troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Western Animation: Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths

Somewhere, in another universe, there is another Earth where life is reversed. The human heart is on the right side, and people who we know to be supervillains on our Earth, such as Lex Luthor and Slade Wilson, are some of this mirror-world's greatest heroes. But on the other end of the spectrum, there is the Crime Syndicate. Made up of Evil Counterparts of the Justice League, they run an empire of organized, superpowered crime that has all but taken over the world. Lex Luthor, in a desperate attempt to stop them, crosses over to the mainstream DC Universe to ask the League for help. The League agrees, but they're facing off against a world overflowing with supervillains—and Owlman (the counterpart to Batman) has his own deadly agenda...

This direct-to-DVD film was originally planned as a Justice League Unlimited prequel film, dealing with how the League decided to make the jump to Heroes Unlimited after Starcrossed. After JLU was cancelled, the film was re-imagined to show off the mainstream DCU. Still, the tone is perfect for a DCAU entry, and the JLU roots are still very obvious. (For example: Absent Hawkgirl, Funny Flash, Watchtower being rebuilt, and the Heroes Unlimited is still a plot point.)

An important fact to keep in mind is that, despite the similarities between the two factions, the Crime Syndicate of America is not composed of Evil Twins of the Justice League of America. Though not explained within the film itself, the members of the Syndicate have different personal and professional backgrounds, with different origins for their superpowers and different secret identities. They are Expys, which is why the "twins" have different voice-actorsnote ; they are actually not the same people as those in the League.

Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths contains examples of the following tropes:

  • All There in the Script: Olympia, the superpowered woman with a spear who fights Wonder Woman and is her Mirror Universe counterpart with regards to powers and origin (Superwoman is actually an analogue to Mary Marvel), is never named in the movie.
  • All Your Base Are Belong to Us: The Super Family "pops over to the universe next door". Later, the League repays the favor.
  • Annoying Arrows: Justified for J'onn. It's pretty hard to hit anything vital on a shapeshifter.
  • Apocalypse How: Owlman attempts a Class Z, which Batman ends up foiling. Batman's efforts knock it down to a Class X on an uninhabited Earth.
    • Earth Prime suffered a Class 6, having been knocked out of its orbit. The entire surface is barren and only the slightest of traces that there ever was civilization remains.
  • Are We There Yet?: "That wasn't funny the first fifteen times you said it either!"
  • Arson, Murder, and Admiration: Superwoman explains that Owlman is her kind of psychopath.
  • Art Major Physics: The QED trigger can't be destroyed because it's Pure Energy but even if that is true, energy can be converted from one form to another and/or dissipated. Still, it's a common enough trope in this genre to be ignored.
  • Axe Crazy: Superwoman. Owlman, too, but he's more quiet about it.
  • Badass Boast:
    • Ultraman points out why he is the Boss of Bosses.
    • Aquaman is told Captain Super is stronger than him:
      Aquaman: That remains to be seen. (bitchslap!)
  • Badass Grandpa: Uncle Super appears to be the strongest of Superwoman's Made Men, as he takes the most effort to take down for the expanded League.
  • Badass Longcoat: Evil Black Canary/Scream Queen.
  • Badass Normal: Batman once again proves why he is the king of this trope.
  • Bait and Switch: The film presents Ultraman front and centre opposite Superman on the cover art, and sets him up as the leader and big boss of the Crime Syndicate; In actuality he's taken down less than halfway through to put focus on Owlman's larger, multiverse-destroying plot.
  • The Baroness: Superwoman.
  • Batman and Owlman Can Breathe In Space: Earth-Prime does not look like it should have much of an atmosphere left.
  • Batman Gambit: The man himself uses one to get Johnny Quick to volunteer for a likely-fatal part in the plan to stop Owlman.
  • Battle Butler: Evil Jimmy Olsen. Ultraman's Pal, doorman, chauffeur, etc.
  • Beam-O-War: Superman, Ultraman, Green Lantern and Power Ring.
  • Bears Are Bad News: Vixen's Crime Syndicate counterpart shapeshifts into a bear to attack Wonder Woman.
  • Beard of Evil: Captain Super, aka Evil Captain Marvel.
  • Big Bad: Ultraman is not this; Owlman is.
  • Beware the Superman: Or Ultraman. Or especially Owlman.
  • Big Damn Heroes:
    • A few superheroes come to Batman's rescue, and they are eventually the first members of the Heroes Unlimited.
    • Martian Manhunter does this twice, the second time with backup from President Wilson and some Space Marines.
  • Brought to You by the Letter "S": Superman, of course, but also Owlman, Johnny Quick, Ultraman and Superwoman and her Made Men.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: Crime Syndicate of America. Right there in the name, people!
  • The Cavalry: "I brought the Marines."
  • Chekhov's Gun: Superwoman threatens to send Batman to an icy world devoid of life. It is where Batman sends Owlman and the QED.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Owlman uses a gun in his fistfight with Wonder Woman, with predictable results.
  • Composite Character:
    • This Superwoman is the thematic double of Wonder Woman, but her actual powers and origin are those of Mary Marvel. Previous comic incarnations of the character have also had her double as Lois Lane and made her a Kryptonian.
    • There is a Crime Syndicate member, named Vamp, who appears to be a combination of Vixen and Beast Boy.
    • Another similar combination occurs with a character named Sai, whose name, and being amongst Owlman's Made Men along with other members whose counterparts have been members of the Outsiders (of which Batman has been a founder and leader) suggests a Crime Syndicate counterpart to Katana. However, her overall appearance, as well as her use of a cat-like mask, recalls Cheshire.
  • Contemplate Our Navels: Seems to be Owlman's super-power.
  • Continuity Nod: It is not a DCAU film anymore, but Bruce Timm has said that most of the original plot was still intact. Included in this film is the construction of the second Justice League Watchtower, the expansion of the League and Wonder Woman obtaining her invisible jet. These events all occurred during the gap between Justice League and Justice League Unlimited.
  • Cool Plane: Owlman's later becomes Wonder Woman's.
  • Cosmic Keystone: Owlman thinks Earth-Prime is one for the whole multiverse. Apparently just that Earth, not its universe.
  • Crapsack World: The governments are busy appeasing a horde of supervillains who are only waiting for sufficient leverage in order to Take Over the World, and the Justice League has been eliminated save for one member. Cue the Earth-1 Justice League.
  • Creepy Monotone: James Woods as Owlman.
  • Dance Battler: Breakdance, or Evil Vibe, tries to be this.
  • Dark Action Girl: Superwoman.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Even though he has only a few minutes onscreen, Firestorm proves to be one.
  • Designated Girlfight: Averted. Although Wonder Woman and Superwoman fight each other in the big team battle, Diana has a struggle with Owlman aboard his plane, and curb stomps several male mooks in a truck and warehouse. Superwoman also fights Batman.
  • Determinator: We never see Batman receiving medical attention after he (narrowly) survives his encounter with Superwoman, suggesting that he spent the next two-thirds of the film fighting with at least one broken rib, AND he beat Owlman who is wearing Power Armor in the final act. To summarize Batman took on his own Power Armor-wearing Evil Counterpart with at least one broken rib and probably a mess of other internal injuries and WON, if not barely.
  • Dissonant Serenity: Owlman. So, so much.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: Angelique and Fortuneteller.
  • Dolled-Up Installment: Something of an inversion - The film was originally written as a DCAU entry, and the process of adapting it into DC's current franchise of stand-alone movies mainly consisted of filing the serial numbers off.
  • The Dragon: Each of the Crime Syndicate's core members has a Quirky Miniboss Squad of supervillains, which they call "Made Men". They each have about seven Made Men, but they trust some more than others:
    • Ultraman has Evil Jimmy Olsen.
    • Superwoman has Captain Super (Evil Captain Marvel, with a uniform and Beard of Evil that make him look like Black Adam.)
    • Johnny Quick has an Evil(er?) Lobo/Warwolf.
    • Power Ring has Olympia (Wonder Woman's counterpart with regards to her origin and powers).
    • J'edd J'arkus (Evil Martian Manhunter) has Angelique/Evil Hawkgirl.
    • Owlman's main Made Man is Black Power (Evil Black Lightning), but Superwoman fits better within the scope of the story.
  • Dying Moment of Awesome: The Jester decided that if he had to go, he might as well make it good.
    Jester: I was down to my last joke anyway... (pulls out a bomb) ... but this one'll kill ya!
  • The Earth Prime Theory: The Trope Namer
  • Earth-Shattering Kaboom:
    • The Crime Syndicate wants to threaten the governments of their world with complete destruction if they do not submit to their demands.
    • Owlman wants to do it to Earth Prime, and thus the Multiverse. It ends up happening to him, not that he cares.
  • Easter Egg: Freeze-framing when Good Luthor shows the League a diagram of the Crime Syndicate's organization tree lets one spot evil versions of heroes like Metamorpho, Blue Beetle (Ted Kord), Cyborg, Zatanna, Red Tornado, and others.
  • Elite Mooks: The various superpowered crime families.
  • Even Evil Has Standards: While most of the Crime Syndicate wants to threaten the governments of their world with complete destruction if they do not submit to their demands, they're not about to allow Owlman and Superwoman to do it to Earth Prime, and thus the Multiverse just for fun.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys: The Jester has a pet monkey named Harley.
  • Evil Counterpart: Basically the entire plot, and inverted with good counterparts for the supervillains. Lampshaded by Martian Manhunter, when he states that his Earth's Rose Wilson is probably evil (she's actually an Anti-Villain).
  • Evil Versus Oblivion: The entire Crime Syndicate (save for Superwoman) teams up with the Justice League to stop Owlman.
  • Expendable Alternate Universe: Batman seems to feel this way. He flatly refuses to participate in fighting the Crime Syndicate until they invade the Watchtower and seems to have no problem sacrificing Johnny Quick to avoid risking the Flash's life.
  • Expressive Mask: Averted with Owlman, whose eyes are always wide open (giving a very unsettling effect), but played straight with Batman, Flash, and every other masked hero and villain in the film.
  • Eyes Always Shut: Captain Super and Uncle Super, referencing the classic squinty depiction of Captain Marvel in general.
  • Famous Last Words:
    Owlman: It doesn't matter.
    Johnny Quick: Good one mate.
  • Fiery Redhead: Averted with the tepid Rose Wilson.
  • Five-Bad Band:
  • Flying Brick: Superman and Ultraman are reduced to this archetype.
  • Foreshadowing: Superwoman considers using the quantum trigger to send Batman to a frozen Earth with no life left on it. Guess where Batman eventually sets the final confrontation to occur?
  • Go Out with a Smile: The Jester, Johnny Quick, and Owlman.
    • In particular Owlman, who chooses to Face Death with Dignity. When Batman warps Owlman and his QED to a different version of Earth from Earth Prime and then high tails it out before going down with the ship himself, Owlman initially shows signs he could deactivate the device and save himself. However he stops before making his move, smirks, and utters "It doesn't matter...", choosing to stand by his nihilist beliefs instead of dooming himself to life on a cold, dead planet (as the Earth he's on is an icy wasteland).
  • Gender Bender: A shapeshifting supervillainess turns into a distinctly male lion to attack Wonder Woman.
  • Genre Savvy: Superman instantly deduces that the Lex Luthor they meet is from an alternate universe by using his x-ray vision. Good Lex's heart is on the right side, and evil Lex is still in jail.
  • He Who Fights Monsters: Owlman, because he blinked.
  • Heroes Unlimited: In the single most obvious reference to the DCAU, the League decides to form one.
  • Heroic Sacrifice:
    • The Jester in the opening scene.
    • Johnny Quick, though he was not aware it would be fatal at the time. Batman warned him it would be dangerous, to which he retorted, "Of course it's dangerous!" and accepted it.
  • "Hey, You!" Haymaker: "Wanna hear a secret?"
  • Hollywood Acid: Jester has an acid that eats through metal as if it were nothing.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Owlman. He could have shut down the bomb that killed him, but he decided that his decision simply did not matter.
  • Humans Are the Real Monsters: Owlman believes this. When Batman suggests that an alternate Earth was devastated by something else, Owlman sounds almost insulted. Owlman counteracts Batman's theory by telling him they both know what humans are capable of.
  • Idiot Ball / Villain Ball:
    • Superwoman inhales Batman's "smokescreen", apparently just to show off, and gets knocked out by the gas that she though was harmless smoke. Of course, this attitude is exactly how Batman defeats supervillains.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice: The Jester. He gets his own back though.
  • Ironic Echo: "Count again."
  • Jedi Mind Trick: The Crime Syndicate member Model Citizen (Evil Looker) tries to do this on Flash. It is even lampshaded by Flash as well when he tries to snap out of it:
    Flash: Hey this is just like the Jedi mind trick!
    Model Citizen: This is not like the Jedi mind trick.
    Flash: This is not like the Jedi mind trick...
  • The Mafia: The Crime Syndicate is a mix between these and your standard supervillain teams, with family heads and Made Men. Just to hammer things in, Ultraman is from Joisey.
    Ultraman: You think you can come to my place of business, an' call me out?
  • The Magnificent Seven Samurai
  • Meaningful Name: Owlman's bomb is called the Q.E.D., or Quod Erat Demonstrandum.
  • Mirror Universe: Somewhat. The main differences are that organ orientation is reversed and good and evil characters have switched sides.
  • Misanthrope Supreme: Owlman.
  • Missing Mom: Rose Wilson appears to have grown up entirely with her father, as her mother was assassinated by Ultraman years ago.
  • Mook Horror Show: Martian Manhunter and Red Archer's "fight" plays out like a scene with a Red Shirt fighting a horror movie monster.
  • The Multiverse: The film takes a serious look at this trope to the point of near-deconstruction: The main antagonist, Owlman, goes completely Nietzsche Wannabe over the realization that the multiverse consists of the sum of all universes made from all possible outcomes of every single choice ever made by any sentient being (let's just be generous and say 'infinity'). Anything done is by definition meaningless because an infinite amount of universes exist that contain all possible outcomes of everything. Naturally, his conclusion is to perform the one action that would, by definition, have any purpose at all because it cannot have a different outcome: Blow it all up!.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • The title is a reference to either Crisis on Infinite Earths, the Crisis Crossover, or the various JLA/JSA crossovers, which had names like Crisis on Earth-One!
    • J'onn laments that with his luck, Earth 1 Rose Wilson will probably be evil. Something of an aversion in that the DCU Ravager is more of an Anti-Hero who is close friends with Miss Martian, wait...
    • One of Martian Manhunter's memories is an image of the JLA's first adventure fighting Starro.
    • The tigerskin rug in Superwoman's personal quarters hints at a dark fate for Tawky Tawny, the Marvel Family's talking tiger.
      • And the very existence of Uncle Super is a reference to Silver Age Captain Marvel comics, where a mysterious, bumbling old man claiming to be Mary and Billy's Uncle Dudley tagged along on their adventures as Uncle Marvel. Uncle Marvel didn't actually have any powers, though.
    • Then there's the invisible jet Wonder Woman keeps at the end, a reference to the infamous invisible jet plane she owned in Silver Age comics and the Super Friends show and comic.
    • Owlman's Made Men are evil versions of the Outsiders (Black Lightning, Katana, and Looker), a team of misfits led by Batman in the '80s and '00s. There's also some Detroit Leaguers in there (Evil Vibe/"Breakdance", Evil Vixen/"Vamp", and Evil Gypsy/"Gypsy Woman" - Evil Steel is missing for whatever reason); the implication is that these were some of the Made Men absorbed into his fold after the death of J'edd J'arkus, the counterpart to the Martian Manhunter, who led the Detroit League.
    • Jimmy Olsen being referred to as "Ultraman's Pal" is a reference to the classic Silver Age series, Superman's Pal, Jimmy Olsen. He even has a signal watch.
    • Johnny Quick's death (where he vibrates so fast that he succumbs to Rapid Aging) may be a reference to Barry Allen's Heroic Sacrifice at the end of Crisis on Infinite Earths.
    • If Martian Manhunter looks a little off, it's because he's sporting his post-Infinite Crisis look from the comics.
    • During Rose's anti-Syndicate speech, there's a certain blonde reporter who looks quite familiar.
    • Ultraman's weakness against blue kryptonite is a nod to Bizarro.
    • The Jester has a pet monkey named Harley.
  • Naked People Are Funny: Good Lex proves this in his first meeting with the Justice League.
    "Whoa! And they call me the Flash..."
  • Near Villain Victory
  • Never Trust a Title: Crisis On Two Earths is the name of a classic DC storyline involving parallel universes, however, the Crime Syndicate universe is not one of them.
  • Not So Different: Owlman insists this to Batman. Batman demurs ("You blinked.")
  • Nuke 'em: The only thing stopping the Crime Syndicate from completely taking over the world was the threat of a nuclear strike.
  • Oh Crap:
    • Flash yells this when he unwittingly speeds out of the air base and begins plummeting to the ground below. Luckily, Green Lantern saves him.
    • During the League's face-off with the Syndicate, Flash and Johnny Quick destroy a piece of science equipment while fighting each other and Quick began hurling the broken pieces at Flash. Flash not only manages to dodge and deflect all the flying shards, but actually reassembles the device and hands it to Quick. Quick responds with a rather apt "Bugger" before Flash punches him in the face.
    • The Jester and Luthor get a good one in the beginning when they realize the Syndicate is already coming for them.
    • Owlman has one at the climax. Sure, he decided it did not matter in the end, but he did look very panicked before he came to this conclusion and the bomb went off.
    • Archer has a lovely one on the docks when J'onn rises up behind him as a giant sea serpent.
  • Omnicidal Maniac: Owlman. Superwoman is one by association.
  • The Only One Allowed to Defeat You: Owlman Lampshades this when he remarks the Justice League should have sent Superman to deal with him (not Batman), but notes he doesn't trust anyone to get the job done, either.
  • Orange/Blue Contrast: See the poster up top.
  • Our Presidents Are Different: President Wilson. You might be more familiar with his Evil Counterpart Slade "Deathstroke" Wilson.
  • Papa Wolf: Yeah, that's right Ultraman, send an assassin to kill President Slade's daughter, it is not like he will not hold anything against you and arrive at your headquarters driving a tank with marines and nuclear weapons. Oh, he will? Oops.
  • Pet the Dog: Ultraman seems genuinely upset at Superman and Lex Luthor beating up his Made Man Jimmy Olsen.
  • Pinball Protagonist: Among the six protagonist Leaguers, Green Lantern does little more than just... be there.
  • Powered Armor:
    • Owlman's suit is designed to augment his physical strength and durability. He is able to briefly overpower Wonder Woman during their first encounter (before she throws him off a plane). At one point he even shrugs off an explosive Batman places on his cowl.
    • Good Lex Luthor's suit also counts.
  • Psychopathic Womanchild: Superwoman. She is willing to help blow up the universe just because her crush wants to, and generally acts like a nasty little girl. Given that she is Mary Marvel—a teenager in an adult body—this makes a lot of sense.
  • Pre Ass Kicking One Liner: Black Canary before she uses her Canary Cry on one of the Made Men point blank.
    "Wanna hear a secret?"
  • The President's Daughter: Rose Wilson.
  • President Evil: Inverted. Though he is reluctant to take decisive action against the Syndicate, President Slade Wilson is the good version of the supervillain Slade "Deathstroke" Wilson.
  • Punch! Punch! Punch! Uh Oh...: Lex Luthor pounds ineffectively on Ultraman, then the latter slams him into a building.
  • Rapid Aging: Johnny Quick becomes a victim of this when he uses his superspeed powers to open a portal for Batman to travel into the Earth-Prime dimension in order to stop Owlman from destroying all reality.
  • Reality Ensues: Normally comic book adaptations are more accommodating to Badass Normal or low-powered characters like Batman or Black Canary, but both are shown to struggle, and Batman's evil counterpart uses Powered Armor to hold his own. Additionally, Black Canary's evil counterpart is dispatched unceremoniously by the Flash.
  • Rebellious Princess: Rose.
  • Redemption Equals Death: Johnny Quick.
  • Refusal of the Call: Batman is totally opposed to helping out the alternate Earth and refuses to participate in any way until the Crime Syndicate invades the Watchtower.
  • Rock-Paper-Scissors: Lampshaded by Green Lantern ("I've played this game before!"), summoning a rock to crush scissors.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Several to the Alien franchise. The most noticeable is when Batman enters a scene in a construction Mini-Mecha that looks very much like Ripley's power loader suit from Aliens. The actual angle of the camera is also almost identical. And the space marines at the end have Pulse rifles.
    • The Martian Manhunter's Evil Twin is named J'edd J'arkus, and even has four arms. There are also references to Star Trek, Star Wars ("Hey! This is like the Jedi Mind Trick!"), and a more subtle one to Doctor Who (a fried "chameleon circuit" locks Owlman's plane into being invisible).
    • Owlman (To Wonder Woman): "Get off my plane!"
    • Evil!Vixen turns into a lion that looks like a more realistic version of Scar.
  • Shut Up, Hannibal!: Batman does this twice to Owlman during the climax. The first time he asks if Owlman intends to talk him to death, the next one is one of the biggest Moments Of Awesome in the film. Wonder Woman does this to Superwoman as well.
  • Shut Up, Kirk!: Owlman gets one off on Batman.
    Batman: If we're really alike, you know this is wrong. You must have been a good man once.
    Owlman: No. Not good. Never good. After all, I'm only human.
  • Slasher Smile: Owlman.
  • Smug Super: All of the Syndicate members are unGodly smug about their powers.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: It is not as bad as in some adaptations, but as ever, Batman (and his Evil Counterpart, Owlman) do hog a lot of the action, especially in the finale. Somewhat unavoidable with Owlman being the Big Bad and all.
  • Statuesque Stunner: Wonder Woman, naturally, and Superwoman as well, especially since concept art shows her at roughly Superman's height.
  • Stealth Pun: When the mugshots for the villains come up, one of them looks like Mr. Terrific, except with a H on his face, making him Mr. Horrific.
    • "Made Men" is not only a Stealth Pun, but a Double Entendre. Many of the villains of the CSA are literally made, as in transformed from normal people into superpowered beings, such as Superwoman's lieutenants and Jimmy Olsen.
  • Straw Nihilist: Owlman, who believes that parallel universes render free will meaningless. Which is why he wants to blow them up. Heck, he doesn't even care during his death scene.
  • Strong as They Need to Be: Owlman's suit. At first he's able to overpower Wonder Woman, then when he's fighting Batman that's completely ignored, and when they fight on Earth Prime, Owlman kicks his ass at first, but he's still not as strong as he was in the start of the film.
  • Suicidal Cosmic Temper Tantrum: Owlman's reaction to learning that for every decision in one universe, in another a different decision was made.
  • Take That Kiss: Superwoman does one to Batman.
  • Taking You with Me: The Jester does this to evil Manhunter and Hawkgirl.
  • Tank Goodness: At the end, the president shows up driving a tank.
  • The Stoic: Batman, naturally, and Owlman.
  • The Syndicate: With plans to become The Empire.
  • This Looks Like a Job for Aquaman: Averted. When Superwoman breaks into the Earth One JLA quarters, Batman calls for some heroes, among them, Aquaman. Do you see a body of water or some fishes he can call? No. He's a capable fighter over the surface.
  • Techno Babble: Lex.
    Flash: Some of us don't speak Star Trek.
  • This Is Something He's Got to Do Himself: Good Lex Luthor may have sorely needed the help from Earth-1's Justice League, but he knows the symbolic importance of fighting Ultraman himself. If the people of his Earth can not stand up to the Crime Syndicate, then there is no chance at all of it sticking once the Justice League leaves. This is echoed in the ending when President Wilson and the Marines come to arrest the surviving Syndicate members.
  • Tiny Guy, Huge Girl: Owlman and Superwoman.
  • Unholy Matrimony: Owlman and Superwoman. While they had this relationship in the comics, Superwoman was Ultraman's wife and she mainly kept up the affair with Owlman to spite him. She didn't seem to care what happen to Owlman.
  • Ungrateful Bastard: Oh, you just saved the multiverse? Ultraman does not care.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: At the beginning of the movie, Flash complains that Batman had turned him into a guinea pig and that he does not feel that Batman likes him very much. At the end they need superspeed to open a "doorway". Flash steps up, but Batman tells him he is too slow and Johnny Quick offers to do it. At the end, it turns out that the job Batman needed done drained the life out of Johnny, and killed him, and that is why Batman would not let his universe's Flash do the job.
    • On the other hand, Batman initially refused to even help the alternate Earth because it wasn't his Earth. He would have sacrificed a good alternate version of the Flash, too.
  • Weld The Lock: Alexander Luthor welds the vault door to slow down the Crime Syndicate.
  • We Named the Monkey Jack: The Alternate Joker had a monkey named Harley.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Where exactly did Captain Super go during the final confrontation?
  • Why Don't Ya Just Shoot Him?: Superman asks Good Lex why he did not just destroy the MacGuffin to keep it out of the Syndicate's hands; Lex replies "It's pure energy - it can't be destroyed."
  • Winged Humanoid: Angelique/Evil Hawkgirl
  • Would Hit a Girl: Superman had no problem battling Superwoman. Given that she is as strong as he is (give or take) and evil, this makes sense.
  • Wrestler in All of Us: In this adaptation, Wonder Woman mercilessly uses several professional wrestling moves. She actually busts out a sidebuster against Vixen, and the fight against Superwoman is no-holds-barred. Diana opens the final fight against Superwoman with a flying drop-kick, and finishes with a modified butterfly suplex and an elbow-drop.
  • You Shall Not Pass: The Jester pulls this in the intro, and manages to bring down a Evil Martian Manhunter and Angelique/Evil Hawkgirl in the process.
  • You're Insane!: What Batman says to Owlman after he reveals his plan to destroy Earth Prime and so prevent humanity from ever existing.
    Owlman: Does it really matter? There are alternate versions of me that you could find quite charming.

Superman/Batman: Public EnemiesDC Comics AnimatedBatman: Under the Red Hood
Justice LeagueTropeNamers/Western AnimationKim Possible
Justice LeagueCreator/MOI AnimationJustice League: War
Superman/Batman: Public EnemiesWesternAnimation/DC Universe Animated Original MoviesBatman: Under the Red Hood
Superman/Batman: Public EnemiesFilms Of The 2000s-FranchisesBatman: Under the Red Hood
Julia's EyesFilms of the 2010sThe Kids Are All Right
Junkers Come HereAnimated FilmsJungledyret Hugo
Superman/Batman: Public EnemiesSuperheroBatman: Under the Red Hood
Superman/Batman: Public EnemiesFranchise/BatmanBatman: Under the Red Hood

alternative title(s): Justice League Crisis On Two Earths
random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
76427
41