YMMV / Gravity Falls


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  • Acceptable Lifestyle Targets:
    • The Wealthy. Not only do you have Pacifica Northwest and her family (which gives rise to Dipper's very apt line, "Mabel, Pacifica's rich. She's cheating at life.") but background characters, like the kid in Fight Fighters who gets his brand new car smashed to scrap metal, only to be assured by his dad that they'll "Just buy another one!" Answer: "I love being rich." Taken Up to Eleven and beyond in "Northwest Mansion Mystery", which shows Pacifica's father as an elitist, classist Jerkass, as well as an emotionally abusive father. One could argue that with "Northwest Mansion Mystery," the series-long correlation of wealth and selfishness has moved from being "comic relief" to "important thematic underpinning of the show."
    • "Soos and the Real Girl" makes a couple of jabs at "basement dwellers".
    • Hipsters/Teenagers. "It's heaven's punishment for our terrible taste in everything!"
    • Goths: Robbie is one who lives in a funeral home, hates his parents, and has no outside relationships.
    • LARPers: Allegedly people who delve into fantasy in order to escape responsibility and self improvement.
    • The Totally Radical fashion and attitude of the 90s to the point where Dipper refers them as "dark times."
    • Pick-up artists (or flirty guys in general), to the point where every female character in "Roadside Attraction" turns on and isolates Dipper when they think he's acting like one.
  • Accidental Innuendo: The Liliputtians are a small group of creatures that control the balls in a mini golf course. Franz the Liliputtian tells Dipper and Mabel, "We control the balls!", which would have a different meaning if taken out of context.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • When Stan told Wendy and Soos that he'd "fire both of them if he could", did he mean he'd be unable to find other employees, or that he'd be all alone if they left?
    • Both the twins have this in spades. Is Dipper a good-natured, intelligent kid who only seeks for the truth regarding the journals or is he a dangerously obsessive child who wants to experiment with a hazardous book and encourages Mabel to make decisions they know are immoral? Is Mabel a fun and All-Loving Hero who lightens up the mood or a continuously Innocently Insensitive and self-absorbed brat who takes advantage of her brother, never learns her lessons and whose flaws are rarely spoken of and poorly addressed?
      • Made worse as of Not What He Seems and the hiatus that followed, after which the unresolved conflict between the Pines family broke the fan base. Among the many morality debates that arose, Mabel fans created a theory that Dipper would become the show's villain (or at least, Anti-Hero) so that Mabel could be the hero. Which of course resulted in another backlash as Mabel herself is already a Base Breaker due to her debatably inconsistent character development.
      • A post floating around tumblr has suggested that instead of simple Aesop Amnesia, Mabel may be deliberately ignoring some of the lessons she learns out of a fear of change, even though she can see some of the huge problems this causes for everyone else. Given her Heroic BSOD after all the changes happening in "Dipper and Mabel Vs. The Future" and the lengths she was willing to go to prevent them, this interpretation is growing more likely.
      • In The Inconveniencing Mabel knows exactly what the Smile Dip is, and that it's banned in the US. She also has no freak-out moment when dealing with its...effects. There are quite a few scenes that make more sense if you assume that's not the only time in the series she's high.
    • Did Robbie really not know about the brainwashing subliminal messages in the song from "Boyz Crazy" or was he lying to save his own ass?
    • Even with his official revelation, Bill Cipher still remains the subject of several conflicting interpretations, due to the nature of his mysterious end goal. There's divide between those who think he's "evil" or simply Chaotic Neutral. As of The Sock Opera, Bill seems to be leaning more towards the evil side, as he tricked Dipper into letting him invade his body, then destroyed the laptop from the bunker before Dipper could pull anything off of it, physically abused Dipper's body simply because he had forgotten what the sensation of pain felt like, and then nearly tricked Mabel into giving him Journal 3 so he could destroy it and keep the Twins from discovering any more about what the town is hiding. However, depending on what exactly he's trying to keep Dipper and Mabel from interfering with there may still be an argument for him falling under Chaotic Neutral or possibly even Blue and Orange Morality. The latter is actually highly suggested by canon supplementary material.
      • While we all know he's a malicious Trickster God whose antics would get him kicked out of the Greek or Viking pantheon. Weirdmageddon shows that his home dimension is slowly dying along with all of his friends. Evil friends who eat children and mutate people faster than radiation in Fallout, yes. But conquering a new home and having a party to celebrate seems like a pretty human motivation.
    • .GIFfany. Is she just a verbally abusive ex-girlfriend archetype who murdered someone in cold blood in her backstory, or is she a very lonely character with deep-seeded abandonment issues who's downward spiral into madness started when her programmer, who may have possibly been either a parental-figure to her or someone she fell in love with, tried to delete her and she was forced to kill them in self-defense?
    • Robbie's parents. Are they sociopaths who see death as a means of business, or are they trying to be as optimistic as they can with a career that involves being surrounded by death?
    • Pacifica is trained like a dog to always put on a good public image, and the whole town seems to like her family. That is, everyone save Candy, Grenda, Dipper and Mabel, whom until Northwest Mansion Mystery she went out of her way to bully. Was she a stereotypical Alpha Bitch having fun? Or was she internalizing the abuse and taking it out on the village idiots? Or was she actually jealous of them for not having as much pressure put on them compared to her and able to live like normal kids?
    • Ford. It's hard to tell if he's a petty Jerkass who held a pathetic grudge against his brother for years, or if he actually grew out of that grudge and is only mad because Stan risked the universe and billions of lives just for him.
      • Episodes after "A Tale of Two Stans" seem to be leaning towards the latter, as Stanford actually doesn't seem particularly antagonistic towards Stan once things settle down. The main antagonistic thing he did was ask for his home and name back, which... isn't really that wrong of him, to be honest. The problems in their relationship seem to stem more from Poor Communication Kills than anything else, as Ford doesn't seem to know Stanley lived in poverty and Stanley doesn't know about Ford's work or the full repercussions of opening the Portal.
      • "Dipper and Mabel Vs. The Future" gives us another part of his personality to interpret. Most of the fandom seems to to have taken Ford's speech to Dipper as disparaging Mabel and/or projecting his own feelings onto Dipper, but he could just as easily be seen as merely recognizing Dipper as the ambitious person he's always been and showing concern for the kids' (and particularly, Dipper's, who has always put his goals and dreams secondary to Mabel's) development as individuals rather than parts of a package, something he seems to feel was sorely lacking in his own upbringing, and that this, and always being together at the expense of everything else, is what he's describing as "suffocating", rather than Mabel (or even Stan) as a person. After all, he does remark on Mabel's own gifts as a person and doesn't think she should be dependent on Dipper any more than he should be dependent on her.
  • Angst? What Angst?: Although this is mostly necessary for a comedic series centered around horrifying supernatural events (aired by Disney, no less), it's not so exaggerated with most characters that they find fighting enormous monsters to be fun. Intentionally taken Up to Eleven with Mabel, though, to the point where her bizarre and inappropriate reactions to dangerous situations (like finding the fun in "trick-or-treat or die") are sometimes called out by others.
    • Subverted in "The Last Mabelcorn," as Dipper shows that underneath his calm facade, he's been deeply scarred by many of the events of the summer—especially by Bill.
  • Anvilicious: Roadside Attraction's "being a playboy is bad" message comes off as this since the two cases it presents, Stan and Dipper, don't really do all that much that's objectionable. Stan only flirts with a single (receptive) female for the entire episode, and Dipper is only ever really seen holding pleasant and friendly conversations with the girls whose hearts he is accused of breaking. Despite everyone referring to what Dipper did as 'flirting' and treating it as a great wrong against the girls, he never actually does anything close to romantic with them. The end result feels clumsy, forced, and kind of out-of-nowhere.
  • Ascended Meme:
    • As of "The Golf War". Mabel finds several tacos in Stan's car and proceeds to eat them, even offering Pacifica one.
    • Grunkle Stan apparently knows of his fan nickname.
    • Dipper's selfie in Dipper and Mabel Vs. the Future has quickly become this.
    • Dipper's line "The nachos tricked me!" in Weirdmageddon forms a pretty apt reference to the fandom's jokes comparing Bill to a Dorito.
  • Ass Pull: Dipper having the memory-swipe gun in his backpack. It was never mentioned he got it in the first place, it comes out of nowhere and it was just put in soley so the Pines family woudn't get caught.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • "Blendin's Game" appears to be written in response for the Protagonist-Centered Morality in "The Time Traveller's Pig". Dipper and Mabel acknowledge that Blendin's troubles were their fault and ask the Time Baby to give his job back.
    • "The Society of the Blind Eye" gives a blanket explanation for the show's various inconsistencies regarding how much the townspeople know about the supernatural elements around them.
    • For those who thought Mabel was self-absorbed or selfish in the first season, "Sock Opera" has Mabel realize the selfless sacrifices Dipper made for her in the past and return the favor. However, the Throw seems to have backfired; due to her suffering Aesop Amnesia afterwards, the fandom debate over her character has grown instead of lessened.
    • For the people who see Ford as The Scrappy for still holding his grudge at Stan. The episode "Dungeons, Dungeons, and More Dungeons" shows that Ford acknowledging to Dipper that his brother indeed rescued him, but was particularly mad about the use of the portal, as the machine's instability had created an interdimentional rift like he feared it would. (He has it contained at the moment.)
    • And for the fans who think that Stan and Mabel's teasing of Dipper is too harsh, "Dungeons, Dungeons, and More Dungeons" shows that it's starting to cause a wedge between Dipper and Mabel.
    • Mabel reaches the climax of her Character Development at the end of "Weirdmageddon Part 2," telling Dipper that she's okay with him staying in Gravity Falls with Ford if it's really what he wants (incidentally, the very issue that caused her to unknowingly hand victory to Bill in the first place, which caused a deeply Broken Base over how much it was her fault).
  • Awesome Ego:
    • Bill Cipher is astonishingly popular among the fanbase with the fact that he's so confident in his master plans while having fun with it.
    • Same with Probabilitor the Annoying in "Dungeons, Dungeons & More Dungeons." He's got a bit of an ego for playing a game where he is the main villain, but you have to admit that he's fairly competent.
  • Awesomeness Withdrawal: The long hiatuses between episode airings frequently cause this. It's gotten to the point where even people who love the show find themselves hard-pressed to get hyped for it because of how Disney schedules it.
    • Made worse by the fact that most of the time, the entire season has already been completed. The only thing causing the hiatus is usually Disney's weird algorithm for when they think they can get the best ratings.
  • Base Breaker:
    • Robbie has his fans, seeing him as a great recurring Foil to Dipper, and also some who dislike him, seeing him as a Jerkass and The Bully. He also suffers from inevitable Die for Our Ship at the hands of Wendy/Dipper fans.
    • Pacifica gets this treatment, minus the shipping factor.
      • Which has changed as of Northwest Mansion Mystery. Now she's stuck between the warring Dipifica and Mabifica factions.
    • Mabel is one of the show's most popular characters with a huge, adoring fanbase that goes insane every time she's onscreen, but she does have her detractors who find her to be selfish, annoying, self-righteous, or a Mary Sue. There are also some genuine Mabel fans who find some of her parts in Season 2 to be poorly written.
    • Waddles has a big fanbase, who find him to be cute and love the dynamic between him and Mabel, but he also has detractors who believe that he causes Mabel to become selfish when he's around.
    • Some fans thought that Quentin Trembley was hilarious, while others found him boring.
    • Wendy, among older fans who find she doesn't fit well with the rest of the ensemble and mostly just exists for Dipper to have a quasi-love interest. She becomes this even more so in Season 2, when after letting Dipper down easy in "Into the Bunker," her appearances in latest episodes become somewhat unnecessary due to the Wendy/Dipper Ship Sinking and have also Took a Level in Jerkass in "The Love God" after learning Tambry and Robbie are dating and along with Nate and Lee decided to ditch going to Woodstock with Dipper and Thompson (especially Thompson, who did not want to go back to having no friends and even sold his watch to get tickets, not much to Wendy's, Nate's and Lee's concern) against their pleas not to.
    • While Stanford Pines' introduction was well-received, arguments that he's The Scrappy and a Jerkass are fairly common, considering that he punched Stan upon his return from the portal and told him decades earlier that hiding Journal 1 would be the first worthwhile thing he'd done in his life.
      • Ford falls into this again in "Dipper and Mabel vs. The Future", when he assumes Dipper feels having a twin is "suffocating" and projects his own frustrations about his relationship with Stan onto Dipper and Mabel. Or, alternatively, when he gave Dipper a chance to develop as an individual and live separately from his sister, unwittingly causing a huge division between him and Mabel. The debate's still raging over what his motivations are.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment:
    • Dipper playing the sousaphone in the "Dipper's Guide to the Unexplained" short "The Tooth".
    • Big Henry's death in "The Golf War".
    • Candy randomly appearing with handfuls of confetti in response to Mabel's wish for a surprise party in "Blendin's Game".
    • "RANDOM DANCE PARTY FOR NO REASON!" from "The Inconveniencing". Even better, this is immediately after the opening credits.
    • Grenda getting a drug-dealing gnome arrested during "The Last Mabelcorn." It only lasts a few seconds, but there was no reason for it.
  • Broken Base:
    • Fans struggling to decide who is "correct" between Dipper and Mabel's differing perspectives has caused this multiple times throughout the series. Depending on which side fans are on, Mabel is either the "good" twin or the "dumb" twin, and Dipper is either the "bad" twin or the "smart" twin. Ironically, the show has gone out of its way to imply that these labels being used towards them in-series have actually been quite limiting and damaging to both twins' sense of self. ("If I'm not the smart guy/a good person, who am I?")
      • There's also division over which of them is more selfish, which began around the episode "The Time Traveler's Pig" and has only grown.
    • There is a huge broken base between people who ship Pinecest (Dipper/Mabel) and those who don't, to the point where big clashes have occurred between fans on the internet.
    • "The Love God" seems set to become a base breaker over Robbie and Tambry getting together under the effects of a love potion and whether or not it works or feels squicky.
    • Not What He Seems in its entirety. While the episode itself is considered the masterpiece of Gravity Falls so far, its non-conclusion followed by a hiatus led to chaos in the fanbase as people took sides over which twin was 'right' in the end, despite the fact that it has not been shown exactly what the effects of their actions will be.
    • Before they're officially confirmed or debunked by canon, popular theories get armies behind them with all the fervor of ship wars. The current kindling in flame battles is the Grunkle4Grandpa theory, or the possibility that Grunkle Stan is actually secretly Dipper and Mabel's grandfather. Grunkle Stan claiming they belonged to a third sibling in "A Tale of Two Stans" has done absolutely nothing to douse the fires.
    • "The Stanchurian Candidate" is the center of a small debate about whether or not Mabel and Dipper's moral ambiguity in this episode is a natural evolution of their characters, or whether it's a forced Out of Character plot put in just so they could have a Not So Different moment with Gideon. It doesn't help that Gideon straight up addresses this by saying they're more evil than they were when he last saw them.
    • "The Last Mabelcorn." While many praise its empowering message about how others' judgments do not decide who you are, some fans saw the Unicorn's Pure of Heart requirement being a scam as the writers deliberately dodging a good opportunity for Mabel to have some character development via self-awareness, essentially calling the twist a cop out. Alternatively it has been interpreted by some as a poorly done Take That, Critics!, considering the way it handles those who criticize Mabel.
      Wendy: "Mabel's a straight up saint, you judgmental hoofbag!"
    • The moral in "Roadside Attraction" has caused this, with some seeing the episode as a good depiction of the complexities and issues with flirting and pick-up artists as a whole, and others seeing its insistence that Dipper is entirely in the wrong for the girls' misunderstanding as unapologetically Anvilicious and one-sided.
    • As of "Dipper and Mabel vs. The Future", fans are divided over who is at fault for the rift being opened (figuratively and literally). Is Ford to blame for the mess because he insisted in not communicating the danger to anyone but Dipper, and for trying to convince Dipper that he's better off without Mabel? Is Dipper to blame for not talking with Mabel and getting her input before making a life-changing decision that would obviously impact her too? Is Mabel to blame for getting mad at Dipper for exercising his right to decide his own future, and for trying to freeze everyone in time so she wouldn't have to deal with her problems? Even Stan's been brought into the debate, since he's the one who created the Rift in the first place. Ironically enough, more blame gets placed on the Pines family than on Bill Cipher, the one character who caused the Apocalypse on purpose.
    • Also after "Dipper and Mabel Vs. The Future," some fans see Dipper and Mabel's relationship previous to Ford's arrival as the ideal sibling relationship that they should be trying to return to, and see Ford's offer for Dipper to live with him separately from Mabel as a horrible thing (since their refreshing, loving, non-squabbling sibling team-up is one of the things drew people into the show in the first season). Others see Ford's offer as him trying to provide a way for Dipper to grow out of the pattern of unhealthy co-dependence and identity issues being a twin has given both him and his sister—something Stan and Ford didn't manage to do peacefully, hence their awful relationship as adults.
    • Whether or not Gideon's Heel–Face Turn at the end of "Weirdmageddon Part 1" was pulled off well or not. Either you consider his small acts of villiany since being locked up, his history with Bill, and the world-ending stakes put with Dipper's speech as a good enough wake up call, OR you consider his vile acts in season 1, his history with Dipper, and his position of power paired up with a weak speech from Dipper as not believable enough.
    • Dipper and Mabel's reconciliation in "Weirdmageddon Part 2: Escape From Reality". One side sees it as heartwarming and a solid reaffirmation of the strong bond between the twins. The other side sees it as Dipper giving up something (Ford's apprenticeship) for Mabel and her getting what she wants, while running off scot-free from any consequences, again. While Mabel tells Dipper he can do the apprenticeship if he wants to afterwards, Dipper himself states he doesn't want to, which extends the above as either a heartwarming moral about the importance of family, and some good character development for Mabel, or the narrative bending over backwards to make sure Mabel gets what she wants while presenting Dipper as being in the wrong for no good reason.
  • Cargo Ship:
    • Mabel and her grappling hook.
    • Sock Opera gives us an in-universe example. Gabe, Mabel's Guy of the Week, is way more into the two sock puppets he always wears on his hands than Mabel, and at the end of the episode, he actually makes out with them.
    • In-universe example again in "Soos and The Real Girl", which gives us Stan and a coin-operated machine, at least in the credits.
    • Gideon has been shipped with a toilet.
  • Continuity Lockout: Appears to be heading this way, what with the Running Gags, Chekhovs Guns, and overall developing Myth Arc of the show. By season 2 this trope is in full force.
  • Counterpart Comparison:
    • Many fans noted how the reveal of Old Man McGucket's backstory is very reminiscent of Simon Petrikov in Adventure Time.
    • A cynical, socially awkward kid who has trouble confessing to a girl he likes, with a voice sounding older than he is, and a sibling who's constantly cheerful and tries not to let anything get them down. Dipper and Mabel, or Wirt and Greg?
    • Related to the above, there's the comparison of Bill Cipher and the Beast, a pair of Satanic Archetypes stalking these children. They both try to make deals with their victims, outclass every other threat, and have taken advantage of an older character in the past.
      • Bill's relationship with The Author calls to mind the antagonistic relationship between Father and Hohenheim. Both started out on seemingly friendly terms, with Bill/Father being a supernatural being that gave Ford/Hohenheim knowledge to advance his understanding of the world...only for the latter to discover it was all part of an evil scheme. Also, Bill's current enemies are a pair of devoted siblings serving as the main protagonist.
    • Before Character Development kicked in, Stan's tendencies to be The Barnum gave him a slight Mr. Krabs vibe.
    • Ed, Edd n Eddy can consider "Northwest Manor Noir" a Spiritual Successor to Ed, Edd n Eddy's Big Picture Show, since they both have The Reveal that a major Jerkass character had a child abuse-related Freudian Excuse.
    • Gideon in Season 2 is easily comparable to Slade Wilson. Both were Demoted to Dragon and serve an Eldritch Abomination who holds what they seek, and are seemingly promised those rewards in exchange for their loyalty in bringing about the apocalypse. Both end up turning on their masters and allying with the heroes, albeit under different circumstances.
    • If you've watched both shows, it's difficult not to notice the parallels between Mabel and Star, with both being hyperactive Genki Girls hanging out with a savvy guy, trying to make friends with the resident Alpha Bitch as well as loving adorable and colorful things like puppies and rainbows.
  • Crazy Awesome:
    • Mabel Pines.
    • Quentin Trembly. The guy cryogenically froze himself in peanut brittle... and it worked!
    • Old Man McGucket.
    • Bill Cipher. He's insane, and our point is that it makes him awesome.
  • Crossover Ship:
    • Mabel and Pinkie Pie, both Crazy Awesome Genki Girls.
      • Mabel and Star Butterfly for the same reason.
      • Dipper and Twilight Sparkle also has some popularity as well.
    • Dipper and Dib for obvious reasons. And Dipper and Norman.
    • Dipper/Phineas and Ferb/Mabel
    • Wendy and Marceline.
      • Wendy's also been paired up with Courtney.
    • Mabel and Marshall Lee seems pretty popular on Tumblr.
    • Randy Cunningham and Mabel. Some people think they would make a good superhero team.
    • Fan-art of an Odd Friendship between Mabel and Gwen has been popping up recently.
    • Coraline and Dipper is popular due to their desire to investigate the unknown.
    • .GIFfany from "Soos and the Real Girl" and Turbo has been making the rounds on Tumblr.
    • Grunkle Stan and Rick Sanchez has gained popularity on Tumblr. Probably due to their shared Jerkass Grandpa/Grunkle status.
      • Also with Ford, since they're both inter-dimensional traveling grandpas who thrive on science.
    • Bill Cipher and YV have appeared in many pieces of fan-art together due to their resemblance to each other.
  • Creepy Awesome: Bill Cipher, an all knowing Eldritch Abomination prone to randomly summoning bizarre imagery is also the most popular character in the entire show.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: Some of the bits on this show probably manage to squeak by through sheer audacity.
    • One episode shows that Grunkle Stan's idea of "family time" is getting the siblings to help him counterfeit money.
    • In another episode, the antagonists are the ghosts of an old couple who died from heart attacks, with their deaths being show on screen. But what caused their heart attacks was hearing a "hateful" rap song about how whack homework and rules are.
    • Bill Cipher enjoying inflicting pain on himself in "Sock Opera". He slaps himself, tumbles down the stairs, smashes his arm in a drawer and bruises it with forks, all with a maniacal smile on his face. It's more than a little disturbing... but he does it with such enjoyment and casualness it's impossible not to find it hilarious.
    • Pacifica's father controlling her with a bell is utterly horrifying, until he gets frustrated at her defying it longer than usual and says "Dingly dingly dingly! Is this bell broken?"
    • Bill Cipher and his eldritch buddies treat the end of the world like a huge party and act like a bunch of rebellious teens. Their party in the Fearamid is a lot like a typical teen party, right down to being busted by the cops (or the Time Police in this case). To literally drive this home even further, they rode up to the Fearamid in a pimped out ride, and the gear shift of their car was Blind Ivan's head.
  • Designated Villain: Blendin is treated as a villain for trying to keep his time machine from being used by a pair of twelve-year-olds. This treatment actually comes back to bite them nineteen episodes later.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
    • Bill Cipher gets this treatment a lot, especially with human versions. Has now reached the point where some fans were actually upset by the apocalypse reveal because the fanon of the cute, quirky, merely annoying or even romantic Bill had become so prevalent and the reminder that he's actually Always Chaotic Evil with a thin veneer of Faux Affably Evil in canon was unwelcome.
    • The episode "Soos and the Real Girl" introduced .GIFfany who is a sentient Dating Sim character. She is a Yandere who is implied to have killed her developers and tried to kill the people who played her, she also tries to force Soos to upload his brain to her system so they can be together forever. Many people found her cute and sexy and were even attracted to her yandere tendencies since she "proved" she was willing to go a long way for love, even if it meant coercing and abusing the person she "loved."
    • Arguably Grunkle Stan gets this treatment from the fans. While it's true he's a sympathetic character, many like to ignore the fact that he very well knew one of the Portal's side effects could have well been The End of the World as We Know It, and he was perfectly okay with gambling the human race and his niece and nephew's lives on the off chance his brother had survived the thirty years inside the Portal (and even pleaded with Mabel to let him continue, even though his decision very well could have killed her). Many like to ignore this in favor of treating Ford, who was angry at him for taking this risk, as The Scrappy for not being grateful, despite both brothers having been pretty prideful and selfish and Grunkle Stan nearly ending the world.
      • There was no indication that Grunkle Stan knew that the portal could end the world, only cause minor gravitational anomalies. The warning about ending the world was written in invisible ink.
    • A vocal part of the fandom semi-regularly describes Mabel using the words "Savior" and "Messiah." There was a tag at one point called OnlyHero!Mabel, an actual prediction of the end of the series involving Dipper being the secret true villain of Gravity Falls that only Mabel can save everyone from. While Mabel is an All-Loving Hero, this is still a pretty obvious Flanderization of her (and her brother's) character.
  • Ear Worm:
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Many of the supernatural creatures or other odd characters have gained popularity with the fans, even though they are usually seen only once. Notable are Paper Jam Dipper, Tyrone, Quentin Trembly, Blendin Blandin, Rumble McSkirmish, Mermando, Big Henry, .GIFfany, and the gnomes.
      • Bill Cipher, who generated massive amounts of fan art for an entire year before he was even formally introduced. While his position as a Chekhov's Gunman can be partially pointed to for this, his popularity skyrocketed after "Dreamscaperers" hit the internet. Bill is even regarded as one of the greatest cartoon villains in recent history.
      • "Bipper" (Dipper under Bill's control) has gained a sizable fan following, despite lasting only one episode.
    • Same goes for the people of Gravity Falls, notably Candy Chiu, Wendy's teenage friends (especially Robbie, who got more development, and Lee, for being friendly to the twins), Old Man McGucket, the Superstore Clerk, Melody, and especially Pacifica, much to the surprise of creator Alex Hirsch. This is why Season 2 has been giving her more Character Development, revealing that she has a Freudian Excuse for her behavior ( her parents being horrible people) and setting up a Defrosting Ice Queen storyline.
      • "The Stanchurian Candidate" has Tad Strange, who is notable for having become an Ensemble Darkhorse MONTHS before the episode aired, due to a very popular theory that he's Bill Cipher's secret brother as well as the fact that he's voiced by Cecil Baldwin of Welcome to Night Vale fame. When the episode aired, however, he's revealed to be nothing more than a joke character, which became an Ensemble Darkhorse all on its own.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • There have been several attempts by the fandom to link Gravity Falls to Slenderman. Most of them have been misunderstanding references to other media or mythological oddities, some of them are just completely fabricated.
    • One theory that's been gaining traction is that Bill took over Dipper's body while he was turned to wood in "Northwest Mansion Mystery," and has been subtly arranging his master plan ever since. Alternatively, while not directly possessing him, Bill is also theorized to have a subtle influence on Dipper's thoughts.
    • Another theory is that Stan and Ford's father Filbrick was actually possessed by Bill, whose manipulations ensured the twins would have a falling out and wind up creating the Rift that frees him. Of course, this theory hinges on the fact that we've never seen Filbrick without his glasses.
  • Estrogen Brigade: Dipper certainly has quite the fangirl base.
  • Everyone Is Jesus in Purgatory: Some fans have interpreted Soos becoming a zombie and coming back to full life as symbolism of Jesus coming back to life, since his name is short for Jesús.
  • Evil Is Cool: Bill in Dipper's body, helped by the awesome reverend outfit he wears during the climax.
  • Evil Is Sexy: .GIFfany, who's more Evil Is Cute. Bill's friend Pyronica is garnering quite the fanbase.
    • Bill Cipher is this as well. He even had this to say regarding his fangirls:
    Bill: WHAT CAN I SAY, CHICKS DIG PSYCHOPATHS!
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop:
    • Mabel's story in "Bottomless Pit" had one about lying.
    • "Little Gift Shop of Horror" has the short story "Abaconings," which goes out of its way to show that using your gifts to help better humanity isn't as important as your best friend being comfortable with your life choices. Also, you shouldn't accept changes in your friends even if they're happy about them, and are right to ask them to return to how they were if the changes make you uncomfortable.
      • This actually takes on greater after "A Tale of Two Stans" as it can be interpreted as a Stan fictionalizing his relationship with Ford and changing the ending to the one he'd have preferred.
    • Roadside Attraction's "Being a playboy is wrong" aesop is cool until you realize that the reasons they give for it being wrong run along the lines of "girls will misinterpret any interaction you have with them as deeply romantic and meaningful to you both, so giving attention to more than one at once is a bad idea."
    • In "The Last Mabelcorn", Mabel trys to win the approval of a Unicone who will give a lock of it's hair to anyone who is pure-of-heart and after struggling for half the episode to prove how good she is, it's revealed that that Unicorns can't see into people's hearts and was putting Mabel though the ringer just to screw with her. After hearing this Mable decided to for-go being nice and just take the hair by force. Mabel perfectly sums up the aesop at the end of the episode with the line "Morality is relative" (she needed the hair to protect her family so beating up and stealing from a unicorn was ok.)
  • Fandom Berserk Button: Discussing who was at fault for Mabel giving the Rift to Bill has become this. Since pretty much every main character had a part in it and the immediate cause was Mabel, the fights between those who blame her, those who blame Dipper, and those who blame Ford have ripped the fandom apart, to the point where many online communities have mutually agreed not to discuss it to avoid conflict (it hasn't always worked, leading to Flame Wars cropping up anyways).
    • Disliking Pacifica seems to also upset the fandom, especially if you say it after seeing most of Season 2.
  • Fandom Rivalry: The fans of this show often clash with fans of Phineas and Ferb. Sometimes they'll get along, however.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Dipper/Mabel aka Pinecest was the most popular couple in the fandom for most of the first season. It's not really surprising either, since they have many dynamics, being a case of Opposites Attract, Savvy Guy, Energetic Girl, Red Oni, Blue Oni, Sibling Yin-Yang, etc. Not to mention that Dipper is constantly preoccupied with and protective of Mabel when it comes to her romantic endeavors, they share a bedroom, they are in general very touchy-feely, often hugging or holding hands. (At the same time, they're twelve year old siblings, and the justification for their shipping being due to their close nature has disturbed a lot of people who are close to their own siblings.)
    • It was then overthrown by Billdip (Bill/Dipper), which was a submarine ship until the second season and has now spread to the point that it's uncommon for fanfiction to not include the ship (there are over 1800 fanworks featuring this ship on archiveofourown, compared to the next most popular, Mabifica, with around 480 fics. Most of these overlap). The ship itself generally has a lot of perverse fanart and fanfiction to its name. Needless to say, this is a highly controversial ship, especially because it's so popular.
      • However, as of "Dipper and Mabel Vs. The Future" and "Weirdmageddon Part 1" there's been a lot of Abandon Shipping, as the episode very swiftly destroyed the Draco in Leather Pants characterization fans had been giving Bill.
    • Despite their rather limited interaction, Dipper/Candy has quite a bit of fanart.
    • Dipper and Pacifica have become the pairing of season two, with the ship absolutely exploding in popularity after Northwest Mansion Mystery. The Gravity Falls subreddit even briefly changed their subscriber count to "Dipifica Shippers" as a joke after the episode aired.
    • "Mabifica" (Mabel/Pacifica) has gained traction along with "Dipifica," out of the desire to see the two girls interact more. It's a bit of a base breaking ship, partially because of its rivalry with Dipifica and partially because it's rare to find fanwork featuring it without its even more controversial Ship Mate, Billdip.
    • The ship known as FiddleStan (Fiddleford McGucket x Stan Pines) has begun to gain wind in its sails.
    • Bill Cipher/The Author (Ford Pines) has been skyrocketing in popularity since "The Last Mabelcorn," for some rather understandable reasons.
      • A strong following for Fiddauthor (Fiddleford McGucket/The Author) likewise arose from this episode. Most scenarios portray Fiddleford as the Boy Next Door character in a rather demented Betty and Veronica scenario with Bill.
  • Foe Yay Shipping: Mabel/Pacifica was a small ship, but after "The Golf War" it has gained traction.
    • Then we have Dipper/Pacifica during The Northwest Mansion Mystery. It started out as an Enemy Mine situation, but the subtext was there.
    • Thanks to "Sock Opera", we also have Bill/Dipper, mainly on Bill's end.
  • Fountain of Memes: Mabel.
    • Ford, who since his introduction has had more memes per episode specifically about him than nearly every other character on the show.
    • In-universe example, Stan in "The Stanchurian Candidate."
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • The Fallers are also on very good grounds with My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, Adventure Time, Regular Show, Invader Zim, Danny Phantom, and Steven Universe fans, mostly due to certain similarities between various characters.
    • Not to mention Coraline, ParaNorman, and Psychonauts. The four canons together make up a popular crossover called "Mystery Kids."
    • Thanks to the coincidentally, amusingly similar designs of Bill Cipher and Yung Venuz, Gravity Falls fans are increasing the popularity of Nuclear Throne. On Tumblr, "#gravity falls" is even at the top of the game's related tags!
    • Well liked by fans of Welcome to Night Vale due to the shows having similar premises and aesthetics. This was reinforced when Cecil Baldwin, who voices the main character Cecil Palmer, was confirmed to be voicing a character named "Tad Strange" in Gravity Falls.
    • Due to its focus on the supernatural as well as government conspiracies, there's a lot of overlap with the SCP Foundation, with one of the stories on the site explaining that the town of Gravity Falls is in fact a covert Foundation containment site.
    • Steadily becoming this with the Over the Garden Wall fandom, often with crossovers.
    • Anything with a motif of stars in it (including Star vs. the Forces of Evil, Wander over Yonder and the aforementioned Steven Universe) has become popular for anything involving Mabel.
    • Gravity Falls fans began the fandom for Star vs. the Forces of Evil, since the preview of the show's intro sequence at a Gravity Falls Comic Con panel led to an explosion of fanart and shipping before a single episode had even aired.
    • Gravity Falls and Steven Universe have become especially close after the premier of "A Tale of Two Stans" and the beginning of the 3rd Stevenbomb (Steven Universe S 2 E 14 Cry For Help) both aired on July 13th, especially since both episodes were very emotionally charged. There were a lot of jokes that the creators did this intentionally to mess with the fans.
    • Thanks to some cross-continuity foreshadowing in Rick and Morty, and the fact that Stanford is confirmed to have traveled through several dimensions, a popular fanon has popped up that Rick and Stanford were friends if not more. The most common bit of fanon is that Rick Sanchez helped Stanford obtain the Infinity-Sided Die, and smuggle it through inter-dimensional customs.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • Gideon trying to kill Dipper with lamb shears in "The Hand That Rocks the Mabel" becomes more disturbing and/or inappropriately giggle-worthy after "The Inconveniencing," when the viewer finds out that Dipper used to dress up in a lamb outfit and dance around in it.
    • Becomes a bit more disturbing when one considers this sacrificial lamb thing Dipper seems to have going on.
    • In "The Hand That Rocks the Mabel" the long list of boyfriends Wendy has broken up with is played as an Overly Long Gag. Flash-forward to "Boyz Crazy" and see how she took breaking up with Robbie. However, we don't know if this happened with all of her boyfriends or if just Robbie. She didn't seem too broken up on leaving him until after she got back with him and Dipper showed her the CD.
    • Old Man McGucket's crack about his inventions being a catastrophe probably being the reason he's living in the dump becomes this when "The Society of the Blind Eye" reveals that's exactly the case due to his memory wiping device.
    • In "Mabel's Guide to Dating", Soos mentions that he wants to have 7 kids so he can "have one to love every day of the week." After watching "Blendin's Game", this statement suddenly becomes a lot more bittersweet.
    • Soos mentions in "Dreamscaperers" that he wished Stan would love him like a son, and it's Played for Laughs (albeit mildly). This becomes sad after it's revealed that his real dad left him when he was 4 years old and never visited him again. He's also been working at the Mystery Shack since he was twelve years old, and sees Stan as a father figure.
      • Also counts as Heartwarming in Hindsight given at times Stan acts like a Papa Wolf towards Soos, even trying to erase his birthday from all the calendars.
      • In "Not What He Seems" Soos mentions to want "legally get adopted by Stan", thus taking Up to Eleven the whole father figure dynamic.
    • Grunkle Stan singing about 'Storing meat for the apocalypse' is pretty funny when you first encounter it. It's less funny when you realise that he has a strange, secret, powerful machine of unknown purpose beneath the Mystery Shack. Another funny point gets docked when we find out The Author actually has a secret bunker filled with survival supplies. It's even less funny when a clock with a countdown to the apocalypse shows up. And it becomes downright horrifying when, exactly one season after Stan sung this song, the Pines family's own screwed up relationship dynamics accidentally causes it for real.
    • Stan's horror over the sculpture of himself being destroyed in "Headhunters" is funny at first, appearing to be nothing more than a joke about his ego. Then you find out he's been trying to rescue his twin brother for thirty years. Word Of God has confirmed this is deliberate.
    • In "Bottomless Pit!" Soos's made-up story involves him having to choose between his high pinball score — his "greatest achievement" at the time and the twins' lives. He chooses the twins. Fast-forward to "Not What He Seems," where he hopes that helping Stan will mean that the former adopts him, but gives up that dream — voluntarily, mind you— to save the twins again when it seems that the portal will cause the apocalypse. What You Are in the Dark indeed, Soos!
    • Quentin Trembley's eccentric politics were Played for Laughs and depicted as harmless in his so far only appearance on the show, but Word Of God has confirmed that it was his "Finders Keepers" law that allowed Gideon to acquire the Shack and evict the Pines with bare theft.
    • Dipper justifies cheating to beat Pacifica in "The Golf War" by saying that her rich status allows her to "cheat at life." In "Northwest Mansion Mystery," Pacifica gets into Heroic BSOD after her parents use her to hire Dipper to stop the ghost and when she finds hidden paintings of her ancestors cheating everyone at life.
    • Many things thanks to A Tale of Two Stans.
      • Upon the reveal of the Stan Twin theory being correct and seeing a young Stanley and Stanford on a swingset together, the fans went into overdrive during the hiatus and made a lot of adorable art featuring the two Stans chasing down the oddities of Gravity Falls together. They... didn't.
      • Also on that same note, the fanart about McGucket and the two Stans working together on big science projects? No Science Bro trio there, given Stan and Ford were estranged and McGucket left the project after seeing "the beast with one eye".
      • Remember when Stan was hilariously overreacting to The Duchess Approves? Specifically, that scene where he sobs "It's just like my life!" as the Duchess ends up disagreeing with her mother? There's a chance it's bringing up painful memories of being disowned.
      • The episode finally reveals why Stan is so greedy. Being cast out by your family while still in high school, told to make a fortune, and spending ten years in poverty will do that to people.
      • The short concerning Stan's Tattoo is hilarious. Learning that's not a tattoo and it's actually a burn (accidentally) inflicted by his brother is not.
      • Stan being responsible for Lazy Susan's eye makes his discomfort around it during their date rather harsh.
      • It seems "Hot Belgian waffles" wasn't just a funny Gosh Dang It to Heck! line, but Stan legitimately bringing up the painful memory of his childhood, given that his family's apartment was next to a place with a sign reading "Hot Belgian Waffles."
    • In the second episode, Stan makes a lame "marriage is terrible" joke. We later learn that he had been divorced once.
    • In The Love God the opening starts with Dipper, Mabel, Wendy and her friends encouraging Thompson to "Gaze upon death, gaze upon death" on an open grave in the town cemetery. In Weirmageddon, Part One Wendy reveals she was with her friends in the cemetery when the apocalypse hit, and none of her friends were able to escape the Eye Bats. One could morbidly say that Thompson did "gaze upon death" for real.
    • In "Mabel's Guide to Dating," one of the shorts aired between season 1 and season 2, Mabel advises that if a relationship isn't working out, you should "force it!" Over half a season later, when fearing that her relationship with Dipper is on the brink, Mabel takes up an offer from Billendin to literally force it—by intending to make Dipper and her summer friends stay with her forever by stopping time. Things don't go well.
  • Genius Bonus:
    • Each episode's credits feature a cryptogram referencing the events of the episode. The first says "Welcome To Gravity Falls." There's also one in the theme song "STAN IS NOT WHAT HE SEEMS" and in an online game "EVER SEE STANS TATTOO?"
    • Whole forums have been dedicated to trying to decipher the possible meanings behind the various alchemy and rune symbols found in the book and background stills.
    • Soos insists on pronouncing the "p" in "pterodactyl". Which is exactly what the ancient Greeks would have done.
    • In his introductory episode, Gideon sinisterly repeats Dipper's "thumbs up". Wonder if he knew he was pronouncing a death sentence?
    • In "The Headhunters", after the wax statue of Genghis Khan accidentally melts himself, Dipper remarks that he "fell harder than the... ehh... I don't know... Jin Dynasty?" Jin was the name of a Chinese dynasty that got conquered by Genghis Khan.
    • In Northwest Mansion Mystery, a countdown begins to the full activation of the Portal, and McGucket believes that the end of the countdown signifies the coming of the Apocalypse. But in the next episode, instead of the end of the world, we are given the answers to many secrets and hidden tensions between the Pines family are revealed and come into new clarity. While the modern meaning of Apocalypse is often interpreted as The End of the World as We Know It, its archaic meaning referred not to an end but instead to a great revelation.
    • What kind of name is "Gompers the Goat"? Well, this guy liked it well enough.
    • In "Soos And The Real Girl", the chalkboard in the background of .GIFfany's first scene shows the Schrodinger Hamiltonian equation (used in quantum mechanics).
    • In "The Last Mabelcorn", one of the board games Dipper and Mabel look at is called "Don't Wake Stalin!". Doubly ironic in that you wouldn't want to annoy a grumpy Gus like him anyway, and its referral to the Karmic Death that Stalin suffered in real life.
    • The first "Dipper's Guide to the Unexplained" short starts off with Dipper eating some food called the Mobius Chicken Strip
    "Dipper":"It's infinitely delicious!"
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: The show is very popular in Russia. It also has a large amount of fanart coming from Japanese and Korean artists.
  • Growing the Beard: The two-part Season 1 finale is most commonly said to be when the show went from just good to exceptional, and it has only gotten better with Season 2, which goes deeper into Character Development and advancing the Myth Arc.

    H-Z 
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Park Ranger McGucket ignoring his father was already bad, but now that we know that Old Man McGucket made himself go insane with the memory gun, which would have probably happened while his son was still a kid, it's even worse.
    • Stan's short speech about life and death in the "Trooth Ache" segment from "Bottomless Pit!", becomes even more depressing after the reveal of his rough backstory in "A Tale of Two Stans".
    • In "The Legend of the Gobblewonker" Stan trying to bond with the kids because he feels like a lonely and abandoned old man becomes a lot more poignant when it's revealed that he was disowned by a majority of the Pines family and later lost his own twin.
      • From the same episode, the name of Stan's boat (the Stan-O'-War) is a lot more heartbreaking after we see that he and his brother owned another boat by the same name together before their falling out.
    • In Dreamscraperers, Dipper overhears Stan saying how "he's a loser, he's weak, I just want to get rid of him." Dipper's extremely hurt, but when he finds and views the full memory in Stan's head, he discovers that Stan was actually comparing Dipper to how he himself was as a child. Then we find out Stan was cast out of his family in A Tale of Two Stans.
      • Stan justifies his tough treatment of Dipper by showing that his dad treated him similarly, which taught him to be strong and fight back. But "Not What He Seems" flashes a book called Daddy Issues on his book shelf, and "A Tale of Two Stans" shows that Stan's father Filbrick's rough treatment went beyond just simple "encouragement to be strong," both implying that the way Filbrick treated his sons actually emotionally scarred at least Stanley if not both Stan twins. Knowing this, Stan's calm decision to treat Dipper similar to how his father treated him, even if Stan is just making Dipper do a lot more (admittedly unsafe and grueling) chores, gets a lot more messed up and really makes you wonder what the heck is going on with Stan psychologically.
    • Remember how irritable Stan was over the hidden room, and how he spent a lot of the episode moping while looking at a pair of glasses? It's revealed in A Tale of Two Stans that he spent close to a month in that room in a Heroic BSOD, and the glasses are his brother's. He was remembering how he accidentally threw his brother into Another Dimension.
    • Remember when Stan said to Dipper and Mabel that it was almost unnatural for them to get along so well? It's revealed that he actually had a great relationship with his own brother, but they spent so long estranged from each other that Stan seems to have forgotten what a healthy sibling relationship is like. Then when he tried to get on friendly terms with his brother, he accidentally started a fight that ended up in him losing his brother for a long time.
    • In "Dipper and Mabel Vs. The Future," Ford asks Dipper if being a twin was suffocating for him. Immediately after this episode aired, the game Gravity Falls: Legend of the Gnome Gemulets was released, implying, among other things, that Dipper almost died of asphyxiation at birth, nearly strangled by one of the two umbilical cords in the womb.
    • Stan's idea to burn Journal #1 in the flashback of "A Tale of Two Stans" becomes this when Bill ultimately burns the three journals in "Weirdmagedon Part 1".
    • The constant jokes and theories about how Disney is trying to kill the series through the show's infamous Schedule Slip stopped being funny when it was announced that the second season would indeed be the last.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight:
    • In the episode Blendin's Game, Soos claims that a genius taught him how to open a vending machine. When the twins go to the past and meet young Soos, Mabel is the one who teaches him how to open the machine. Soos considers Mabel to be a genius!
    • Just watch any scene involving the portal prior to the reveal in "Not What He Seems" that Stan was doing it all to rescue his brother.
    • Soos in one of the shorts mentions he wants to have seven kids, one to love every day of the week. He wants to be a better father than his dad was!
  • Het Is Ew: There have been quite a lot of shipping wars in the fandom, many of which seem to find their basis in this. There has been some of the opposite, but it's far less common.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Wendy lives near the forest, has a manly father and three brothers, all redheads. Sounds familiar...
    • Mabel's goal of restoring the wax sculpture with her "arts and crafts skills" feels reminiscent of the story of the Botched Spanish Fresco, when the episode would have been written long before that story broke.
    • The scene where birds appear and land gently on Soos is so much funnier when you find out that, according to Word Of God, "Soos" is short for Jesús.
    • "Soos and the Real Girl" features animatronics at a pizza place coming to life and attacking people. Sound familiar? Alex Hirsch actually had to make a statement confirming that it was a complete coincidence, thanks to Animation Lead Time.
    • An all-seeing wish-granting demon possesses a youth, using his new body to further his own nefarious purposes and keep others from stopping his goal.
    • The game .GIFfany hails from is called Romance Academy 7.
    • .GIFfany's status as Soos' Psycho Ex-Girlfriend is a bit hilarious when you remember that her character designer, Paul Robertson, had done the sprite work for another group of evil exes a couple of years prior.
    • From Northwest Mansion Mystery: When the ghostly antagonist starts rampaging on the wealthy party-goers, they all turn into warped tree versions of themselves. Bonus points for the entirety of the mansion temporarily becoming a forest. Not to mention the sheltered girl kept in line by a certain sound: "The ringing of the bell commands you!"note 
    • Blanching is a real word, not just some Unusual Euphemism. It means skin turning pale. So I guess "Straight Blanchin'" is about vampires.
    • In "Legend of the Gobblewonker" Mabel makes up a rap of all the words that rhyme with her name, and Soos remarks they should write it down. Fast-forward to "Society of the Blind Eye"; Soos reveals that for half the summer he thought Mabel's name was "Maple, like the syrup"! They SHOULD have written it down so he could remember.
    • Around late 2012, a fanfiction was made titled "Pacifica's Revenge" that featured Pacifica making Dipper her butler as revenge for telling her that her grandfather never actually discovered Gravity Falls. Parts of the story involved Dipper being forced to wear a butler outfit and eventually becoming Pacifica's boyfriend. Northwest Mansion Mystery also featured Dipper in a butler outfit (under the request of Pacifica's father) as well as signs of possible romance between the two characters.
    • The main three Pines been given When Life Gives You Lemons Quotes becames this when Stanford Pines aka The Author was voiced by J. K. Simmons, who voiced one of the most famous subversions of that old saying.
      • Also, Simmons' attitude toward safety in this show is in stark contrast to Portal.
    • Stan and Ford's childhood dream of building a boat and exploring the vast, wide world beyond their childhood home.
    • The revelation that Grunkle Stan stole his brother's identity and has been living under his name for thirty years made for some of the most serious scenes in the series so far, but it's made extremely giggle-worthy when you realize that his brother, the Author of the Journals, is now technically legally married to Goldie the Mechanical Gold Panner.
    • More proof of why Alex Hirsch is a Trolling Creator: for about half of season two Dipper, Soos, Wendy and Mabel assume that the laptop in the bunker belonged to the Author. When we get to "A Tale of Two Stans," the Author shows his contempt at the thought of personal computers becoming successful.
    • By the time "The Stanchurian Candidate" aired, Stan's campaign barely seemed like an exaggeration next to "I'm starting to wonder myself whether he was born in this country" Donald "I promise I will never be in a bicycle race" Trump's.
    • Tad Strange mentions liking bread, his voice actor was responsible for announcing a ban of all wheat and its byproducts.
    • Bob Odenkirk was asked to do the voice of Stan. He's known for playing Amoral Attorney Saul Goodman, who became the main character of a spin off called Better Call Saul. Said spin-off goes into detail about Saul's past as a con-man, his arrest records, and even having a falling out with his more responsible brother.
    • Back in season one, Quentin Trembley was heard on a recorded message saying: "The only thing we have to fear is gigantic, man-eating spiders!" Guess what we meet later on in season two? Perhaps he knew about them?
    • Gravity Falls is infamous for its schedule slip and constant hiatuses. Shortly after Dipper and Mabel vs. The Future aired, it turns out that Gravity Falls is still airing new episodes to at least November 23rd, while nearly every other animated series it shares fans with (i.e. Rick and Morty, Steven Universe, Star vs. The Forces of Evil, etc.) is currently on hiatus until at least 2016.
  • HSQ:
    • The entirety of "Not What He Seems". Stan continues work on his mysterious portal project and counts down the hours until something happens, and throughout the episode, the gravity reverses (even recreating a scene from the opening). Stan is then taken into custody by the government agents for having stolen radioactive waste, and while the twins try to prove his innocence, they discover that the real Stan Pines is dead. Whoever their great uncle is that they've been living with all summer, is an unknown, nameless criminal who has multiple fake identities to throw people off. The twins are both torn up over this, then they discover the portal and Stan comes back to confront them, telling them not to stop the portal. Mabel reluctantly trusts him, while an anguished Dipper and Soos try to stop Stan. And just to kick the episode into overdrive, the author of the journals emerges from the portal. And he's Stan's brother. Holy shit.
    • The following episode, "A Tale of Two Stans," is also pretty heavy. We find out the backstories of Stan and the author of the journals, Stan's brother. Stan really is the twins' great uncle, but he faked his death and took on his brother's name and identity and became Stanford, because Stanford got flung into the portal. We learn how Stan and Ford lived before Gravity Falls, and we also learn how the portal even came to be and what traumatized McGucket enough to drive him to wipe his own mind.
    • The ending of Dipper and Mabel vs. the Future, where Bill, possessing Blendin, tricks Mabel into giving him the rift and then smashes it, creating the tear between the two worlds.
    • With the arrival of the Apocalypse and the show appearing to enter its end game plan, all of "Weirdmageddon" is guaranteed to be this upon viewing. Pick any part.
  • Idiosyncratic Ship Naming: Dipper/Robbie has been dubbed Muffin Explosion, due to a gag in their first meeting (The Inconveniencing) where Dipper mistakes Robbie's explosion graffiti for a muffin.
  • Idiot Plot: In "Soos and The Real Girl", the clerk outright warned Dipper and Mabel about the dating simulation game and even pointed at a sticky note on the case that said it should be destroyed at all costs... but they decide to rent it for Soos anyway because they see his romantic skills as a bigger problem. Boy, should they have listened.
  • Inferred Holocaust:
    • In Episode 2 Old Man McGucket claims that he's gone on murderous rampages in robots many times before and hasn't been caught.
    • The pterodactyl's nest is constructed of dozens of human skeletons (mainly of miners), so it's implied that it ate a lot of people (also possible that it could've just found the bones).
    • Candy remarks that Several Timez "won't last a week" in the woods after Mabel lets them go. Subverted in that they live on garbage and have become scavengers.
    • A lot of fans on the Fridge page have speculated that Pacifica is in for hell from her parents once the party in "Northwest Mansion Noir" is over.
    • In the end of Not What He Seems, some of Gravity Falls was destroyed, the goverment agents are still after Stan and now everyone in Gravity Falls is fully aware of the town's supernatural secret from the gravity anomalies. However, it was subverted since Ford brainwashes the government agents into thinking the readings they got were radiation from an unexpected meteor show and the town believes the gravity anomalies were just one giant earthquake.
    • The entirety of "Weirdmaggdeon".
  • Informed Wrongness: Dipper's behavior in "Roadside Attraction", since despite being aware of where to draw the line in his actions and not acting inappropriately with the girls he talks to throughout the episode, the show still treats his daring to talk to them at all as a great moral violation.
  • Incest Yay Shipping: The infamous Pinecest between Dipper and Mabel, obviously.
  • Jerkass Dissonance: Alex Hirsch was (rather understandably) surprised at the fanbase that Pacifica has garnered. He did say that she would receive "some development" in Season 2, though, possibly as a result of this. When he said this, he was writing "Sock Opera", so he was referring to "The Golf War". Evidently, he and the other writers came to like her as well, since she receives even more development in "Northwest Mansion Mystery."
    • Ditto Robbie, though his popularity also overlaps with that of all the teen characters on the show, who are also getting more time and development in Season 2 as a result of the positive reception, specifically in "The Love God".
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Rumble McSkirmmish came across as being this, because of his EXTREMELY black and white view on morality, and the fact that he was a complete fish out of water. It's obvious that he tries to do the right thing, and feels deeply regretful when he believes that he's made a mistake.
    • Robbie in "Boyz Crazy". True, what he did towards Wendy in the episode was out of line, but he seemed genuinely despaired when Wendy told him that they were through.
    • Lil' Gideon's father. He may assist his son in his evil schemes, but clearly does so because he's understandably terrified of him. It's implied he joined the Blind Eye Society to forget Gideon's abuse.
    • Pacifica Northwest in "The Golf War". Her jerkass attitude is implied to come from parental pressure, and her obsession with wealth and material value seems to be compensation for the fact that, along with their pressure, her parents are selfishly absent for most of her life. This gets worse in "Northwest Manor Mystery," where it turns out they did something to her that causes her to instantly stop any rebellious action from just the sound of a bell ringing. Thankfully, she seems to be getting nicer to Mabel and Dipper, at the end of both these episodes.
    • .GIFfany can definitely come off this way. What with her talk about being sure her new boyfriend, Soos, won't abandon her. The fact that she was returned to the video game store a total of three times, and at least one of those times someone she considered her boyfriend returned her with a note essentially asking people to kill her. And finally how desperate she becomes over not wanting to be abandoned again. It becomes a bit hard to not feel bad for her.
    • Blendin Blandin definitely played the antagonist in "Blendin's Game", what with him trying to erase the twins from existence for costing him his job, but he's just too pathetic to hate. Mabel flat-out says as much: "he's too sad to really be a bad guy."
    • Grunkle Stan, thanks to A Tale of Two Stans. His father didn't like him very much, and he did ruin his brother's future... but on the other hand, he was disowned and forced by his parents to do the impossible task of making up the money they potentially lost from his mistake while he was still in high school, and he spent almost ten years of his life in poverty, having to chew his way out of a car trunk, getting jailed three times in three countries, and becoming Persona Non Grata in most of the country after numerous failed scams. Suddenly, his bitterness makes a lot of sense.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Dipper has been paired with Wendy, Candy, Mabel, Grunkle Stan, Soos, Gideon, Robbie, .GIFfany, Pacifica, Tambry, Old Man McGucket, Tyrone, and even with Bill Cipher. It's probably best to just list who Dipper hasn't been paired with yet.
  • Love to Hate:
    • Gideon. An evil little guy who is psycho for Mabel, bent on town conquest, even trying to kill Dipper for being in the way of his goals, and overall one of the most depraved characters of the show.
    • At present, Bill Cipher probably has the most unbalanced screentime vs. fanbase popularity ratio of any character in the series. He's only appeared in three episodes so far, and while undeniably diabolical and sadistic, he's still great fun to watch and speculate about.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Preston Northwest for some; it seems to run in the Northwest family. In anticipation of a ghost coming to ruin his party, he hires Dipper to exorcise the ghost, making an offer that he — or rather Mabel— doesn't want to refuse, and relies on Dipper's conscience to not release the ghost in revenge and endanger Mabel. He only gets Out-Gambitted because of his daughter's Heroic Willpower and desire to be a White Sheep.
    • And then there's Bill Cipher, a seemingly omnipotent being who has his grand apocalyptic plan completely mapped out, has been putting the pieces into place for years, and doesn't allow any apparent defeat to be a setback, only a delaying of the inevitable.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • Grunkle Stan. In "The Legend Of the Gobblewonker," he uttered the line "Who wants to put on blindfolds and get in my car?" and, later in the same episode, is made to wear a tracking bracelet on his ankle after we see him harassing a young boy about fishing tips and being chased off by the boy's mother. To add fuel to this, Grunkle Stan seemed oddly comfortable to have The Talk with Mabel (in Dipper's body).
      • Taken to a frightening extreme in the infamous (though not as well-known as "Dipper Goes to Taco Bell") troll fic, Grunkle Stan the Rapist.
    • Lil Gideon is this to some fans, especially since "Little Dipper".
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • The gnome puking rainbows from the first episode.
    • "Bill Cipher is a magic Illuminati dorito", a reference to his triangular shape and heavy involvement in the mythology of the show.
    • A fanfic has been created, titled "Dipper goes to Taco Bell", and it's gained... infamy due to its content; it's consider similar to My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic's Cupcakes. So now pictures have been created associating Dipper with a fear of Taco Bell or tacos in general, and a few pictures of Dipper going to Taco John's, while putting John Egbert in the picture as well.
    • Another Gravity Falls troll fic has gained infamy, though not to the same extent as DGTTB. It is called Grunkle Stan the Rapist, and those who have read it have claimed that is even ''worse'' than the former.
    • A fandom example, but some fans have been prone to saying "I jumped off the [insert Dipper ship here] and onto S.S. Pacifica" since "Northwest Mansion Noir", which had a staggering amount of Ship Tease between Dipper and Pacifica, and they left their previous shipping for this one.
    • A couple of videos of Dipper saying "Talk dirty to me" followed by a saxophone jingle has humored quite a few. This has also caused the phrase "Talk Dippy to me" to get thrown around.
    • Any and all talks about "the Hiatus" like it's some sort of all-devouring monster and/or contagious disease with the power to drive people insane.
    • The "Dramatic Author" Meme exploded after tumblr users Mermandos and Phantomrose96 created it. It quickly went out of control. Even fandom celebrity MoringMark got in on it!
    • Editing any scene with Ford with another line from his voice actor, J. K. Simmons. His roles in Spider-Man, Portal 2, and Whiplash seem to be the most popular targets.
    • Princess Ford.
    • Stan's radio interview in "The Stanchurian Candidate" becomes memetic In-Universe, to the point that one of the memes based on it parodies the "One does not simply walk into Mordor" meme.
    • Ford being White and Nerdy.
    • BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL BILL… (This reference has been more or less common from Cipher's inception, but caught fire as a fandom response to the ominous ending of "The Stanchurian Candidate," which foreshadowed Bill's return.)
    • WELL WELL WELL WELL WELLWELLWELLWELLWELLWELLWELL.
    • ...BUT HER AIM IS GETTING BETTER!
    • JOAJE.note  This and "HER AIM IS GETTING BETTER!" later became overused to the point of becoming dead memes.
    • Dipper Selfie Collections.note 
    • Dryly announcing another hiatus.note 
      • "tfw no gf," a common complaint. (The original meme, of course, stands for "that feel when no girlfriend.")
    • "People stealing credit for Bill's evil."note 
    • "Friendly reminder: we've never seen [character]'s eyes."note 
    • "Bill Cipher Did Nothing Wrong 2k15." note 
    • The phrase, "Listen up, you one-lifespan, three-dimensional, five-sense skin puppets," as well as variations thereof, appears to be becoming memetic. note 
    • "Reality is an illusion, the universe is a hologram, buy gold, BYE!"
  • Mind Game Ship:
    • Dipper and Bill.
    • Likewise, as of the reveal of their history, Bill and Ford is beginning to gain traction.
  • Misaimed Fandom:
    • .GIFfany, a character made as a message against Perverse Sexual Lust and as a criticism of dating sims, has gained a number of fans that found her genuinely hot and even has a small number of fan fiction pairing her with a self-insert. Usually this goes in-hand with her Draco in Leather Pants treatment.
    • Many fans continue to use the "Alpha Twin" comment from "Little Dipper" as a friendly, affectionate trademark phrase of Mabel's, ignoring that the phrase was actually coined by Mabel in a Jerkass Ball moment to bully her brother and she has since stopped using it.
  • Moe:
    • Mabel.
    • Dipper can qualify for this, too, at times.
    • Mabel's friend Candy also fits this, without a doubt.
    • Lil' Gideon intentionally invokes this.
    • .GIFfany, despite the fact that, or perhaps because, she is so crazy.
    • Pacifica has some surprisingly adorable moments in Northwest Mansion Mystery.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Many fans feel that Lil' Gideon crossed the line in "The Hand That Rocks the Mabel" when he tried to kill Dipper simply so he could go on a date with his sister.
    • Bill Cipher crosses this in the second season. While he was never on the side of good to begin with, his actions in his first appearence could just be interpreted as him being a Punch Clock Villain who takes his job seriously. However, him abusing Dipper's body to the point he needed to be hospitalized and almost manipulating Mabel into giving him the journal firmly establishes him as one of the main antagonists.
    • Pacifica's parents cross this in "Northwest Mansion Mystery" when they would rather let all their guests, including four children die rather than swallow their pride and let in the common people of the town. Plus their survival plan depends on them cannibalizing their butler. They were also revealed to be extremely emotionally abusive towards Pacifica, up to and including having her trained to respond to a bell with contrition like one of Pavlov's dogs.
    • Grunkle Stan's parents crossed it when they kicked him out of the house when he was about seventeen or eighteen, all because of a stupid mistake he made, refusing to even hear his side of the story. They told him not to return home until he was rich. That's just cold.
    • Darlene is probably one of the most evil Monster of the Week villains. After luring Stan into the Mystery Mountain she reveals that she plans to eat Stan and turn his body into a mummy just like she's did quite a number of others. She later goes out of her way to chase Stan down and tries to eat him, along with Dipper, Mabel, Candy and Grenda. She makes it clear at the end of the episode that she will keep feeding on victims as long as there are guys like Stan still out there.
  • Never Live It Down: Wendy's only line in the earliest promos was: "Later, dorks." This has lead to some Fan Fic writers treating the word "dorks" like it's her Verbal Tic, not unlike Kevin.
  • No Yay: Dipper/Mabel and Stan/Ford, for some fans, because it's incestual. While some fans will make an exception for non-biological incest, they're blood relatives in both cases.
    • Bill/Dipper can also fall under this, as it involves possessing Dipper's body against his will.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • The brain monster in the freezer in "The Inconveniencing".
    • Big Henry in "Golf War".
    • Dipper as a sock puppet. He's funny when he's mad.
    • Gideon's mother has only appeared in one scene in one episode, yet it's upsetting.
  • OT3: Mabel/Pacifica/Dipper, as Pacifica has become more friendly with the Pines twins, shipping her with one or the other has become incredibly popular. Still Pincest continues to be the fandom's favorite ship, so after episodes like "The Golf War" and "Northwest Mansion Noir" shipping all three has become the "everyone is happy" compromise.
  • Paranoia Fuel:
    • The cipher at the end of season 1 finale revealed the name of a website, which posted many cryptograms, among them "IM WATCHING YOU" and "IT ALL STARTED WITH A MAN A CURIOUS MAN." (they have been since removed, and replaced with "A Forgotten Tale"), and features Bill Cipher at the main page. Just what the fuck is this site? Word Of God says the site isn't affiliated with Disney, but it seems to be official to some capacity due to it foreshadowing an unexpected Gravity Falls flash game's release. After going on a hiatus since October, it reappeared in June and has been updating since - the wiki link above chronicles its every update.
    • Bill Cipher departs from his first appearance by letting the character know that, until next time, he'll be watching them... not that he wasn't before. The whole time.
    • Experiment 210, like most creatures with the power of Voluntary Shapeshifting, definitely evokes this feeling. Fitting, considering what he's an homage to.
    • The Hide-Behind is always right behind someone, making that creepy clicking noise, but he'll always move away before you can get a clear look at him.
    • "Not What He Seems" introduces the idea that your loveable relative may in fact be a complete stranger who had stolen his identity. This thankfully isn't entirely the case with Grunkle Stan, but the scenes in which it's looking like it is are extremely unsettling.
  • Periphery Demographic:
    • Just to give you an idea how big the show's adult fanbase is, even ERod loves it.
    • And now, Doug Walker, a.k.a the Nostalgia Critic and his brother Rob Walker have found the show. Both love it, and are going to do Vlogs on it in December. Rob has even said that he can't find anything really wrong with it, and Doug has managed to get himself caught in the codes and theories of the show.
    • The adult fanbase for the show is so large that it even receives a nod in-show, in "Dungeons, Dungeons & More Dungeons."
    Stan: "I'll have you know there's a big mystery element, and a lot of humor that goes over kids' heads!"
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: Dipper/Pacifica has Dippica/Dipifica/Dipacifica and Dipper/Candy has CandyDip. Dipper/Wendy has WenDip.
    • Agents Powers and Trigger are Powertrigger.
  • The Problem with Licensed Games: So far, Gravity Falls: Legend of the Gnome Gemulets got mixed to negative reception. Praise was given to the visuals and dialogue, but the main criticism is that it is short.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: Ford. Upon his initial introduction, many saw him as a selfish Jerkass, especially since his introductory episode was dedicated to showing and giving sympathy to Stan's side of their conflict. As episodes went on and depth was given to his character and backstory, many conceded that, despite both having acted immaturely as a teenager, as an adult he has very justifiable reasons for his actions. Desperately trying to make up for accidentally helping Bill jumpstart the end the world by keeping all openings to Bill's dimension shut, for instance.
  • Rewatch Bonus:
    • The episodes have subtle hints of future plots and cameos of characters before they become important. One example: time traveler Blendin Blandin can be seen in the background in early episodes.
    • Knowing that Grunkle Stan has known that Gravity Falls has supernatural oddities makes more sense when you go back and watch the episodes where he denies it.
    • The reveal of the Author's identity causes a ton of it. One specifically pointed out by Alex Hirsch himself is that Stan's initial reaction to the sculpture of himself in "Headhunters" is because, for a moment, it seems like his brother has somehow returned.
  • Ron the Death Eater: Depending on the fan/writer/artist, Mabel and Dipper occasionally get this treatment. Stan isn't immune either, as you can see from the troll fics listed in the Memetic Molester bulletin.
    • Doing this to Dipper has shot up in popularity since the emergence of the many Villain!Dipper headcanons on tumblr following "Not What He Seems." To the point where there is an actual theory called "Dipper4TrueVillainOfGF."
    • Parts of the fandom will often exaggerate Mabel's flaws, portraying her as, among other things, a Manipulative Bitch.
    • Some also exaggerate Ford's selfish tendencies, portraying him as a heartless man who'd protect his Journals over the safety of the world and his family, or a malicious one deliberately trying to break up the twins' good relationship.
  • The Scrappy: Stan's father who disowned him after he accidentally ruined Ford's chances of going to a dream school (and the millions the family could've made as a result).
  • Self-Fanservice: When it comes to drawing Bill Cipher, fandom likes to draw him not only as his adorably evil triangle form, but also as a tall, suave, handsome young man in a yellow suit. The looks vary from lanky teen to Alex Hirsch, but he is almost always paired with Dipper in a lot of these pictures. And this isn't even accounting for all of the suggestive and bloody art Bipper gets...
  • Ship Mates: Billdip (Bill/Dipper) shippers are usually pretty friendly with Mabifica (Mabel/Pacifica) shippers. There's a lot of crossover in their ranks, and they're both warring against the canon-teased Dipifica (Dipper/Pacifica).
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: Sadly, Gravity Falls fans are becoming notorious for two things on tumblr: their scary, unhealthy theory wars and their equally scary, unhealthy ship wars.
  • Shocking Swerve: Bill somehow making a deal with Blendin' and taking his body. Blendin' was happy in his last appearance because he got his job back and his hair, thanks to the twins.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped:
    • "Summerween" presents a sad, but true: at some point, the world is going to tell you that you're too old for things like Halloween and trick-or-treating, so it's better to enjoy it while you can than spend time worrying about what older kids think of it.
    • "Boss Mabel" shows that while there's nothing wrong with treating your employees with more respect, don't be too nice or else your employees will walk all over you.
    • "The Bottomless Pit": Mabel's story has the unfortunate but very true aesop that sometimes hearing the truth can be far more damaging than a lie, and that lying is sometimes necessary for the greater good.
    • "Boyz Crazy": Exposing your crush's boyfriend as a jerk so she'll break up with him does not automatically make her "available" for you, and you should be breaking her and him up for her own good, not for yours.
    • "Sock Opera": you should be willing to make sacrifices for the ones you love, and if someone has aided you at detriment to their own goals, you should help them in return.
    • "Society of the Blind Eye" gives the message that while everyone has things they'd rather forget, extreme denial isn't healthy. Instead you should learn from the experiences.
    • "Blendin's Game:" If your deadbeat parent makes no effort to see you, why should you make an effort to see them?
      • Also, don't run away from consequences; face them like you should.
    • "The Love God": Don't meddle in the personal relationships of others. Often times you will just make things worse for them.
    • "Northwest Mansion Noir": Just because your entire family happen to be lying, stuck-up jerkasses it doesn't mean you have to follow in their footsteps. You are who you choose to be, not what your bloodline dictates you are or other people try to force you into being.
    • "A Tale of Two Stans": While pursuing your dreams is a good thing, don't let it consume you to the point where you can't be sympathetic towards, forgive, or care about the ones who love you, and are blinded to the very fact that they love you.
    • "Dungeons, Dungeons, and More Dungeons": You don't have to like something that doesn't suit your interests but you still shouldn't mock others for liking it. Most shows go for "Don't mock people for liking something because you could like it too," but this episode teaches that it's wrong to give flak to others for liking something whether you like it or not.
    • Overall, in Season 2, The Power of Trust is a recurring motif. Stan not telling anyone about his portal project almost destroyed his relationship with Dipper, Mabel, and Soos; Ford refusing to believe that what Stan did was an accident caused their entire friendship to fall apart; Ford and Dipper not telling Mabel what the rift was turned out to be a major contributing factor to Bill's Apocalypse; and Mabel not trusting Dipper to make decisions for his future (without ruining their relationship and her own future in the process) motivated her to leap at the chance to freeze time in Gravity Falls forever, which became the other major contributing factor to Bill's Apocalypse.
  • Squick:
    • In "Little Dipper" Mabel and Dipper save the day by, having shrunk down to the height of about an inch, crawling into Gideon's armpit and tickling him. And he'd apparently been sweating like a dog too...
    • To a lesser extent, in "The Deep End", there is a kid stuck in a pool filter as if it's prison for a prolonged period of time. Very disgusting for anyone who's had to clean a pool—every single bit of water and trash goes through the filters. And public pools are notoriously gross.
    • Old Man McGucket eating through a baby pterodactyl in "The Land Before Swine".
    • Bill telekinetically removing a deer's teeth in "Dreamscaperers". Even Gideon finds this disgusting.
    Gideon: Agh! You're insane!
    Bill: Sure I am! What's your point?
    • The pages regarding Bill in Book 3 are covered in blood.
    • What Bill does to Preston Northwest's face in Weirdmageddon, Part 1. Click at your own risk.
  • Starboarding: There are fans who find Dipper's Precocious Crush on Wendy adorable without shipping them.
  • Strawman Has a Point:
    • Dipper and Mabel's actions in "Stanchurian Candidate" are ethically reprehensible but arguably justified by circumstance. Bud Gleeful all but threatens to destroy their home and possibly do worse and Stan refuses to take things seriously in spite of the looming threat posed, which has a very real chance of coming to pass before Gideon even gets involved.
    • The main unicorn from "The Last Mabelcorn" is truly an awful person for scamming and deliberately sabotaging the emotions of a child, but despite actually being unable to scan a person's heart, she has a point when she brings up how Mabel truly isn't pure of heart, just selfish and desiring for others to see her that way. In addition, she also points out doing good deeds to make yourself look good rather than to actually help others really isn't all that noble.
    • In "Roadside Attraction," Stan's advice to help Dipper get over Wendy (that Dipper should practice talking to girls while on their roadtrip) is treated as being "kind of a jerk" and Dipper's actions while following said advice are treated as morally reprehensible, but Stan's right in that the more you do it, the better you get at it. In addition, Stan encouraged Dipper to show confidence, which was exactly what Dipper lacked around girls. Stans advice was also more specific with Dippers situation rather than Mabels advice which was to just move on despite her knowledge of Dippers awkwardness.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song:
    • "Double Dipper" features several knockoffs of well-known songs like "Don't Start Un-Believing" and a sound-alike of Spandau Ballet's "True", probably the most popular slow dance.
    • In "Dipper vs. Manliness", Dipper likes to sing "Disco Girl" by BABBA. The snippet of chorus sung is also very similar to "Dancing Queen".
    • The song playing at the Summerween store in the cold open sounds like "Monster Mash".
    • Whoah-oh! Livin' on a pra- I mean, "Takin' over midnight!"
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: "The Last Mabelcorn" could have taught the more widely applicable lesson that it's okay to have flaws and that no one will ever be perfect, but at the same time, the fact that everyone has flaws doesn't mean you shouldn't be held accountable for your own. Instead, Mabel's lesson and conclusion from an episode about her being called impure of heart is that her critics are "lying jerks" and that morality is relative. Small wonder that this episode caused a Broken Base.
  • Toy Ship: Mabel and Mermando.
    • Dipper and Candy, as of Summerween
    • Dipper and Pacifica as of Northwest Mansion Mystery.
    • As well as Mabel and Pacifica.
  • Ugly Cute:
    • Grenda. She may have the voice of a pro wrestler, but she's also a boy-crazy preteen, and quite adorable.
      Grenda: Please turn off your cellphones! Unless you're texting me, cuties!
    • The candy monster from the first "Dipper's Guide to the Unexplained" short, especially after it stops wreaking havoc when it gets distracted by the television.
    • As disturbing as he is, seeing Bill as everyone in the Mystery Shack at the end of the twisted rendition of the show's intro in Weirdmageddon, is oddly adorable, especially with him as Mabel.
  • Uncanny Valley: Exploited for Bill Cipher's Demonic Possession of Dipper's body. Not only does "Bipper" move in awkward, unnatural, inhuman ways, but in general he treats the body like a toy, pulling at its face and repeatedly slamming its arm in a drawer while appearing to enjoy the pain. To top it off, Dipper's normally cute design is rendered in unsettling detail, complete with facial wrinkles, bags under his eyes, and detailed, fang-like teeth. Even without the context of the plot, the sight itself is incredibly disturbing. Of course, this was most likely completely intentional.
    • .GIFfany's weird voice is oddly disturbing, especially when she laughs. To make it worse, except for her brief shouting fit, she almost constantly sounds cheerful, even when she's threatening Soos. Also, from the same episode, animatronic characters she possesed.
    • Stan's hot air balloon. Played for Laughs.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: In "Roadside Attraction," the girls who get mad at Dipper in the episode for "flirting" with a different girl at every new tourist trap are this. We're supposed to feel bad for them and know that Dipper is in the wrong for his unfaithful flirtations, but considering each girl only had one simple, non-romantic conversation with him, gave Dipper their numbers to keep in touch, and really had no expectations to ever see him again, the idea that they would assume they were now anything more than friends and get mad at Dipper for hanging out with other girls is absolutely ridiculous. By domino effect, this causes Candy's more justifiable hurt to also become unsympathetic, because Mabel, Candy, and Grenda's anger at Dipper is based entirely on the other girls' words rather than anything Dipper did wrong, but the situation is never addressed as anything other than Dipper's fault, with Mabel even hissing "Betrayer!" at him when he tries to apologize.
  • The Untwist:
    • The twist in "Boyz Crazy" was set up rather obviously by Dipper and Wendy early on.
    • The Reveal that Stan was using the Portal to rescue his brother (the Author), could be this for some fans who had already speculated and predicted this months before "Not What He Seems" aired.
      • This got a nod in "Dungeons, Dungeons, and More Dungeons," where Soos said that he predicted Duck-tective having a twin brother a year before the episode aired.
  • Villain Decay:
    • While Gideon averted it in his first re-appearance in Season 2, "The Stanchurian Candidate", it was then played straight with him in "Weirdmageddon Part 1", where he is just a flunky to the true Big Bad Bill Cipher, and his usual creepiness is completely absent in favor of the pure comedy of him being a stereotypical Corrupt Hick sheriff (as Wendy puts it: "He's gotten folksier!"). Genuinely caring about his fellow prison inmate gang members also neuters his villainy. In the end, his Heel–Face Turn doesn't come off as too surprising as a result.
  • What an Idiot:
    • Ford has a Played for Laughs moment of this when he kept a dangerous inter-dimensional dice around him and doesn't seem to note how incautious that is when he assures Dipper that it's protected in a cheap plastic case.
    • On a more serious note, Ford traps a rift that can destroy the universe in what is basically a snowglobe and then safely stores it... in a flimsy unlocked cabinet beside the control panel.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: The show's creators really stretch their TV-Y7 rating; the show is positively rife with Nightmare Fuel, bizarre imagery, and touches subject matter that is normally taboo in children's programming, whether it be for the sake of drama or for a joke. Adult jokes are prevalent and the show can get quite violent, compounded by the fact characters visibly shed blood, red or otherwise. The show's characters are shown to be quite flawed for Disney protagonists as well; Stan and his brother are far from ideal role models and even Dipper and Mabel have engaged in unsavory behavior (although they usually learn from it). The show's a lot more mature than one would expect from it.
  • What The Hell, Casting Agency?: Preston Northwest: Upper-Class Twit, elitist snob, and Abusive Parent. So naturally, Nathan Fillion is the first actor that comes to mind...
  • Win Back the Crowd: Gravity Falls is beloved for its excellent animation and writing, helping Disney get the trust of its viewers back with regards to its cartoons.
  • The Woobie:
    • Dipper fits this. In "The Inconveniencing", for example, he spends the entire episode trying to impress Wendy, but almost loses it when Mabel mentions the "Lamby Lamby Dance." Also, in the convenience store, Wendy's friends accuse him multiple times of being a scared little kid. On top of that, he is forced to do the "Lamby Lamby Dance" to save them and on top of that, Wendy is watching him do it. He does get saved from complete embarrassment however, when Wendy decides to keep the dance secret from her friends.
      • On top of that, Wendy's facial expression when she sees Dipper do the "Lamby Lamby Dance" can be interpreted as a form of squee. So, while Dipper feels absolutely humiliated, it's not all bad.
      • In "Fight Fighters", the poor kid seemed genuinely, realistically terrified that he had to fight with Robbie.
      • His struggling to tell Wendy how he feels about her and ultimately having his feelings unrequited puts him firmly in this territory during "Into the Bunker."
      • In "Sock Opera," when Bill tricks Dipper into letting him possess his body the poor kid ends up so beat up that at the end of the episode he insists on needing to go to the hospital.
      • By a little more than halfway through the second season it's clear he's quietly been an emotional wreck for awhile. It's been noted that he has an extremely low concept of self-worth and is quick to blame himself for things that go wrong, even if it's not his fault. He's also extremely lonely (he still misses Tyrone, his clone, "the only one who ever understood") due to his only close friends being members of his family, most of whom pick at his insecurities in moments of insensitivity just for the sake of jokes. The major exception is currently Ford, who validates and even shares Dipper's interests and feelings and passes no judgement on the quirks that others have often alienated Dipper for. But as of "The Last Mabelcorn," it's very clear Dipper's been mentally traumatized by Bill's abuses towards him, and unfortunately Ford seems to have unintentionally added to the nightmare fuel. To top it all off, he's been put in charge of protecting a McGuffin that, if broken, would end the world, and has very little idea what the right thing to do is in terms of protecting it. All of this adds up to one incredibly confused, hurt, frustrated, and lonely child.
      • During Weirdmageddon, he spends three days wandering a post-apocalyptic wasteland not sure if any of his family or friends are still alive. He goes "to heck and back" to rescue Mabel, to the point where he was dragging himself along the ground after a car wreck and that still didn't deter him, and when he finally reunited with her, discovered that she'd replaced him with a new "improved" version of himself; for a kid whose self-esteem is in the negatives anyway, that's gotta be incredibly painful. Not to mention the flashback to the twins' fourth grade Valentine's Day, when Dipper didn't receive a single card and ran from the classroom to hide in a janitor's closet when the class laughed at him for it.
      • The reveal in the game that Dipper, not even 5 minutes old, nearly suffocated in the hospital because of his umbilical cord, the universe either hates him or Bill has been watching, and screwing with 'Pine Tree' for years, how can you not feel bad for the kid.
    • Blendin Blandin from "The Time Traveler's Pig." He wasn't a bad guy, yet he was reprimanded and punished for just doing his job. Clearly, he had been overworked and was a nervous wreck, and the minute he decided to take it easy, two little kids stole his time machine. This was all Played for Laughs (and in no way was his story as sad as poor Mabel's when she lost Waddles).
      • If it's any consolation, his only punishment was to finish doing the job he was trying to do in the first place, so no harm no foul with any luck. Though he is on his boss's bad side now.
      • He did get sent to time jail for life. But then again, he did establish a combat match to get a wish to wish the kids out of existence (rather than just using it to undo the damage done to him). Also, from a managerial standpoint, a guy who lets himself get tricked by 12 year olds out of a time machine does not make you look good at all.
    • Li'l Gideon's mother. "Just keep vacuuming... just keep vacuuming..."
    • Mermando in "The Deep End." Just a twelve year old kid, and he was separated from his family, just barely escaped from sailors who were going to feast on his flesh, and wound up trapped in a swimming pool for an undetermined amount of time.
      • It's also dang near impossible not to feel awful for the poor kid stuck in solitary confinement in the same episode.
      • Again from that episode, Dipper can be considered one for giving up his new-found job as an assistant lifeguard to help Mermando. Of course, Dipper only wanted the job to reach his unrealistic desire to "eventually marry Wendy" so it might be mitigated somewhat.
      • And later, Mermando's forced to marry a manatee! Guy can't catch a break.
    • Sev'ral Timez. Let's see... they were raised in a giant hamster cage and cloned, were verbally abused by their creator/manager and were denied food if they didn't perform well, they are Extreme Doormats who are too timid to stand up for themselves and allow themselves to be controlled by people, they are now homeless and live in the forest and have to resort to eating garbage so as not to have empty stomachs, and they have no idea how to take care of themselves. The astonishing thing is that, while the episode was a Take That towards the manufactured nature of 90s boy bands, the singers themselves were portrayed in an astonishingly sympathetic way.
    • The "Free Pizza" guy never gets anything he wants, whether it's free pizza, a package, or barbecue. And he looks so dejected every time.
    • Wendy, after she reveals that she only pretends to be constantly laid-back as a way to cope with her aggressive family, which is a burden on her emotions. This suddenly makes her rare emotional outbursts such as in "Boyz Crazy" even worse.
    • Old Man McGucket. He worked with the author, and witnessed something so horrible that he decided the best thing would be to erase his memories of it with a mind eraser gun he created. He then continued to use the mind eraser gun for every event he wanted to forget, without ever realizing he was driving himself insane. It certainly makes the fact that his family ignores him now all the more harsh.
    • Poor Soos, as revealed in Blendin's Game: his dad left him at a young age and never came back, making up for missed birthdays with postcards saying things approximate to "Sorry I couldn't make it champ! Busy with work!" From the way Soos's Abuelita talks about him, it's clear the Parental Abandonment was pretty purposeful rather than neglect stemming from travel work.
    • Thompson, as revealed in "The Love God"; he deliberately allows himself to be picked on to get friends and pleaded not to be alone when his friend group split up in anger.
    • Pacifica becomes this as we learn more about her home life in season 2, especially in "Northwest Mansion Mystery" in which we learn that her parents are flat-out psychologically abusive as opposed to just neglectful.
    • Grunkle Stan if you think about it. "Not What He Seems" has dialogue that suggests that he feels directly responsible for his brother's disappearance, lamenting that he had to get involved in things 30 years ago. He's spent the last 30 years of his life looking for a way to save his brother.
      • It only gets worse in A Tale Of Two Stans. After an accident in his teen years, Stan gets disowned, betrayed, and has to run from the law. After 10 years, he finally gets to see his brother and former friend, only to be told that he still doesn't want to see him again. On top of it all, he loses his brother who he brings back after 30 years, and his brother STILL hates him even though Stanley regretted those moments his entire life.
    • Ford. He's more of a Jerkass Woobie at the moment, but it is clear that his experiences with Bill Cipher had put enough stress on him to drive him half-mad, and who knows what he had to endure after he was sent through the dimensional portal. All of his issues also stem from a lack of self-esteem in his childhood, often being deemed a "freak" for having six fingers on both hands.
    • Bud Gleeful (and his wife), who's clearly being victimized and abused by his nine-year-old dark-magic-using son.
    • Mabel in "Dipper and Mabel Vs. the Future". So much. As if having her big birthday plans shot down wasn't enough, she might have to leave Dipper behind in Gravity Falls.