Awesome Aussie

"(chuckling) That's not a knife. (pulls out a ten inch Bowie knife) Now, that. That's a knife!"
Mick Dundee, Crocodile Dundee

A close mate of the Dashing Hispanic and Imperturbable Pom.

Since Australia has earned a reputation as one of the most dangerous countries on Earth, due to its harsh environment and myriad of highly dangerous creatures, many authors have stood to reason that anyone who can survive there must be quite a bit tougher than your ordinary human. Australians (specifically, Anglo-Australian males) in fiction are often portrayed as über-masculine rough-and-tumble supermen, champion outdoorsmen who tear up the outback in their Jeeps and have never met a crocodile they couldn't wrestle. Expect a fondness for knives. Some also like to mention the fact that Australia was founded as a penal colony to emphasize how tough they are, as if this is ever taken as a compliment. Obviously not 100% realistic, but there's some truth here. It is notable, however, that the majority of depictions of this trope date from before the first Iraq war.

However, compare that to the typical depiction of Australian Aborigines. They are usually depicted as slender and easygoing; they don't need to be physically tough to survive the Outback considering they know the land inside out and know to how to live in it without blundering through it.

For more completely true information on Australia, see Land Down Under.


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  • Arnie 'Crocodile' Gregory, from Hajime No Ippo.
  • Adventurer Archaeologist Jim Cook from Yu-Gi-Oh! GX. He seriously plays the part, having a pet crocodile that he carries around (not a pet to him; to Jim, Shirley is family), and his Duel Disk is shaped like a boomerang.
  • It's not played up, but Australia from Axis Powers Hetalia can swim for 10 kilometers (about 6 miles), and apparently doesn't feel accomplished until he's swam the length of the Dover Straight.
  • Kiddy Phenil of Silent Mobius is an Australian policewoman who was rebuilt into a powerful cyborg after an encounter with a cyborg serial-killer in Tokyo. Now, she fights demons with fists and big guns.

    Comic Books 

    Films — Animation 
  • The Rescuers Down Under:
    • Jake, a kangaroo rat and champion outdoorsman with whom Bernard battles for Bianca's affection.
    • The villain, O'Rourke, is an evil version of the Awesome Aussie, a poacher and trader in Australian wildlife who keeps a pet goanna.
  • The Easter Bunny, of all characters, is portrayed this way in Rise of the Guardians. It requires an Australian accent to make the line "I'm a bunny" sound badass. Helps that he's voiced by Hugh Jackman.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Mick Dundee, Paul Hogan's character in Crocodile Dundee, is the trope codifier (much to many Australians' dismay). Something of a subversion, since his famous claims turn out to have been substantially exaggerated, and he's a bit clueless when out of his element. Still decidedly tough, though. They also meet an aborigine friend of Dundee who is an urbane city dweller who is just happening to be in the bush for a visit and they can hear him stumbling in the dark about complaining that he hates being there.
  • The Drover in the film Australia was clearly designed with this stereotype in mind, complete with the use of "Crikey!" As such, he references several other famous Badass Australians.
  • Mad Max: "Mad" Max Rockatansky. And many of his friends.
  • In Pacific Rim, the Australian Jaeger, Striker Eureka, is the most advanced and most powerful Jaeger, being a Lightning Bruiser armed with thermal Sting-Blades, brass knuckles, and chest missiles. And when their Jaeger is disabled, the pilots climb outside and take potshots at a Kaiju with flare guns to keep it distracted and away from civilians. Basically, it's surprising they don't challenge Kaiju to games of knifey spooney.
    Herc: [grabbing the flare guns] Now, we have a choice here: either we sit and wait, or we take these flare guns and do something really stupid.
  • Erin in You're Next was raised by a Crazy Survivalist on a compound in the Outback before moving to the US. This background makes her very well-suited to fighting off a home invasion.
  • Boomer the Kangaroo from Our Lips are Sealed.
  • Most of the cast of The Proposition, a very dark Australian western film.
  • Mick Taylor in Wolf Creek is an evil take on this trope, being essentially a Serial Killer version of Crocodile Dundee.
  • The protagonist of Dakota Harris is an Indiana Jones expy who singlehandedly foils a Nazi plot to change the outcome of the war using an Alien Artifact capable of time travel.

  • Jack West from the series named after him, by Matthew Reilly.
  • In The Last Continent, Rincewind meets some Awesome Fourecksians, including his somewhat more self-assured counterpart (not that that's saying much) Bill Rincewind and a talking kangaroo.
  • In the Newsflesh universe, Australians are widely respected for the survival abilities and considered highly desirable as employees (especially in jobs involving travel) and as spouses.

     Live Action TV 
  • Skippy The Bush Kangaroo is clearly the most badass Australian out there.
  • Jim Taggart from Eureka.
  • The entire 8th Battalion AIF in ANZACs, a five part mini-series from the 80s set during the Great War. Truth in Television.
  • Tucker, in Danger 5. With the added bonus that he's the cool-headed leader of the eponymous Multinational Team.
    • However, he's significantly nerdier than most examples.
  • Arrow gives us Slade Wilson and Billy Wintergreen, ASIS agents who can catch arrows and love swords.

  • Johnny Thunder, the LEGO character.
  • Outback from G.I. Joe.

     Video Games 
  • Team Fortress 2
    • Exaggerated to hilarious extremes with SAXTON HALE, pictured above, the "loose cannon" inventor / adventurer / asskicker / CEO.
    • The Sniper of the eponymous team. He's not as manly as Saxton, but he certainly is smart, resourceful, and absolutely deadly at long-range. Though, the expanded universe comic "Blood in the Water" reveals he's only adopted-Australian. His birth parents are New Zealanders. This explains why he never got muscly and never sported a moustache or Australia shaped body hair.
    • Of course, the entire nation of Australia is like this in the Team Fortress 2 canon, being a nation in which every citizen sports a huge mustache and is a paragon of awesome manliness (even the women). The Sniper is apparently the only Australian without a mustache, although he's by no means a pansy. The discovery of the element Australium is responsible and has made Australia the world's leading country. But without the Australium, they're deprived of their power and rendered defenseless (though they can still survive a Neck Snap).
      • Speaking as an Australian myself, I can confirm that the above description is the literal, gospel truth.
  • Ian "Hunter" St. John, from Wing Commander.
  • Kid, the fiery teenage thief from Chrono Cross.
  • Dingodile from the Crash Bandicoot series.
  • Private Chips Dubbo has become a Memetic Badass thanks to having some of the best dialogue in the series and a kickass attitude.
  • While Australia doesn't exist in Final Fantasy XIII, it has a parallel in Gran Pulse - and since both Fang and Vanille come from Gran Pulse, they fit this category easily.
  • Mass Effect 2: Miranda Lawson is voiced by an Australian actress, and her father is named after an Australian poet, so she's probably Australian. While Miranda lacks things like the crocodile-teeth hat, an extravagant moustache or muscle development like a bad-tempered house, she's still an extremely useful teammate with a counter to every kind of defence, whose loyalty power is to hoist enemies up with her biotics and slam them into the ground with phenomenal force.
  • Dead Island has the likes of Purna who can go toe to toe with the horrifying zombie horde just as well as her international allies, Ryder who does so without being immune as well as a number of survivors, in stark contrast to other Zombie Apocalypse works where those still alive can be counted on one hand. Dead Island: Riptide gives us Wolverine, here he goes by the name John.
  • Dying Light continues the tradition from its predecessor Dead Island by giving us Harris Brecken, the leader of the Tower and the parkour instructor who taught the people in the quarantine how to survive.


     Western Animation 

     Real Life 
  • Steve Irwin, the Crocodile Hunter, the ballsiest animal rights activist ever to walk the Earth. As his nickname implies, Irwin is mostly known for wrestling crocodiles, which he had done since the age of nine. He based his persona on Crocodile Dundee.
    • The whole Irwin family counts. Steve's wife, Terri, even became an Australian citizen.
    • While not damaging to his legacy, Irwin's tragic death was something of a subversion of the trope, as he was killed by a stingray, which isn't even considered that dangerous among sea creatures.
  • Albert Jacka
  • Billy Sing, Australia's greatest sniper in WWI. Born in the state of Queensland, and notably unusual (in terms of this trope) for being ethnically half-Chinese. General William Birdwood, commander of Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC), told Lord Kitchener that "if his troops could match the capacity of the Queensland sniper the allied forces would soon be in Constantinople." The enemy forces specifically assigned a champion Turkish sniper to assassinate the man. When said sniper had Sing in his sights, Sing shot first, and was the only one of the two to walk away alive.
    • Along simlar lines was Caleb Shang, a Chinese-Australian soldier and something of a soldierly jack-of-all-trades, worked as both advanced scout, sniper, machine gunner, stretcher bearer, anything the regiment needed him to be. He was the most highly decorated non-white soldier of the ANZAC forces, including Billy Sing.
  • Just about every dangerous animal from that continent. Tawny Frogmouths, huge birds with red eyes and wide, reptile-like mouths. Dingos. The Inland Taipan, the most venomous snake in the world. And, of course, saltwater crocodiles.
    • Huntsman spiders.
      • Huntsman spiders may be giant and hairy, but they're really quite gentle... Or maybe that's just what they want us to think. These are, after all the same spiders as the 'giant crab spiders' and 'rain spiders' of Brazil, Florida, and many other equatorial to temperate regions. Presumably named so due to their tendency to drop out of the sky like giant man-hunting, parachuting crab-spider ninjas.
  • Ned Kelly, infamous Irish Australian bush-ranger, outlaw and now firmly entrenched figure of folklore.
  • Sir John Monash, World War One general and last man ever knighted on the field of battle. Held responsible by King George for winning the entire damned war. One notable quote: King George commented that they just 'might' win the war using Monash's tactics. Monash's reply, a single incredulous 'might?'
    • The way he reported it in his diaries, the King began a sentence with the words "If we win this war—" at which point Monash interrupted: "If we win?". It was rumoured at one point that if the war had stretched into 1919, the King intended to sack Field-Marshal Haig and put Monash in charge of the entire British Army.
    • Monash being A Father to His Men contributes much to his reputation.
  • John Simpson Kirkpatrick, a stretcher-bearer during the Gallipoli campaign, became an integral part of the ANZAC legend when he acquired a donkey and spent three and a half weeks tirelessly and fearless working to transport wounded British soldiers to safety under heavy fire until he was finally killed by machine gun fire.
  • Hugh Jackman is renowned for playing particularly Badass characters and... pretty much nothing else. This may or may not be because Hugh Jackman is arguably the world's most famous Australian actor.
    • Somewhat subverted, as when he's not playing a badass, he's playing in a musical or romcom, and was known specifically for these roles prior to breaking out into badass action roles. He's still a badass though.
  • Erwin Rommel, the Trope Namer for Magnificent Bastard, said that, if he had to take Hell, he would use the Australians to do so. And the New Zealanders to hold it.
    • Expand that, and you get pretty much the history of the Australian armed forces. Yes they suffered losses from time to time, but generally did pretty well overall.
  • Pendulum is the most popular drum and bass band to ever come out in the planet. They now reside in London, but their hometown is Perth, Australia.
  • Andrew Ucles catches wild animals. With his bare hands.
  • Tipsy Australian fights off crocodile with eye-poke.
  • Clive James: An incredibly funny Dead Pan Snarker writer, journalist, interviewer and TV presenter.
  • Less awesome in himself, but possessing an awesome job title is David Feeney, Federal Member for Batman and Shadow Minister for Justice.
  • Surfer Mick Fanning encountered a shark while competing in an event in South Africa. His reaction was to punch it. Video and reactions can be seen here.
Averted by the fact that perhaps the best known Australian in the world is Dame Edna Everidge (a crossdresser) and that perhaps the two best known Aussie movies in the world are "The Birdcage" (about homosexuality) and "Priscilla, Queen of the Desert" (about drag queens!)