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Trivia / The Room

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  • Accidentally Correct Writing: As mentioned in Throw It In!, "hospital on Guerrero Street" was a Greg Sestero ad-lib, but there actually used to be a hospital on Guerrero Street, though it moved out of San Francisco to nearby Daly City in 1965.
  • Acting for Two: Originally, Chris-R was going to be played by Scott Holmes, who already plays Mike, wearing a hat and glasses, which would have made the film even harder to follow. Fortunately (unfortunately?), Holmes convinced Wiseau to give the role to his roommate, Dan Janjigian, whose performance so impressed Wiseau that he thought about writing more scenes for Chris-R, but never did.
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  • Acting in the Dark: According to Tommy Wiseau, Denny has some sort of mental disorder, which explains his behaviour in the film. Philip Haldiman was not told about this, and the entire explanation was likely a post-release retcon anyway.
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!:
    • The "oh hai, X" construct is used more than enough times in the film, but in the flower shop scene Johnny just says "hai doggie" without the "oh".
    • "What a story, Mark" and "Anyways, how is your sex life?" are often paired together, but they are from different scenes.
  • Big Name Fan: Pewdiepie has stated that this is one of his favorite films.
  • Copiously Credited Creator: Tommy Wiseau ignored the normal convention of placing his name at the end with the caption "Written, Produced, and Directed by" possibly in order to have his name in the credits as much as possible.
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  • Creator's Apathy: As production dragged on, professionalism just fell apart. Most of the crew were convinced the film would never be seen by anyone. Greg Sestero admitted to phoning in his performance. Entire scenes were out of focus because they did not bother to check the lens.
  • The Danza: Subverted if that's even possible to do with this trope with Mike Holmes as Mike. Believe it or not: according to The Disaster Artist, the actor's name is actually Scott Holmes and Wiseau credited him as "Mike Holmes" because he had forgotten Holmes's real name.
  • Dawson Casting: Played straight with Philip Haldiman, who was one of the oldest members of the cast and played the youngest character, Denny.
  • Deleted Scene: The film has only two scenes that ended up on the cutting room floor: the original version of the Chris-R scene and Johnny committing suicide in the living room instead of the bedroom. Tommy Wiseau insisted on keeping everything in the film, so aside from these two scenes (and everything filmed on the HD camera), everything that was filmed ended up on screen.
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  • Deliberate Flaw Retcon: In addition to using the Parody Retcon excuse liberally in defending the film, Wiseau also claimed that Denny's strange, abnormal behaviour was deliberately written in order to indicate that Denny was mentally ill (even though none of the characters in the film seem to find his behaviour particularly out of the ordinary).
  • Doing It for the Art: Tommy Wiseau. The man spent years raising six million dollars to write, produce, direct and advertise his dream project with absolutely no studio support. The amount of time and effort he poured into making it a reality is nothing short of astonishing - perhaps even inspiring.
  • Dye Hard: Juliette Danielle, if you couldn't tell from her roots and eyebrows.
  • Enforced Method Acting:
    • That Chris-R's actor puts on a better show than the rest of the cast during the 'gimme my fucking money' scene with Denny is apparently largely down to the fact that Wiseau genuinely pissed the actor off between takes.
    • Greg Sestero's venomous delivery of "Keep your stupid comments in your pocket" is due to him channeling all the frustrations of the shoot, and imagining he was actually saying to Wiseau "Why are you doing this to me?"
    • Greg Sestero actually managed to pull this on Wiseau himself by speaking French to him during the recording of the park football scene. Wiseau has a strangely intense hatred for everything French, so when he tackles Sestero in that scene there is genuine anger behind it.
  • Fake Nationality: Wiseau claims to have been born in the United States, but given how little he has revealed about himself combined with his speech mannerisms and accent it's pretty safe to say that this isn't the case, which would make this trope apply to Johnny. Wiseau being from Eastern Europe is the most common guess, and there is reason to believe he was born and raised in Poland.
  • Fan Community Nickname: Roomies, as coined by Robyn Paris (Michelle).
  • Fan Nickname:
    • Greg Sestero (Mark) is referred to as "Sestosterone".
    • Mike is the "Me Underwears" guy. But only because that's more succinct than "Hilarious Blowjob Face" guy.
    • Fans of The Room have been officially dubbed the "Roomies" by Robyn Paris herself (o hai Michelle)
  • He Also Did: Dan Janjigian, who gave that famously hammy performance as Chris-R, is also an Olympic bobsledder.
  • It Will Never Catch On: With a script so nonsensical that the only way to properly salvage it was a complete rewrite and a director who had zero experience in how to make a film, every cast and crew member believed the film would never be seen by any audience, much less get completed.
  • Looping Lines: Constantly. Most of Johnny's dialogue was obviously dubbed over in post. This may explain some of his more notorious line readings.
  • Method Acting: Chris-R's actor stayed in character during his entire time on set, resulting in the other actors being genuinely scared of him.
  • Money, Dear Boy: Sestero considered leaving the set due how difficult it was... but didn't for this reason.
  • No Export for You: The movie has only showed in very few countries and all of them in direct-to-video. According with a Spaniard distributor, Wiseau has a very tight control over the distribution of the film, making the international distribution of the film really hard. As a side-effect, the film has not been dubbed yet, even in countries when dubbing is mandatory by law.
  • One-Book Author: To date, this is Tommy Wiseau's only feature film, and none of his online projects have gained as much notoriety or cult following.
  • Parody Retcon: The director and star claimed his film was actually a "black comedy" after it became the So Bad, It's Good hit of 2003. Trailers were even hastily edited to reflect this. No one was fooled, except maybe Wiseau. The rest of the cast and the script supervisor knew exactly what they were making.
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  • Shrug of God: What was up with that flower shop lady? Who knows. Not even Tommy Wiseau knows. Maybe she was busy, maybe she was on drugs.
  • Throw It In!:
    • According to a crew member, the infamous "Hai doggie" scene was one of these. The owner of the flower shop they were filming the scene in just happened to have the dog there and it hadn't moved at all during the filming so Tommy Wiseau improvised a brief moment where he rubs the dog simply because the thing was creeping him out.
    • Sestero ad-libbed the part about the hospital with the beaten up woman being on Guerrero Street (despite being aware that there is no hospital there) because it's where Wiseau's San Francisco apartment is located. Even though no one who saw the movie would ever make the connection, Wiseau was furious at Sestero for this... and used the take anyway because it was the best one they had.
    • Wiseau insisted on the entire cast being present during the filming of every scene, in case he suddenly felt like throwing them into the background.
  • Troubled Production: Filming took over six months. In that time, two cinematographers (along with their crews) resigned and three actors left, being either recast or replaced with a completely different character.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • According to The Disaster Artist, Wiseau was considering a subplot about Johnny being a vampire with a flying car. It never comes through in the film, but Wiseau is utterly fascinated with vampires.
      • The scene in question would have used "O Fortuna", thus increasing the ham levels. This does not just sound utterly ridiculous, this might have been the funniest scene in the whole film. Shame he didn't have the six million dollars for that scene.
    • There's an early version of the film's main theme, which according to Milicevic was rejected by Wiseau for being too depressing. The former interpreted the film as a tragedy.
    • According to Greg Sestero, the film began life as a play. It would've been a Bottle Film, with the whole story being set in a single room. That's what the film's title is supposed to refer to; Wiseau was just too lazy to change the title when he decided to make it a movie.
    • The play was also adapted in an unpublished 500 page book.
  • Word of God: According to Mr. Wiseau, Lisa's mother makes a full recovery from her breast cancer. He's also helpfully clarified that yes, Denny does have some sort of mental disorder, a detail that makes a lot of his scenes make more sense.
  • Writing by the Seat of Your Pants: According to the book The Disaster Artist, everything that fans love about The Room was ad-libbed. Wiseau was writing, directing, casting, rewriting, and acting by the seat of his pants, practically making up the film as he went.
  • Write Who You Know: It's suggested in The Disaster Artist that Tommy wrote Johnny as essentially a romanticised, tragic reflection of himself — a well-meaning, magnanimous, kind, and sympathetic Nice Guy who's heartlessly taken advantage of and betrayed by the ungrateful people in his life. But it's observed that while Tommy was something of a troubled, brooding loner with few, if any real friends beyond Greg himself, the Johnny character is constantly surrounded by close friends and loved ones, who frequently extol his virtues. The book also implies that Johnny's abusive relationship with the sociopathic Lisa was torn straight from a chapter of Wiseau's own love life.

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