Western Animation / Avengers Assemble

http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_avengersassemble_6468.jpg
Well, the old BattleCry seems kind of redundant now, eh?

Avengers Assemble is an American animated series that premiered on Disney XD's Marvel Universe block in 2013. Based on the long-running Avengers comic book franchise and inspired by the success of the live-action Avengers movie, the show uses a cast and designs similar to those seen in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It's not quite an Animated Adaptation of the movies (they never reference events from it), more a series that just takes cues from it. It is set within the same universe as Ultimate Spider-Man.

The series was launched as a replacement for the fan-favorite animated series, The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes!, and doesn't reference the events of that show in order to make Assemble accessible to new viewers. Joe Casey, Joe Kelly, Duncan Rouleau and Steven T. Seagle of Man of Action Studios were served as executive producers of the first season, and became as consultants in the second season.

In keeping with the influence of the movie, the show features an Avengers line-up consisting of Captain America, Iron Man, Thor, the Incredible Hulk, Black Widow and Hawkeye. The Falcon appears as the team's seventh member, the only Avenger not present in the movie (though he does join the Avengers proper in Avengers: Age of Ultron as one of newest recruits).

The series begain airing on July 7th, 2013, preceded by a 1-hour preview special that aired on May 26th, 2013, the same month as the release of Iron Man 3.

The second season premiered on September 28. The show’s second season picks up where the first left off and see the titular heroes going up against the mad titan himself, Thanos, as well as Ultron and the Squadron Supreme in the latter episodes. The season also sees Ant-Man join the team, as part of a promotion for his solo film.

The third season was titled Avengers: Ultron Revolution, capitalizing on the success of the Age of Ultron movie and gradually building up to a Civil War adaptation to tie in to Captain America: Civil War. Black Panther, Captain Marvel, and Ms Marvel have guest spots in the season.

A fourth season was announced at the 2016 San Diego Comic-Con, titled Avengers: Secret Wars, where the team goes missing and Black Panther must form a new team in their absence, featuring Ms. Marvel, Captain Marvel, The Vision, Ant-Man, Wasp, and the Jane Foster version of Thor.

A character sheet is currently under construction.

Not to be confused with the comic book series of the same name, the Market-Based Title for the UK release of the movie, or the trope named for the show's source material.


Tropes:

  • Action Girl: Black Widow, of course.
  • Adaptation Distillation/Broad Strokes:
  • Adaptational Badass: MODOK is shown to be more powerful than he usually is in other Marvel shows. He also has technopathic powers now and took down Iron Man with relative ease.
  • Adaptational Heroism:
    • Princess Python starts off as a former member of the Circus of Crime, but reforms and joins S.H.I.E.L.D. by the end of the episode.
    • Both men to have operated under the name "Radioactive Man" were super villains in the comics, but this version of Igor Stancheck is a member of the Winter Guard and helps to dissolve a destabilized facility that was falling towards a village to save said village. Similarly, despite being based on Ivan Vanko from Iron Man 2, the Crimson Dynamo is a member of the heroic Winter Guard and only stole a capsule because it contained Radioactive Man.
  • Adaptational Species Change: The supervillain Ghost is instead a human with latent inhuman DNA that was awakened to Seeker's superweapon creating a Mass Empowering Event.
  • Adaptational Villainy: Hyperion gains the villainy of King Hyperion, his Mirror Universe counterpart from Exiles. As such, he's depicted as a sociopathic Well-Intentioned Extremist who is revealed to have destroyed his own planet when they wouldn't submit to his rule. Though, given the rest of the Squadron appeared and how they behaved, it may be a downplayed version as they're more in line with the Squadron Sinister.
  • Adaptational Wimp:
    • As powerful as Thanos has been portrayed, this version is not "godlike" in stamina or invulnerability. On one occasion, he was apparently winded by the time Arsenal removed his Infinity Gauntlet. There's also the fact that an Earth-based satellite beam was capable of completely vaporizing him, even though it's something he can come back from
    • Kang the Conqueror is severely rudimentary and unskilled compared to his comic and The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes! counterparts.
  • Adaptation Induced Plothole: In the comic, there were several good reasons the Masters of Evil were able to go around unrecognized as the Thunderbolts; their team had gone through several line-up over their career, the members they used for this plan all had powers that are pretty common in the comic book Marvel universe (and in Moonstone's case, she avoided using her most recognizable power-intangibility- precisely so no one would recognize her), and they arrived at a time where most superheroes were missing, making it all easier for the civilians to welcome these news mysterious heroes with open arms. In this series, the Avengers (and presumably all the other heroes) are still active and well, the Masters of Evil met them barely three episodes before and they had no other line-up than the one they use as the Thunderbolts, making you wonder how the Avengers don't recognize them right away. It doesn't help either that Zemo steals a Facial and Voice recognition fooling gadget exactly one episode before the Thunderbolt's debut, and Mimi keeps her accent as Songbird anyway.
  • Adapted Out:
    • The Soul Stone is left out of the Infinity Stone collection. Possibly because of the religious connotations and the greater plotline surrounding it.
    • Pepper Potts does not appear in this continuity at all.
    • Barring any future revelations, it would seem that like in the movies, the original Ant-Man and Wasp were not founding members of the Avengers in this continuity.
    • The series accurately recreates the original Thunderbolts line-up with the exception of Jolt, the team's youngest member and Token Good Teammate.
    • For the first time since The Marvel Superheroes, averted with Igor Drenkov, the spy who sabotaged Banner's test and made him the Hulk, as he actually appears in "Dehulked".
    • When Captain Marvel's origin is briefly recounted, all the audience is told is that she was an Air Force pilot who was kidnapped and experimented upon by the Kree. No mention is made of Mar-Vell, who was Carol's lover and the original Captain Marvel before she got her powers.
  • Aesop Amnesia: No matter how many times Tony learns that relying solely on technology will not work, he's right back to being a smug jerk who thinks his tech is infallible the very next episode.
    • Eventually deconstructed during the Avengers Disassembled arc where Ultron's actions exacerbates Tony's behavior to be worse than usual, causing half of the team to quit over it. Becomes a Subverted Trope at the resolution of the story as following episodes show Tony actually giving forethought to problems the team as a whole has and trying to fix them.
  • All According to Plan: It happens two times in "Bring on the bad guys". First, the Avengers defeat and capture Red Skull, who is taken prisoner to SHIELD's tricarrier. Captain America suspects: it was too easy. Red Skull was actually a Trojan Horse; Dracula was hidden in his armour, liberated him, and let him assault the tricarrier. And then again in the end of the episode: the bad guys were driven away, and the tricarrier was liberated... but the bad guys achieved their true objetive: liberate Hyperion, who was held prisoner there
  • All Your Powers Combined: The Super-Adaptoid had all of the Avengers' powers and skills.
    • The nations of the world combined their power grids in order to make a blast powerful enough to defeat Thanos
  • Appropriated Appellation: Captain America is the one that gives the Space Phantoms their name.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism: Hawkeye was reluctant to believe vampires are real and even more reluctant about Count Dracula (actually King Dracula) being real despite being part of a team that has a god among them. Thor himself brings it up that the others used to consider him a myth before meeting him.
  • Arch-Enemy:
    • Red Skull, and possibly Dracula, for Cap.
    • Loki, but also Doctor Doom, for Thor.
    • Justin Hammer wishes he was this for Tony, but MODOK and Red Skull are actually better fits for Iron Man.
    • Attuma for Hulk, at least in "Depth Charge."
  • Artifact of Doom: The Infinity Stones act as this. Individually they're unstable, massively destructive Macguffins. In a near complete set they have a corrupting influence rivaling the One Ring.
  • Art Shift: The Flashback in "Molecule Kid" is done in the style of The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes!.
    • The show also black boxes certain scenes, possibly to emulate the feel of a comic book or action movie.
  • Artistic License – Physics
    • After Hyperion splits apart a meteor with heat vision, the show forgets about both the meteor chunks raining down New York and the heat that would be generated from the meteor entering the atmosphere.
  • Ascended Extra: Black Widow was largely absent for most of the first season. She becomes a regular in the second, appearing in all episodes to date.
  • Assimilation Plot: Ultron's ultimate goal is to copy himself onto human hosts and eventually replace humanity as the planet's sole sentient lifeform.
  • Attack! Attack! Attack!
    Thor: What is our plan to fight with this Skull?
    Iron Man: Hit everything! Hard!
    Hawkeye: So... the plan is that there is no plan. I thought he was the smart one.
    Hulk: I like the plan!
  • Attack of the 50-Foot Whatever: The Midgard Serpent.
  • Audience Surrogate: Falcon fills this role as the newest Avenger, acting as a stand-in for the audience as he's introduced to the team.
  • Avengers Assemble: Naturally, belonging to the franchise that this trope is named afternote , this occurs in the first episode when Captain America goes missing in a fight with Red Skull.
  • Awakening the Sleeping Giant: Justin Hammer mining vibranium in the Savage land, ignited the wrath of the rock people. They still did not fight, but they helped Tony Stark to manufacture a basic armour.
  • Badass Boast: Cap gets an excellent one on behalf of the team in Thanos Triumphant.
    When Avengers stand, tyrants fall!
  • Bad Future: By the 30th Century, Kang the Conqueror will rule the Earth. They trap Kang millions of years in the past, freeing the 30th century Earth from his tyranny.
  • The Bad Guy Wins: For a largely up-beat show, this happens a lot.
    • The first episode ends with the Red Skull and MODOK seizing control over Tony's armor along with severely injuring him by ripping out the surgically implanted arc-reactor that protects his heart.
    • The Cabal manages to successfully hijack the Tri-Carrier and bust Hyperion out of prison in Bring On The Bad Guys.
    • In By The Numbers The Cabal seizes control of the Tessarct.
    • After the Season 1 finale, Red Skull manages to give his master Thanos the Tesseract.
    • In Episode 12 of Season 2, Thanos gains the Infinity Gauntlet. In the next episode, its powers are absorbed by Arsenal, who is promptly possessed by Ultron.
    • In Crack In The System and Avengers Disassembled, Ultron manipulates first Steve into leaving, then the Avengers into splitting into two camps, with Spider-Man, who'd been called up by Tony after Cap's departure, swinging off in disgust.
    • In Terminal Velocity, Nighthawk and Speed Demon successfully steal the Avenger's data and in Avengers Last Stand Squadron Supreme ends up taking over the world.
  • "Bang!" Flag Gun: In Episode 7 of Season 1, Hawkeye's distraction arrow emits a flag that says, "BANG!"
  • Batman Gambit:
    • When Steve Rogers and Tony Stark were trapped in the submarine of Red Skull and his minions, with no armour, shield or technology (not even to call the other Avengers), they had to rely on this. They staged being captured, and staged a fight between themselves, with Stark telling Cap that "leaders" exploit the knowledge of the intelligent guys and then leave with nothing... which reinforced MODOK's suspicions about the intentions of Red Skull, and turned against him.
    • "The Ambassador" has Doom pull one of these to gain access to Tony's database. He got outgambitted.
    • In Crack In The System and Avengers Disassembled, on the other hand, Ultron forces Tony to destroy everything he's ever built and plays on the divisions between Steve and Tony to split the Avengers in two.
  • Beauty Is Never Tarnished: Black Widow.
  • Beware the Superman: Like Superman if he decided to abuse his powers, Hyperion is a super powered alien who inflicts terror all in the name of what he perceives is right.
  • Big Bad:
    • Red Skull in Season 1.
    • Thanos in Season 2, with Ultron and the Squadron Supreme serve as Arc Villains in between.
    • Ultron will be the real deal in Season 3.
  • Big Bad Duumvirate: Red Skull and MODOK in the first episode.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Thanos acts as the Big Bad for Season 2 but the Squadron Supreme are also acting against the Avengers with the intent to obtain the Infinity Stones for themselves, but now Ultron joins the mix after stealing the power of the Infinity Gems. Since Thanos and Ultron have been defeated, the Supreme Squadron are the only threat remaining.
  • Big Bad Wannabe: Justin Hammer in both episodes he has appeared in to-date.
  • Big Damn Heroes: The Falcon rescues Iron Man from the Red Skull-possessed Captain America.
  • Big "NO!": Iron Man does one when Captain America's seemingly vaporized by Red Skull.
    • Doom shouts this in "The Serpent of Doom" as he's being sent flying into the the underworld.
  • Bigger on the Inside: Thor's room.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: Every Avenger besides Iron Man in episode 2.
  • Breaking the Fellowship:
    • Apparently happened before the series even began, with Captain America's apparent death prompting Iron Man to bring the team back together again. Unfortunately, the team is shattered again in "Crack in the System" and "Avengers Disassembled", the team breaks up with Captain America and Tony Stark not on the best terms. Widow, Hulk, and Falcon join Captain America, but Hawkeye and Thor remain on Iron Man's side, with Ant-Man joining him afterwards. Spider-Man is the only one who doesn't pick a side. By "Small-Time Heroes", there are now two factions that refer to themselves as "The Avengers". The team ultimately reassembles in "The Ultron Outbreak" and Ant-Man becomes a full member.
    • Season 3 has a less severe version of this. It's revealed that the Avengers gradually stopped meeting up after the fight with Thanos, since there were no more threats that warranted the full might of the team. They end up coming back together in the premier in order to fight the Masters of Evil.
  • Broke Episode: "Small-Time Heroes" sees Iron Man's half of the Avengers operating without electricity, the Avenjet, and advanced technology. They may not be impoverished, but their severe lack of resources hampers their ability to deal with even low-level supervillains. Their only option was to recruit Ant-Man, and camping with him gave them almost everything they needed.
  • But He Sounds Handsome: Even while pretending to be Grim Reaper, Tony wastes no time in calling Tony Stark's technology awesome, complimenting him on his genius.
  • The Cameo:
  • Canon Foreigner: Aaron aka Molecule Kid.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: Can be safely assumed of any group that calls itself The Masters of Evil.
  • Cerebus Syndrome: Things get considerably darker and more serious when Ultron turns up. It takes him approximately two episodes to do what the Cabal and Thanos both tried and failed to do break up the Avengers and he does without even getting out of third gear.
  • Civvie Spandex: Falcon wears his Ultimate Marvel look "Planet Doom", which is basically mechanical wings worn over a T-shirt and some cargo pants.
  • Comic Book Fantasy Casting:
  • Comic-Book Movies Don't Use Codenames: The Space Phantoms don't actually go by that name; it's just a term Captain America uses to describe them. Even Hawkeye comments on how incredibly cheesy it sounds.
  • Composite Character:
    • Red Skull, like his movie counterpart, is a combination of the Skull and the first Baron Zemo, with elements of the Dark Reign version of Norman Osborn thrown into to the mix.
    • As mentioned above, MODOK plays a similar role to the movie version of Arnim Zola.
    • The Midgard Serpent is combined with Cul, Odin's brother ( and Thor's prophesied killer) from the comics.
    • Hyperion is given elements of The Sentry (one of the Avengers' other Superman analogues), such as his alien fortress. He also has a bit of King Hyperion from the Exiles comic.
    • Dracula has much more in common with Baron Blood, particularly his World War II background and his connection to Captain America.
    • The Black Bride (the alternate timeline counterpart of Black Widow) is a combination of Black Widow and Madame Masque, even sporting the latter's iconic golden mask.
    • The alternate version of Hawkeye is known as Bullseye, in reference the Daredevil foe of the same name. Also, Hawkeye's Evil Counterpart in the Dark Avengers is... guess who.
    • The Red Skull's monocle and role as the leader of HYDRA come from Baron von Strucker.
    • Ant-Man is the Scott Lang version, but has the science background and high-tech lab of Hank Pym, the original Silver Age Ant-Man. Word of God was that this was intentional, as the creators wanted to mix together elements of the various Ant-Men from the comics.
    • Trick Shot is this mixed with Decomposite Character as well. In the show, Hawkeye was the original Trick Shot before he reformed and joined S.H.I.E.L.D., while the second Trick Shot is his villainous successor.
    • The Arsenal is eventually revealed to be a vessel for Ultron.
    • The Radioactive Man used in the show is the short-lived Igor Stancheck version from Russia, but he sports the costume and design of Chen Lu, the original Radioactive Man from China.
    • Doctor Spectrum is the Billy Roberts version of the character, but is black like the original Kenji Obatu version.
    • A literal in-universe example is the Supreme Adaptoid, who is a Fusion Dance of the Scientist Supreme and the three A.I.M. Adaptoids. Ultron then makes his return by merging his damaged remains with the Supreme Adaptoid.
    • The Beetle is presumably the original Abe Jenkins version since like Jenkins, he becomes MACH-IV and later reforms as a member of the Thunderbolts, but he sports the same armor as the Latverian Beetle from the Ultimate Marvel continuity.
    • Truman Marsh is an existing (albeit extremely obscure) character from the comics, but his characterization and relationship with the team are taken directly from Henry Peter Gyrich, the Avengers' recurring government liaison.
  • The Consigliere: If Captain America tells Tony that something might be a bad idea, you can just bet your eyeteeth it'll end up blowing up in Tony's face.
  • Conspicuous CG: There's a lot of blatant CG used for the creation of vehicles, planes, weaponry and buildings.
  • Continuity Lockout: While the show isn't in continuity with the MCU, it takes a number of things from the movies as Broad Strokes canon. This means the show will often forego explaining certain things on the assumption that the audience has seen the movies. A big example is that J.A.R.V.I.S. disappears and is replaced by a new AI named F.R.I.D.A.Y. between Seasons 2 and 3. No explanation is given for this in the show, as it was a fairly significant plot point in Avengers: Age of Ultron. "The Kids Are Alright" establishes that F.R.I.D.A.Y. is the most advanced A.I. Tony created, leading to the implication that this change is the result of a system upgrade.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • In "Ghost of a Chance", Falcon is fighting Captain America's Space Phantom double and he at first wonders if the Red Skull and MODOK are pulling the Mind Swap trick again.
    • The same episode has a cameo from Nick Fury and a mention of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s teenage superhero program from Ultimate Spider-Man.
    • Hawkeye's dislike of Spider-Man in Avengers Disassembled apparently carries on from when they first met in Ultimate Spider-Man.
    • Beetle's armor no longer has shoulder missiles, as they were torn off and assimilated by Agent Venom in Season 3 of Ultimate Spider-Man.
    • One episode ends with Loki being locked away inside an Asgardian prison. That's where he is during his first appearance in Hulk And The Agents Of SMASH.
    • The Hulk mentions having encountered the Inhumans previously, something which occurred in the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. episode "Inhuman Nature".
    • Vista Verde, the town that celebrates the Hulks in Agents of S.M.A.S.H., appears in U-Foes.
      • In the same episode, Captain America mentions that all of the previous Helicarriers were destroyed. This is likely a reference to the destruction of the first Helicarrier in the season one finale of Ultimate Spider-Man and the Tri-Carrier in the season four premiere of the same show.
  • Continuity Snarl: How exactly Bruce got his powers and became the Hulk is contradicted on two separate occasions. The incident was first shown in "Planet Doom" as a small gamma bomb that went off in a lab near Bruce, ultimately giving him his powers. In "Dehulked", his origin is closer to the The Incredible Hulk film's take on it, with Bruce willingly getting the gamma blasted into him by a laser under the supervision of General Ross. On top of all that, if what A-Bomb said in Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. is supposed to believed, Rick himself was supposed to be there to be saved by Bruce before he got hit by the gamma radiation. Although, Rick Jones wasn't in "Dehulked".
    • Klaw's appearance in "Thunderbolts Revealed" is radically different than how was previously-established in Ultimate Spider-Man, which takes place in the same universe.
      • He is human again (albeit briefly), despite the fact that he was a living embodiment of sound prior to this episode.
      • He now resembles his Marvel Cinematic Universe counterpart, as opposed to having his red full-body containment suit, including a different sound generation located on the opposite arm.
      • No longer voiced by Matt Lanter, "Klaue" now sports a ambiguously foreign accent that is completely distinct from Lanter's gruff bad guy voice.
    • Emil Blonsky, who had his Abomination persona forcibly removed in the Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. episode "Spirit of Vengeance", is a gamma monster again in "Dehulked" with no explanation, though it's possible that this took place before Agents of S.M.A.S.H.
    • Egghead begins his villainous career midway through season three, despite the fact that he was already a villain Scott Lang sold tech to, according to a line of a dialogue in "Spectrums", a season two episode.
  • Cool Shades: Hawkeye has a nice pair of purple shades, and even carries spares in his belt pouches.
  • The Corruption: When the Infinity Stones gather together they begin to mentally whisper in the person ears and promise ultimate power.
  • Crazy-Prepared: Nighthawk. Fitting, since he's a Captain Ersatz of Batman.
    Nighthawk: I'm always one step ahead.
  • Creative Closing Credits: The end of "Avengers:Impossible:
    • Director: Impossible Man
    • Producer: Impossible Man
    • Script: Impossible Man
    • Camera: Impossible Man
    • Make up: Impossible Man
    • Special effects: Impossible Man
    • Best boy: Sr. Impossible
    • Clapper loader: Impossible Man
    • 1st assist. clapper loader: Impossible Man
    • Assistant to Mr. Man: Avengers
    • All the best ideas: Impossible Man
    • Is there a bonus scene at the end of this? Impossible!
  • Deadpan Snarker: The Hulk, like before.
  • Death by Adaptation: All of Squadron Supreme, save for Hyperion. This turns out to be false in Season 2.
  • Debate and Switch: The Avengers have split. Captain America, Hulk, Black Widow and Falcon are on one team, working for SHIELD. Iron Man, Thor, Hawkeye and Ant-Man are on the other. Nick Fury order his Avengers to detain the others, as Stark had become a Destructive Saviour. They show up, face each other, but there was no Avengers vs. Avengers fight, not even a pre-fight debate, as the bad guy shows up immediately and forces them to join forces.
  • Decomposite Character: Following in the shoes of The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes!, Crimson Dynamo is literally Ivan Vanko from Iron Man 2 without the Whiplash elements, if not more so than that character, as this version is also modeled on Mickey Rourke's appearance from the movie and unlike EMH, where it was revealed through promotional materials and the tie-in comic, he's actually called "Ivan Vanko" on screen. This becomes bizarre in Season 3 as the Anton Vanko Whiplash, himself based on Ivan, appears briefly in Kang's debut.
  • Defiant Stone Throw: After one man threw a stone at Thanos, the rest of new York joined in, hitting him with whatever they could find.
  • Depending on the Writer: Like Superman in Justice League, Thor's power level depends on the writer and situation going on in the show. Thor has taken on Thanos alone only to be beaten by Attuma and Hyperion in only a few seconds.
  • Diabolus ex Machina: Happens right at the end of "Thanos Triumphant"; Tony has successfully rebuilt Arsenal, who takes the Infinity Gauntlet from Thanos and allows the Avengers to defeat him. Yay! Except that somehow Ultron hacks into Arsenal, takes him over, rebuilds him in his image, drains the power from the Infinity Gauntlet, and takes off with plans of his own.
  • Divide and Conquer: Cap and Tony figure out that Red Skull's Cabal isn't the unified, well-oiled machine he makes it out to be in In Deep and play on MODOK's resentment at being number two in AIM and HYDRA's hierarchy and Attuma's hunger for power to have them start a little brawl with Red Skull.
    • The Squadron Supreme has the same problem, and Falcon saw it coming.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?: The scene where Captain America and Captain Marvel argue while both asking a sheepish Falcon to take their side looks an awful lot like a nervous child being being caught in the middle of an argument between their parents.
  • The Door Slams You: Falcon used this against the Impossible Man. His fault, for using his powers to turn a fight against villains into a sitcom parody.
  • The Dragon: MODOK, to Red Skull.
    • Dragon Ascendant: Once Cosmic Skull has been defeated, and he becomes a threat on his own, even without the Cabal.
  • Dream Tells You to Wake Up: In the "Saving Captain Rogers" episode, an aged Baron Zemo hipnotized Captain America into believing that he was still fighting WWII, alongside Bucky, and against the first Baron Zemo (father of the modern one). The important part of that fantasy is when WWII Zemo captures Bucky and takes him to his lab, forcing Captain America to find the way to Zemo's secret lab. Outside the fantasy, the old Zemo had retrieved his father's castle but ignored how to access into the hidden lab, so the Captain did so for him. Once it is done, Zemo got the super soldier serum of his father that renewed his youth and gave him strength to stand to Iron Man and Black Widow, while leaving Captain America perpetually in that dream. As they fight, Captain America is worried that something is happening that is destroying the castle, and Bucky got trapped under one of the rocks. Bucky then told him: everything is a dream, he has to let it go, and return to the real world.
  • Drill Tank: One is used in Hammer's mining operation in Savage.
  • Dull Surprise: Adrian Pasdar often lapses into it as Iron Man.
  • Early-Bird Cameo
    • Ant-Man shows up wearing the same costume Scott Lang sported the following year in the live-action movie.
    • Kamala Khan made a non-speaking cameo as a normal human before actually appearing later in the series as Ms. Marvel.
  • Enemy Mine: Skull summons Dracula, Attuma, and Doctor Doom to join him against the Avengers. The first two join up while Doom remains on his own. However, none of the Cabal members particularly like each other, but by the end of "Bring On The Bad Guys", they seem to trust each other to some degree after a major victory came from truly working as a team. Dracula even voices newfound respect for Skull.
  • Evil Counterpart: Red Skull to Captain America, as per usual. Later he's this for both Cap and Iron Man.
    • The Squadron Supreme (Supervillains here, like the Squadron Sinister in the comics) serve as Evil Counterparts to the Avengers, but they're even more directly counterparts to DC rivals the Justice League (Nighthawk = Batman, Hyperion = Superman, Speed Demon = The Flash, Zarda = Wonder Woman, Doctor Spectrum = Green Lantern)
  • Evil Costume Switch: Played with, after Red Skull jacks Iron Man's armor, he repaints it black and adds the HYDRA logo. The Costume is the same, but the person in it is now evil.
    • Happens again in The Dark Avengers, when the Avengers are brainwashed into thinking they're villains. They trade in their normal outfits for black colored or color-reversed costumes.
  • Evil Versus Evil: Doom and Red Skull's forces fight over an Asgardian weapon in "Serpent of Doom".
  • Exposed to the Elements: Hulk and Thor have no problems with low temperatures, Iron Man wears his suit, but Hawkeye and the Black Widow are out there in Antarctica wearing the same clothing they always do, and have no problem at all. Hawkeye's suit does not even have sleeves!
  • Expy: The Thunderbolts' publicist is a redheaded woman with glasses named Gabby. Visually, she's a dead ringer for Dallas Riordan, the team's police liaison from the comics.
  • Family-Unfriendly Death: An alien guard quite literally dies screaming as he's being vaporized at the beginning of "New Frontiers".
  • Fastball Special: Hulk and Hawkeye perform the move in "Ghost of a Chance".
  • Foreshadowing:
    • During an action scene in "The Age of Tony Stark", Hulk was referred to as "Maestro" by one of the machines from the future.
    • "The Ultimates" is full of it. Natasha gets into a very tense argument with Tony over his leadership style, and the other Avengers have to intervene and break it up. Near the end, Cap remarks that fighting villains is so much better than the Avengers fighting one another. And to top things off, it ends with Tony mentioning how proud he is to be an Avenger and how he's honored to call these heroes his friends. Now remember which storyline is going to be the basis for the season finale...
    • Similarly, when Kang the Conqueror arrives from the future, he says that these are the Avengers from "before the schism".
    • In the very next episode, one of the exhibits in the 30th century museum is a holographic image of Falcon and Iron Man fighting each other. Later, Kang chastises Cap for his naivety, telling him "You'll learn when..." before being cut off.
  • Forgotten Fallen Friend: Arsenal performs a Heroic Sacrifice near the end of Season 2 to make sure Ultron is destroyed once and for all. Tony is clearly devastated at the time (and indeed, had shown he was quite fond of Arsenal throughout the season), but when Ultron returns in Season 3, nary a mention is made to Arsenal, or the fact that the poor guy essentially sacrificed himself FOR NOTHING.
  • For Want of a Nail: "Planet Doom" takes place in an alternate timeline where Doom prevented Tony Stark from being wounded in the Middle East, Bruce Banner from being exposed to Gamma Radiation, and Captain America from being unfrozen. The resulting world has no Avengers or any other heroes, allowing Doom to easily conquer the planet.
  • "Freaky Friday" Flip: Between Red Skull and Captain America.
    • Happens again in Head to Head, this time to the entire team.
  • Grand Theft Armor: The Red Skull takes control of Tony's armor at the end of the first pilot.
  • Gas Mask Mooks: The HYDRA soldiers wear gas masks.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: Hawkeye freaking out in Hyperion when other men - specifically big, brawny, ruggedly handsome square jawed men such as the title character and even his own teammate Thor - wink at him.
    • One of the alien guards in the opening of "New Frontiers" is strongly hinted at being impaled by Corvous Glaive, thanks to the "below-the-torso" angle.
    • In "Adapting to Change", an annoyed Hawkeye questions why Widow would bring up a certain "incident" that happened in Tokyo in the middle of a fight. Said incident is never described to the audience.
    • In one of darker moments in this show, "Seeing Double" included a scene with zombified corpses of a dozen Red Room women.
  • Gladiator Games: Mojo organized those games IN SPACE!!
  • Gotta Catch 'Em All: Season 2 has the Infinity Stones being scattered across Earth, with the Avengers, Thanos and the Squadron Supreme wanting to find them. Unlike most examples the Avengers are not very proactive about finding them, having so far gathered them by stumbling onto them during missions.
  • Grand Theft Me: Red Skull attempts to do this to Captain America.
  • G-Rated Drug: The concoction Nighthawk uses to neutralize the Hulk has the effect of causing the Hulk to act as though he's drunk or stoned. It's actually Played for Laughs just how blatantly his behavior resembles that of a drunk person.
  • Five-Bad Band: By the end of "Bring On The Bad Guys", the Cabal appears to form one of these at last.
    • Big Bad: Red Skull, who finally gains the other members' trust and loyalty, for the most part.
    • The Dragon: MODOK - Skull's first follower, and his closest underling.
    • The Brute: Attuma, the most arrogant, hotheaded and strongest, and MODOK when piloting the Adaptoid.
    • The Evil Genius: MODOK, who is also The Dragon, and is also joined by Dracula.
    • The Dark Chick: Hyperion.
  • Flying Car: Black Widow owns one. It gets trashed almost every time its shown.
  • Hate Plague: MODOK uses nanobots to cause this effect on the Avengers.
  • Hate Sink: Truman Marsh fills this role after the government decided to take control of the Avengers in U-Foes. Marsh is shown as a complete Jerkass who constantly bashes on the Avengers when they don't get intel even if they saved many lives from the U-Foes and Hydra. Out of all the Avengers, he makes Hulk more miserable by blaming him for the messes the U-Foes make, and for the failure of the missions. After saving an old Helicarrier from crashing into a nuclear power plant, he tells Hulk he can no longer be part of the team, causing Hulk to leave in sadness. Unsurprisingly, this has earned the scorn of all the Avengers. To add insult to the injury, Marsh brings in Hulk's old friend Red Hulk to replace him.
  • Heel Realization: Sort of. In "Hulked Out Heroes" when the others are...well, Hulked Out and acting just like Hulk does when he's particularly angry, Hulk realizes he's not the easiest guy to live with. The other heroes also realize they weren't very understanding of the level of anger and frustration that Hulk has to live with and constantly keep under control.
  • Heroic Bystander: After Thanos defeats all the Avengers, the people of New York start to fight him as best they can, as well as helping the Avengers up.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: The Arsenal destroys himself in order to stop Thanos from blowing up the Earth.
  • Hidden Depths: The Hulk collects glass animal figurines.
  • Hollywood History: "Blood Feud" had a back story of Dracula being a reluctant ally with the Allies in World War II for the sake of defending Transylvania. Since Transylvania is literally in the middle of Romania, an ally of the Axis, this is only plausible if the events depicted took place after August 1944, when Romania defected to the Allies following King Michael's coup.
  • Human Aliens: The Squadron Supreme are all human enough to pass for SHIELD agents.
  • Hypocrite: Red Skull criticizes Iron Man for hiding behind his armor. Then he decides to steal that armor by the end of the first episode.
  • In-Name-Only
    • In the comics, the Cabal is a meeting of villains with huge political power and influence. Here, it is just a regular super villain group.
    • In comics, The Ultimates are an alternate version of the Avengers, who work as a military force under SHIELD command. Here, they are just robot copycats of the Avengers controlled by Ultron.
  • Inventional Wisdom: In "Mojo World," Hawkeye disables Mojo's hoverchair by hitting an unprotected circuit board on its underside (He even lampshades the design flaw).
  • I Pulled a "Weird Al": In "Guardians and Space Knights," Cap tells the others their roles in the "just in case Galactus comes back" plan, and Tony tells them good luck with that, but he has his own and runs off. We find that going off on your own is called "Pulling a Stark."
  • Ironic Echo: The first episode has Iron Man sending holographic images to get the Avengers back together. The Red Skull does the same thing near the end of episode 2 when recruiting villains for his Cabal.
  • It Only Works Once: Remember how MODOK took apart Tony's armor with his mind in the first episode? He tries again in In Deep only to find out Tony put something in his armor to avoid a repeat of the experience.
  • Killed Offscreen: Doctor Doom used time travel in "Planet Doom" to interfere with the origin stories of the Avengers and make sure that they never develop super powers. He says that he did the same with the Fantastic Four, who do not exist in that timeline either. We do not get to see a flashback of that, it's just a passing by mention (note that the timeline was fixed at the end of the episode, so this was temporary anyway).
  • Knight of Cerebus: When Hyperion showed up that's when the series started getting darker in tone.
  • Laugh Track: Invoked by the Impossible Man, who turns a battle against Attuma into a sitcom scene. Of course, Hulk and Thor can hear and complain about the strange laughing in the air.
  • The Leader: The series will have Tony as the leader rather than Cap again. However, they both split the role.
  • Legion of Doom:
    • In the first season, the Red Skull leads a group of villains called the Cabal, which consists of Attuma, Dracula, Hyperion, and the Super-Adaptoid (controlled by M.O.D.O.K. this time).
    • In Season 3, the Masters of Evil appear as recurring foes. Their ranks include Beetle, Goliath, and Screaming Mimi.
  • Lighter and Softer: Despite the dark colors and overuse of shading, it still possesses a relatively light-hearted tone compared to its predecessor.
  • Let's You and Him Fight: Just about standard when it comes to the Avengers meeting new heroes.
    • Tony's reaction to the Thunderbolts stealing the Avengers' arrests is to sneak into their base and spy on them. They then have an all-out brawl before it's revealed that the Thunderbolts are actually the Masters of Evil.
    • The Inhumans are even worse, with both sides attacking the other. They get into a fight over the Inhumans keeping secrets (though given that the Inhumans inadvertently caused the whole episode's conflict it may be justified). Black Bolt punches people just for touching him – even when in the middle of a battle with a huge monster.
  • Limited Animation: In some places.
  • Male Gaze: Black Widow's Spy Catsuit receives highly detailed animation, which makes it perfect for the shots of her shapely buns, well-toned yet shapely long legs and pelvic center;Zarda is another example
  • Mass "Oh, Crap!": How most of the Avengers react when the Hulk bodychecks Odin!
  • Mirror Universe: The Reality gem creates a Mirror Universe, wherein the Squadron Supreme are earth's heroes, while the Avengers are not only criminals, there not even a team. The villainous Avengers all dress in shades of black (or just straight up reversals of their costume colors), though they acted more like delinquents than megalomaniac super villains.
  • Ms. Fanservice: Black Widow, Zarda, and Hela.
  • Mugged for Disguise:
    • In the episode "In Deep", Cap and Iron Man do this to Crossbones and the Grim Reaper, with the real villains kept tied up at Avengers Tower.
    • Hulk does this to Crimson Dynamo in "Secret Avengers", stealing the outer layer of his armor to use as a disguise.
    • The entire team does this to a group of A.I.M. workers in "Adapting to Change".
  • Mundane Utility: Thor and Hulk use Thor's Lightning powers to make popcorn.
  • My Friends... and Zoidberg: Hulk in "Mojo World", and... his friend. That guy with sharpened rods. What's that sound, are there crickets in space?
  • My God, What Have I Done?: In "Doomstroyer", after Doom takes control of the Destroyer armor and starts wrecking Latveria because the armor is messing with his head.
  • Mythology Gag: There are so many of them that they have their own page.
  • The Name Is Bond, James Bond: The Red Hulk introduces himself in this manner when he joins the team.
  • Never Found the Body: Red Skull is aware of this trope and refuses to believe Iron Man had been killed when Justin Hammer couldn't find his body in Savage.
  • Never My Fault: In "Inhumans Among Us" when the Avengers and Inhumans get into a fight the Inhumans blame the Avengers for starting it and claim that they're racists despite the fact the Inhumans spent the better part of the episode disdainfully referring to the Avengers as "humans" and attacking Iron Man for claiming they were withholding important information(which they were.).
  • Never Say "Die": In "Thanos Rising," the Falcon finds footage of Thanos destroying Titan, and expresses shock at what he's seeing. The only onscreen acknowledgement of the genocide Thanos committed is a computerized caption stating "Population decreasing.".
    • Averted in "Avengers' Last Stand". Cap states that the Squadron believes them "dead and gone".
  • New Powers as the Plot Demands: The Avengers membership cards in "Depth Charge" rather inexplicably have built in scanners that can instantly identify Atlantaean technology despite never having seen it before.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: The Space Phantoms escaping their dimension was pretty much Iron Man's fault.
  • Noodle Incident: whether this is a continuation of Earth's Mightiest Heroes or not, the team has long since disbanded...for yet undisclosed reasons.
    • In "The Ambassador", J. Jonah Jameson reports that the "controversial speaker" at the UN is "not Spider-Man... this time."
    • It's unclear why Ant-Man and Hawkeye hate each other so much, but it apparently stems from an incident that occurred between them in the past.
      • It's been revealed: Scott developed tech for the Circus of Crime during the period Hawkeye served as Trick Shot, not knowing of their ulterior motives, and thus betrayed them, which apparently included blowing up an arrow in Trick Shot!Hawkeye's face.
    • During the battle with the Supreme Adaptoid:
    Black Widow: Hey, remember Tokyo?
    Hawkeye: Why would you bring that up?
    Black Widow: The other thing thing that happened in Tokyo!
    Hawkeye: Oh. Why didn't you just say so?
  • Not-So-Harmless Villain: Justin Hammer could be seen as this. He did build the Super-Adaptoid after all, and he almost killed the Avengers with it. That's gotta count for something.
    • Doom seems to slowly be realizing how much of a threat the Cabal really are.
  • Offhand Backhand: Black Widow, upon calling Tony out to actually lead the team he declared himself leader of, casually backhands a mook trying to get the drop on her.
  • Off Model: While Tony remotely watches the other Avengers do their hero thing, trying to guess how or whether they will succeed Jarvis comments that if Tony were actually betting against himself, he'd owe fifteen billion dollars. This figure is accompanied by a flashing digital display of the number 15,000,000, which for those of us playing at home, is actually fifteen million.
  • Oh Crap!: The Avengers' reaction to seeing Dracula Hulking Out after drinking the Hulk's blood. They quickly get another Oh Crap! when Hulk turns into a vampire under Dracula's control.
    • Cap and Tony get another one when they finally take a look at one of the cargo holds aboard Red Skull's command sub and realize that he is building an army in conjunction with Dracula and Attuma the likes of which the world has never seen before; surpassing even their worst fears about what the Cabal was capable of. Amusingly, Skull gets a genuinely huge one when Cap punches Tony.
    • Cap has this reaction in Bring on the Bad Guys when he realizes the Cabal just busted Hyperion out of prison.
    • They have this reaction when the Hulk body-checks Odin.
  • Only the Chosen May Wield: When the mind stone causes a mix-up between the Avengers' minds and their bodies, the one who gets Thor's body tries to lift Mjölnir but can't since he's not worthy and a "Freaky Friday" Flip doesn't trick the hammer.
  • Orcus on His Throne: After the fight in the first episode, Red Skull takes several episodes and the big bad in the shadows that doesn't actually do anything.
  • Order Versus Chaos: Interestingly inverted from their Civil War alignments, this time we have Tony as the anti-authority chaos while Steve is the militant Order, as opposed to the Logical Order Tony and Freedom-based Chaos Steve of Civil War.
    • This is the stance that Cap and Iron Man's Ultimate counterparts took in Hulk Vs. Wolverine.
  • Out of Focus: Since the Avengers split in two teams, there are two episodes dedicated to each half. Small Time Heroes solely centers on the main Avengers Team, led by Iron Man. Captain America's half is sidelined and hardly appears until the end, when the unusual amount of destruction Iron Man's team left behind gets Nick Fury's attention. Secret Avengers focuses mostly on Cap's SHIELD Team, likewise with Iron Man's Avengers completely sidelined.
  • Phantom Zone: Limbo, the Space Phantoms home dimension.
  • Plot Hole: In "Blood Feud" vampire!Black Widow TKOed herself by running into a mirror, which Cap says is because she didn't have a reflection. He immediately holds a piece of the mirror up to her to reveal that she does have a reflection. Sure it's fading a little, but it's still visible to anyone who cares to look.
  • Plot Tailored to the Party: Every Avenger gets a moment to shine in their plan to trick Thanos into running through the use of the stones one by one.
    • Thor's Asgardian longevity protects him from the Time Stone.
    • Hulk's practice with directing his anger lets him lead the rest in the Hate Plague induced by the Mind Stone.
    • Widow and Hawkeye share a moment when she deduces the timing of Thanos' teleporting from the Space Stone allowing Hawkeye to shoot him.
    • Captain America is grounded enough to realize when the illusion of the Reality Stone is too good to be true.
    • Falcon comes in at the end successfully drawing fire from the Power Stone due to his greater maneuverability.
    • All this so Tony can finish rebuilding Arsenal so he may drain power from the stones and seize the gauntlet.
  • Powered Armor: Naturally, Iron Man. Which Red Skull takes for himself at the end of the first episode. Also, Falcon.
  • Power Glows: When the Hulk gets really angry and really strong he starts glowing green.
    • Tony has a constant golden aura when he serves as Galactus' herald.
  • Putting on the Reich: The Red Skull wears an SS uniform. Not surprising considering his origin.
  • Putting the Band Back Together:
    • Iron Man puts the team back together in the first episode.
    • As a Call Back, Season 3 starts with the Avengers having to reassemble again after having gone their separate ways.
  • Race Lift: Like his MCU counterpart, the show's version of the Norse god Heimdall is black.
  • Reality Ensues: In the Season 3 premiere, it's established that the Avengers, as much as they enjoy being heroes, still have lives of their own. If there isn't that huge a threat, each member has better things to do than meet up.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: The first sign that something was not right with Captain America.
    • When MODOK infects the Avengers with his nanobots, they all naturally sport red eyes.
  • Red Is Heroic: Practically all of the main cast with two exceptions.
    • Inverted with the Red Skull.
    • Interestingly, Hawkeye's proto-design was red, though it was changed to purple at some point. The old red version can still be seen in some merchandise, as well as Ultimate Spider-Man prior to the actual crossover with this series (Hawkeye, like everyone else, has had his turn to be the guest star of the week in that show a time or two, but his design wasn't a 100% match for this show's until the actual crossover with it.)
  • Remake Cameo: Brian Bloom, who voiced Captain America in The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, voices Hyperion.
    • Elizabeth Daily is Moonstone of the Masters of Evil/Meteorite of the Thunderbolts, whereas in the previous series she was Hawkeye's old partner Bobbi Morse/Mockingbird
  • Remember the New Guy:
    • During their debut, the Guardians of The Galaxy are known by Thor. After their own series came, we actually get to see how Thor met them for the first time.
    • The Avengers meet the Inhumans in "Inhumans Among Us", but Hulk already knows who they are. This is in part due to Hulk's first encounter with them in the Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. episode "Inhuman Nature".
    • Vision shows up with no origin given, and the Avengers apparently already know who he is.
    • This is repeated with Captain Marvel. The Avengers all know her when she first shows up, and it's mentioned that she's teamed up with them in the past, even though she never became an official part of the team.
  • Replicant Snatching: Done by the Space Phantoms in "Ghost of a Chance".
  • Reptiles Are Abhorrent: The Midgard Serpent, which is destined to kill Thor.
  • Running Gag: Hawkeye's cool purple shades are constantly getting knocked askew on his face.
    • Hulk doesn't like anyone touching his glass animal collection.
    • The cookies made by Falcon's mom gets a lot of love.
    • Hawkeye does not like it when people blink an eye to him. It eventually becomes a Berserk Button. Don't worry, Clint, we understand you ;)
  • Sadistic Choice:
    • Red Skull fires two missiles, heavily implied to be nuclear tipped, at Las Vegas and Los Angeles knowing full well the Avengers would be lucky to stop one. And even if they stopped both missiles, he would still get away with the MacGuffin so they served their purpose as a decoy.
    • In "Inhuman Condition", the Avengers cannot stop Ultron's Death Ray, so they could either let it fire, or convert it back to its original purpose, which is to awaken latent inhuman DNA in normal humans. They choose the latter, and which means there will be more Inhumans popping up in subsequent episodes.
  • Screw Destiny: When the midgard serpent shows up, Thor is sure that he must die in order to stop it, because legends say so. The legend of the Ragnarok, to be precise: Thor will kill the serpent, go nine steps back, and die. All the Avengers rejected the old myths, and took a third option: reopen the portal, and send the serpent back to it.
  • Senseless Sacrifice: Arsenal sacrifices himself near the end of Season 2 to destroy Ultron once and for all. Unfortunately, Ultron returns in the Season 3 premier, and continues to menace the Avengers throughout the remainder of the series.
  • Shared Universe: With Ultimate Spider-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy, and Hulk And The Agents Of SMASH. As the jolly green Giant's a member of both the latter and this show's main cast, it's implied one takes place after the other or concurrently.
  • She's Got Legs: Black Widow, Hela and Zarda are examples of this trope.
  • Shout-Out: Falcon refers to Thor's interdimensional bedroom as "Bigger on the inside".
    Kang What did you ancient people used to say? "Make my morning?"
    Iron Man: Close enough.
  • Slouch of Villainy: The Red Skull at the end of episode 2.
  • The Smurfette Principle:
    • As with the live-action movie, Black Widow will apparently be the only female Avenger, at least at the start. For the longest time she was the only female in the entire show, until Sam's mother was introduced. And even then, Widow was absent from a lot of the Season 1 episodes, though she did get a much bigger role in the subsequent seasons.
    • Finally averted in Season 4, where Ms. Marvel, Captain Marvel, the Wasp, and the new Thor join the Avengers.
  • Social Media Before Reason: Oh, no! Hulk and Thor are having a destructive fight in the middle of the city! What should common citizens do? Oh course! Take selfies!
  • Spanner in the Works: The Space Phantoms' plan ultimately failed because they didn't count on Falcon's involvement.
  • Spared by the Adaptation: Sam's mother appears, and bakes cookies for the team in a few episodes. In the comics, both of Sam's parents were killed while he was still a child.
  • Spoiler Title: "Inhumans Among Us" pretty much gives away its own reveal: that there are secretly Inhumans living among humans.
  • Stealth Hi/Bye: At the end of the second episode, Black Widow pulls this off when the team's assembled at Stark Tower.
  • Story Arc: Season 2 can neatly be cut up as follows:
    • The Infinity Stone arc which focuses on Thanos coming to earth and the Avengers locating the Infinity Stones.
    • The Avengers Disassembled arc which focuses on Ultron separating the team for his own ends.
    • The Squadron Supreme arc which focuses on the Squadron Supreme enacting a plan to deal with the Avengers and giving each Squadron member A Day in the Limelight, save for Nighthawk and Hyperion, each of whom had their own early on.
  • Superhero Paradox: Tony's reassembling of the Avengers gets the Red Skull to form The Cabal in response.
  • Taking the Bullet: Iron Man stepped in and saved the Wrecker from Hyperion.
  • Technopath: This show's version of MODOK has this ability, making him much more effective.
  • Teleportation Rescue: Iron Man tries to make a Heroic Sacrifice by using the last of the power in his armor to manually push Ultron into the Sun. Luckily for him, Thor suddenly teleports in to take him back to Earth.
  • This Cannot Be!: Ulik helped to unleash the Midgard Serpent in Asgard, and legend says that Thor would die fighting her. The mere sight of Thor still alive causes this reaction in him.
  • Title Drop: The show's title is said by Iron Man in both opening episodes, and pretty much every other episode, it being the team's rallying cry.
  • Took a Level in Badass: The Supreme Adaptoid in Season 3 vs. the Super-Adaptoid from the first two seasons. Hawkeye even Lampshades this when he expresses disbelief that the Avengers are actually getting their butts handed to them by an Adaptoid.
  • Totally Radical: Tony calling MODOK "Modork".
  • Training the Peaceful Villagers: Iron Man convinces the peaceful natives of the Savage Land to help him deal with Justin Hammer.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • The Mole inside Doom's henchmen in "Planet Doom" was Frank Castle, The Punisher. He's not a character related to the Avengers, he had never appeared in the series before, and there was absolutely no hint about it, so watchers had absolutely no reason to expect his presence.
    • The Arsenal, an obscure character that even comic fans might have a hard time identifying, plays a major role in the first two episodes of Season 2. He even joins the team before pulling a Heroic Sacrifice. He later gets rebuilt, but is possessed by Ultron before performing ANOTHER Heroic Sacrifice.
    • Bruce Banner in the Season 3 premier. Lampshaded when Falcon almost attacks him, assuming he's an A.I.M. worker. He even confesses that he didn't recognize the good doctor without his green skin or muscles.
  • Unexplained Recovery: Klaw returns in "Panther's Rage" with nothing more than a Hand Wave for how he survived complete disintegration.
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight: In "Adapting to Change", the team dresses as AIM members for an infiltration. While this is not an unusual action, you can't help but notice that all the AIM guys are men, but not one thought the very obviously female person (Black Widow) wearing one of their outfits was a bit suspicious?
  • Vehicular Turnabout: Red Skull and the Cabal actually manage to hijack the Tri-Carrier and use its weapons against the Avengers.
  • Villain Exit Stage Left: Red Skull and MODOK at the end of the first and second episode.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: Hulk's relationship with Thor and Hawkeye is this. He's also has a competitive edge with his bowling buddy, The Thing.
  • Vocal Dissonance: In "The Ultimates", Black Widow's Ultron-created double uses Ultron's voice.
  • Voices Are Mental: Used when Skull and Cap switch bodies.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist: Hyperion is a genocidal tyrant, but seems to honestly believe that mankind would be much safer under his rule.
  • Wham Episode: At the end of "Crack in the System", Cap's frustration with Tony's way of doing things results in him quitting the team.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: The series did not really explain what happened to the Infinity Gauntlet and the Infinity Gems after Ultron absorbed them.
    • Producer Steve Wacker openly said that they have no plans for Molecule Kid to appear again on Avengers Assemble.
    • No mention is made as to why JARVIS has been replaced in Season 3 with FRIDAY.
  • What Measure Is a Non-Human?: The Avengers don't seem to have any qualms with using lethal force against the Space Phantoms. Though it's never stated if what they did actually kill them.
    • They also had no problem using lethal force against vampires either. But being mystical creatures, they probably don't stay dead anyway (or aren't really alive in the first place).
    • During the fight with Doctor Spectrum, it's established that Ant-Man once killed one of his own ants by accident, and that he harbors intense guilt over the incident. Then, during the final battle with Hyperion, he sends a whole army of insects against the villain, many of which are then killed by Hyperion's heat vision. Ant-Man has no visible reaction to this, despite clearly being upset by the accidental death of a single ant just a few episodes earlier.
  • Whole Plot Reference: As mentioned, the character cast and their designs are based on the successful movie The Avengers. The episode "Avengers: Impossible" features an alien invasion of the Chitauri, coming through a portal in the sky, which is stopped when Iron Man manages to send a missile though the portal. Sounds familiar? And what is shawarma, anyway?
    • The entire first season appears to have been this for the movie, seeing as Skull is revealed to have been only The Heavy, trying to get the Tesseract for his master, Thanos. Thanos likewise makes a brief, silent cameo at the end.
    • "Hulk's Day Out" is this to The Hangover.
    • The second season plays out somewhat similarly to the Skrull arc of The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes!, with Captain America being the catalyst for a broken fellowship as planned by the Villains.
    • As mentioned in the Shout-Out section, "Under Siege" is an homage to Die Hard, with Hawkeye in the John McClane role.
    • "Nighthawk" is about a villain using contingency plans that one of the heroes created to take down their teammates should they ever turn evil. So basically, the Marvel version of the famous "Tower of Babel" storyline from JLA (which was previously adapted as Justice League: Doom).
  • Wolverine Publicity: The cast consists solely of characters who have appeared in the movies, while other, non-MCU heroes like Black Panther, Ms. Marvel, The Vision, Ant-Man, and The Wasp were removed from the team. The major guest stars from the first season were mostly more heroes who have appeared in the movies (such as the Guardians of the Galaxy), or heroes who are about to be joining the MCU (Ant-Man).
    • If you want a good example of how this trope works, Black Panther, Ant-Man, Captain Marvel (the former Ms. Marvel), and Vision all started appearing once they either had movie appearances or were confirmed to appear in future movies.
    • Ironically, the man the trope is named after did not appear in the first season, despite having movie appearances and an action figure in the official toy line.
  • Worf Effect: Despite being around the Hulk's strength and with weather powers Thor gets his butt kicked and needs saving a disturbing number of times compared to other characters. Attuma dismissed him with nary a thought in the latter's debate episode and he had to be saved by Iron Man from Ulik, a foe from his own rogue's gallery. His lightning attacks are often treated as prime examples of The Worf Barrage.
    • The U-Foes managed to hold their own very well against the Avengers...at first. By the end of their debut episode, the U-Foes suddenly become severely under-powered and are swiftly taken out. They're ultimately defeated by knockout gas. Bear in mind, one of their members is literally made of gas.
  • World of Snark
  • Xanatos Gambit: Red Skull in Blood Feud. He tricks Black Widow into becoming a vampire so the Avengers will fight Dracula, which could end in 2 scenarios beneficial to the Skull: 1) Dracula kills them and gets the super soldier serum, thus ridding Skull of his enemies, or 2) which actually happened, the Avengers beat Dracula, thus convincing him he needs to join the Cabal to defeat Captain America.
  • Xanatos Speed Chess: Red Skull's plans in the first episode.
  • You Need a Breath Mint: Hawkeye makes this point to Hulk with a multiple bank shot landing the tin in Hulk's mouth.
  • You Wouldn't Like Me When I'm Angry
    • Inverted as Thor states that he likes Hulk when he's angry
    • Falcon also told this to the Impossible Man. Hulk interrupts them with a Big "WHAT?!".

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/WesternAnimation/AvengersAssemble