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A 1936 novel written by Daphne du Maurier, Jamaica Inn tells the story of young Mary Yellan, who was brought up on a farm in Helford but had to go and live with her Aunt Patience after her mother died. Patience's husband, Joss Merlyn, a terrifying bully who is almost seven feet tall, is the keeper of Jamaica Inn.

On arriving at the gloomy and threatening inn, Mary finds her aunt in a ghost-like state under the thumb of the vicious Joss, and soon realizes that something unusual is afoot at the inn, which has no guests and is never open to the public. The plot follows a group of murderous wreckers who run ships aground, kill the sailors and steal the loot. It is an eerie period piece set in Cornwall in 1820; the real Jamaica Inn still exists and is a pub in the middle of Bodmin Moor.

Made into a 1939 film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Charles Laughton and (in her first starring role) Maureen O'Hara. Later made into two Mini Series; one in 1983 at ITV starring Jane Seymour, Patrick McGoohan and Billie Whitelaw, and another in 2014 at BBC1 starring Jessica Brown Findlay.

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Tropes in Jamaica Inn:

  • All Girls Want Bad Boys: Mary is attracted to Jem, despite knowing that he is a horse thief.
  • Bastard Boyfriend: Jem is considered this by many readers, but considering that this novel was written in the twenties and set over a hundred years before this, that he, Francis and Joss accept Mary's defiance of gender roles is quite remarkable.
  • Big Good: Squire Bassat acts as one more or less.
  • Boundand Gagged: Happens to Mary twice.
  • Creepy Uncle: While Joss despises Mary at the beginning of the novel, he comes to care for her and admits to having a 'soft spot' for her. He kisses her on the lips when she is injured and later suggests to her that if he were younger, he would have courted her.
    • Subverted/zig-zagged with Jem and Mary's romance, as he too is sort of her uncle (by marriage, anyway).
  • Evil Albino: The vicar, Francis Davey. A very progressive example, as society's reaction to him being different is cited as his reason, as opposed to him being simply an evil 'freak of nature'. Moreover, most albinos would make terrible gunmen owing to their bad eyesight, but Davey makes other people do his dirty work for him. Also, up till the point he reveals his true self, Mary trusts him absolutely.
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  • Evil Uncle: Joss admits to Mary that he has murdered people.
  • Have a Gay Old Time: The coach driver notes that there are "queer tales" about the goings-on at the inn.
  • Love Martyr: Aunt Patience to Joss.
  • Meaningful Name: A long-suffering wife named Patience.
  • The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything: Subverted. Terribly, terribly subverted. Joss's gang are more like The Pirates Who Don't Do Anything Else.
  • Salvage Pirates: The wreckers.
  • Sinister Minister: Francis Davey.

The 1939 Alfred Hitchcock adaptation includes these tropes:

  • Adaptational Heroism: Jem Merlyn becomes Jem Trehearne, a Royal Navy lieutenant sent by the government to infiltrate the wrecker crew.
  • Adaptational Villainy: Eager to import the film to America, the producers learned that having a clergyman as a villain violated The Hays Code, so the Vicar had to be Adapted Out. In his place, the novel's Squire Bassat got transformed into Sir Humphrey Pengallan, the Big Bad of the film.
  • Ambiguously Bi:
    • Sir Humphrey (played by an actor who famously spent his life in a Transparent Closet) has a dandyish manner and a mincing walk, but is clearly horny for Mary.
    • Harry, who acts as The Dragon for Joss, is very flamboyant and wears earrings, but also hits on Mary (then gets told "She's not partial to your sort"). He was played by Emlyn Williams, who was bisexual in Real Life.
  • Creator Cameo: Averted. This was the last Alfred Hitchcock film in which he didn't make some sort of cameo, though it's been reported that he was an extra in the film. If so, he might've been in the crowd in the final scene.
  • Defiant to the End: Sir Humphrey at the film's climax.
    What are you all waiting for? A spectacle? You shall have it! And tell your children how the great age ended. Make way for Pengallan! (leaps to his death)
  • Disney Villain Death: Sir Humphrey, from the mast of a ship, no less!
  • Fat Bastard: Sir Humphrey, gleefully so.
  • Flashed-Badge Hijack: Trehearne does this with a horse-drawn coach.
  • Have a Gay Old Time: Phrased even more amusingly than the novel.
    Coach driver: That place. Jamaica Inn. It's got a bad name. It's not healthy, that's why. There's queer things goes on there. Queer things. I won't stop there, not if she were to offer me double fare!
  • Internal Reveal: A conversation between Sir Humphrey and Joss after Humphrey takes Mary to the inn establishes that Humphrey is the Diabolical Mastermind behind the shipwreck scheme. Hitchcock reportedly wanted to wait a while before this was revealed, but Laughton, eager to ramp up the villainy in his performance, overruled him.
  • Screw the Rules, I Make Them!: Sir Humphrey Pengallan is the local justice-of-the-peace, who obviously condones his own criminal schemes.
  • Signature Style:
  • Smug Snake: Sir Humphrey is supremely conceited and relishes the way he controls everyone around him.
  • Villain Protagonist: Since Charles Laughton was producing, once he decided to switch from playing Joss to playing Sir Humphrey, this trope got invoked hard.
  • Wicked Cultured: Sir Humphrey Pengallan, a refined country squire who's secretly the Diabolical Mastermind of the wreckers.
  • World of Ham: With Charles Laughton as Sir Humphrey, pretty much everyone else in the cast was forced to ham it up just to keep up with him, with Leslie Banks (Joss) also standing out with an over-the-top performance. To put it another way, when the most subtle performance comes from Robert Newton, you know you've found a film full of this.
  • Wretched Hive: How the inn is portrayed.

The 2014 BBC adaptation also includes these tropes:

  • Bottomless Magazines: A single-shot flintlock gun is fired three times without reloading.
  • The Unintelligible: Joss's lines were borderline inaudible, leading to numerous complaints. The BBC blamed it on problems with the sound mix.
  • Evil Albino: Averted. The character of Francis Davey was this is the original book, but this is not used for the sake of political correctness and for the understandable reason that it is in somewhat bad taste for a modern villain to be depicted in this way.


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