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Partially Civilized Animal

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These animals are a notch higher than the Nearly Normal Animal, Speech-Impaired Animal, and Talking Animal, but not quite Civilized Animals. They're Partially Civilized Animals.

Like the Nearly Normal Animal, Speech-Impaired Animal, and Talking Animal, the Partially Civilized Animal is very much an animal when it comes to thought processes, personality, instincts, priorities, and motivations. They are more frequently depicted as just walking on four legs than on walking on two legs or walking both ways. Quite a few of them can walk on two legs as well they can on four legs, but they still normally walk on all fours. Like the Civilized Animal, they may wear a few accessories or articles of clothing (often in pantless fashion) and often have some sort of Mouse World.

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Partially Civilized Animals can make human-like arm and hand gestures and many can grasp objects as if they have opposable thumbs. Some are bipedal even if their species isn't naturally so, but many others are depicted as staying on four legs if they are a four-legged animal in Real Life. Like Nearly Normal Animal, Speech-Impaired Animal, and Talking Animal birds, Partially Civilized Animal birds can have Feather Fingers, but their wings have to look completely like wings.

Unlike the Nearly Normal Animal, Speech-Impaired Animal, and Talking Animal, Partially Civilized Animals exhibit some form of civilized manner, usually to a lesser degree than the Civilized Animal, and often have some form of Mouse World. Unlike the Civilized Animal, the majority of the mannerisms are that of the animal and they are more likely to be four-legged than two legged if they are naturally four legged.

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This is between the Civilized Animal and the Nearly Normal Animal, Speech-Impaired Animal, and Talking Animal on the Sliding Scale of Anthropomorphism.


Examples:

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     Fanfiction 
  • This trope is Invoked in the My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic fanfiction series called the Triptych Continuum to explain the strange phenomena from the base show of certain species being able to speak and interact with ponies, yet still being treated as, well, normal animals. The phenomena is explained in-universe as "Tenant Species"; species that have almost, but not quite, achieved full sapience, being held back by overwhelming bestial instincts that render them incapable of founding their own civilizations. As such, ponies (and, implicitly, other truly sapient species) "adopt" these species into their own civilizations, giving them land to occupy and preventing them from hurting themselves or being exploited, whilst the "tenants" pay rent for this protection in various ways. The specific fanfic A Duet for Land and Sky, in its third chapter, addresses the phenomena in detail and lists some of the more notable tenant species:
    • Cattle suffer from a combination of timidity and an overwhelming herd instinct; not only do they startle easily, but in groups, they tend to unthinkingly fall in with the behavior of the group. This means flash-mobs and panic-stricken stampedes are things that cattle are extremely prone to.
    • Sheep are incredibly passive, and will basically do whatever they're told without question (something elaborated on in the fanfic Half!, which explains that sheep basically never grow out of that childish naivety of believing whatever they're told). As such, they're considered legally incapable of owning their own property or signing any form of binding contract.
    • Pigs are eating machines and also incredibly selfish; they were adopted less out of pity and more fear of what they might do to secure food if left to their own terms.
    • Alpacas are both incredibly territorial, violently temperamental, and nauseatingly unhygienic, with a tendency to basically kick and projectile vomit at anyone who comes within range.

     Film 
  • The animals of the The Lion King live under a monarchy ruled by lions that has organized events and laws and animals are shown to be capable of interacting with each other on a sapient level. But nevertheless, most animals more or less act as the real life counterparts would such as meerkats living in underground tunnels, lions and hyenas hunting other animals, and ungulates grazing on grass. Although the movie does tend to put a more anthropomorphic spin on otherwise natural behaviors such as the trio of hyenas cracking jokes about how they're going to eat Simba, Nala, and Zazu.
  • The animals from Madagascar and its spin-offs have the animals using crude tools, wearing simple clothes and occasionally going bipedal. But there is no doubt that they are animals, and they can't speak with humans (the animals can understand human speech, but it doesn't work the other direction).
  • The dinosaurs in The Good Dinosaur, particularly Arlo's family of farming Apatosaurus and the Tyrannosaurus rex who act like cattle ranchers.

     Literature 
  • Erin Hunter:
    • Warrior Cats is a bit hard to put on the Sliding Scale of Anthropomorphism, but most probably this level. They're normal domestic cats living in an ordinary human world (well, normal aside from the fact that they can talk to each other and some can get nine lives), but they have their own society of four Clans in the forest with a firmly structured ranking order and rules, have a religion, and use healing herbs.
    • Canines in Survivor Dogs have religious beliefs, rituals, and their own societies, but are otherwise normal dogs and wolves. Unlike in its sister-series Warriors, they don't use medicine.
    • The characters in Seeker Bears are bears who have religious beliefs, simplistic rituals, and some basic knowledge of healing herbs. They are treated like normal bears and view the world from a POV that is noticeably non-human.
  • Many of the dinosaurs in Dinoverse. They don't speak in language and have no concept of clothing, but they are pretty much universally pretty bright, anything with fingers is quite dextrous, they have good grasps on emotions and ideas like repayment or fairness, and some live in communities that tend to be tightly knit.
  • In Who Moved My Cheese, the mice Sniff and Scurry still act on mouse instinct and can't talk to Lilliputians other than through gestures, but they wear (and can tie) shoes.
  • The wolves in Firstborn act like normal wolves for the most part however they understand how basic medicine works.
  • Animals in Tailchaser's Song have their own cultures, complex religions, rituals, and have a sense of monarchism. They, however, for the most part act like animals and are treated as such.
  • The badgers in The Cold Moons are treated by humans as ordinary badgers. For the most part they also live as normal badgers. However, they also can talk with one another, have religious lore, can use herbs as medicine, and can build basic technology such as stretchers made out of branches. In the case of the main characters, they live in a large community with laws and a parliament.
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     Live-Action TV 
  • Parodied in That Mitchell and Webb Look, with a series of recurring sketches involving a farmer who acts like and talks to his horse as if it was one of these. In fact, it's simply a Not At All Civilized Animal (i.e. just a regular horse), but this doesn't stop the farmer from reacting with a violent tantrum whenever the horse responds to his overtures with nothing but uncomprehending disinterest.

     Tabletop Games 
  • In Hc Svnt Dracones "Laterals" are mutations who look exactly like normal animals instead of the Petting Zoo People who make up most of the Vector population. They can talk, usually wear clothes (including some sort of pants), and most are fully integrated into larger Vector society, but they don't have thumbs.

    Toys 
  • Early on, My Little Pony characters were this. They were talking horses with a culture and monarchy, yes, but they also were shown living in stables and wearing horseshoes. A few years into G1 the characters shifted into Civilized Animals and have stayed that way ever since.

     Video Games 

     Webcomics 
  • The canines in Wurr at first seem like Talking Animals... then we find out that the dogs are in the Bronze Age.
  • Dr. Vapnoople's bears in Girl Genius are talking animals organized like army troops and at least one is a doctor but they are still bears with the urges and impulses of giant carnivorous animals.

     Western Animation 
  • Dog from WordWorld is a non-talking, four-legged dog, but he owns a house. Most other four-legged residents, including Elephant and Tiger, belong in this trope, too.
  • Perry the Platypus from Phineas and Ferb can't walk like a human or talk and wears a hat and has a career.
  • Coco the monkey from Mickey Mouse Clubhouse walks on two legs and wears a skirt, a strapless top, and a bow on her head, but she is mostly a "normal" monkey otherwise.
  • The Lion Guard: Just like in the movie, the Pride Lands seem to be about as close as an ecosystem can get to resembling a monarchy with law while still more or less being the ecosystem it's based on. The royal lion family is clearly in charge of everything. All animals have "jobs" they are supposed to perform to maintain the Circle of Life such as crocodiles keeping fish populations in check and hyenas eating what other predators leave behind. The animals have organized events like funerals and concerts and many can be seen playing together. On top of all that, the show even has a justice force in the Lion Guard whose job is to maintain peace, save animals from disasters, and deal with animals upsetting the Circle of Life. But when you look past all these human-like elements, you still more or less have an African savanna ecosystem. Predators hunt prey animals, herbivores migrate and graze, many animals steal from and fight with others, and visually the animals have very little anthropomorphism beyond their faces.
  • All animals in Littlest Pet Shop (2012) behave in this way. Most, but not all, walk on two legsnote , Shivers (a wild squirrel) is shown to have a house of sorts, and more domesticated animals are shown taking up human hobbies like stage magic. Furthermore, all animal species can speak to each other, but not to humans (except Blythe). Language barriers among animals exist, but are regional and cultural rather than based on species.
  • Boo Boom! The Long Way Home: Jack the bulldog. Due to being a military dog trained by the American army, he has a lot of knowledge about military weapons and tactics (like being able to identify any weapon he sees) and, as the series finale shows, can even operate a tank. Other than that however, he is still very much a dog who can only talk in Animal Talk and walks on all fours.


Alternative Title(s): Partially Civilised Animal, Demi Civilized Animal

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