at the end of the finale. It left bad taste in many viewers' mouths since there was an entire episode dedicated to having Barry learn to accept his mom's death and that he isn't immune to tragedy simply because he's a hero. Given how season two was...uneven many feel that this will continue the show's decline in quality, rather than reverse it.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks:
    • Two key story elements are copied from Season One. Joe's police partner is left Locked Out of the Loop of Barry's identity as the Flash despite working closely with him, and the Big Bad is a mysterious Evil Counterpart to the Flash who wants Barry to become faster to further his evil plans. Both of these make Season Two just a tiny bit repetitive.
    • Even Zoom's reveal is an exact copy of the reveal of the Reverse-Flash in Season One — the team's kindly mentor is actually their worst enemy and has been playing them all for fools.
      • Zoom's Evil Plan of wanting to conquer the hero's city is something that's been been done to death on Arrow.
  • Jerkass Dissonance: Harrison Wells of Earth-2 may or may not have good intentions (we see that Zoom is holding his daughter captive), but he's definitely an unpersonable grump either way. However, his snappish, biting remarks have provided some of the best lines of the season, if not the entire show. A lot of fans are liking Wells for his incredibly blunt and confrontational personality, providing a stark contrast from both the cool, analytical, and methodical Eobard Thawne and the nice guy Wells of Season One.
    Cisco: "Our 'Wells' might've been evil, but you're just a dick!"
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Wells is acting like a total Jerkass to Team Flash because he's doing all he can to save his daughter from Zoom, but the Adult Fear is getting to him.
    • Killer Frost is quickly established as a cold-blooded killer, but she's clearly as terrified of Zoom as anyone else on Earth-2, and she loses her husband when he gets carried away brutalising the Flash and is murdered by Zoom for it.
    • Hunter Zolomon watched his father kill his mother, an experience that warped him into a psychotic serial killer. And, unlike Barry, Hunter had no one to care for him after losing his parents. None of this excuses his actions, but it's not hard to see how he wound up becoming what he is. His increasingly heinous and sadistic crimes in the rest of the season, however (especially his murder of Henry Allen), ruin any sympathy the audience may have for him.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Patty is Zoom. Explanation 
    • Fans are also joking that Sonic is Zoom because of the blue colour scheme.
    • X is Jay Garrick. Explanation 
    • After "Flash Back", referring to Hartley as if he's been a regular character since his Season One appearance has become quite popular.
    • Earth-2 Lives Matter! Explanation 
    • Responding to someone saying "What?" with Zoom/Jay's "YOU CAN'T LOCK UP THE DARKNESS."
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Lewis Snart put a bomb in his own daughter's head to make his son work for him.
    • A few possible crossing points for Zoom:
      • In his backstory, Hunter Zolomon was a serial killer who murdered 23 people.
      • We knew from the beginning that Zoom wanted the Flash dead, but in "Enter Zoom," he rises to a whole new level of cruelty: he kidnaps Linda to bait the Flash, then brutally beats Barry before breaking his back, drags him to the newspaper and the police station to show off the city's bloodied and broken hero, then tries to kill Barry while his friends are Forced to Watch. Kick the Dog doesn't even begin to cover it.
      • "Running to Stand Still" reveals that he's been sending metahumans from Earth-2 to fight the Flash so that Barry can get faster and have more speed for Zoom to steal; Zoom never expected any of his minions to succeed (indeed, his plan required them to fail), and he had no qualms about abandoning them to either die (he even helped Barry destroy Sand Demon) or be trapped on Earth-1 for the rest of their lives.
      • In "Versus Zoom", it's revealed that Zoom has been posing as "Jay Garrick" since The Flash first appeared on Earth-2, creating a hero to inspire hope so that he could rip it away. This is made even worse when it's revealed that he's been keeping the real Jay Garrick prisoner while using his name as part of the whole sick façade.
      • Then he tops that of in "Invincible" when kills Henry in the old Allen house right in front of Barry, just to prove that they're Not So Different in the ultimate act of pettiness.
    • In "Running to Stand Still," the Trickster and Weather Wizard pass out hundreds of bombs to children all across the city by disguising the Trickster as Santa Claus. When the Flash discovers this, the two gleefully laugh about how they will blow up multiple families if the Flash doesn't let them beat him to death slowly.
    • Deathstorm's casual admittance that he hasn't let Martin Stein out in years.
    • Zoom's father murdering his wife while making his young son watch.
    • Believe it or not, but it seems as if Barry has passed it by going back in time to selfishly rescue his mother from the Reverse-Flash, thereby derailing his own time line, altering the fates of many characters, including his own friends and family, and erasing his past self. Not helped by the fact that this action once generated the story arc for Flashpoint. It is however in a very Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds manner.
  • Narm:
    • The "Flash signal" is fine as a little reference... the average viewer will immediately notice that the thing, by all logic, should have projected a Reverse-Flash symbol onto the clouds...
    • Captain Cold's gun being able to freeze laser beams is a breach of science so blatant that it even stands out on this show. Until you actually look up the science and find that it IS possible...
    • Snart's dad killing one of his cronies by blowing his head up should be horrifying... but the guy getting his head blown up just sounds kind of bored about the whole thing.
    • Almost every scene with Francine. Her actress just overacts so hard that it becomes hard to take her seriously.
    • "Legends of Today" has so much plot to chew through that Kendra's introduction to both the Flash and Arrow teams is treated absurdly casually. First Cisco rather unbelievably blows Barry's identity to her, then with just a single edit she's in Star Labs with the whole team, and then all of Team Arrow apparently has no problem with her knowing all about them too.
    • At the end of "Potential Energy" Eobard Thawne arrives in our present and asks Gideon "Where the hell am I?" But Gideon apparently has a sense of drama and says nothing at all as the music flares up, while Thawne just keeps staring at his hand.
    • "Trajectory" has Team Flash coming to the realization that "Jay Garrick" is Zoom, after Barry shatters the display case with the helmet for Cisco to "vibe," when he could have opened it normally instead. But how does the episode ultimately end? With Barry suddenly speeding away, running miles without hesitation to a faraway cliff, and then angrily ripping his mask off to scream his lungs out. It's as over-dramatic and ridiculous as it sounds. The fact that it's nearly identical to a joke from The Big Bang Theory doesn't help. Even worse, beyond their first few episodes Barry and Jay didn't really have much to do with each other on a personal level, yet Barry is reacting like he's been stabbed in the back by his oldest and closest friend.
    • The origin story of Zoom, in which Hunter's father is wearing his old war helmet for no reason as all as he abuses and murders his wife, followed by a downright Dickensian scene where Hunter is dropped off at an orphanage with the social worker sneering "He's all alone."
      • From the same episode, Zoom has to ask how the team figured out his identity, when you'd think the biggest risk of exposing it he ever took would stick in his mind.
    • The villain Griffin Grey comes off slightly less intimidating when you find out that he shares a similar name to Grey Griffin the famous voice actress, rendering anytime the characters call out his name unintentionally humorous.
    • Zoom having flashbacks in every single conversation he has with Caitlin feels like a running gag after a while.
    • Henry's reveal that Garrick was his mother's maiden name. It's clearly setting up something for later, and is better than whatever that is being a complete Ass Pull, but it still comes off as a very contrived line, stretching belief that Barry wouldn't already know this tidbit.
    • Greg Finley aka Tony Woodward trying to walk like a zombie after the character's short-lived resurrection looks nothing but incredibly stupid.
    • When Black Siren, Laurel Lance's Earth 2 villainous counterpart, shows up, Wells asks the team if they know her. Caitlin replies that they 'loved her'. Which, would be a reasonable response from True Companions...except for the fact that, save for Roy, Laurel was the member of Team Arrow that the Flash crew interacted with the least on-screen. Hell, Caitlin in particular never shared a scene with Laurel, so her delivering the line is particularly odd.
    • At the end of the season finale, when Harry, Jesse and the real Jay Garrick leave for Earth-2, Jay puts on his helmet... and it's crooked. Seriously, no one on set caught that?
  • Narm Charm:
    • The mayor presenting the key to the city to the Flash. It's a classic superhero cliche that should be unbearably cheesy, but instead is a Crowning Moment of Heartwarming. It really sums up how this series is a love letter to the superhero genre, rather than trying to distance itself from it like so many recent adaptations.
    • Jay describing Zoom as an "unstoppable demon with the face of death" sounds a little awkward until we see Zoom in action and it becomes clear that Jay wasn't exaggerating. The fact that it's later suggested to be some subtle Evil Gloating on Zoom's part helps too.
    • Zoom catching lightning in slow-motion. It's obvious that he's defying the laws of physics, but it makes him look so epic.
    • Zoom, of all people, saying "Merry Christmas" in "Running to Stand Still" is simultaneously unsettling and hilarious. It also serves as a nice Call Back to Harrison Wells saying "Merry Christmas" in his distorted Reverse-Flash voice in "The Man In the Yellow Suit."
    • From "Versus Zoom", Zoom's over-the-top declaration that "YOU CAN'T LOCK UP THE DARKNESS!" should come off as silly, but the effect of Teddy Sears delivering the line with Zoom's Black Eyes of Evil combined with Tony Todd's voiceover performance makes it terrifying.
  • Older Than They Think: Jefferson "Jax" Jackson is not, contrary to popular belief, merely a Decomposite Character/Composite Character of aspects of both Ronnie Raymond and Jason Rusch, but was originally a member of Ronnie Raymond's supporting cast.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • King Shark shows up at the end of Episode Four, looking far better than you'd expect from the show's budget, and promptly gets knocked out, only serving as the means to introduce Barry to Earth-2's Harrison Wells. Luckily for fans, he got his own episode later.
    • Damien Dahrk's cameo in "Legends of Yesterday." He gets one scene where he kills some Argus personnel and menaces Oliver. Neal McDonough plays up the Evil Is Hammy aspect of it for all it's worth.
    • Reverb, aka Cisco Ramon of Earth-2, only gets one scene before being killed, but he makes an impressive showing with his menacing demeanor and using his powers to subdue and beat down Barry.
  • Replacement Scrappy:
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: "Jay Garrick". Fan reception early on in the season to the character was lukewarm, mainly due to being seen as an Adaptational Wimp. However, the revelation that the Jay Garrick persona was just an act from the start and he's actually been Zoom all along certainly changed a lot of minds. This is especially true since many fans feel that Teddy Sears' performance as Zoom/Hunter Zolomon is superior to his as Jay Garrick.
  • Romantic Plot Tumor:
    • Barry and Patty's turbulent courtship which comes to an end because of Barry's refusal to tell Patty he's the Flash.
    • "Jay" and Caitlin's relationship arc because it feels rushed and because from the perspective of the viewer Ronnie died shortly before the remnant's introduction.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: As mentioned above, people are already shipping Wally with Linda, even though they haven't met yet. It helps that they were an item in the comics.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: With the addition of "Jay Garrick" and Patty Spivot (respective love interests of Caitlin and Barry), the naval battles from Season One have only become that much messier.
  • So Okay, It's Average: While enjoyable, some fans aren't enjoying Season Two as much as Season One (which admittedly set the bar pretty high). There are several reasons for this: accusations that Zoom is too similar to the Reverse-Flash to stand out on his own as a Big Bad; him being a Spotlight-Stealing Squad as most of the metahumans this season have been his lackeys at the expense of the Rogues (all of whom have been Put on a Bus), while other fan favorites like the Trickster and Grodd were used pretty quickly in the first half; the big reveal of Zoom's identity causing some Pacing Problems; the way the main characters have been forced to act like idiots to justify Zoom' threat; Barry's romance with Patty being seen as a Romantic Plot Tumor for those who didn't care for them while she never properly used as Joe's new police partner because she was always kept Locked Out of the Loop before she was quietly written out. But the final straw for many was Zoom's plan to conquer Central City, which was seen as a blatant copy of Arrow, since many a villain on that show has tried to conquer Star(ling) City.
  • Special Effect Failure: Atom Smasher's transformation in the season premiere is painfully CG, looking like something we might have seen twenty years ago.
  • Strangled by the Red String:
    • Caitlin and "Jay" really come off as this, especially considering that Caitlin just lost her husband and basically runs after him like a hypnotised puppy from the very start.
    • Some think this of Barry and Patty as well, since a lot of people felt like Barry was settling, and the typical "I have to keep my identity a secret from my lover" thing being beyond outdated by this point. It doesn't help that her comic counterpart was a very obvious place holder for Iris, so those who knew that felt this way about the show's version by default.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks:
    • The Rogues despite being a big part of Season One, have all been Put on a Bus meaning that the Big Bad, Zoom gets all the attention and there's little break from that particular arc.
    • The Adaptational Villainy of Hunter Zolomon. In the comics, he was a tragic figure who had a lot of bad days before he snapped, and even when became Zoom his main motivation was to make the Flash suffer tragedy so it would turn him into a better hero. Here he had a really horrible childhood before being shunted off to foster care and was a notorious serial killer all before he got his powers, and he makes people suffer just for the hell of it.
    • There is no Jay Garrick. He's just an alternate identity Zoom stole so he could give people hope, before Zoom took it away. Considering Jay is one of the oldest heroes in DC Comics - not to mention the first Flash, this particular plot twist is very unwelcome in some quarters as they see it disrespectful to Jay's legacy. Though it's possibly set up to be fixed with the reveal that Garrick was the maiden name of Barry's grandmother, implying that Henry's Earth 2 counterpart could be the real Jay. Then the finale reveals that Henry's counterpart is the real Jay, but he comes from yet another Earth — which he himself calls "Earth 3" when speaking to our heroes for relativity's sake — where he was saving the day until Zoom up and captured him and put him in the iron mask.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Atom Smasher, who undergoes Adaptational Villainy and appears to die in his debut episode. Counts for double since he's from another Earth and he's implied to have murdered his counterpart on this Earth, who apparently never got powers.
    • Patty Spivot, due to Joe and Barry arbitrarily keeping her Locked Out of the Loop she never contributes anything to plot, even though she's a very keen eyed detective. It's very telling when she's Put on a Bus, Joe doesn't get a new partner.
    • Tar Pit has a power set that fits especially well to be a foil to the Flash, and the episode even includes a scene based around Barry being slowed down enough to keep him from saving Iris from being hurt. But by the time he shows up, the needs of the ongoing arc mean that he and Barry hardly even fight at all.
    • Cisco's Evil Twin Reverb has tons of potential because him being essentially what Cisco could be if he learns to perfectly master and develop his abilities would make him a perfect rival for Cisco in future seasons. He's killed off in his debut episode.
    • Deathstorm, Ronnie's Evil Twin, doesn't get fleshed out very much, is Out of Focus compared to Killer Frost, and, like Reverb, is offed by Zoom in his debut episode.
    • Trajectory had a ton of potential with being the shows first ever female speedster, as well as having conflict with a voice in her head encouraging her to continue using Velocity 9. It's implied that the only reason she has resorted to crime is a result of low wages and her lowering mental state from continued use of the substance. When given the offer by Barry to stop what she is doing and try to fix her wrongs which could lead an interesting plot of the two sides of Trajectory at ends while battling the illness effects of Velocity, she instead takes more Velocity 9 and runs until she evaporates in thin-air. Unless her death is revealed to instead be her being absorbed into the Speed-Force for a future appearance, it's quite a wasted opportunity.
    • Killer Frost, who showed signs that she was possibly redeeming herself, ends up locked in a cage by Zoom and executed after the very first time she interacts with her Earth-1 counterpart. It doesn't help that her possible chance at redemption was dropped entirely from her character as well.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: "The Reverse-Flash Returns" could have been a triumphant return for Season One's well-received Big Bad and a possible hint that fan-favorite Eddie might somehow be alive. Instead, we got a timey-wimey bit of technobabble that is generally considered an Ass Pull, with Thawne's return only lasting a single episode (albeit one that tied up a couple of loose ends from Season One, such as the reason for Thawne's hatred for the Flash). Although given the fact the two's timelines are in reverse, the door's still open for him to come back.
    • "Flash Back" brings us Hartley's Heel–Face Turn which a lot of people wanted, although the episode did show him helping with the Speed Wraith the details are glossed over once Barry get to the future, with him now being a lot friendlier and saving Barry from the Speed Wraith. Those wanting a Redemption arc for the character unfortunately don't get it.
    • "Jay Garrick", when it turns out that he never even existed; he was just Zoom and a time remnant of Zoom, used to give the heroes false hope and further Zoom's plot, rather than being an Older and Wiser mentor who's also the Hero of Another Story like he was originally built up to be.
      • Then it turns out Jay Garrick actually does exist and is Henry Allen's Earth-3 doppelganger, but we only get a couple of scenes with him in the finale before he departs for Earth-2 with Harry and Jesse Wells.
    • Zoom. In the comics he's an Anti-Villain with a unique motivation, but the writers decided to add more mystery to the character and thus confirmed he wouldn't be Hunter Zolomon, indicating that this Zoom, who was introduced as a terrifying villain who utterly breaks Barry in their first fight, would at least be an interesting new character. Then they proceed to leave him underdeveloped for the bulk of the season, making him feel like a Boring Invincible Villain Replacement Scrappy for Eobard Thawne rather than the aforementioned terrifying and mysterious new villain they set him up to be, topped with the reveal that he really is Hunter Zolomon, except he's basically In-Name-Only without any of the nuance, making it feel like they wasted both the opportunity to create a new Big Bad for the Flash and waste a popular comic character with potential.
    • From "Back to Normal" to "The Runaway Dinosaur," Barry was without his powers, and the episodes revolved around stopping the threats in other ways. You'd think this would be a good time for Cisco to learn to use more of his powers like Reverb, especially since one of the enemies is his brother's Earth-2 counterpart, but that doesn't happen. He does, however, help bring Barry back from the Speedforce.
    • The shows budget limitations force the "Metapocalypse," with every remaining Earth 2 metahuman attacking Central City at once, to be crammed into all of about five minutes. It's played up as a massive catastrophe, after which Barry speeds in and cleans up the whole problem save for a few stragglers.
  • Trapped by Mountain Lions: Ironically played. For the first half of the season, no one really cared about Iris' mother when she had nothing to do with the more interesting main plot, until it introduced Wally to the show, while the 'more interesting main plot' became an infuriating Arc Fatigue plot that ruined several popular characters, while the plot that came from Francine's introduction, Wally slowly building a relationship with Joe and Iris, ends up becoming one of the best parts of the season.
  • Unfortunate Implications: Some people feel that Francine West's characterization is full of this: a black parent who abandoned her child and had a drug problem. This was upsetting to fans who felt the West Family had transcended the stereotype.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • Joe and Iris telling Francine to stay out of their lives comes more across of Kick the Dog than anything else. Joe at least realized he made a mistake when he learns they have a son who grew up without a father because of this, not so much Iris, who treated it like a complete betrayal when Francine never had a chance to tell her.
    • Other fans are calling foul of Henry Allen's abrupt departure in the premiere, pointing out that Barry had been working for years to free him and wanted nothing more than to spend time with his dad, and finding his on-screen reason for leaving less than convincing.
    • Wally at first, blaming Joe for not being around when he was a kid, despite the fact that his mother left before Joe even knew she was pregnant. Joe even points out that as a detective's wife Francine knew how to disappear. The next episode shows that he's angry at Francine too, even moreso, and he quickly learns to get past it and bonds with Joe.
    • Barry ends up being even more of a jerk to Patty over his secret identity than he was to Iris, openly lying to her face when she figures it out while claiming that it's for her own good, as if her not knowing would protect her if Zoom found out how much Barry cares about her.
    • Scott Evans' being disappointed that Iris wasn't asking him out on a date and was instead trying to talk about work seems to be an attempt to humanize a rather one-note Flash hater. Instead it makes him appear even worse since he proceeds to get angry with Iris and guilt-trip her. Considering that he was the one to assume there was a date and that he holds power over Iris (being her boss and all), some fans were not amused when she expressed an interest in pursuing the relationship.
  • What an Idiot:
    • Doctor Light discovers that she has a double on Earth-1 and decides to replace her to hide from Zoom. She does this by going to her crowded workplace in supervillain gear, refers to her as her double, and tries to murder her in front of a dozen witnesses. Uh Light, are you clear on the fundamental concept of Kill and Replace? It requires people not to know the original is dead. As for the next episode stating that she specifically wanted to use Linda's body to convince Zoom she was dead, and then run, rather than taking over Linda's life? Again—killing your double in front of a dozen witnesses kinda blows the cover.
    • Topped by Cisco falling for one of the oldest tricks in the book, and blithely opening Dr. Light's cell once he sees it empty. Granted, the team had no idea she could turn invisible, though you can argue he still should have considered the possibility given that her powers are based on light.
    • Pretty much the entirety of Barry's "impersonate my alternate universe self" plan in "Welcome to Earth-2." Unsurprisingly, it gets Earth-2 Joe killed and Barry himself captured by Zoom. Comes off as particularly egregious considering that he spends a lot of time angsting about putting his loved ones in danger (even pushing Patty away because of it) and yet does it to his Earth-2 counterparts without much thought.
    • In "Escape From Earth-2," Zoom begins a manhunt for Dr. Wells and warns the entire town that he demands his head. However, it never occurred to Zoom to search STAR Labs—Wells' place of work—first. His warnings indirectly cause Wells to realize that Zoom's hunting him and gives him time to escape.
    • Barry giving his Speed to Zoom to save Wally. Not that doing so isn't noble and heroic, but Zoom had already released Wally by that point, and Barry had gained a power-boost beforehand that made him more powerful. Given this, the fact that Zoom is dying, and the fact that the process to do so could have easily been reversed, Barry not just betraying Zoom after Wally was secure is just madness.
  • The Woobie:
    • Patty, Iris and Joe in "Running to Stand Still," when it's revealed to the audience how much pain and anger the former still carries over her father's murder, and to Joe by a tearful Iris the fact that he has a son. Also Harry (doubles as a Jerkass Woobie), when he is forced to help Zoom defeat Barry in order to save Jesse.
    • Jesse Wells, held prisoner and tortured by Zoom to be used against her father. The scene where Zoom allows her to see Harry for a brief moment before taking her away again is heartbreaking.
    • Wally West, though of the Jerkass Woobie variety, at least at first. Raised by a single mother in poverty, who then contracts a fatal degenerative disease that they can't afford treatment for, forcing him to become an illegal street racer as a means to pay the medical expenses for. Then, out of nowhere, he finds out that he has a father and sister he was never told about, and his mother intentionally never told him about them, while said father never tried to track her down. He reacts terribly, but it's hard to not feel bad for the kid.
    • Assuming he wasn't evil himself, Earth-2 Martin Stein is kept in a permanent And I Must Scream situation by Deathstorm, their death at Zoom's hands really being a mercy for him. Knowing Earth-1 Martin Stein, it is hard to think about.
    • The man in the iron mask. Held prisoner by Zoom for who knows how long, with his mask preventing him from even speaking, and it sounds as if it gives him difficulty breathing as well. His attempt to get a message across to Jesse and Barry only makes matters worse for him; they fail to understand the message, and Zoom threatens the man into keeping quiet. Finally, despite Barry's promise to come back for him, the man in the iron mask is left behind when his fellow prisoners escape, and he remains at Zoom's (distinct lack of) mercy. The Reveal in the finale makes his situation even worse: he's the real Jay Garrick, whose identity was stolen by Zoom for the sake of Zoom's twisted idea of "playing hero". Once he's freed, however, he seems to have held together fairly well.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/TheFlash2014