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Western Animation / Heidi's Song

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Heidi's Song is a 1982 Animated Musical produced by Hanna-Barbera based on the novel Heidi by Johanna Spyri. It was directed and co-written by veteran H-B animator Robert Taylor and is one of only three animated features Hanna-Barbera made that did not feature their trademark characters (the other two being Charlotte's Web and Once Upon a Forest).note 

Like the book, the film tells the story of an orphaned girl named Heidi who is taken to live with her grandfather by her Aunt Dete. Heidi's grandfather initially dislikes having Heidi around because she interferes in his routine. But when her grandfather hurts his leg, Heidi helps nurse him back to health, and the two begin to bond. But all is not well when Aunt Dete arrives to take Heidi away again, saying that a wealthy family in Frankfurt, Germany, wants Heidi to come live with them...

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The film was received well enough but never garnered the attention or praise that Charlotte's Web did. While Paramount distributed the film during its theatrical run and VHS releases, this film is part of the Hanna-Barbera librarynote , with Warner Bros.note  eventually releasing the film to DVD for the first time in 2012 through the Warner Archive.

Do not confuse with Heidi, Girl of the Alps which is based on the same novel but is a different work.


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Heidi's Song provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Disney Death: When the tree Heidi's grandfather was cutting falls down on top of him, Peter rushes to his aid and thinks he's dead, and the grandfather responds, "Who's dead?"
  • Does Not Like Shoes: As usual, Heidi prefers to walk barefoot. She even removes her boots in the opening sequence.
  • Dream Sequence: Heidi has one early in the film, in which she dreams she's taken away by the spirits and other supernatural creatures that live on the mountain.
  • Eerie Pale-Skinned Brunette: Klara is one.
  • Friendship Song: When Peter realizes that Heidi's in trouble, he rallies the country animals to rescue her by singing "That's What Friends Are For."
  • Friend to All Living Things: Heidi makes friends with animals with an ease that would make a Disney princess jealous!
  • Grumpy Old Man: Heidi's grandfather may be cantankerous but he does mean well, as shown when he is nursed back to health.
  • Hair of Gold, Heart of Gold: Heidi is blonde and a very sweet girl.
  • Hates Everyone Equally: Peter tells Heidi her grandfather is this and he's right, at least at first.
  • Heartwarming Orphan: Heidi may as well be the poster child.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Although Heidi's grandfather can be harsh, his actions over the course of the film show that he deeply loves her.
  • The Kids Are American: Heidi sounds American while her aunt and grandfather both have European accents.
  • Limited Animation: Some sequences are reused, most obviously on the animals.
  • Nice Hat: Aunt Dete wears one.
  • Non-Human Sidekick: Heidi has Spritz the baby goat (a clear Expy of Schneehopli from the book) and her grandfather has his dog, Gruffle.
  • Not Even Bothering with the Accent: Both Margery Gray and Roger DeWitt, Jr. don't even bother to hide their American accents.
  • Oh, Crap!:
    • The grandfather and Heidi have a collective moment of horror when the former realizes that the tree he was chopping down is going to fall on him.
  • Papa Wolf: Heidi's grandfather becomes this once he warms up to her. Even before that he was willing to throw himself under a falling tree to push her to safety.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning: All the rats have red eyes. Even lampshaded in the Villain Song: "And 'E' is for your evil eyes of red!"
    • Inverted with the kindly old goat of the mountain though, who also has red eyes.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: Spritz, the little black goat, is adorable.
  • Unnamed Parent: Heidi's grandfather is unnamed in this adaptation.note 
  • Villain: Exit, Stage Left: When Miss Rottenheimer and Sebastian's plans are foiled, they decide to pack up and exit the Sessemann mansion.
  • Villain Song: "Ode to a Rat", sung by Sammy Davis Jr. as the Head Rat as he encourages the rats to be as vicious and nasty as possible, after Heidi very nearly talks them into being friends with her. See Friend to All Living Things above.

"As you go down the third time, they'll admit
That's What Friends Are For."
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