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Characters: Wreck It Ralph Cameo Characters

This page covers the cameo characters of Wreck-It Ralph.

As mentioned in the opening paragraph, one of the most notable aspects of the movie is how Disney went out of its way and licensed a bunch of cameo characters from notable video game franchises. Unlike other cameos, these are neither lawyer-friendly nor blatant knockoffs. They're just the honest-to-God real deal, and their appearances here have a plot-relevant role (despite still remaining background characters), to boot! Not only, there's a great amount of detail and attention paid to them by the movie's makers. So, let's see the cameos present in this movie. Due to the many characters, some of whom are well hidden, this list is incomplete.

General list of characters, sorted by company

Nintendo

  • King Bowser Koopa from Super Mario Bros.
    • Mii-Expy versions of Princess Peach and Daisy also appear, and Mario himself is name-dropped by Felix at his 30th anniversary party.

Sega

Capcom

Midway (now Warner Bros. Interactive)

  • Paperboy from Paperboy.
  • The Bartender from Tapper.
  • Kano and Smoke from Mortal Kombat are part of Ralph's villain support group.
  • The player knight from Joust.
  • Satan/Satine from Satan's Hollow

Namco Bandai

  • Pac-Man, Clyde, Inky, Blinky, and Pinky from Pac-Man.
  • Taizo Hori, Fygar, and Pooka from Dig Dug.

Gottlieb

  • Q*bert, Coily, Slick, and Ugg from Q*bert.

Konami

Atari

Data East

Taito America

  • The Qix from Qix.

Muginoho

  • The Beard Papa's mascot is a security guard at the Sugar Rush car factory.

Disney

Other


Detailed list of characters, in order of appearancenote .

    open/close all folders 

The Bad-Anon

    In General 

Short for Bad-Guys Anonymous, this reunion of famous gaming villains is what, on a meta level, drew attention to the movie in the first place: this One-Scene Wonder was the first sign that this would be a movie "that got it right". In this reunion, taking place in the ghost-cage from Pac-Man and hosted by Clyde the ghost, various "bad guys" share their frustration about how their role doesn't help their popularity at all. All of them have some kind of issues about it, although the one who makes the biggest deal out of it is undoubtedly Ralph himself.

(Official bios) Some of them (see below)

Tropes:

  • Advertised Extra: Applies to all the cameos in general, but most of the movie's marketing included the Bad-Anon as one of its core points. See One-Scene Wonder below.
  • Bad Is Good and Good Is Bad: Their mantra, known as the "Bad Guy Affirmation", is essentially an oath based on this concept. Justified In that their villainy is just part of a role they play.
    "I'm bad, and that's good. I'll never be good, and that's not bad. There's no one I'd rather be... than me."
  • Book Ends: Ralph returns at the Bad-Anon at the end of the movie, only he's much happier with his job now, thus deserving a round of applause by the other "villains".
  • Dysfunction Junction: Self-esteem issues are implied for every one of them, hence the "one game at a time" banner in order to discourage villains from attempting to seek popularity in other games, as it would put their own home game in jeopardy.
  • Legion of Doom: Averted. Sure, they're all powerful villains in the same room, but they're not plotting anything because they're not doing their job during this scene.
  • Mass "Oh, Crap!": When Ralph announces he doesn't "want to be the bad guy anymore", especially due to how the rest of the group is otherwise faithful to each one's job — despite the unpopularity coming with it. Then again, this is what happens with most Disney movies dealing with a radical change in an established order.
  • Mean Characters Nice Actors: Villains in their respective games may be, but on their freetime, they're genuinely nice guys who's trying to help Ralph deal with his self-esteem during the Bad-Anon meetings.
  • Punch Clock Villain: In the context of the movie, gaming characters are treated like actors playing their own role, and much like Ralph, the villains are good-natured people playing villains.
  • Shown Their Work: All the cameos feature a lot of research to some extent. Word of God explained that, while setting some conditions, the game companies understood straight away that Disney had the best of intentions with the movie, licensed cameos included. In setting said conditions, the game companies owning the characters essentially helped the movie's writers in keeping the cameos true to their original form.
  • The Smurfette Principle: There's only one female member present. She has no lines and is referred to as "Sorceress", but her hairstyle and skin and clothing coloration match.
  • Tropaholics Anonymous: This reunion is very reminiscent of real-life Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, right down to the "Hi, I'm (X); hi, (X)" routine.

    Clyde 
"Nice share, Ralph."note 
Voiced by: Kevin Deters

One of the ghosts from Pac-Man debuts in the Disney Animated Canon with a secondary job as the host of the Bad-Anon meetings at his own home. Calm and collected, Clyde helps the others deal with their self-esteem issues, as their villainous roles, and consequent unpopularity, has taken quite the toll on the spirit they do their jobs with, although discouraging any thought of trying to play a different role. Like Coily, Eggman, and Bison below, Clyde appears alongside the hero opposing him, as Pac-Man himself makes a cameo in another point of the movie.

Used with Namco Bandai's permission.

(Official bio) Clyde: Orange and finally in charge Clyde, the orange ghost who - along with pals Inky, Blinky, and Pinky - has made PAC-MAN's life difficult. These days old Clyde leads the weekly Bad-Anon meeting in his spare time.

Tropes:

  • Blue with Shock: Alongside Bowser and Sonic below, Clyde is the one character with a particular in-game trait that the writers managed to work into the movie as a gag. In Clyde's case, he becomes Blue with Shock when doing his part in the bad guys' Mass "Oh, Crap!", becoming blue exactly as he does when Pac-Man eats a power pellet.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Clyde never really loses his cool, regardless of the villains' poor self-esteem.
  • Sincerity Mode: When he tells Ralph that "we can't change who we are", he says it without any trace of malice in his voice.
  • Team Dad: He even kickstarts "the Bad-Guy affirmation" (quoted as the caption under the image for Bad-Anon, above).
  • You Can't Fight Fate:
    Clyde: "Ralph, Ralph, we get it. But we can't change who we are."

    Zangief 
"Just because you are bad guy, does not mean you are bad guy."
Voiced by: Rich Moore

The Russian-born powerhouse hailing from the Street Fighter franchise makes his debut in the Disney Animated Canon as a "bad guy" who really isn't, in order to help other gaming villains to be happy with the role they're given despite the fact they're all good-natured guys at heart.

Used with Capcom's permission.

(Official Bio) Zangief: not a bad guy Zangief, the muscle-bound, hairy-chested, mohawked wrestler from "Street Fighter" is a regular at the Bad-Anon meetings.

Tropes:

    M. Bison 
"You're not 'going Turbo', are you?"
Voiced by: Gerald C. Rivers

The actual villain from the Street Fighter franchise has two roles: on a meta level, he acts as a repalcement for Dr. Wily; but, definitely most notably, within the context of the movie he's the first character to introduce the concept of 'going Turbo', a line later used in the movie proper. As with his original, Street Fighter-verse counterpart, the Disneyverse Bison is a glowing-eyed world dictator, but, much like Zangief, is implied to only play that role. Additionally, like Coily, Eggman, and Clyde, Bison's cameo in the movie is accompanied by that of the hero opposing him, in his case Ryu.

Used with Capcom's permission.

(Official Bio) M. Bison: the eyes have it A uniformed villain from "Street Fighter", M. Bison tames his bad-guy habits at Bad-Anon.

Tropes:

    Dr. Eggman 
Pictured: Eggman's Wreck-It Ralph render from the movie's official site. As with Clyde, it's as close to official artwork as we can get.

Doctor Ivo "Eggman" Robotnik, the villainous Mad Scientist from the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise shows up in the weekly Bad-Anon meeting. Like Coily, Clyde, and Bison, his cameo appearance comes with that of the hero opposing him, in Eggman's case Sonic himself (see below).

Used with SEGA's permission.

(Official bio) Dr. Eggman: Hedgehog nemesis Dr. Eggman, the mustached, goggle-wearing antagonist from "Sonic The Hedgehog" takes a break from his World-conquest mission to attend the weekly Bad-Anon meeting.

Tropes:

  • Absent-Minded Professor: He seems not to be focused on the meeting as it takes place. See The Eeyore below.
  • Clasp Your Hands If You Deceive: Only in his render, as pictured here. He doesn't do it in the movie. More notably, there are two alternate poses for Eggman: one is the one pictured here, and the other is the image for this page as a whole. He clasps his hands in both.
  • The Eeyore: He seems kind of depressed (or at least absent-minded; see above) during the meeting, and ends up looking down during the "Bad Guy affirmation" with a seemingly broken look on his face, as if he's about to break down sobbing. Most likely, he knows that the fact he's about to leave the meeting means he's only about to get his ass handed to him again.
  • Throw the Dog a Bone: He gets even with Sonic in the Creative Closing Credits. Sonic Spin-Dashes at him in Chemical Plant Zone, only to lose his rings in the process.
  • The Voiceless: Mike Pollock, Eggman's voice actor in the video games, was never notified of Eggman being in the film. Jim Cummings, reprising his role from the 90s television shows, recorded lines for the character that ended up being deleted from the final cut of the film..

    Bowser 

Full name King Bowser Koopa, the Big Bad of the Super Mario Bros. franchise makes his fire-breathing debut in the Disney Animated Canon as one of the "bad guys" attending the weekly Bad-Anon meeting. Unlike other cameos, this one isn't an Advertised Extra and is, instead, a non-speaking background cameo appearance, which is rather ironic considering the importance of the franchise in question. This might have something to do with either the infamy of the Suddenly Voiced Bowser in Super Mario Sunshine or the fact that, unlike Coily below and Clyde, Bison, and Eggman above, Bowser isn't accompanied by his nemesis Mario. This last fact is because the writers wouldn't have known how to use Mario in the movie.

Still, Bowser's appearance in the movie is most likely what, according to near-unanimous speculation, led to the tie-in Licensed Game being a Nintendo exclusive (DS, Wii, and 3DS), despite said game not featuring any of the cameos.

Used with Nintendo's permission.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

  • Must Have Caffeine: Much like in real Alcoholics Anonymous groups (just think of the one in The Simpsons Movie), Bowser is seen drinking coffee. The explanation is either this, or coffee is simply Disneyverse Bowser's Trademark Favorite Food.
  • Shown Their Work: Aside from Bowser's physical faithfulness to his original artwork (which, just as Eggman's, made his cameo in the first trailer all the more notable), there's the fact that, much like other cameos, the writers worked with each character's original owners - in this case, Nintendo - in order to make sure the characters stay true to form. Word of God is that the way Bowser is seen drinking coffee is how he is canonically supposed to do so.
  • Spit Take: Much like Clyde's turning blue above and Sonic's loss of his rings below, this is a character-in-game-trait that the movie's writers managed to work in the movie as a gag. His breath of fire results in a fiery Spit Take (for the same reason Clyde becomes Blue with Shock, that is, during the Mass "Oh, Crap!" due to Ralph's "I don't want to be the bad guy anymore").

    Neff 

The Final Boss from Sega's Altered Beast makes a surprise appearance in the movie as a member of the Bad-Anon meeting. As with his original incarnation, Neff is an antropomorphic rhino with magical powers, but he's not given as much importance as the other cameos and pretty much stays in the background most of the time.

Used with SEGA's permission.

(Official Bio) Neff: purple's the new black As "Altered Beast's" resident evil wizard, Neff is a natural for the Bad-Anon meeting roster.

Tropes:

    "Cyborg" (actually Kano) 
"You can't mess with the program, Ralph."
Voiced by: Brian Kesinger

This is a tricky one to describe. Simply put, the so-called "Cyborg" is essentially Kano from the gory, M-rated, and not-at-all-Disney-like Mortal Kombat franchise. However, in the movie this Bad-Anon attendant is referred to as "Cyborg" for some reason. Most likely, this choice is supposed to avoid any close association between the Disney movie where Kano appears in and the latter's source material; going by this theory, we might say that "Cyborg" is actually a Disney-verse version of Kano. An authorized Captain Ersatz, if you will.

In fact, there's been some speculation about the character's identity when scans of a book adaptation of the movie surfaced online, given the presence of Cyborg among the Bad-Anon attendants despite said book only featuring Disney's own characters. Then the movie came out, and the fact that the writers had the balls to work into the movie what made the character so infamous in the first place confirmed that Cyborg, after all, was indeed supposed to be Kano all along. We're talking about Kano's Fatality, where he rips out someone's heart (and then some). No, really.

Used with Midway's, now Warner Bros. Interactive's, permission.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

    "Zombie" (actually Cyril) 
"Zangief saying labels not make you happy. Good! Bad! Rrraaarrrgh! You must love you."
Voiced by: Raymond S. Persi

Copyright-wise, Kano's situation (see above) also applies to Zombie, better known as who he's obviously supposed to be: Cyril from House of the Dead, only balding and without the blood on his face. Sure, Disney could have simply referred to the character's source material as "Curien Mansion", but there you go.

Anyway, for the character himself, this is Cyril's counterpart for the Disney Animated Canon: a zombie who, despite carrying two axes and being obviously as deranged as is to be expected from a zombie, is still a good guy at heart, as can be said about every other "villain" seen at Bad-Anon (and as you should know well by this point if you've scrolled the page down this far).

Used with SEGA's permission.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

Other Characters

    Yuni Berth 
"All clear! The arcade's closed!"

Actually the first cameo seen in the film, Yuni, representing Dance Dance Revolution in the Disney Animated Canon, appears for a few seconds with a specific purpose: the placement of her game's cabinet allows her to see if there are still people around when Litwak's arcade closes, allowing other characters to cut the act.

Used with Konami's permission.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

  • Attract Mode: Yuni's dancing on her own - or rather, pretending to, as she's just checking if there's still anyone in the arcade.
  • Bare Your Midriff: Although her belly button isn't shown.
  • Fashionable Asymmetry: Her stockings don't match, much like Vanellope's (who actually appears in the movie after Yuni does); nor do her wristbands (one of which has a detached sleeve). Or the sides of her skirt, for that matter. Let's just say only her shirt and her face appear to be perfectly symmetrical.
  • Girlish Pigtails: She actually has two ponytails.
  • Shout-Out: The fact someone has to tell the others when to cut the act parallels Toy Story, as the very same happened with the titular toys in that movie. Given Disney's description of this movie was (contrary to the fandom's "Who Framed Roger Rabbit with video game cameos") "the videogame equivalent of Toy Story" this is most likely intentional.
  • Zettai Ryouiki: Averted, despite the character's Japanese heritage. Justified due to this being a Disney film, although the miniskirt still made it in Yuni's design in the movie.

    Ryu and Ken 

"Shoryuken!... Oh, boy, what a day."note 

Ryu and Ken from Street Fighter are introduced to the Disney Animated Canon right after Yuni (just read the quote in Yuni's caption, and then the one in Ryu and Ken's caption in quick succession), when Ryu suddenly stops attacking Ken as soon as he's sure there's no one else in the arcade; the two then leave. Ryu reappears at Tapper's as a background character later on in the movie.

Used with Capcom's permission.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

  • Attract Mode: Same as Yuni's dancing described above. Ryu is seen attacking Ken with a Shoryuken, only to stop as soon as Yuni tells him he can cut the act.
  • Bonus Stage: In the Creative Closing Credits, Ralph and Vanellope reunite with Ryu and destroy the infamously Tonka Tough car from Street Fighter II within seconds. Which is kind of a Justified Trope, considering wrecking stuff is what Ralph does best. Then Ralph gets curbstomped by Blanka, quickly proving that while Ralph's strength is unrivaled when it comes to wrecking stuff, the Street Fighters are still the best when it comes to actual fighting.
  • Brick Joke: After asking Ken to go drink something at Tapper's together, he's later seen at Tapper's when Ralph visits said game (which also happens to act as an actual bar for game characters in the Wreckverse).
  • Broken Masquerade: From "Shoryuken!" to "Oh, boy, what a day".
  • Calling Your Attacks: Shoryuken!
  • Mood Whiplash: See the quote in Ryu and Ken's caption.
  • Mythology Gag: In case you're wondering why Ryu and Ken "leave together like best buds" when the arcade closes, it's because in the Street Fighter games they are best buds anyway.
  • Role Reprisal: Kyle Hebert and Reuben Langdon are back.

    Chun-Li and Cammy 
Pictured: top-left, Chun-Li hanging out with Cammy in the first Game Central Station scene; top-right, Chun-Li in the second; bottom-left, her portrait at Tapper's, as explained below; bottom-right, her artwork in the movie's Chinese poster.

The first cameos spotted after the Bad-Anon scene ("spotted" being the keyword here), Chun-Li and Cammy - still hailing from the Street Fighter franchise - don't do as much as Ryu and Ken do, but Chun-Li herself still appears often throughout the movie as a background cameo. Neither Chun-Li nor Cammy have any lines at all.

Used with Capcom's permission.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

  • Advertised Extra: Chun-Li in the movie's Chinese release, as seen in the bottom-right corner of the image. Perhaps justified not only because of Chun-Li's Chinese nationality, but also because she replaced Bison in the movie's Chinese poster... and a red-clothed dictator portrayed as a "bad guy" wouldn't quite fly there.
  • Bowdlerise: Cammy isn't quite as Stripperiffic as in her home series.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: The top-left corner of the image can be seen while the camera is panning from the "GAME CENTRAL STATION" sign to the Station itself. And as for Cammy, that's it.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: The top-right corner of the image comes from a shot of Game Central Station, during the scene in which Calhoun explains to Felix that the arcade would be in huge danger if the cy-bugs were to break loose. Look closely at Chun-Li. Three words for you: Surge Protector approves.

    The homeless Q*Bert family 

Pretty much the entire Q*bert cast returns in the movie, as a living deconstruction of the modern gaming industry: the success of the more modern, Rated M for Money shooters led to Litwak's Q*Bert cabinet's lack of popularity, which eventually culminated in the plug of said cabinet being pulled. Now with his own game "unplugged", Q*Bert himself barely managed to evacuate his own game alongside his co-workers, with whom he now lives as a homeless hobo, struggling every day just for some food. At least, however, he and his former in-game "enemies" are now more of a family, and as such always stick together.

Q*Bert is also the most plot-relevant of the cameos, as he interacts directly with most of the main cast: he first met Ralph when the latter gave him one of his two cherries out of compassion, and later recognized the same guy after he stole Pvt. Markowski's Powered Armor. He told Felix about Ralph's game-jumping shortly afterwards.

He and his family found themselves a better place to live by the end of the movie.

Used with, essentially, Columbia Pictures' permission (as they owned Gottlieb for a while in the late 70s and early 80s, before they spun it off under the auspices of Coca-Cola, (who also briefly tried to re-brand the pinball business as Mylstar), so they continue to own the rights to Q*Bert even despite Gottlieb going out of business in 1996).

(Official bio for Q*Bert) Q*Bert: unplugged Q*Bert, whose game was long ago unplugged, spends most of his time in Game Central Station, the travel hub for all arcade-game characters - and the unfortunate "home" to those whose games are over.
(Official bio for Coily) Coily: bouncing purple snake Once the bouncing purple villain in the Q*Bert arcade game, Coily finds himself hanging with his former adversary in Game Central Station after their game is unplugged.

Tropes:

    Sonic the Hedgehog 
"If you die outside your own game, you won't regenerate, ever! Game over."

One of the most notable cameos in the movie, the eponymous protagonist from the series of the same name, Sonic the Hedgehog, makes his debut in the Disney Animated Canon. His role here is that of a much more famous game star than others, and much like "big name stars" in Real Life, here he uses his fame for the greater good by starring in PSAs about a vital rule within the context of the movie: essentially, when a character wanders outside his or her own game, said character becomes mortal, and as such any death is the Final Death. Given the exposition he provides, Sonic is a cameo given a prominent role indeed, much like Q*Bert (see above).

All of this, of course, happens when our beloved blue blur is not busy Saving the World.

Other than being advertised a lot, the Sonic cameo also appears a few more times throughout the movie, again, much in the same vein as Q*Bert. Unlike Q*Bert, however, Sonic's appearance is part of a deal between Disney and Sega: in exchange for Sonic's cameo, Ralph himself will appear as a Guest Racer in Sega's Sonic & All-Stars Racing Transformed; however, this part of the deal also granted Roger Craig Smith to deliver his lines as Sonic, which is another reason why this cameo has been met with such praise.

As obvious as it is, used with SEGA's permission.

(Official bio) Sonic the Hedgehog: still Saving the World When this hero who moves at the speed of sound is not busy saving the world in his own video-game series, Sonic the Hedgehog slows down to make public service announcements reminding his arcade-game colleagues to stay safe - especially when outside of their own games.

Tropes:

    Pac-Man 

The Man himself, Pac-Man, munches his way into the Disney Animated Canon doing what he does best: eat everything in sight, while attending the Fix-It Felix Jr. 30th Anniversary Party.

Used with Namco Bandai's permission.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

  • Big Eater: According to Word of God, this trait for Pac-Man's cameo appearance has been explicitly requested by Namco.
  • Irony: When Ralph destroys the Niceland Apartments-shaped cake in a fit of rage, Pac-Man is splattered with it. What's ironic? He didn't get to eat the cake.
  • Mythology Gag: For the same reason as Sonic above - the fact Pac-Man is seen at a Milestone Celebration can't be coincidental. Does the title Pac-Man World ring any bells?
  • Pac Man Fever: The guy isn't the Trope Namer for nothing. Sure, the movie averted the trope, but frankly the movie wouldn't be quite complete with a reference to one of the most famous gaming icons.

    Skrillex 

Yes, that Skrillex. While not technically a gaming cameo, he appears at the Fix-It Felix Jr. Anniversary Party nonetheless - as their official DJ. He has no lines, though.

Used with, huh, Skrillex's own permission. Or perhaps it was kind of a given, what with Skrillex contributing to the movie's soundtrack.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

  • As Himself: Despite having no lines, that's obviously Skrillex.
  • Ink-Suit Actor: Just in case you thought Ralph, Vanellope, Felix, and Calhoun were blatant - just wait until you notice him. He flat-out appears As Himself.
  • Unexpected Character: While fans knew he was involved in the movie's soundtrack, his actual appearance in the movie caught a lot of people off guard. In a good way.
  • The Voiceless: Despite Skrillex's own work on the movie (heard later during Moppet Girl's gameplay session in Hero's Duty), he didn't do any voice acting as his own avatar here.

    Tapper 
"Hold that thought."

Acting as a bartender for all the arcade games' heroes, Tapper appears in the movie as his bar goes beyond its purpose as a proper game, working as a place where more characters meet aside from Game Central Station itself.

Therefore, as Ralph himself notes, Tapper knows a lot of people. Ryu and Peter Pepper have been spotted there, as well as other gaming characters seen in some portraits hanging on the bar's walls.

Used with Midway's, now Warner Bros. Interactive's, permission.

(Official bio) None

Tropes:

  • Almighty Janitor: Given the stuff Ralph finds in the lost-and-found, it's safe to say Tapper knows at least Mario and Solid Snake. Yeah.
  • Excuse Me While I Multitask: Inverted. Tapper interrupts his chat with Ralph (see the quote in his caption here) for about five seconds only, in order to quickly resume his role in his game by giving the customers the drinks they wanted. He then goes back to said chat.
  • Frothy Mugs of Water: Tapper's bar serves Root Beer, despite the game being still Tapper and not Root Beer Tapper - and at least one character has either been seen Drowning His Sorrows or implied to. Right.
  • Limited Animation: Despite being shown with better graphics than those of the Nicelanders, he has the same erratic movements as they do. It's a bit jarring.
  • Nice Guy: He still manages to listen to Ralph's rant despite having a job to do, and does his best to comfort him while outright stating the biggest help he can offer is allowing Ralph to look for a medal in the bar's lost-and-found.

    Tapper's portraits 
[-In case you're wondering, no, Mario isn't in therenote .-

While not counting as characters in the strictest sense, these portraits are worth mentioning because they depict many cameos and Original Generation characters alike, some of which (Tails in particular comes into mind) only made it in the movie only thanks to this gimmick.

They've been drawn by artist Bobby Pontillas, and some of them can be seen in good quality on his blog. The idea, according to Pontillas himself, was to replicate the overall effect of Sardi's restaurant in New York, as many caricatures of famous guests who have visited the place can be found there.

In order to avoid making the already really tall image even taller than it is, here are the two pages of the website Disney Screencaps depicting the scene, so you can look for other portraits there... if you want to go for a Wiki Walk, that is.

Each character's been used with their respective copyright owners' permission.

(Official bio) None (see the ones given for the characters who actually have an official profile on the movie's site)

Tropes:

    Beard Papa 
"This is Beard Papa. The glitch is in the bakery! Get me King Candy."

What's been said about Skrillex also applies to this guy. While not technically a gaming character, Beard Papa, the mascot of the eponymous chain of cream puff stores, appears in the movie as the guard to the Kart Bakery in Sugar Rush. In said Kart Bakery, the "create your own kart" minigame is held, as player characters can create their own karts there (within a minute).

Fitting Sugar Rush's ongoing theme of Product Placements justified by the game's status as one big Level Ate, Beard Papa somehow combines said Product Placement with that of an actual character thanks to his cameo appearance.

Used with Mugino Co., Ltd.'s permission (or should we say "request"?).

(Official bio) None

Tropes:


Wreck It Ralph Other CharactersCharacters/Wreck-It Ralph    

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