troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Headscratchers: Gravity Falls
    open/close all folders 

     General 
  • This has less to do with an episode and more to do with the series in general: How exactly do we know Dipper has a crush on Wendy? TV Tropes mentioned it a handful of times, and so do a few other sites whenever they mention her. As of this writing, only the pilot was released and Wendy barely got screentime, nor was there any indication of Dipper's feelings towards her. Where is everyone getting this idea?
    • All There In The Manual. note 
    • And several later episodes pretty much revolve around it.
  • Another one similar to the above: Can somebody please tell me where and when somebody says that Wendy is Manly Dan's daughter?
    • Disney Channel Medianet. note 
    • Also in the show, Wendy shows a picture of herself with her three brothers, who were seen in an earlier episode fishing with Manly Dan.
  • How does this site list things from episodes that have not yet officially premiered on Disney Channel?
    • Episodes have been leaked repeatedly.
    • People with On-Demand see the episodes early, and some people put it on the internet for others to see before it airs officially.
  • The parents had to know what being with Uncle Stan was like. Who in their right mind would think it was a good idea to leave them in Gravity Falls? Were the parents simply fed up with child-rearing in the off-chance cryptids would come knocking?
    • Maybe the parent whose uncle he is has really fond memories of spending the summer at their cool uncle's place. Also, he's not actually malevolent, and he seems to get along very well with the children. (I'm not entirely sure if they basically meet him for the first time or not.) And maybe he was the only one available.
    • In "Gideon Rises", after the events of the prior episode, they do call to check up on the twins and him, so they do care about him. He lies to try and ease their concerns and judging by the way he says "You too," at the end, they probably told him that they loved him.
  • How come there are already foreign dubs of the show when season 1 isn’t even over yet?
    • it's a popular show and on Disney which streams world wide. I'd be a tad more surprised if there wasn't any foreign dubs out
  • When is it canonically stated that Dipper and Mabels' middle names are their parents' first names? It's all over the GF Wiki, and I'm a little confused.
  • A minor one, but why does Dipper only get one character-specific scene in the intro while Mabel & Stan both get two?
    • I always thought the extras were meant to go to Soos and Wendy... But what do I know?
  • Why does everyone insist on spelling Bill's last name with a "y"?
  • Who stole the capers?
    • The Caper-Case Caper.
  • Do journal number three's pages really stop as if the person writing it mysteriously disappeared, or is it because they hid it in the forest and it would be weird if they went out into the forest alone every time they wanted to update it while they believe they're being watched?
    • Both theories make sense. The answer, though, is unknown since we haven't been given the answer yet.
    • This has been explained. The reason is that the author continued from that point in invisible ink to hide it from prying eyes.
  • Yes
  • Why does the fanbase (particularly on this site, but I've seen it elsewhere) treat this whole "Stan has a twin brother" theory like it's some huge secret or conspiracy? Stan obviously has a brother. That has been implicit since the very first episode. His brother is Dipper and Mabel's grandfather, because that's kind of what a great-uncle is: your grandparent's sibling. And we know that grandparent is a man because Stan and the twins share the same last name. I understand the fun of Epileptic Trees and I don't mean to ruin that, but come on. This one shouldn't be some zany theory. It should just be common sense.
    • The whole secrecy thing about Stans brother/Dipper and Mabels grandfather isnt that he exists, he obviously must, but that he is involved in the mysteries surrounding Gravity Falls and the hidden Gate beneath the Mystery Shack.
    • We don't know whether whichever of the twins' grandparents is related to Stan was a brother or a sister. Obviously he has at least one sibling because he's the twins' great-uncle, but there's a (very likely) possibility that he has a twin brother connected to the Gravity Falls mysteries and, considering the evidence for his existence in the first place and his absence in the present, he's confronted Bill Cipher in the past and it didn't end well for him. It's a secret because no one in the show has openly acknowledged him.

     Characters 
  • If Grunkle Stan's full name is Stanford, why does his license plate read STNLYMBL (Stanley Mobile)?
    • Maybe he finds Stanford a little dorky or stuck-up sounding and prefers to be called Stanley?
    • Knowing Stan, he probably stole it.
    • Stanley can be shortened for Stanford?
      • Stanley typically isn't a nickname, though in this case the show might use it that way because both share "Stan" as a root of sorts.
    • There's a huge heaping pile of evidence that Stanford had a twin brother who was the previous inhabitant of the Mystery Shack. The license plate is a part of that huge heaping pile, with the inference that the car also belonged to the twin — who was probably named Stanley.
  • Why does Robbie feel romantically threatened by a 12-year old? He knows that Dipper isn't serious competition, Wendy wouldn't leave him for Dipper.
    • I think he might be insecure.
    • He knows Dipper treats Wendy better than he does. Maybe he's not afraid that'll lead to romance, but just to them hanging out more or her realizing Robbie's a jerk.
      • Well, Robbie isn’t a jerk to Wendy, keep in mind. He actually treats her pretty well and definitely likes her. He’s arrogant to everyone around him, but Wendy knows him well enough to know that’s just how he is. And it should be taken into account how jaded Wendy is to dating—if he did treat her wrongly, she’d likely dump him in an instant. Mostly, Robbie sees Dipper as a threat because he’s an insecure teenager who struggles with his identity and tries to make a “statement” through his clothing and music, amongst other things.
    • Because he's a stereotypical "teen" character. Teens are thought of, and usually are, not as smart as they think they are, and not as emotionally stable as an adult, as they are still growing. All that jazz. He's jealous of Dipper because it would be weird for the stereotypical teen not to be insanely jealous of everything that even looks at his girlfriend.
    • Overall it's complicated and you have to examine the episodes to track it all:
      • In "The Inconveniencing," they first met. Things began when Dipper pointed out Robbie's explosion graffiti resembled more a muffin and embarassing him in front of his friends and Wendy. Over the episode, he acts condescending toward Dipper, but simply incites Dipper to try harder. An example is when Robbie fails to get into the store, Dipper then tries. After being teased, Dipper goes and gets them in, embarassing him further. The episodes ends with them pretty much on neutral terms, him nodding in respect of Dipper ridding the ghosts.
      • In "Double Dipper," Dipper attempts to keep Robbie away by using his clones. Not much interaction, though we see Dipper's view on Robbie.
      • In "The Time Traveler's Pig," the situation intensifies. Dipper keeps trying to win Wendy the stuffed animal, but ultimately fails, leading to Robbie beginning to date Wendy, much to Dipper's chagrin. Here, we see that Robbie doesn't like Dipper or Mabel very much, a typical quality that older teenagers have toward younger kids, the dislike being mutual.
      • Everything is summed up in "The Fight Fighters." Here, we see that while Robbie likes Wendy, he sometimes doesn't pay attention to her. This leads to an argument between him and Dipper resulting in Robbie finding out about Dipper liking Wendy. Before going to try and call her to tell her, Dipper stops him and breaks the phone in process. Finally fed up with Dipper for embarassing him as well as getting in the way with Wendy, the fight is announced. Matters intensify when Dipper gets Rumble onto Robbie. After Dipper stands to Rumble, Robbie attempts to start the fight, but can no longer find it to hurt Dipper, either out of minor respect for acting like a man or that Dipper was already pounded on to where Robbie feels it isn't worth it. Ultimately, he is forced to come to terms that Dipper is an important guy in Wendy's life and will not go away. Dipper and Robbie agree to 'hate each other in silence.'
      • Ultimately, he views Dipper as a nuisance but later as a threat and someone he just doesn't like. However, he is forced to accept that he will not go away. Dipper's maturity, skills and determination makes him stand out and Robbie acknowledges that.
  • What is up with Dipper's voice? It is really deep! Early puberty much?
    • I wouldn't be suprised if the voice choice is so that listening to dipper's dialogue doesn't make an older audience want to rip their ears out. I mean, cmon, this show is so out of Disney Channel's character that they have to be aiming for a periphery fanbase.
    • This is hilariously ironic, since "Bottomless Pit" makes it a plot point that Dipper's normal voice is apparently crackly, prepubescent, and girly.
      • Also, that story is told by Dipper. He may think his own voice sounds worse than it actually does — which is not an uncommon thing for kids that age.
  • Dipper's crush on Wendy seems to be unrealistic and despite being a smart kid this crush raises two questions... 1, does he know that he will eventually go back to Piedmont and will never see Wendy again and 2, if he somehow marries Wendy does he honestly want to have that insane lumberjack Manly Dan Corduroy as a father-in-law?
    • Strong emotions like love don't usually take logic into account.
    • "Never see Wendy again"? Whose to say Dipper and Mabel won't go back to the Shack for subsequent summers, especially given how much the place has grown on them by the end of season 1?
    • He does seem to know that it may ultimately not go anywhere, based on how much he was able to sympathize with Mabel's plight with Mermando. Won't stop him from trying though.
    • Near the end of "Into The Bunker, Wendy reveals she was somewhat aware of Dipper's crush on her. While very flattered, she does let him down gently. Whether the ship has sunk or not is not completely sure, but now it is.
  • This troper's been noticing this but why exactly does Pacifica hate Mabel anyway? It's not really explained and she kinda shows a unhealthy unexplained hatred of her... she even keeps a billboard with Mabel's face on it as seen in "Gideon Rises".
    • Some people are just terrible people for no adequately explainable reason.
    • It's been confirmed on Alex Hirsch's twitter she'll get more characterization in season 2. Maybe they'll explain it then?
    • It's a clash of opposites. Pacifica is used to getting her way since she is the popular girl in town. To the town, she's the descendant of the town's founders and well-off regarding wealth. If she snubbed you, you'd probably be screwed in the town. Mabel is her opposite, clashing Pacifica's fashion with her homemade sweaters and being a cheery girl who defies the conventions, and having no power over her.
    • Pacifica's relationship with her parents in "The Golf War" explains everything!
  • If the picture of nine-year-old Mabel is accurate, she's been stuck in braces for almost five years. That's almost unheard-of in this day and age. What kind of quack dentist does she have? Or is the show supposed to be set in the 1980s?
    • Coming from someone who wore braces for almost four years, it seems Reality Is Unrealistic. That said, Mabel's got a definite sweet tooth so it doesn't seem unlikely that she's the type of person who bends or breaks the rules about her braces, and, consequentially, breaks the actual braces. Things like hard candies and gum can break brackets, and that adds up to more time in braces. Plus, we don't know how misaligned Mabel's teeth were when she first got the braces (and we likely never will due to the simplified art style) and that definitely factors into how much time it spent in them.

     Tourist Trapped 
  • If Mabel got her lips caught in the leaf blower, how come the smooch mark appears on her right cheek?
    • Maybe she got it off her mouth but then it got stuck on her cheek?

     The Legend of the Gobblewonker 
  • If the Crazy Old Man wanted attention, why didn't he drive the mechanical monster to a place where everybody could see it? Why keep it hidden?
    • Cause then he might get caught and held accountable?
    • Or because he's, Y'know, crazy?
    • Would you pay more attention to an article about the life of a common everyday bird, or about possible Bigfoot sightings?
  • What's the timeframe for this episode, if last Family Fun Day had Dipper and Mabel with Grunkle Stan and Dipper had his new hat, but they've only been in Gravity Falls for about a week?
    • As of "Tourist Trapped", the kids have already been there for a week or two. By the time they go fishing, it's probably been close to a month.
      • Word of God says seasons 1-3 will spread over the first summer, so I'm guessing each season is about a month long, give-or-take.

     Headhunters 
  • How did the Sherlock Holmes Wax statue melt so fast when the sun came up?
    • He is also a vampire.
      • ...I'm sorry?
    • He might have been melting already and the intense heat from the sun just made the progress speed up?
    • Dipper deliberately lead him to the the "Mystery Shack" sign on the roof. The heat from the big lights illuminating the sign did most of the job.
    • Sherlock said the wax statues were cursed to come alive at night, so presumably exposure to the sun while acting alive would violate the curse and kill him.
    • It was established early in the episode that exposition to sunlight melts the statues ("I'm looking at you, wax John Wilkes Booth"), and then we learned that they only come to life during the night. Basically what should have happened is that Holmes would become just a statue and then gradually melt during the day (rooftops tend to be hotter than other places, anyway). They probably melted him so fast to have him die on-screen and avoid ambiguity.
  • How were there no prints on the axe when Dipper, Soos, AND Mabel have held it without wearing gloves throughout the episode?
    • Probably because the cops just suck at their job. I mean, didn't they just hold a flashlight up to the ax?
      • It was a blacklight, but yeah, they totally suck at their jobs.
    • Dipper said to check the extra prints, meaning exclude the ones they already knew of.
      • He didn't say "extra", he said "axe for", as in "Check the axe for prints".
    • Wool and Cotton gloves don't leave prints, just fibers. Leather Gloves leave impressions of the animal skin they're made of. Both are like a fingerprint.

    The Inconveniencing 
  • How did Mabel not get hurt from having her head turn completely around?
  • Why is there still food in the store, and how is it still properly edible? The building was condemned, likely around 1995.
    • Foods with a ton of preservatives that have been vacuum packed in plastic stay good for years. That's why they're often found in emergency kits. The thing that REALLY doesn't make sense is that the ice is still in cubes. It would've melted in the time the freezers were shut off, and re-frozen into an ice-blob when Wendy turned the power back on.
    • Haunted places don't have to obey your mortal logic and silly laws of nature. This may actually count as foreshadowing.
    • Given that the electricity still worked, there was still food and machines in the store, the chalk marks were still on the floor and the only notable damage on the place was that there was what looked like a thin layer of dust, I'd hazard a guess that the place hadn't been condemned for a couple of months. A year at best.
      • But the newspaper is dated 1995. How does this fit into your explanation?
      • Perhaps the series takes place in 1995?
      • But teenagers all have modern phones.
      • It could be an alternate 1995 where technology is a decade or two ahead.
      • They could have kicked the bucket in 1995/1996, some newspapers didn't sell and weren't replaced and gathered dust while they were alive. After they died, and the store was condemned, they used ghost magic or something to basically keep the place frozen in time, which would explain why the frozens weren't melted and the food not expired.
      • Seeing as everything worked in the store, they probably were constantly "waking the store up" to scare off other curious teenagers. On that note that may explain the other hot dogs.
      • There's also the possibility that someone at the power company put a note on their account — something like "ongoing investigation, do not cut off service" — and then nobody ever bothered to go back and finish the process.
    • Based on the fashions and "rap" music in the flashback, the shopkeepers did indeed kick off in 1995.
    • I got the impression the store was kind of stuck in time.
  • Does anyone find it weird that Robbie was never seen attacked/transformed by the ghosts?
    • It's most likely that such a scene was planned but cut for time.
      • Or he's not actually a teen, but something else with a bad attitude and pasty skin.
      • Come to think of it, if he wasn't attacked/transformed, then he would've witnessed Dipper performing "The Lamby Lamby Dance" and know that Wendy was lying about Dipper beating up ghosts.
      • Well, he does seem to know that Dipper's actually 12 years old in Fight Fighters...
  • It's safe to say that the store was closed shortly before the episode took place. Why? There is a fully functional DDR-esque machine that one of the teens was using in the store.
  • In the scene where Dipper sees Wendy, Robbie and Tambry's reflections as skeletons, Robbie's reflection isn't reversed and the stitched heart on his hoodie is missing the blood dripping from it. I'd chalk it up as an animation error, but the stitched heart on the Bill Cipher wheel is also missing the blood drops. What's up with that?

     Dipper vs. Manliness 
  • Apparently, the manotaurs have three Y chromosomes. This is meant to be a joke, but it does raise the question: How the heck do those things reproduce?!
    • Via mitosis?
      • You mean mantosis.
      • Well, we never see any females, so maybe they are just immortal and don't need to reproduce.
      • Then where do they keep getting offerings for Leader-ar?
    • Easy, their chromosomal system is different than ours. Lots of organisms follow different inheritance rules, like birds and fruit flies and corn. Even if they're fully sapient and anthropomorphic, they're still supernatural creatures with fists for nipples, six adam's apples and pectoral muscles on their abs. Our biology already doesn't apply.
  • So, if cutting off the head of the Multi-Bear is the final test of manliness, how did all the other Manotaurs get to become official men without performing the task themselves?
    • Maybe he used to have a lot more heads than he does now...
    • I always just assumed it was the Manotaurs being opportunistic. They have an ongoing feud for whatever reason with the multi-bear and have never been able to thwart him themselves so they send in the kid to do their dirty work for them. If he succeeds, their problem is gone. If not, they haven't lost anything really because it's just some kid they met earlier that day. I don't think anything really implies that this is the same test of manliness they give every single Manotaur, and even if they did say that it doesn't mean they weren't lying.
  • During the Training Montage, we can see Dipper and Chutzpar in town at night. This is odd because the rest of the episode implies that the events of both Mabel and Dipper parralel plots take place within a single day. In the hot spring Dipper even says "these last few hours...".

     Double Dipper 
  • There's a party going on at the Mystery Shack, so more people than usual are there. At times, there is a clear line of sight between the dance floor and the eight Dippers. At one point, Dipper and Tyrone are standing right next to each other on the edge of the dance floor. How does nobody at the party notice this?
    • For the same reason people see multiple instances of the weirdness of Gravity Falls, and yet aren't taken away by the nice men in white coats when trying to prove it. They're used to the weirdness of the town. Or alternatively, they could have thought that Mabel was with Dipper, and that they must look enough alike to be able to pull off such a disguise.
  • The Dipper clones were perfectly willing to let themselves be dissolved, and don't find it particularly bad that they are essentially dying. Is this another hint at the sacrificial lamb thing Dipper has going on? As the clones seemed to just be a heck of a lot more fragile versions of him?
    • Maybe the clones weren't truly alive, but were just echoes of Dipper himself. Like if there were robots programed with his personality.

     Irrational Treasure 
  • When comparing the document from the book to various sources, a chart of astrological signs is shown and the Cancer symbol isn't the usual ♋ but with a different symbol. Is this some kind of an alternate symbol?
  • Who actually made the underground treasure trove? It's implied to be Trembley, but there's also a film projector and government documents dating from the 50s. That would make him 150 when he encased himself in peanut brittle, and he doesn't look 150. Does he periodically come out of hibernation? Is he really an alchemist who discovered the secret of eternal youth? Similarly, it can't be the government who put all that stuff there, because Blubs said their mission was to find Trembley. And it can't have been the author of the journals, because he was following the clues like Dipper and Mabel were. Unless he found Trembley's resting place and put all the other stuff in there? Or is there some fourth party involved in all this that'll be revealed later on?
    • Possibly the Author of the journals, having found Trembleys resting place, but never updated the details in the journal itself.

     The Time Traveler's Pig 
  • Wait, if they go back in time, shouldn't there be two Dippers and two Mabels?
    • I guessing this version of time travel works more like a reset button on a video game where it lets you relive moments of your life as oppose to traveling through time.
      • Dipper says that there's only one timeline where Wendy doesn't get hit in the eye, which means this show runs on Multiverse Theory or something similar.
    • Here's a thought. Whenever Dipper and Mabel time travelled to the fair, they displaced themselves. But when they go back to the events of the first episode, there are 2 Dippers and Mabels, so shouldn't they have displaced themselves from that point in time as well.
      • Possible explanation: Dipper and Mabel wanted to relive the day, so the time travel measuring tape displaced their selves from the original timeline. When they were running through the past back to the future toward the end, they didn't want to relive the day so they didn't displace their selves from the first episode.
      • Another possible explanation: different rules apply depending on how far back you travel. You travel to the same day (which Mabel and Dipper did, repeatedly) you displace yourself. Travel further than that, you don't.
      • Yet another explanation: There were originally two Dippers and Mabels, but they were displaced when something that was the same happened in the timeline. Although the last one shouldn't have been a displacement by this theory for Mabel, maybe just one is needed for a displacement.
  • Why doesn't Dipper just tell Wendy to...I don't know, duck for cover?
    • I assumed he did in a timeline we didn't see. Dipper repeated the day long enough to develop an algorithm of every possible variable, and the the ball ALWAYS ricochets as much as it needs to in order to hit Wendy in the eye.
  • In the original timeline, it takes until Dipper gets back with the ice for Robbie to get to Wendy. So how/why, in every other iteration, is he practically standing behind the two of them at the prize booth?
    • It was probably quicker to write it that way.
      • Probably the same reason why we never saw the ghosts in the convenience store attack/transform Robbie.
      • Also the same reason why he knows about mind-control music, and the reason why his shirt has a picture on it that appears on Bill's circle. Note also that he spends some time near the Shack, looks like a zombie, has encountered Rumble Mc Skirmish, and we have no idea if he managed to catch those two Dipper clones.
    • When Dipper goes back the first time, he is in a different location and has to go find Wendy. Maybe in the altered timelines Dipper throws the ball later than he originally did, so Robbie is closer to Wendy?
  • Why didn't Dipper get the ice for Wendy's eye before throwing the ball? Even if it'd seem weird to her, it would prevent Robbie from helping her recover.
    • That would've made it look like he planned for her to get hit in the eye, which would be even worse than a clearly accidental hit.
  • Why didn't Dipper and Mabel just quickly win Waddles and then do the whole "ball throwing skepatic" thing to impress Wendy.
    • Maybe the wind changed just enough in the time it would have taken them to do that. After all, there was supposedly only one universe where the trick works.
  • Why didn't either Dipper or Mabel use the magic copy machine so they could win Waddles and the stuffed animal at the same time?
    • Perhaps Dipper doesn't want to use it again after his clones went rogue.
      • Only the clones didn't go rogue. Dipper himself went rogue when he attempted to go against the plan. The clones for the most part were completely on board with doing it Dipper's way.
      • Regardless, they still caused more trouble than they were worth.
  • How come Mabel remembered the last change when she wasn't a part of it?
    • Maybe she was. Of course, that means she's now a month older than Dipper.
      • And a millimeter taller, as shown in "Little Dipper".
    • Wibbly Wobbly Timey Wimey?
    • It's cartoon logic. That's like asking "How come Wile E. Coyote can survive an explosion when in real life it would have vaporized him?"
      • Just because it's a cartoon doesn't mean it follows Looney Tunes logic. Looney Tunes is a slapstick comedy. Gravity Falls is a sitcom with fantasy and adventure elements.
      • ... and has also used slapstick violence and blatant cartoon physics.
      • Slapstick works even for live action, so I don't think that suggests regular cartoon logic. Also, what Looney Tunes style cartoon physics have actually been used (outside of blantant supernatural cases)? I have a bad eye for those things.
    • I thought Mabel immune to the changes because she'd time travelled in the first place.
    • RE: Example of Looney Physics. When learning how to be a man Dipper jumps a gorge and lands on the other side, only to comically knock himself back into a ravine so deep the bottom can't be seen. Next scene he's right back to training.
    • Mabel remembered all the other instances, though, so the last thing she'd remember is Dipper being a jerk about her losing Waddles. It's an easy logical jump from there to "the day's been reset again, Dipper must've stopped being a jerk."
  • Why did Mabel even need to be there to tilt the gutter? Couldn't Dipper have propped it up to that angle ahead of time?
    • There might not have been enough time or maybe the gutter couldn't have remained propped up without someone holding it.
    • It's widely considered that Mabel has some powerful nature she doesn't know about. Among these unknown powers... the ability to manipulate time instead of following destiny, Dipper states that she was the missing variable after all.
  • Or, alternatively, why did Mabel wait around until after the ball finished flying? She had plenty of time to get down from the roof and get Waddles but instead she just stands behind Dipper for a bit.
    • Considering there's only one universe in which Wendy doesn't get hit, maybe Mabel's position is absolutely critical to... wind direction or something.
    • Well Mabel didn't know that Pacifica was going to win Waddles, so she wasn't in a rush.
  • Why didn't they win Waddles, go back in time with him, and make sure Wendy never got hit by the ball?
    • Perhaps the pig farmer would have noticed he was short one pig, leading to even more complications in the timeline?
  • Why didn't Dipper just try and block Robbie or Blendin? If they weren't close to Wendy, or Robbie didn't have a snowcone, then Dipper could get the ice.
    • Messing with Robbie or Blendin would lead to a confrontation, which would make him lose his chance with Wendy.

     Fight Fighters 
  • The whole moral of this episode confuses me. Don't get me wrong, this was one of my favorite episodes yet, what with the pixel art and gaming references and Grunkle Stan being as funny as always, but the plot just bugs me. First, it's supposedly cheating for Dipper to get backup against a jerk who's way older and stronger than him? Second, while Rumble being naive and having a single-track mind is funny and all, it's quite horrifying to see him go to town on Dipper just because he didn't try harder to correct him on who his nemesis is. That brings me to the biggest problem. Why is Dipper portrayed as being in the wrong for trying to avoid a needless fight? Even after he got Rumble, he wasn't wanting revenge, he just wanted Robbie to back off. If he had just avoided Robbie altogether, then what? Robbie goes around saying "Hah, Dipper's such a wuss, I was gonna beat the pulp out of him, but he chickened out and didn't show up." If anything, I'd think people would be impressed with a kid who could put aside his ego and save his skin, and I wouldn't think anyone would approve of a teenager picking fights with a kid who's younger and much smaller than he is. Especially not Wendy.
    • TLDR? The moral of the story is that if a jerk who's way out of your league picks a fight with you, you shouldn't run away or get help from someone stronger. You should stand up to the bully and he'll chicken out.I can really see kids benefiting from this moral.
      • I guess the moral is don't fight a bully with a bully. Rumble isn't exactly a bully, but Dipper did want him to scare Robbie
    • Really? Not every show has to have a moral, you know? But if there had to be one, then what I ended up getting from this episode was simply that picking fights with others would only lead to pain. Both guys were in the wrong here. Dipper deceived someone stronger than him to fight his own battle for him, and ended up paying the price for it once the truth came out. While if Robbie had decided to go through with fighting Dipper, Wendy would have caught him in the act, which would have been most horrible for their relationship.
      • No, not every show has to have a moral. But Gravity Falls has been extra moral-y lately, and there was a clear attempt to make a moral here. Dipper's whole 'I'm the bad guy here' thing, for a start. It's still not exactly the best message to be making - the clear implication here is that if you don't fight someone who's challenged you, you're a coward. If you do, and you're taking back-up (Dipper was clear enough about the whole just wanting to scare him thing, and as soon as it got out of hand he jumped to rescue Robbie, but Rumble completely ignored him and just fought because that's what he does) then you're in the wrong and the bad guy in the situation. But if you go unarmed and just give in to the bully, then you'll luck out and won't get beaten up.
      • I believe the moral is don't have someone else do your dirty work, because the job was meant for you.
      • I'm pretty sure the moral of this story is "don't use magic and magical beings you don't understand to crush your enemies." It's sort of like summoning Cthulhu to beat up Godzilla for you.
      • I thought the moral was that violence isn't always the answer, and you have to take the fall for what you've done. As Soos said, "take it like a man."
  • Why didn't Dipper just use his Manotaur training and open up a can of whoop-ass on Robbie?
    • Maybe his fighting style is specific to giant monsters?
      • Well, it seemed to work just fine against Gideon in the season finale...
      • Dipper opening a can of whoop-ass on Gideon was more of a "parents can lift cars if their kid's under them" thing—some of what he did was learned, but a lot of it was just pure adrenaline over Mabel's kidnapping. Fighting with Robbie is never gonna have that same visceral quality to it, as there's really nothing Robbie can do to him comparable to abducting his sister and best friend. (Or maybe I'm overthinking it and Dipper's just had more time to practice the manotaur stuff over the course of the season than he has in the relatively scant episodes between "Dipper vs. Manliness" and this one.)

     Little Dipper 
  • Okay, this one is kinda complicated, but I'll do my best: In the opening of the episode, it's made completely clear that the only reason Gideon wanted the Mystery Shack in the first place is to inflict as much pain as possible on them to exact his revenge. He was entirely alone, so he can't have been lying or making up excuses. However, by the end of the episode, he apparently now wants it because it contains something that he wants. So...when exactly did this happen? The only way he could have changed his mind would be if he had discovered something about the Mystery Shack that he wanted during his excursion to obtain it, and unless I missed something, he didn't. So, what happened?
    • Maybe it's because of the book? Dipper doesn't show it to him, but Gideon seems to be suspicious.
    • Well, Gideon has his own book, he could have seen said secret there somewhere in-between scenes. And he could have been motivated by both, both pain and destruction and the secret. It's possible he just focused more on the "pain" part because he's completely batshit insane.
      • I was mostly referring to this one scene where Gideon asks Dipper, "Did you read about it in a book?" And considering that his is number 2, he's aware that there are more books, and it's quite likely that he wants the other books too. Dipper didn't answer the question, which Gideon possibly interpreted as a confirmation.
    • Veering into WMG territory Gideon's book may have clues or details on what Grunkle Stan is hiding under the Shack. We know that Stan and Gideon have been antagonistic for a while so this may not necessarily be a new revelation in universe, but rather the first time this has been presented to the audience.
      • Maybe it has something to do with Stan's room behind the vending machine.
      • Confirmed. In Gideon Rises, Book 2 has pages concerning possible hiding places for the other Books. Most of them seem to involve the Mystery Shack.

    Summerween 
  • The copy machine was never destroyed. Why not just copy up 499 pieces of candy?
    • Would YOU want the Summerween Trickster to catch you cheating? I don't see that ending well...
    • Whatever type of ink the copy machine uses, it probably won't taste like candy. Not that the Summerween Trickster is a stranger to bad candy, but ink is just pushing it.
  • Why was Dipper so obsessed with getting to the party and so opposed to trick-or-treating, when a monster who just ate a different child right in front of him was planning to eat him too if he didn't collect enough candy in time?
    • The power of love blinding his judgment?

    Boss Mabel 
  • How did Dipper manage to capture the goblin-thing? He's a twelve year old boy, and he overpowered a giant monster. HOW!?
    • The same way he overpowered the Multi-Bear?
  • Why did the book state that the Grem-Goblin was weak to water when it clearly made the monster more dangerous?
    • Because it didn't, in fact, say that it was the Gremoblin's weakness. Dipper had to turn the page to see that it was warning against using water on it. He even points out how odd it's wording was.
    • I'll add the quote:
    Dipper: "'Uh, got it! When fighting a gremloblin, use water...'"
    [Mabel runs out and splashes it with water as Dipper turns the page]
    Dipper: "'...only as a last resort as water will make him much much scarier!' AH! Who writes sentences like that!?"

    Bottomless Pit! 
  • Did they come out from the same hole because of some unexplained magic bullshit, because they fell so far gravity was sending them back the way they came, or something else?
    • It's suppose to be mysterious like that.
  • Wait a second. The ending shows that if you fall down the hole you'll just fall back out the entrance and no time will have elapsed from when you fell in. Plus, Stan has been throwing unwanted stuff in the hole for a while. If that's the case should he have just kept seeing the stuff fall back out almost immediately after throwing them in?
    • It's purpose may actually be as a supernatural garbage disposal, so anything alive may just be spat back out.
  • Pretty sure it's because Mabel's story was the only one that was true, and thus the truth set them free. It was the last story right before they escaped. Grunkle Stan may have started confessing to no one after being convinced he was going to fall forever. The objects can't really talk, so they just fall forever. Got the "truth" thing from the Fridge Brilliance page on TV Tropes.
  • If no time passed since when they fell down the hole, and when they were spat back out, why isn't it still stormy outside?
    • ...Magic?

    The Deep End 
  • Why was Mabel so determined not to let Dipper find out about the merman until she was practically forced to tell him?
    • Because Mermando told Mabel that his kind must not be seen.
  • How the heck did Mermando get home so quickly? When Mabel receives his bottle-messages, it's obviously the same day—Stan discovers he was glued to the pool chair, Dipper gets fired, Mabel's wearing the same sweater, etc—which means Mermando had to have somehow gotten home in the span of a few hours. The problem with that being Mermando lives in the Gulf of Mexico, and Oregon is on the other side of the United States!
    • Probably the same way he was able to get those bottle messages to Mabel so quickly. Which is also unexplained.
    • Maybe merpeople acquire special powers with experience and/or age, so once he was able to contact his family with the megaphone, they could magically transport him and the bottles.
    • Maybe they're just really fast swimmers. Aquaman is fast enough to swim up waterfalls.

    Carpet Diem 
  • With the message of "Stan is not what he seems." in mind, his seemingly innocent moment of tempting fate about secret rooms becomes something more. Did he want them to find that room? He immediately took what looked like a pair of glasses and hid them from view, these never become relevant in the episode. Or was he perhaps wanting them to search for other hidden rooms?...Did he want them to find whatever the hell he has behind the snack machine?
    • The glasses could become relevant in a later episode.

  • Did they forget that there is an empty room where the wax figures used to be?
    • Would you want to live in a room where you killed formerly alive and CURSED wax figures who's souls may still haunt the room? I would like to keep my head while I'm sleeping, or at least wake up in the morning, thank you very much.
    • The shag carpeting is obviously a dealbreaker.
    • There's new attractions in the Mystery Shack all the time; I could easily see Grunkle Stan having already filled the wax figure room with more new attractions and rendering it no longer empty.

  • Just...what is the Mystery Shack? It has all of these secret rooms, and multiple instances of working magical/futuristic objects. Are they even trying to hide that Stan knows way more than he is letting on?
    • I don't think they're trying to hide it so much as they're playing it down for the time being. Letting it simmer in the background, as it were. The question isn't so much whether the man has secrets as it is what those secrets entail.
  • Why didn't Dipper use the President's key to get in? It seems to fall under many other cases of Aesop Amnesia , like about why the copier hasn't been used either.
    • Does Dipper even believe that the key works? He got it from Quentin Trembley. Who was confused on why it wouldn't work on a wall. Hell, does it even work on every lock? We won't know for sure until they use it. Also, Grunkle Stan would probably count it as cheating. (Which just might impress him, but Dipper doesn't know that.)
      • He knew it worked when they freed Stan in that same episode.
    • Who says they even still have the key? It certainly looked like Mabel gave it to the gremloblin in Boss Mabel for his "five minute break." Perhaps the creature still has it (or ate it), or it was lost in the destruction, or whatever.

    Boyz Crazy 
  • How exactly did Robbie find out about that mind control song in the first place?
    • There are a number of possibilities. He could've just heard it from someone else, or read about it.
    • He could have been telling the truth about ripping it off of some other guy.
    • Backwards subliminal messages in songs ("backmasking") aren't exactly a new idea. A teenage metal fan like Robbie could easily have heard of it and decided to give it a try. Given that he has his own band, he'd probably have the audio editing equipment/software to make it himself.

  • Why is Stan so obsessed with the apocalypse in this episode? Is it just Stan being Stan? Or is this one of the situations where we should consider the message "STAN IS NOT WHAT HE SEEMS?"
    • I'm sure we'll find out soon enough.
  • Boy bands as depicted in this episode. Are they still relevant? I mean, we have sensations like fun. and such, but these guys look like the 90s boy bands. Is this just a Disney thing though? I feel like the Disney Channel has an odd fixation on them.
    • Dipper comments that the group was "ten years too late". It's also a sort of gift from Alex Hirsch to his sister, a '90s preteen/teen who was obsessed with boy bands and with Lance Bass in particular.
    • I think Disney has a bit of a business fielding teen pop idols, a la the Mickey Mouse Club, so it's relevant to them.
    • They aren't that irrelevant ya know, BTR is kind of a thing.
      • There's also that whole One Direction thing going on.
    • It's an "Ariel Hirsch really really really wanted to meet Lance Bass" thing.
  • Wendy's attitude to Dipper after Dipper exposed Robbie made no sense—she accused Dipper and other men for caring only about themselves, but Dipper did a good deed by exposing Robbie for the liar he is. Just how could Wendy not thank Dipper, when what Dipper did was for her? If you ask me, Wendy was the selfish one, not being grateful that Dipper was right about Robbie.
    • Wendy's attitude made perfect sense. Dipper did the right thing, but for the wrong reasons — and when he immediately asked her out instead of giving her time to process her emotions, he proved that to her. "Hey, your significant other's been manipulating you and lying to your face! And now that he's out of the way, you wanna get ice cream and hold hands with me?" Dipper was just so dang excited about putting Robbie down that he didn't think about what the news would do to Wendy. That's what she was reacting to.
    • I thought he was trying to console her. I mean, conspiracy theories are Dipper's hobby, and he takes those very seriously. Do you really think Dipper is the kind of person to turn down the opportunity to get to the bottom of things whenever something out of the ordinary happens? From Dipper's dialogue after that scene it is very clear all Dipper wanted to do was look out for Wendy. Wendy was suspicious of Robbie and reluctant to trust him, she thought she could trust him, Dipper was suspicious and thought something was fishy, and he ultimately reaffirms Wendy's initial suspicions.
      • Ways to console someone do not include eagerly asking them out on a date — which is what made Wendy snap at him. Yes, Dipper's super into conspiracy theories and whatever, and yes, he's generally good-hearted and sincere, but he's also a guy who still has a lot to learn about how to talk to girls, and other people in general.
      • If I recall a date does not involve bringing a family member, (I.e. Grunkle Stan). Dipper's offer was more of joining him and his great uncle on a fun night. I wasn't suggesting that he was asking her out.
      • Why would she want to do that immediately after she found out that Robbie was lying to her about the song, and after she broke up with him? Either way, Dipper didn't really care about how Wendy felt at that moment. He just wanted Wendy to go and have a "fun night" now that Robbie was out of the picture, and completely disregarded how she felt.
    • Dipper's intentions in inviting Wendy to go do something with him and Stan are less important in the long run than how Wendy interpreted them. Wendy's fairly upset: she's just found out her boyfriend was at least lying to her and at worst actively trying to manipulate her, and she now has a break-up to process. So even if Dipper were just trying to cheer her up, she sees it as Dipper trying to catch her on the rebound especially since we now know Wendy has always been aware of Dipper's crush on her and so she's upset whether the way she interprets things is the truth or not.

    Land Before Swine 
  • So on this episode they show a likely sentient creature crushed on screen. An old man being swallowed whole, and then the same old man implies that he ate his way out of the pterodactyl. Is this a case of Adored by the Network? I thought Disney hated Gravity Falls, what with all of the hiatuses lasting for at least a month. Not to mention that really long hiatus.
    • Pretty much every Disney Channel show currently in production has gone on a wonky schedule over the past year. New episodes are spaced out at irregular intervals (bi-weekly or even once a month — weekly if you're lucky), and a 26-episode season can take more than a year to air (as we're seen with Gravity Falls). Phineas And Ferb — which is definitely Adored by the Network — has been on similar hiatuses (none quite as long, granted, but the 11-minute format means they have twice the material to dole out).
    • As for the first one, What Measure Is Not Human?
    • Paradoxically, that long hiatus was due to Disney loving Gravity Falls. Disney had originally ordered only twelve episode. After six episodes had aired, they realized what they had on their hands and put the show on hiatus to produce eight more episodes.
  • Why does Mabel's face look different in this episode?
    • Looked the same to me.
  • Do Stan's glasses have no lenses? In Stan's story, the pterodactyl pokes him in the eyes through his glasses. This might just be him not thinking his story through, but another pair of Stan's glasses found in Carpet Diem are also in the book. If the page shown in the opening is actually in the book. Is there something with Stan's glasses that has to do with the bigger mystery of Gravity Falls?
    • Anything ridiculous that happened in that scene can be ascribed to "Stan was making it up as he went along". Remember his story in Bottomless Pit? The man's a crap storyteller. That's all.
  • At the end, Dipper shows that the dinosaur slashed through his vest. When did that happen?
    • It was a quick moment that happened after the scene with Stan punching the dinosaur in the face when they were being chased but his vest did get bitten. It could almost qualify as blink and you'll miss with how quick it was.

    Dreamscaperers 
  • Does Stan not actually remember anything about Bill Cipher? Is he not actually acting when he refuses to acknowledge the weirdness of Gravity Falls?
    • They only mentioned a Bill in his presence. That could be anyone.
  • Why does Bill Cipher act...a lot like Stan?
    • How does he act like Stan?
      • His general attitude is reminiscent of how Stan acts. To this troper at least.
  • If Stan hates Dipper then why the heck did Mr. and Mrs. Pines send Dipper and Mabel to Stan's house for the Summer in the first place?
    • He doesn't hate Dipper. They established that in Carpet Diem at the latest.
    • Did you watch the episode all the way to the end?
    • The better question is: Why the hell did Dipper think Stan hated him when a mere two episodes ago (and remember, each season takes place as one month of summer, so this HAD to have happened recently) Stan supported Dipper all the way through in Boyz Crazy in his plot to bust Robbie? Sure, I'd be pretty torn down too if someone said something like what Dipper heard from Stan (before listening to the whole conversation), but before that, it looks like Dipper would rather have Bill invade Stan's mind and cause him unknown amounts of mental torture, also causing Gideon to receive the Mystery Shack, AKA his crush's and his only friend in Gravity Falls' paycheck, as well as he and his sister's HOUSE FOR THE NEXT SEVERAL MONTHS all because Stan gives him a lot of chores and acts a little pushy.
    • I don't think before the Eavesdropping Dipper was planning to not help Stan just that he was reluctant. The reluctance is a little more justifiable when you remembered that Stan is often quick ti make fun of him ("Little Dipper") and appears to show Mabel favoritism at times ("Carpet Diem"). Also, it's pretty normal for any of us to have those moments where we question whether our loved one truly care for us be it a family member or friend.
  • Would Gideon stealing the deed to the Mystery Shack actually work out on a legal sense? Should he succeed in getting the deed, there's no proof he got it fairly nor legally.
    • Plus, a deed is not assignable. Meaning that since it still has Stan's name on it, Gideon does not own the property until his name is on the deed. In other words, the others are not trespassers. Do your homework next time Alex Hirsch.
    • Yeah, but the police in Gravity Falls are both highly incompetent, and corrupt. And they're fans of Gideon.
    • While it wouldn't work in a legal sense there's nothing to say that Gideon wouldn't use his journal to convince everyone else otherwise.
    • According to Alex Hirsch, it's because Quentin Trembly put the "Finders Keepers" law into effect, which pretty much means if someone steals something from you, it's theirs legally.
      • Here's the quote from his AMA on the Gravity Falls Reddit: "Since the town was founded by a mayor who was legally insane (Quentin Trembley the Third, Esquire) its arcane charter laws are equally insane. Woodpecker marriage is legal. The 'Finders Keepers' law allows whoever holds a physical deed to own that property (created by Trembley as an experiment to create a new form of government called "GimmieOcracy") and children can legally be sent to ADULT PRISON."
  • What did Soos mean by "the infinite horizon"?
    • He was just waxing poetic.
      • Like trying to lick your elbow now matter how hard you try to "reach" the horizon. it keeps moving away from you. seemingly infinitely distant from you. Or something like that
  • Why didn't Bill just attack Gideon to get what he wanted? Are you seriously telling me that an omnipotent demon just got screwed out of his Deal with the Devil by some snot nosed little brat who got away from it scot-free? Bill wastes his time attacking the Pines Family (and Soos...and Xyler, and Kraz) instead of just beating the hell out of Gideon who has exactly what he needs. It legitimately seemed that Gideon could have screwed Bill out of the deal at any minute-as long as Bill was distracted, Gideon could easily just blow up the safe (which is exactly what he did) and get the deed without paying Bill back at all.
    • Because he, for some reason, needed to make a deal. It's fairly standard with demons and extradimensional beings. Whatever he wanted, he couldn't just take it, which is why the book said "do not make a deal with him."
    • We have no idea what Bill wants though. The only thing that's clear at this point he has some sort of agenda against Stan and Gideon could have helped him to whatever end that is. He may have also been grateful to Gideon for summoning him back to Gravity Falls so he may have felt charitable enough to go along with the ride since it was anti-Stan.
    • We've only seen Bill within the realm of the dream, and when he was summoned, during which everything went gray and time stopped. As mentioned in the WMG, when Bill left after being summoned, all who saw the summoning appeared to be waking up. Outside of dreams, Bill might not have any power at all, shoot, maybe he can't even go outside the dream world at all.
  • Why does everyone keep thinking Bill tampered with Stan's memories? There's nothing going against the "Stan knows everything" theory. The probably just looked in the wrong doors.
    • The fact that Bill knew Stan makes it clear they had a connection. Stan, however, made it pretty clear he had no idea what anyone was talking about when Bill's name came up. The theory is that Bill made Stan forget about him, Stan was lying, or they've never met and Bill just knows of Stan.
      • As stated above, Bill is a common enough name, so we can assume he didn't know they were talking about that specific Bill.
  • Where was Stan's hat when they woke up?
    • It probably came off while Stan was asleep.
  • How come the moon symbol thingy also changed to a Pac-Man symbol...thingy on the big circle? Up until now I thought Stan was just wearing a different hat.
    • I'm pretty sure that each symbol on the circle represents a character. Bill even calls Dipper, Mabel and Soos pine tree, shooting star, and question mark, respectively. So when Stan's symbol changed on his hat, it changed on the circle too.
    • As Alex Hirsch revealed in the SDCC Gravity Falls Panel (sort of, he uses the Most Distracting Object whenever someone asks a spoiler-y question), it's not an animation error. It'll most likely be significant in future episodes.
  • I'm not sure deeds work like that, Gideon. Just because you break into someone's house and steal a piece of paper doesn't give you permission to tear it down literally 2 minutes later.
    • The fact he owns the town is probably the only way he can get away with it.
      • Stan brings this up in "Gideon Rises" and Gideon replies with something like "Stan gave me the deed" and this somehow easily fools Sheriff Blubs as he replies, "Well that's all the proof I need to see!"
    • It's also worth considering that a "steal the deed" plot is a pretty widely used plot in comedy series and it always is played as "if I'm holding the deed, I own the thing" regardless of how things work in the real world.
  • For the record: is this episode called "Dreamscapers" or "Dreamscaperers"?
    • "Dreamscaperers".
  • I understand that Alex Hirsch likes for actions to have consequences, and the Mystery Shack being full-on demolished would be impossible for the characters to bounce back from. But from a Watsonian perspective, it doesn't seem like there's any reason for Gideon to just punch a massive hole in the roof and then leave the Shack standing. Either he needs it in tact, or he needs it demolished. There's no sense in going halfsies like that.
    • It wouldn't really have the same effect on them if he didn't destroy part of it. After all, that scene is pretty intense to viewers like us, and to us, it's just a drawing on a screen. Think of how crushing that would be to the Pines'.
      • Huh. Y'know, Gideon's desire for the book so completely dominated his characterization in this episode and the next one, I guess I kinda forgot that he occasionally just does things to spite the Pines. Still, if Dipper had left the book in his room, Gideon would've pretty much been screwed—and if he knew for certain the book wasn't in there, why not just completely destroy the place to really crush them? Again, it seems like it should be an all-or-nothing deal.
    • I think he put the hole in the roof to be spiteful, but hasn't had time to search the Shack thoroughly for its secrets and intends to do so after the town accepts his ownership. In Gideon Rises we confirm that both journal number 1 and Stan's strange machinery are hidden under the shack and apparently weren't found by Gideon; we know Gideon expected to find journal number 1 and probably suspected other clues as well so he wouldn't want to completely destroy the shack until after a thorough search.

    Gideon Rises 
  • How did Gideon know about McGucket and his proficiency at making robots?
    • Judging by the episode's events, it's probably because, as Stan revealed, Gideon had set up cameras everywhere in town, one of which must have caught wind of McGucket's confession in episode 2.
      • Was Gideon actually using cameras then, though? He still would have had the amulet back then, so he didn't need to spy on people to trick people into thinking he's "psychic."
      • Fridge Brilliance: The amulet gives him telekinesis, not telepathy. He has to trick people into thinking he's psychic because he isn't. That's why he has such an awful rivalry with Stan: they're both con men.
      • Even if he didn't hear the episode 2 confession via camera, nothing's to say that Old Man Mc Gucket stopped making robots in between then and now.
  • What the hell could Stan be building a super weapon for? Is this the same reason Gideon wanted the books?
    • Who said the device was a super weapon? At this point it could be practically anything. Also given that Stan needed all three journals just to activate it it's more likely the device was there before Stan owned the property.
      • Dipper said that it looked like some sort of super-weapon when he found the pages in Journal 3.
    • A Freeze-Frame Bonus code in the book suggests it's some kind of portal.
  • How does Wendy still not realize Dipper has a crush on her immediately after Soos blares it out and covers up it it rather poorly? Hell, he even says "Nailed it!" within earshot of her! Wendy has to be playing dumb at this point.
    • Because it's Soos. They're all probably used to him saying weird things. All the time.
    • I get the idea she's known since The Inconveniencing. She doesn't say anything about it because, well, she's Wendy. She wouldn't go out of her way to hurt the poor kid's pride.
    • I'm pretty sure Wendy knows, just look her expression at the end of The Inconveniencing when Dipper couldn't help express his happiness when Wendy talks about hanging out with him at the Shack next time.
      • Indeed, "Into the bunker" reveals that she already know.
  • Any particular reason Gideon had his father take one chunk out of the shack in the previous episode and then leave it up for all of this one? If he thought the journal was in the shack, why would he do that if, for all he knew, he could have just destroyed the part it was in?
    • He thought it was underground, around the shack. Also, he only destroyed the sign, and the part of the roof the sign was attached to. I think.
    • Still, (Rule of Drama aside) you can't help but wonder why he had him take one chunk out of it and then leave it standing for a whole other episode.
    • Because he wanted to show the Pines that he has defeated them. by destroying part of the shack he was bassically saying "your house is my toy to do with it what i want". Bassically, it was a Kick the Dog moment For the Evulz.
  • We know why Stan acts surprised to learn about Dipper's journal—to make Dipper think it's of no real value. If Stan was looking for journals, why didn't he take #3 after Irrational Treasure, when Dipper clearly consulted it right in front of him at Pioneer Day?
    • Stan is never on screen while Dipper is consulting the journal and only reappears after Dipper has put it away. Most likely Stan was too distracted by his hatred of Pioneer Day to notice that Dipper was reading it at all.
    • Alternatively, he might have just thought it was better with someone who was better equipped to defend it should someone like Gideon come for it. He knows how old he is, and what he is capable of. Dipper on the other hand, is young, eager to learn, and a hell of a lot more agile than Stan.
      • I'm sorry, which one of them punched a freakin' pterodactyl?
  • How did Gideon get his hands on Waddles, or Mabel not noticing Waddles was missing in the first place until the unveiling of Gideonland, despite appearing to have had the time to pack her sweaters?
    • They might have had to leave him behind, with the understanding that nothing would happen to him.
  • Why did Gideon seem to just consider having Mabel as his queen when she was in his grasp, and not before she left?
    • It's easier to make someone do something when they're in your giant robot hand.
  • Why would the writer of the journals put a map of possible hiding locations for the other journals when he wants to keep them separate (or at least that's what we get out of Gideon)? The writer knew he couldn't go back for the journals since he believed he was being watched and that would no doubt give them away, so what was the point of a map? He might as well have just put up a sign saying "Dig here, dummy!" Also when would he have the time to draw 3 separate maps in such detail? He feels like he's being watched but screw urgency! He's got to make things easier for a possible evildoer who could easily abuse the journals for ultimate power!
    • First of all the final entries in Dipper's book suggest there was a big gap between the maps and the author's fear of someone stalking them. It is possible the map was made so he/she could study possible locations where to hide the journals but never wrote his/her final decision. The map wasn't made to led you to the hiding place but to help the author to decide the hiding place. that is why it was so hard for Gideon to find the other journals(assuming he had the second book long before Dipper got the third one), they only described possible places were you could hide the journal. On the other hand, since he/she didn't destroy the journals when he/she had the chance, it is possible he/she decided the books were too important to be lost and he/she left vague descriptions of where to find the others and hope they fell in the right hands in case something happened to him/her.
  • Where are we going to put stuff for Dipper's Guide to the Unexplained? I mean, it's a mini-series. Are we just keeping it on the Gravity Falls page with seperate folders, or...?
    • Probably

    Mabel's Guide to Life 
  • Pacifica has been established as hating Mabel, she even throws darts at her picture. So why did she take part in Mabel's color quiz?
    • Maybe Mabel paid her? As for why she would pay her archenemy, maybe it's just in her optimistic nature to be totally nice to people.
    • Vanity. Mabel was recording it, Pacifica loves people paying attention to her, no matter who's watching.

    Scaryoke 
  • Why would the author of the journals put the spell to raise the dead in plain ink, and then put zombies' weakness in invisible ink? Shouldn't it be the reverse?
    • The plain ink doesn't mention weaknesses, but the invisible ink says that the author's just discovered some, so I think the implication is that he wrote the invisible ink stuff after the rest of the book (presumably to keep whoever was watching him from finding any subsequent updates.)
      • Sure enough, there's a brief moment when the invisible ink is revealed you see a message saying basically "I've decided to switch to invisible to further keep my secrets safe" everything in invisible ink is clearly later updates.
    • My point is, if he was assuming the books might fall into someone else's hands, why would he make the method of stopping zombies harder to find than the method of raising zombies? The latter is clearly what needs to be more well-hidden, while the former is what clearly needs to be less hidden.
      • Perhaps by that point The Author no longer trusted anyone with the knowledge he was collecting and decided to keep it in a place only he would be able to find it? He may have hoped the zombies would wipe out anyone who found the journal

    Into the Bunker 
  • So, if it turned out that "the Author" was really the shapeshifter, then what was he fighting in the shadow when we first saw him?
    • Himself. He's a shapeshifter. He was putting on a shadow puppet show for Dipper and Wendy so they'd trust him.
      • Or it was some other creature the shapeshifter was genuinely fighting against, and just decided to lure it near Dipper and Wendy so they'd be more likely to trust him. We don't actually know what happened, and we won't know what happened until we get Word of God on this. But I'm gonna lean toward some other creature. Something made those holes.

    Golf War 
  • Pacifica mentions that her family took care of the whole "her family is a fraud" thing with money. Why would they need money? Dipper handed all the evidence right to them! All they would need is a few quarters to buy a matchbook. (Or however much those things cost now)
    • She wasn't saying they payed to cover it up, she meant as long as they were still rich and powerful her ancestor being a fraud wasn't that big a deal.
    Sock Opera 
  • Why was Bill able to cheat Dipper out of his end of the bargain in this episode? In Dreamscaperers, Gideon was able to break the deal when Bill couldn't hold up his end, but in this one, not only does Bill not even give Dipper the promised code after it'd be useless, but he gets his reward right off the bat! What changed?
    • Unlike Gideon, who made a very specific and clear demand before they shook on it, Dipper never actually asks Bill to do anything. Bill loads the conversation with promises and implications, probably so Dipper will make assumptions about the terms of the deal and not realize that he hasn't actually ASKED for anything. Essentially, the only deal they ended up making was: "I want a puppet." "Ok sure."
    • It's unlikely Gideon has gotten out of his deal anyways. Bill mentioned to Gideon they'd work out the details later so Bill is probably biding his time until he needs Gideon for whatever thing he has planned.
      • "You fools! Do you realize what you've cost me!?" Yeah. It definitely sounds like Bill still has what he needs from this arrangement.
  • When sock puppet Dipper shows up floating next to Mabel, it's made clear that "ghost" Dipper inhabited the sock puppet just like Bill did with Dipper's body, as shown by the mouth and arm movements of the puppet. But then, when Gabe enters the room, we see Dipper using the sock puppet with his hand. When Gabe leaves, he goes back to the mouth and arm movements.
    • I'm going to guess no one could hear him unless he moved a "vessel" along with what he wanted to say, neither Mabel nor Gabe ever seem to notice his shouting and groaning when Mabel twisted his arm.
    • It was all done with his hand. Dipper's just hamming it up to get his emotions across.
  • Why couldn't Wendy and Soos hear Bill taunt Dipper in the car? Are we just chalking that up to Bill's powers?
    • Maybe they just assumed he was acting weird due to sleep deprivation.
G.I. Joe: RenegadesHeadscratchers/WESTERNANIMATIONGreen Lantern: The Animated Series

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
86446
35