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Narrator: An alternate time. An alternate world.

Earth 717, created by Over9000Pylons is an AU Fanfic of the Marvel Universe. The universe is primarily a blend of Classic 616-Marvel, The MCU (with the benefit of no rights complications preventing certain characters from appearing) and original material. The stories are primarily 12-chapter "Volumes" focusing on major characters within the universe, with shorter stories occasionally published to fill in the gaps between.

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Stories published so far include:

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This Fanfic Provides Examples of:

  • Adaptation Distillation: With the main influences being 616, the MCU, and various cartoons (particularly Avengers EMH and Spectacular Spider-Man).
  • Adaptation Origin Connection:
    • The Sentinels were originally manufactured by Stark Industries and were the inspiration for Tasha's invention of the Iron Maiden armor.
    • Magneto's family were killed by HYDRA.
    • Doom engineers the accident that gives the Fantastic Four their powers
    • Otto Octavius created the spider that gave Peter his powers in this continuity. Later in Spider-Man Volume 1, he directly creates Electro.
    • As in the MCU, Stark (be it Tony or Tasha) is the one who creates Ultron.
  • Adaptational Early Appearance: Colossus is one of the X-Men's "first class" in this iteration, rather than joining the team at a later date.
  • Adaptational Heroism:
    • Obadiah Stane. Subverted in Iron Maiden Volume 3.
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    • Doom's backstory is slightly more sympathetic; Valeria, his fiancée, was killed in the accident that scarred him, so his grief over it is more justified. His resentment of Reed is no less misplaced though.
  • Adaptational Sexuality:
    • Tasha Stark is bisexual.
    • Electro is gay in this continuity, with his boyfriend Henry breaking up with him shortly before his transformation.
  • Adapted Out: Angel has his place on the original X-Men taken by Colossus.
  • All Deaths Final: Unusually for superhero fiction, this rule is said to be in effect, with one exception. This turned out to be Jean Grey, at The Stinger of X-Men Volume 3.
  • All Love Is Unrequited:
    • Obadiah towards Tasha
    • Hinted with Gwen towards Peter, and possibly Harry towards Gwen
  • Arch-Enemy: Naturally, for a Superhero story:
    • Doctor Doom to Reed Richards
    • Mister Sinister for Cyclops
    • Sunset Bain for Iron Maiden
    • Doctor Octopus for Spider-Man
  • Ascended Extra:
    • Private Lorraine is given a first name (Natalie, after her MCU actress), and made a Howling Commando in Captain America Volume 1.
    • Sunset Bain, a very minor villain in the comics, is one of the most prominent villains in the setting thus far and Iron Maiden's arch-enemy.
  • The Atoner: Dr. Erskine; in this version, he was originally a Nazi scientist working alongside HYDRA.
  • Bad Boss: Madame Masque often kills her minions for minor indiscretions in fits of insanity
  • Because You Were Nice to Me: Why Veranke merely imprisons Anelle, rather than killing her like the rest of the royal family. This turns out to be her her undoing.
  • BFG: Doom uses a rocket launcher in Fantastic Four Volume 1.
  • Bi the Way: Tasha Stark
  • Big Bads: Befitting superhero fiction, every story has at least one:
    • X-Men Volume 1: Magneto
    • Iron Maiden Volume 1: Aldrich Killian
    • Hulk Volume 1: Glenn Talbot and Samuel Sterns
    • Fantastic Four Volume 1: Doctor Doom
    • X-Men Volume 2: Mister Sinister
    • Captain America Volume 1: Red Skull
    • Iron Maiden Volume 2: Sunset Bain
    • Thor Volume 1: Malekith The Accursed
    • Agent Carter Lead & Lipstick: Baron Wolfgang Von Strucker
    • Hulk Volume 2: The Leader
    • Ms. Marvel Volume 1: The Supreme Intelligence
    • Galaxy Crusade: Queen Veranke
    • X-Men Volume 3: Madelyne Pryor
    • Daredevil Volume 1: Mister Fear
    • Captain America Volume 2: Helmut & Helen Zemo
    • Spider-Man Volume 1: Doctor Octopus
    • Iron Maiden Volume 3: Sunset Bain
    • Thor Volume 2: Perrikus
  • Big Sister Mentor: Iron Maiden shows shades of this to Spider-Man during her brief appearance in Spider-Man Volume 1.
  • Bloodier and Gorier: The series doesn't shy away from describing graphic violence.
  • Bully Hunter: Eddie Brock towards Flash Thompson
  • Canon Foreigner:
    • Ciridylia, Malekith's wife, and Zedonius, his personal dragon.
    • Helen Zemo, wife of Baron Helmut Zemo
  • Character Death: More than a few significant characters have met their ends so far:
    • Ho Yinsen
    • Valeria Zefiro
    • Abraham Erskine
    • Glenn & Carla Talbot
    • Amadeus Cho
    • Senator Robert Kelly
    • Alex Summers
    • The Howling Commandos
    • Phineas Horton
    • Aldrich Killian
    • The Living Laser
    • Happy Hogan
    • Aeltri
    • Malekith
    • John Ryker
    • Brian Banner
    • ROB
    • Morrat
    • Paibok
    • Grixx
    • Titannus
    • Citri Noll
    • Veranke
    • Deathlok/Donald Pierce
    • Madelyne Prior
    • Helen Zemo
    • Daniel Whitehall
    • Debbie Hayward
    • Obadiah Stane
    • Rhona Burchill
    • Whitney Frost
  • Chekhov's Gunman:
    • In Iron Maiden Volume 1, Tasha injures an AIM Soldier named Anya, who ends up becoming the 717 incarnation of Crimson Dynamo in Volume 2.
    • The tank that attacks The Hulk during his first transformation in Hulk Volume 1 is later revealed to have been piloted by Emil Blonsky.
    • The crook Spider-Man captures in Chapter 1 of Spider-Man Volume 1 turns out to be Max Dillon, who Doc Ock turns in Electro.
  • Co-Dragons: Lucia Von Bardas and The Beetle to Doctor Doom.
  • Composite Character:
    • Glenn Talbot pilots The Hulkbuster
    • Kurse takes Skurge's place as Amora's sidekick
    • Donald Pierce is an iteration of Deathlok
    • Sunset Bain is essentially combined with the Mandarin, being a villain of Chinese descent who serves as Iron Maiden's arch-enemy
  • Coitus Ensues:
    • Bruce and Betty in Hulk Volume 1
    • Scott and Jean early in X-Men Volume 2
    • Carol and Mar-Vell in Avengers Volume 1, before the climax of the story.
  • Corrupt Politician: Quite a few examples:
    • Robert Kelly
    • "Abigail Conway", aka Helen Zemo
    • Rachel Dreyfuss
    • Randolph Cherryh
  • Crazy Jealous Girl: Throughout Spider-Man Volume 1, Gwen clearly isn't pleased by how close Peter and Mary Jane get.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Doom gives one to Iron Maiden in Volume 2 of her eponymous series, which then convinces him to discard the reactor technology he just purchased from AIM, since it's inferior to his own designs.
  • Dramatic Irony: The story openly refers to the Winter Soldier as Bucky, making no attempt to hide his identity, though the heroic characters have no idea (yet).
  • Deal with the Devil: Viper made a deal with Dormammu in 1944 to become The Ageless. In a subversion of how the deal usually goes, Viper did this by sacrificing the souls of three young girls, rather than by pledging her own to Lord of the Dark Dimension.
  • Death by Adaptation: Heinrich Zemo was killed when Cap knocked him into the vat of chemicals in this version.
  • Decomposite Character: Heinz Kruger is split with a twin sister named Hannah.
  • Don't Create a Martyr: The crux of Magneto's original plan in X-Men Volume 1. He knows that if Kelly is killed by a mutant, it will only rally the public behind the anti-Mutant cause, so his plan is to have Jean take control of a civilian, have them plant a bomb to destroy Kelly's office, and then take the blame, making the act look like one of random terrorism rather than a retaliation by mutants. Jean, of course, refuses, prompting Magneto to eventually just throw the bomb at the building himself and go to Plan B.
  • The Dragon:
    • Madame Hydra to The Red Skull in Captain America Volume 1.
    • Kurse to Malekith, and then to Amora after the latter's death.
    • Electro to Doc Ock in Spider-Man Volume 1.
    • Vapor to The Leader
    • Whiplash to Madame Masque in Iron Maiden Volume 3
  • Dragon Ascendant: Madame Hydra takes the Red Skull's place in HYDRA's leadership after the latter's seeming death.
  • Dropped a Bridge on Him: Aldrich Killian, set up as a major antagonist in Iron Maiden Volume 1, is usurped by Sunset Bain as leader of AIM, converted into a Risk Control trooper, and is unknowingly killed by Tasha.
  • Eerie Arctic Research Station: HYDRA's base in Captain America Volume 1 is located in the Arctic.
  • Early-Bird Cameo;
    • Salia Petrie in FF Volume 1
    • Vanessa Marianna in FF Volume 2
    • Talbot references Doom in Hulk Volume 1, one volume before his official appearance
    • Storm first appears in X-Men Volume 2 before joining the team full-time in Volume 3.
    • Wolverine appears in Hulk Volume 2 before reappearing in X-Men Volume 3, having joined the X-Men in the time gap
  • Empty Shell: The AIM Risk Control Troopers, which is why the heroes don't hold back when fighting them; they're getting Mercy Kills.
  • Enemy Mine: The heroes make several over the course of Galaxy Crusade, including with Doctor Doom, Sunset Bain, and The Kree.
  • Energy Absorption:
    • One of Captain Marvel's powers, and the climax of Avengers Volume 1 has her able to absorb the power of the Key-Stone (aka the Soul Gem) after Veranke turns its power on the Avengers.
    • Exploited in Spider-Man Volume 1: Electro needs to absorb electricity from outside sources, so Spider-Man lures him to Central Park and has him spend all his stored electricity while being unable to recharge.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones:
    • Malekith’s main motivation during ‘’Thor Volume 1’’ is to resurrect his beloved wife Ciridylia, who was killed in the Asgardian/Dark Elf war.
    • Helmut Zemo to his wife and children.
  • Exiled from Continuity: Bullseye, Deadpool, Gambit, Kraven The Hunter, Sabretooth, and any variations of other characters (e.g. She-Hulk & X-23), due to the author's dislike of them.
  • The Fellowship Has Ended: It's noted in Iron Maiden Volume 3 that The Avengers went their separate ways after repelling the Skrull Invasion, and haven't kept in contact since.
  • Five-Man Band: The Original X-Men fit this quite comfortably;
  • Fix Fic:
    • Thor Vol. 1 might as well be The Dark World done right.
    • Electro's portrayal in Spider-Man Volume 1 is essentially a rectified version of his Amazing Spider-Man 2 portrayal.
  • Friendly Enemy: Professor X and Magneto, as always.
  • Fugitive Arc: The latter half of Captain America Volume 2 for Cap and Sharon, after HYDRA frames SHIELD for bombing the Capitol building.
  • Gender Flip: One of the author's favorite tropes. Some characters flipped include
    • Iron Man
    • Crimson Dynamo
    • The Beetle
    • Master Mold
    • The Wizard
    • Alastair Smythe
  • Government Agency of Fiction: SHIELD, as always. The organization is smaller than usual, consisting of only 42 active agents, with each one having a number designation.
  • The Heavy: Ronan The Accuser to The Kree Supreme Intelligence in Ms. Marvel Volume 1.
  • Heel–Face Turn:
    • General Ross abandons his crusade against the Hulk at the end of Hulk: Volume 1
    • Torgo, at the end of Galaxy Crusade.
  • Hero of Another Story: War Machine: Defender Of Earth is built around this; while The Avengers and Fantastic Four are off in space, War Machine repels the Skrull invasion on Earth, assembling his own team (consisting of Black Widow, Union Jack, Firestar, and Quicksilver) in the process.
  • Heroic Sacrifice:
    • Yinsen
    • Dum Dum Dugan
    • Jean Grey, twice, though neither time sticks
  • Karma Houdini:
    • Subverted; Mister Sinister escapes at the end of X-Men Volume 2, but his partnership with HYDRA is over (on bad terms), and many of his resources are destroyed. He's eventually captured by Cyclops, Iceman, and Firestar in Volume 3.
    • Most of AIM manages to escape by the end of Iron Maiden Volume 2, except for Killian and The Living Laser (who are killed), and Radioactive Man (who's captured, though in a double subversion, he's freed by Deathlok while being transported to prison).
    • Downplayed with Helmut Zemo Captain America Volume 2; he evaded capture, but he's been exiled from HYDRA, his wife is dead, and he's forced to go on the run.
    • Abomination and Monica Rappaccini both evade capture in Wrath Of The Titans.
    • Ellen Brandt and Maya Hansen manage to escape justice at the end of Iron Maiden Volume 3, and are left in control of what remains of AIM.
  • Kill 'Em All: Captain America Volume 1 ends this way for the Howling Commandos, except for Cap, Peggy, and Bucky, of course.
  • Kill the Ones You Love: Tasha mercy kills Happy after he's turned into a Risk Control trooper.
  • Legion of Doom: A smaller version than usual, but Iron Maiden faces the trio of Radioactive Man, The Living Laser, and Crimson Dynamo (named as "The Lethal Legion" in the Chapter title) in Iron Maiden Volume 2.
  • Let's You and Him Fight: Hulk Volume 2 features two of the most famous examples: Hulk vs Wolverine and Hulk vs The Thing.
  • The Lost Lenore:
    • Steve ends up serving this role to Peggy in the Agent Carter one-shots, though obviously, he's not really dead
    • Whitney to Tasha at the end of Iron Maiden Volume 3
  • Lovable Alpha Bitch: Despite being Flash Thompson's girlfriend, Liz Allan objects to his bullying of Peter.
  • Love Theme: "If I Didn't Care" for Steve & Peggy.
  • The Man Behind the Man:
    • Kang to Veranke
    • Played with in both Thor stories; while Loki orchestrates Malekith and Perrikus' returns, neither villain works for him directly.
  • Nebulous Evil Organization: A few:
    • AIM
    • HYDRA
    • The Syndicate
  • Not Worth Killing: Why Abomination spares Hulk in Wrath Of The Titans; Hulk has been weakened by Rappaccini's serum, so defeating him in that moment, when he's not at full strength, would be a hollow victory.
  • One-Winged Angel: Whitehall turns into Kraken-esque monster after being exposed to his Theta Virus in Captain America Volume 2.
  • Pragmatic Villainy:
    • Doctor Doom & Sunset Bain both offer assistance to SHIELD during the Skrull invasion because if the Skrulls conquer Earth, neither Doom nor Bain would be able to do so themselves (Bain also gets herself granted asylum in the UK).
    • After being captured by SHIELD, Moses Magnum is more than willing to rat on HYDRA, placing his own interests over people who betrayed and tried to kill him.
  • Put on a Bus: Cyclops and Iceman leave the X-Men at the end of Volume 2 to hunt down Sinister. They return to the team in Volume 3
  • Race Lift:
    • Eddie Brock and Lance Hunter are both black.
    • It's never specifically called attention to, but since he was originally a member of the Nazi party it seems likely that this version of Abraham Erskine isn't Jewish.
  • Rage Against the Mentor: Scott when he discovers Xavier erased his memories of being Sinister's assassin in X-Men Volume 2.
  • Redemption Equals Death: Obadiah Stane in Iron Maiden Volume 3
  • Robot Buddy:
    • HERBIE to Reed Richards.
    • ROB to Bruce Banner. Until Hulk Volume 2 that is.
  • Screw Destiny: Carol makes this point to Veranke in the climax of Galaxy Crusade, stating that the Dard'van prophecy never mentioned the Avengers.
  • Sealed Evil in a Can:
    • The Living Laser, until he's freed in Iron Maiden Volume 2
    • Malekith and his Dark Elves
  • Serial Killer: Mister Fear
  • Sequel Goes Foreign: Iron Maiden Volume 3 is set primarily in Europe.
  • Ship Tease: A bit between Cap and Iron Maiden in Avengers Volume 1, though it's mostly one-sided on her end.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The Avengers' ship during Galaxy Crusade is named the Rogue One.
    • Several to Mass Effect, particularly during Galaxy Crusade.
  • The Starscream: Sunset Bain to Aldrich Killian, a rare example where The Starscream successfully overthrows the Big Bad and takes their place permanently.
  • The Stinger: In the tradition of the MCU, each story has one.
  • Superman Stays Out of Gotham:
    • Generally averted; heroes guest star in each other stories' fairly frequently (the most prominent examples being the Fantastic Four in Hulk Volume 2 and Iron Maiden in Spider-Man Volume 1).
    • Notably, this applies to villains as well; Doctor Doom appears at the beginning of Iron Maiden Volume 2, Radioactive Man appears in Hulk Volume 2 after previously being an adversary of Iron Maiden, and the Beetle, who debuted fighting the Fantastic Four, appears in Spider-Man Volume 1.
  • Superhero Prevalence Stages:
    • Phase One is decidedly Stage #1; Superhumans are just beginning to appear.
    • Phase Two has, fittingly, moved into Stage #2: the Avengers have formed, superpowered threats are more prevalent, street-level heroes such as Spider-Man and Daredevil begin appearing, and the public, in general, is more familiar with superheroes.
  • Take That!: Let's just say Iron Maiden Volume 3 isn't very kind to David Cameron AT ALL...
  • True Companions:
    • The Fantastic Four
    • The Howling Commandos
  • Violently Protective Girlfriend: Betty Ross to Bruce. She even ends up killing Atrocity in Hulk Volume 2.
  • The Virus: HYDRA's specialty:
    • The Corrupted Blood Virus in Captain America Volume 1, which transforms those it infects into monsters dubbed "Bloodhounds."
    • The Theta Virus in Captain America Volume 2.
    • There's also the L-Virus, created by the purifiers to wipe out Mutants.
  • We Can Rule Together: Doc Ock briefly offers this to Spider-Man in Spider-Man Volume 1, but quickly decides he'll settle for dissecting him when the Wall-Crawler refuses.
  • Wicked Cultured: The Red Skull enjoys opera and is eating a well-cooked steak when he meets with Horton.
  • Wolverine Publicity: Completely averted; Wolverine doesn't join the X-Men until Volume 3 of their series, and even there he's only a supporting character. The focus of that series is firmly on Scott and Jean.
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