YMMV / WarioWare

  • Best Boss Ever: The bosses of the final stages usually fit:
    • The first game had you play through a hilariously crappy adventure-style game that switched controls on the fly to things you may have played through on an earlier level. Touched also had a similiar set-up for Wario-Man's boss stage and plays Final-Exam Boss a bit more straight.
    • The first WarioWare also has Orbulon's boss game where you have to defeat a boss Dragon Quest style by picking the correct spelling of the words, and Dribble & Spitz' boss stage which is reminiscent of the shmup genre.
    • Tiny Wario's stage from Smooth Moves has Wario Dance Company where you had to dance to the beat and strike poses every now and then.
    • Twisted had 9-Volt's boss stage where you played through a level from Super Mario Bros.
    • Smooth Moves had Dribble & Spitz' boss stage where your Mii goes through an obstacle course before taking down a giant nose, and 9-Volt's boss stage where you played through a level from the SNES Star Fox (Corneria, Sector X and Titania on the respective difficulties) and had to take down ROB with a Zapper.
  • Best Level Ever:
    • 9-Volt's stages tend to be much appreciated by fans for its focus on Nintendo games.
    • From the first game, we have Ana & Kat's stage which is very Japanese flavored, having a song instead of interlude + game music, and having interesting microgames based on nature.
    • The first game also has Dribble & Spitz's stage for its sci-fi style and song rather than interlude + game music, similiar to Ana & Kat's stage. It also has a great boss stage.
    • Smooth Moves feature Dribble & Spitz for having interesting games as well as the microgames' music once again being switched in favor for a song and having a great boss on top of that.
    • Game & Wario has the "Gamer" stage, which centers around 9-Volt playing video games past his bedtime. The microgames themselves are pretty basic, but the real challenge is hiding from his mother who is constantly checking if he's actually asleep. It's even styled like a B-Grade horror movie, complete with Psycho Strings and 5-Volt crawling out of the TV.
  • Broken Base:
  • Base-Breaking Character: Ashley. Is she a mysterious and interesting character that stands out from the rest, or is she a overused and cliche character that doesn't fit in with the weird and quirky cast?
  • Do Not Do This Cool Thing: Game & Wario's "Gamer" has a warning before the game proper that you shouldn't stay up past your bedtime playing video games in real life.
  • Ear Worm:
    • "Kogane iro no anata no kuupe..."note 
    • "You better learn my name 'cause I am Ashley!"
      • "Sore wa kanojo no koto (A-shu-rii!)."note 
    • "Gettin' fit and funky, is that your desire?"
      • "Kagayaku karada hoshikereba..."note 
    • "This here is Mona Pizza..."
      • "Kochira Mona Pizza..."
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Ashley is argaubly the most popular character among fans, especially in her native country, due to her creepy and mysterious demeanor, her Halloween motif, and her cute design. She's so popular that she appears as an Assist Trophy in Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS / Wii U, as a Mystery Mushroom costume in Super Mario Maker, and has several sets of badges in Nintendo Badge Arcade.
    • Game-wise, 9-Volt and 18-Volt are generally the most popular, as their microgames are based on classic Nintendo games.
    • 9-volt's mother 5-Volt, much like Ashley, has gotten a big reputation for being so darned freaky, with her surprise drop-ins to check on her son to see if he's still asleep, which are sure to catch you off guard. But we love her anyway.
    • Young Cricket is popular among the female fans for being the series' only Bishōnen.
    • Mona has a lot of fans, though not as many as Ashley, due to her cute design and peppy personality. Her crush on Wario also makes her popular with shippers.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With the Wario Land series. As WarioWare got popular, Wario Land became less, and consequently, the latter series became dormant and Wario's appearance in Super Smash Bros. largely focused on the former series. This then sparked an ongoing debate on which series meshed better with Wario and thus should be more prominent. While fans who like both sub-series are not unheard of, the most vocal ones are at odds with each other.
  • Friendly Fandoms: With the Rhythm Heaven series due to them being created by the same team, having similar styles, and the frequent crossovers between the two franchises.
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • The nature and popularity of Ashley has unsurprisingly prompted this, with many fanfics centered around her past and her relationships with the others.
    • How Wario met the others and became friends with them is also a very popular fanfic subject.
    • Mona's Precocious Crush on Wario appears in many fanworks.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: The Super Mario Bros. fandom in general ships Mario/Peach and Luigi/Daisy, however what to do with Wario and Waluigi stumped fans for years. Some fans shipped Wario with Captain Syrup, however when Mona came along the fandom jumped onto the Wario/Mona bandwagon. Waluigi is primarily still seen as single, though some ship him off with Rosalina.
  • Growing the Beard: As well-regarded as the first game is, it does suffer a little bit from Trial-and-Error Gameplay at times, as the controls are almost never explained prior to any of the minigames, meaning that if you make an incorrect guess as to how a minigame's controls work, the result is almost invariably an instant fail. Twisted (or Touched, for people in countries where that game suffered No Export for You) is where the series really came into its own, and began using control styles that were less frustrating, in addition to opening up more gameplay opportunities.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • The game which basically inspired Wario to found his company is Pyoro, a game for handhelds that's highly successful and features a red bird as its mascot. Sound familiar?
      • As of 2014, the extremely simple yet (briefly) intensely popular Flappy Bird, which also features a red bird, makes for an even better point of comparison.
    • The description for the Kid Icarus record in Twisted is "This is as close as you'll ever get to a sequel." Nope.
    • Not to mention that there is also a record called NES Remix.
    • Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog has a character named Penny, who sings, has red hair, and a mad scientist is in love with her. WarioWare has a character named Penny who is a redhead, a mad scientist herself, and harbors a secret fondness for singing. Became even funnier when Felicia Day, who played Penny in Dr. Horrible, was cast as mad scientist Dr. Kinga Forrester in the revival of Mystery Science Theater 3000.
    • One of Mona's games in 2004's Touched bears a very uncanny resemblance to 2010's Fruit Ninja.
    • There's a bootleg videogame called Mario 14 (a hack of Kid Niki: Radical Ninja 3) which, according to the title screen, was made by Wario. If the year shown on the copyright is true, this game predates WarioWare by 10 years.
    • Gamer is a game where the player can't move from their preplaced spot, and must multitask multiple screens and use a hiding mechanic to avoid getting attacked by a mysterious, horrifying threat that comes from multiple angles. Sound familiar?
  • Jerkass Woobie: While Ashley is certainly a jerk, it's hard not to feel sorry for her. As she is a lonely and introverted outcast who is not only mediocre at magic, but was implied to have been abandoned by her parents at a young age, and has no friends or anyone to comfort her (aside from Red.) Jeez.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Ever since Ashley was introduced in the series, and kind of inevitable due to her popularity, she has been shipped with nearly all the characters in one way or another.
  • Moe:
    • Kat and Ana qualify, being preschooler ninjas.
    • Ashley, especially after her redesign in Game and Wario. Both her initial newer designs also qualify as Creepy Cute.
  • More Popular Spin-off: To the Wario Land series, which itself is one to the Super Mario Land series.
  • Older Than They Think:
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • The objective of Listen to the Doctor from Mega Party Games. You're instructed to physically do something stupid OUTSIDE of the game, and there's nothing stopping the other players from refusing to applaud you and thus denying you any points. There's a reason that very few multiplayer video games are reliant on the honor system.
    • Blowing into the mic in Touched is somewhat clumsily implemented, especially since background noise can very easily screw you over if you're playing on an original DS, DS Lite, or DSi. Playing on the 3DS has the opposite issue: its microphone's not nearly as good at picking up sound, forcing you to blow to the point of lightheadedness in some cases.
  • Sidetracked by the Gold Saucer: Despite being a game already composed of minigames, some of the side things you can unlock can easily sway you away from the arguably main task of completing all the microgame gauntlets:
    • The first game has "Dr. Wario." Given that it basically is a fully playable bootleg version of Dr. Mario, its addictive properties should come as no surprise.
    • It's no surprise that Pyoro was such a huge hit In-Universe, given that it's a pretty distracting minigame.
    • Touched has the Orbit Ball minigame. It's essentially an Endless version of Kat and Ana's boss microgame, where you draw trampolines to keep a ball in the air.
    • The first game has a simple jump rope minigame called "Jump Forever", where the goal is to jump successfully as many times as you can without tripping on the rope.
  • Spiritual Successor: Mario Maker to WarioWare DIY. Both involve making your own short games for others to play.
    • Warioware itself is the spiritual successor to Sound Bomber from Mario Artist: Polygon Maker, as the basic concept of mircogames and even some of the games were taken directly from it.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song:
    • In the first WarioWare game the music for Kat and Ana's boss stage "The Frog Flap" is very similar to "Music, Music, Music" by Teresa Brewer.
    • Go Go Mike from WarioWare: Touched! has almost the exact beat from the chorus to "Greased Lightening" from Grease.
    • "Body Rock" from WarioWare: DIY is very very similar to "Physical" by Olivia Newton-John, even down to having similar lyrics at one point.
  • That One Boss:
    • Twisted's "Wario De Mambo", Good luck trying to do it on Hard, as there's many moves you have to repeat. Miss one, and it's all over.
    • Dribble & Spitz's boss stage from Twisted. You must violently shake the system in order to outrun a boulder, while jumping over obstacles and holes. If you can SEE anything on the screen, you're not shaking it fast enough to outrun the boulder. Nearly unplayable on level 2 or higher.
    • The slider puzzle in Orbulon's DIY microgames.
    • Ashley's boss game in Touched!, in which you have to navigate Bullet Hell without getting hit once.
  • That One Level:
    • Very few of the Microgames in the first Warioware are inherently hard due to the very simplistic nature of their design, but the "Noodle Cup" microgame (one of Orbulon's games) can be a serious pain in the ass. It's one of the few minigames that isn't as simple as tapping a button to win—it requires intuition and forces you figure out the right pattern to pour the noodles into. Oh, and you only have a couple seconds to decide which one to pour the cup into, so it's very easy to pick the wrong one in a rush.
    • Any microgame that requires you to spot the wrong one out of four (i.e. "Odd Man Out", "The Real McCoy", "Find My Behind") can be a buzzkill too, since it requires you to have very precise attention to detail while the clock is breathing down your neck.
    • The "Ice Climber" microgame. You are given exactly two seconds to grab the bird, and between the very slippery platforms, odd jump physics and the fact that you can accidentally fall or jump to your death, it's very easy to bungle it. Not hard per se, but rich with Fake Difficulty.
    • "Wario Kendo", where Wario has to stop a blade from falling on him—it's very easy to get the timing wrong when you try this one.
    • "Lickety Split" (one of Kat and Ana's microgames) also requires very precise timing to eat the hearts, and it's very easy to mess up on it.
    • "Go Fer The Tater" has very sensitive collision detection, which makes it really easy to knock the gopher against the cramped rock environment while trying to rush to the potato.
  • This Is Your Premise on Drugs: Actually, this is every other game in existence off its meds—specifically, Ritalin.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks: The artstyle that was introduced from Game and Wario onwards has not been well received by a good portion of the fandom. (Especially Mona's new design..)
  • Uncanny Valley: Some people in certain microgames in Smooth Moves due to crude 3D graphics. Especially the girl in the "Take a Headshot!" minigame.
  • Woolseyism: The techniques in Smooth Moves have completely different names (and meanings) in Japanese and English, and they all make sense in the English translation. ('Tengu' becomes 'Elephant', 'Mawaryanse' note  to 'Chauffer', etc.) A full list can be found here.


http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/WarioWare