Keep Circulating The Tapes: Western Animation

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    Disney 
Disney is notorious for treating its films (theatrical or otherwise) with reverence and God-like status...and treating its animated shows like they need to be moved to a leper colony to dienote . Many have been made available on YouTube, but Disney has consistently taken down the episodes. To wit:

  • While having a few episodes on VHS (no longer sold and are extremely hard to find), not only has Bonkers been out of reruns for years with no plans to re-air it or put it out for DVD, but pulled two episodes centering on Mad Bombers out of sensitivity after a 1995 Oklahoma bombing. (It doesn't help that pulling one of those left a huge plot hole in the series because it's the same one where Miranda replaces Lucky as Bonkers' partner.)
  • Season 1 and the first half of Season 2 of Gargoyles were released on DVD. The other half of Season 2? Disney decided not to release it, allegedly due to "low sales". And none at all was released outside North America.
    • Similarly, Disney released the vast majority of episodes for DuckTales, Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers, and Goof Troop — as well as a couple of sets for Darkwing Duck and Adventures of the Gummi Bears — but have yet to offer the complete run of the shows on DVD by releasing further sets for these shows (infuriating fans of the first three, which are one box set away from being completely on DVD). Additionally, Quack Pack didn't even have any sort of proper DVD release at all — it got a three-episode "best-of" DVDnote . And that's not even getting into the Disney Afternoon shows that haven't yet made it to DVD in any way, shape or form. For all that the Disney Afternoon did for the company in the 1990s, they sure don't seem eager to return the love.
    • For the record, the Disney Afternoon series that were fortunate enough to get a DVD set release got 20+ episodes and nothing else beyond feature content. No TV spots, commentaries, commercials, behind-the-scenes specials on how the show was created, nothing. And these series are still quite popular amongst Disney fans; not to mention the purpose of DVD is to be able to see the episodes in their uncut form. It doesn't help that, with the exception of DuckTales and Gargoyles, these episodes released on DVD remain in their Toon Disney syndication format — you would almost expect to see the Toon Disney logo in the corner of the screen. With all that they put into a re-release of one of their animated films, compare the original VHS version of the Darkwing Duck episode "Darkly Dawns the Duck" with the first DVD set version. If the company is complaining about "low sales", this shoddy DVD treatment is probably why. To make things worse, the classic Disney Afternoon shows have not been aired on American TV since 2008 (when TaleSpin and Goof Troop reruns were permanently removed from Toon Disney), so it's hard to even get a copy recorded from TV. At one time, copies recorded from said channel of nearly all episodes of most Disney Afternoon shows were posted on YouTube but eventually taken down.
    • All this makes one question even more why Disney would license out their more popular Disney Afternoon titles in comic book form through Boom! Kids. The comics - especially Darkwing Duck - essentially continue where the shows left off and are heavy on Continuity Porn, meaning they'll only make sense to people who have watched the shows. The only people to whom these comics would cater are 30-year-olds with no problem grabbing comics off the kiddie racks.
    • To be fair, this is changing (if only slightly). The third and final release for Gargoyles has finally been made available...off their own Disney Movie Club website, and it's in a bright yellow slim pack that stands out from the rest pretty obviously. The same with TaleSpin (and the same bright yellow slim pack), and a DVD release of the DuckTales movie. How barebones are these releases? The TaleSpin DVD doesn't even have an episode list, and the DV Ds themselves are stark, bare discs with just the logo and some other titles. The movie, at least, has a colour picture on it.
  • Other than a VHS and DVD release of Mickey's Magical Christmas: Snowed in at the House of Mouse and Mickey's House of Villains, as well as the show's pilot episode as a DVD bonus of the former, there is actually no release of House of Mouse anywhere. Many of the show's episodes and shorts have been uploaded onto YouTube, so at least there's that.
  • Super Robot Monkey Team Hyper Force Go! had a few Season 1 episodes released on DVDs that came with the short-lived toy line, but these are now impossible to find since the only ones you could possibly get would be second/third/fourth/etc. hand and which fan in their right mind would be willing to give those up? Since then the show has had its fifth and final season canceled (on a Cliffhanger) and stopped airing in the US (It had stopped showing up in other countries such as England long before) so other than the DV Ds now episodes are literally impossible to find though any legal means. At all.
  • Fillmore!: There were a good number of episodes on YouTube, but they were all removed except a few episodes subbed from German and the like.
  • Buzz Lightyear of Star Command went to the same leper colony as all the other Disney TV shows. After years of reruns it was last seen on American television in 2008, and so far there is no way to see it in the U.S. The only home video release it got was the Pilot Movie.
  • PB&J Otter is a Playhouse Disney cartoon considered too saccharine by many older viewers, but which has also become a cult classic to some old-time fans thanks to Nostalgia Filter. Unfortunately for those fans, it was taken off the air in 2005 and saw no home video and DVD releases (odd, since they did release plush dolls of the otters at one point). Someone has uploaded Season 3 somewhere on the internet but there is no official home video release for it. In 2012, Disney Junior began airing reruns in an early morning time, but were relegated to death slots in late 2013 and removed completely in July 2014.
  • Nightmare Ned got one season due to Disney getting endless complaints from parents saying it was scaring their children. There's currently little on YouTube and it was apparently only ever reran in Canada on Family. Because of the show's hardly-known existence, most people remember it as a computer game from Disney Interactive rather than a Disney show.
  • Pepper Ann doesn't have any VHS/DVD releases and has not aired on TV in reruns since 2005. Most of the episodes had been uploaded onto YouTube, but Disney has since taken the show down.
  • The Proud Family has the first 15 episodes available on iTunes, and the Big Damn Movie on DVD. The remaining 40 in between might as well be missing episodes.
  • The Replacements used to be on YouTube, but is now yet to be released on DVD. As of now, the entire series is on iTunes.
  • Recess has a few DVD releases: Recess: School's Out, the direct-to-DVD movies (which also include episodes of the series as bonus features), and a Christmas DVD that's an episode compilation. As for actual episodes, there are none (unless you live in Germany, where the entire series is available on iTunes). Which is strange, considering how popular it was during its run.
    • The entire series got posted on YouTube in 2011...until Disney began taking almost every episode down for copyright. This even includes the international dubs. To put it nicely, many fans were outraged. At the very least, however, there are plenty of other video sites to watch full episodes, like Watch Cartoons Online.
  • Disney's Doug had 4 2-episode VHS releases in the 1990s, while for a long time The Movie was available only on VHS (it is available for streaming on-demand on various sites; it was made available on DVD via Disney Movie Club). There were various VideoCD releases of the movie in other countries, but they've all gone out of print. The Internet only has a handful of episodes up, unlike the Nick series, which has every episode available. Sure, it wasn't as beloved as the Nick series (Doug and Roger's original voice actor Billy West did not care for it to say the least), but it was still popular nonetheless, so you'd think Disney would've given it better treatment.
  • 101 Dalmatians: The Series had one VHS release (101 Dalmatians Christmas, which also contained the episode "Coup DeVil") and one VideoCD release that has severe sound issues (Dalmatian Vacation) (and on video outside the US) back in the 1990s. That was it. The entire series has been uploaded to YouTube, but don't be surprised if Disney starts taking down episodes for copyright.
  • The underrated and little-known Teacher's Pet. Aside from The Movie and the first episode appearing as a bonus feature on the movie's DVD, the series has never gotten a home video release. Ever. And it's also very hard to find online. Coincidentally, most people only remember it as a movie rather than a TV series.
  • While it only was aired on Disney in America, Toad Patrol has never been fully released on DVD. Some episodes of Season 1 were made available, but that's it.
  • Donald and the Wheel is the lesser-known follow-up to Donald Duck in Mathmagic Land and has thus far been on a single limited-edition and rare Donald Duck DVD collection that has since gone out of print (The Chronological Donald, Volume 4 if you were wondering). This collection makes no indication on the case that it has Donald and the Wheel, so unless you found out from an outside source and were deliberately looking for it, or you're a total Donald Duck fan and bought every DVD set, chances are you don't have it.
  • Eek The Cat, an early 1990s American/Canadian co-production that aired on Fox Kids, never had a DVD release, and probably never will, as Disney currently holds the rights to the show and won't release it...unless enough fans badger Disney with letters, emails, mail bombs, and videotaped suicides over it, or Disney becomes so broke and desperate that they have to make money off it (or they give the rights to a company that will put it out on DVD or streaming).
  • Good luck finding the original version of the song "Arabian Nights" from their animated film Aladdin (which is itself readily available on home video every several years)—Disney changed a lyric after complaints came in about how racist it was. The original can be found on the original soundtrack release and no other home release of the film or its soundtrack.
    • But now it hasn't been forgotten since the original version can be found on Youtube.
  • Disney got the rights to NASCAR Racers as part of acquiring Saban Entertainment. It seems unlikely that the series will ever get a DVD release, since Disney is so blasé about NASCAR to re-release it and Saban is so blasé about NASCAR to bother buying back the rights to it when they bought back Power Rangers and most of their live-action output. Give yourself a round of applause if you come across an episode on your old Fox Kids and Jetix tapes, as well as out-of-print VHS releases made during the show's run on Fox.

    Nickelodeon 
  • Many Nickelodeon shows were temporarily available to stream on Netflix for people subscribed to the site. However Netflix let their contract with Viacom expire in June 2013, leaving fans of certain shows to search for other methods of viewing, unless they had an Amazon Prime subscription, which allows the streaming of Nick shows through the Amazon Video service (but even then, not all episodes or Nick movies are accessible for streaming).
  • Although The Fairly Oddparents got several home video releases throughout the 2000s, all season packs (besides Season 6, which got a retail release) got DVD-R releases exclusive to Amazon.com. The same goes for the first two Nickelodeon seasons of Doug (we bet that Disney will still be sitting on their episodes, as noted above).
  • Likewise, the short-lived series Catscratch. Besides getting the shaft during its original run, only two episodes have been put on DVD ("Nick Picks", Volumes 3 and 5). It's possible to find them on the internet, but it's no picnic.
  • Only a selection of Jimmy Neutron episodes and specials have been released on DVD. The entire series can be (illegally) downloaded though. There was also a brief, magical time where the whole series could be seen on Netflix. Such heady days are past. On the bright side, it's easily found on iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and on Nicktoons.
  • The Brothers Flub (not to be confused with The Brothers Grunt) got 2 4-episode VHS releases and that was it. Thanks to TV critics generally hating it and the theme "song" being considered a Most Annoying Sound, the show got low ratings, and became so obscure that a Wikipedia article wasn't written for it until 2008; its IMDb listing is also almost entirely blank except for three credits, only one of which is right. For the longest time, the only trace of it online was a low-quality rip of the intro from RetroJunk. The entire show was also on a video website called Kidobi, which subsequently removed the episodes. The first 8 episodes were finally released on iTunes in 2014.
  • Butt Ugly Martians at least got a bit more recognition, but it's very hard to find unless you come across one of its three VHS releases.
  • The X's, which is much-maligned amongst Nick fans, has vanished from all of Nick's networks and websites, and only had three official releases: 2 episodes on 2 "Nick Pick" DVDs, and 13 episodes on iTunes. And only a few episodes have been uploaded on YouTube.
  • The Mighty B! rarely airs on Nicktoons as of 2014, most likely due to it's critical unpopulartity. There a a few DVDs of the show, but they don't comprise the entire series.
  • Nicktoons TV (or Nicktoons Network as it is now known) once had a slew of original cartoon programming that all seemed produced at a portion of the budget of a regular Nicktoon, and they are all unavailable from DVD releases in their entirety. Kappa Mikey and Corneil and Bernie ("Watch My Chops" in regions outside North America) had a few episodes released, but both series have never had complete releases (as in, all episodes).
    • And even them espite the two seasons being available on iTunes (and on DVD in Australia), only three episodes of Kappa Mikey were ever released on DVD in North America. The show was originally a Nicktoons Network original, but did have a short run on the regular Nickelodeon channel, but was restricted to early Sunday mornings, and most viewers weren't interested in it. And now that Nicktoons Network has now replaced it with newer shows, good luck finding it elsewhere.
  • Yakkity Yak is super hard to find too. Only a couple episodes are on YouTube, and no telling how long they'll stay...
  • KaBlam! never got a VHS or DVD release, and hasn't aired in the US since 2005 (not counting instances in 2006 and 2008 where it was brought out only for Nicktoon-related marathons). And no, this isn't due to a very fractured rights situation—almost everything involved is owned by Nickelodeon and not its creators (including the ''Angela Anaconda shorts- even though the show itself is owned by Fox, the original shorts are still under Nick's ownership). A huge boom of the show was put up on YouTube in late 2009, along with torrent downloads, so the show became viewable again. As of 2015, it's currently holds the dishonor of being the only Nicktoon without any home media release in any way, including iTunes.
    • So far, only two full episodes are missing on YouTube- "KaFun!" (which was speculated to only air once or twice in 1998 in the US but it's most recent airing was in Japan in 2006) and "Just Chillin'!" (which premiered in 2000 and was only reran a few times before Nickelodeon took the show off the lineup and never aired on Nicktoons). In the case of "KaFun!", a few of the shorts are availible- the Action League Now! short "And Justice For None" (taken from an airing on the short's spin-off), the Prometheus and Bob short "Glue", the music video for "Pizza Rocket", and the one-shot short Untalkative Bunny (which was spun-off into its' own show in 2001, but didn't air in the US. It's also notably the only short on the show to air on another TV series, Cartoon Sushi on affiliate MTV. While spun-off by a different company, Viacom still owns the short). The Henry and June wraparounds (which had the duo learn about a Japanese knock-off of the show) and the Life With Loopy short "Larry's Girl" (where Loopy finds a date for Larry from a dating website) remain lost. "Just Chillin'" has the Action League Now! short "Fatter" uploaded and the episode's Race Rabbit segment (only the Japanese dub, however) online, however the Henry and June wraparounds (where the show receives in-universe budget cuts after the duo go overbudget trying to make the show more action-packed, thinking the show will be cancelled soon) and the one-shot short Dave, Son of Hercules are still missing.
    • One of the biggest examples is The Henry and June Show, a TV special that aired in March 1999 in hopes of getting Henry and June their own TV series. It didn't work, and the special was never aired again. And not only was the special not released on VHS, but it never aired outside the US. It was deemed lost forever until someone uploaded it to YouTube in 2015.
  • The English-language Nickelodeon release of Spartakus And The Sun Beneath The Sea.

    Cartoon Network 
Cartoon Network has a lot of its original shows in a wasteland on DVD more than likely due to some Laser-Guided Karma from Warner Home Video. With a lot not selling or doing well enough to be released on DVD, Cartoon Network is not willing to let the Warner Archive take over because that would make them look on the same level as all those shows CN has told us were so much better than. As of 2015, Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends and The Amazing World of Gumball have been ushered quietly to the Warner Archive, but most of the following examples stand little chance of seeing more releases until Cartoon Network admits they weren't as popular as they claim. Despite this, a lot of Cartoon Network's original programming is available for purchase and/or streaming on places like Netflix, Hulu, iTunes, and even Cartoon Network's own website mostly because CN can handle some of those themselves and the digital side of WHV does whatever the hell it wants. (Some have also found easier distribution on DVD in other regions):

  • The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack: Only the first five episodes have ever been released on DVD, a few episodes could be found on YouTube, and no telling how long they'll stay. However, the entire series is available on iTunes and Hulu Plus.
  • The Life and Times of Juniper Lee: There was said to be a Season 1 DVD at the start of 2009...that never showed. And good luck trying to find any trace of episodes. CN Video, which was where the final episodes played? Nope. YouTube? Unless you like Abridged Series and some promos, nope. Your best bet is iTunes or a torrent.
    • Or buying the Australian release of season 1. But it's region-locked, so unless you live in Australia or have AnyDVD (which can play region-locked DV Ds regardless of what region they're from), you're screwed.
  • Whatever Happened to... Robot Jones?: All 13 episodes were available on Cartoon Network Video back in 2008, but have since disappeared and will probably never return again...unless the channel feels generous and puts it on Boomerang in a few years. So now the question is, "Whatever happened to Whatever Happened to… Robot Jones?"
    • Better yet, the original airings of the Season 1 episodes. In the original airings, Robot Jones was voiced through an Apple text-to-speech program, but all further episodes had him voiced by a child (Bobby Block) instead and altered to sound robotic. To make matters worse, the season one episodes had Robot Jones' voice redubbed with the new voice and digitally removed the "Ass" on a banner that read "Kick-Ass" on the episode "Growth Spurts".
    • The video website DailyMotion has most (if not all of the episodes) available, but the season one episodes are the redubbed ones. The only episode with Robot Jones' original voice available on the site is "P.U. to P.E." (which also has the redubbed version of that episode).
  • Sheep in the Big City. Season 1 was on iTunes for a time, but it was removed for reasons unknown. The show never got a home video release except for one episode as a "sneak preview" on a Powerpuff Girls VHS/DVD and a three episode DVD in the UK.
  • Mike, Lu & Og is pretty much forgotten. The only DVD release is of three episodes, and only in the UK. It airs on Boomerang occasionally, but don't count on it. Fortunately, the whole series is on YouTube.
  • The final regular episodes of Ed, Edd n Eddy. As the only episodes of the sixth season completed before Danny Antonucci decided to scrap the remainder of it for the series finale movie Ed, Edd, and Eddy's Big Picture Show, "May I Have This Ed? / Look Before You Ed" aren't available on iTunes or any other digital service.
    • Netflix has Ed, Edd n Eddy, but only seasons three and four. They had seasons one and two available, but they have since been replaced.
  • As of now, only the first two seasons of Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends have been released on DVD. Season 3 was later released in region 4, but there is still no word about its US release, along with seasons 4, 5, and, 6. However, all seasons have been released on iTunes, the PlayStation Network, and Google Play in the US. It was briefly on Boomerang, but not anymore.
    • Season 3 was released via the Warner Archive, but now Season 2 is out of print.
  • Anything by Maxwell Atoms. Well, there are Billy and Mandy movies and the out-of-print Season 1 set of the show, but not the rest of the series (Netflix had seasons one and two available, but those have since been replaced with season three. Also, seasons one and two did not include any of the Evil Con Carne shorts). Evil Con Carne, however, has only a small handful of episodes available on the aforementioned set. Nothing's been said about Underfist yet.
  • Time Squad. Youtube is one of the few places to view the entire series, but it is unreliable, because the videos, while being uploaded at a seemingly high rate, are repeatedly (and almost relentlessly) pulled down every time. One could try to view the episodes by simply Google video searching, where you'll get video sites that haven't taken them down (DailyMotion, as of 2015, seems to be the only place to find most of the episodes, uploaded by someone named BrassThorax, who also uploaded a Fully Automatic Clip Show highlighting the show's homoerotic undertones and commenting that there's really no difference between the Ho Yay on Time Squad and the slash fiction it inevitably spawnednote ). Cartoon Network as only put the episodes for viewing on their site twice; once in 2007 with multiple episodes from both seasons, and again in 2012 (as part of the channel's 20th anniversary special) but this time only short clips. There was a three episode DVD release in the UK, however.
  • Hi Hi Puffy AmiYumi. YouTube is, once again, your only bet with this one. There were two home video releases in the mid-2000s, but that was it. Back then, the show had an immense Hatedom, due to the big Animation Age Ghetto blowups that plagued that time, but as years passed, now it's widely regarded as a classic.
    • Unless you are willing to export a DVD release from Thailand that comes with a English audio track, and even then it only covers the first 2 seasons, or the complete series release from Japan that also comes with an English audio track.
  • Class of 3000, a short-lived series made around the time that Cartoon Network was going downhill due to its harebrained shift to live-action fare, centered on Andre Benjamin (Andre 3000 from the rap group OutKast) as a former pop music star who takes a job as an Atlanta school teacher with a failing music program. The only release this show got was on iTunes and a soundtrack.
  • Good luck finding the third season of Scaredy Squirrel anywhere, especially if you're in the United States. While the first two seasons are available on Amazon Instant Video, the remaining twelve episodes from season three have never been released in any format.
  • Unlike most Cartoon Network shows, The Problem Solverz has yet to see a DVD release. Given it's near-universal hatred and Sensory Abuse...
    • Season 2 is a worse example, The show was available to watch on Netfix in 2013, where it had an exclusive Second Season containing about 8 11-minute episodes. Since March 30, 2015, the whole series has been taken off Netflix, and Season 2 doesn't seem to exist anywhere on the internet. If you have any of the Netflix-aired episodes, don't get rid of them!
  • Following Sym-Bionic Titan's end, the show was out of reruns and had no DVD, and likely will never have one due to Cartoon Network writing off the show on their taxes. The only legal way to get it (at least in the US) is through iTunes. It was reran on Creator/Toonami a couple of times before the write-off.
  • Camp Lazlo: A very, very rare press kit has a DVD of the first two episodes, Season one has been released on DVD but only for Region 4 and it's region locked, two episodes have appeared on the Cartoon Fridays DVD and a Christmas compilation. It was on Boomerang, but it stopped playing on the channel shortly after.
  • The first 15 episodes of Moral Orel were released on DVD, but the rest haven't, presumably due to weak sales of the first set. Shame, as the third season is the show's best — and most depressing, which is why [adult swim] canceled it, yet they specifically asked the show creator to ramp up the content.
  • Codename: Kids Next Door has no home video releases besides a DVD with the first few episodes made very early in the show's run (which is now out of print) and some episodes on compilation DVDs released over the years. Made odd by the fact that it was a borderline Cash Cow Franchise for Cartoon Network during its run and is so continuity-driven in later seasons that a DVD release is necessary to enjoy the show. There are a few seasons available on Netflix though.
    • Made especially painful by the fact that this show almost never gets rerun on CN, and only a handful of episodes air when it does. The show was last seen in 2012 on Cartoon Planet when they revived that show and made it a compilation show of canceled and forgotten original programming from Cartoon Network's past.
  • Robotomy has never gotten a DVD release at all. The same show was also cancelled after 10 episodes—all of which were fifteen minutes. However, it is available on iTunes, accessible via torrents, and a couple of episodes ("Bling Thing"note  and "Playdate"note ) have aired on Cartoon Network's revived installment show Cartoon Planet. As of 2013, the entire series (all 10 episodes) is on Netflix.
  • Stoked: For the longest time after Cartoon Network took the show off their schedule in late July 2010 due to low ratings, the best way to see the remaining 4 episodes of Season 1 as well as the entirety of Season 2 was on YouTube thanks to Australian fans of the show who would DVR the episodes on ABC 3. As of 2014, the entire series in on Hulu.
    • While on the subject of Fresh TV shows aired on Cartoon Network, the same thing also happened to Sixteen after they aired the series finale in late June of 2010. While they still aired reruns every so often for awhile afterwards it was not to extent of how it was prior to the series finale and was quietly taken off the schedule for good in early 2011. Nowadays the only place where you can see the show is on YouTube through recordings by fans in the mid 2000s when the show was airing in its origin country of Canada.
  • Dexter's Laboratory has no home video releases beyond the first season. This may be somewhat justified as the second season is several times longer than the first, and the third and fourth ones are considered one of the most noticeable dork ages in Cartoon Network history. Part one of its second season did get released in Australia alongside their first season release (which not only retains the banned episode "Barbequor" but additionally the original pilot shorts and two music videos, even if the former are already included in the first season's episodes), but they don't have any plans to release part two because of low sales. There's also no sign of a release in any modern format for the stand-alone movie Ego Trip, produced between seasons two and three and the last hurrah for the series' original style (though it was released on VHS).
  • Robotboy: only the first season is on DVD, in two volumes, and only in French. Fortunately, the show is one of the couple Cartoon Network European Co-Productions that has a perpetual, permanent position on Cartoon Network UK's overnight timeslots.

    Warner Bros. 
  • Static Shock has had only one volume containing six episodes. Thankfully, the entire first season is actually available on iTunes—and the entire series is beyond easy to find on Watch Cartoons Online.
  • The Zeta Project has the entire first season out on DVD, but not season 2, though the latter is availible online on Watchcartoonsonline.
  • Nothing has yet been said about DVDs for Histeria!, which was made available for viewing on the In2TV website until it was shut down. What's worse is that the In2TV version had a cut of the episode "Megalomaniacs" featuring a sketch called "Convert or Die" that turned The Spanish Inquistion into a game show where contestants must convert to the Catholic Church or be tortured for being heretics. That sketch only aired once when the show was on television (due to Moral Guardian complaints that it would make viewers hate Catholicism) and replaced with another sketch (that's also lost forever) where the Histeria kids bother General Custer during his infamous last stand. The good news in all of this is that YouTube has some (if not all) of the In2TV episodes, including the version of the episode "Megalomaniacs" with "Convert or Die." The bad news is that the General Custer sketch is not included in this or any other episode.
  • The short-lived Kids WB cartoons Wayneheadnote  and Detention (the latter of which didn't even see any cable reruns. Waynehead did air for a time on Cartoon Network in the early 2000s).
  • While the entirety of Tiny Toon Adventures is available on DVD, nothing has been said about the two double-length specials, "Spring Break Special" and "Night Ghoulery", the latter having been previously released on VHS.
    • The Spring Break Special did air on Discovery Family (back when it was called The Hub Network) on Easter of 2013, as well as Night Ghoulery appearing on the very last Saturday Morning Cartoon block Vortexx. Unless you recorded any of them, you're boned.
  • Skunk Fu!. Three compilations exist, but they don't comprise the entire series.
  • While most of the Scooby-Doo shows were released on DVD, there are a couple of omissions on the complete release side. One should note episodes of these series are very much still being released in random sets and online.
    • The remaining episodes of The New Scooby-Doo Movies aren't available either, due to having to get clearance by the guest celebrities or their estates if they died.
    • The New Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo and The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries have yet to be released complete on DVD.
  • Warner Home Video entertained the idea of releasing the entire series of Hanna-Barbera's first program for TV, The Ruff & Reddy Show, but they put the kibosh on it after seeing the then numbers on other sets like Huckleberry Hound and Yogi Bear. Now that the Warner Archive has eliminated that problem such worries have been diminished, but quality of the masters still move Ruff and Reddy further down the list.
  • Goldie Gold and Action Jack, which is on Warner Archive's eventual docket.
  • Paw Paw Bears was a planned Warner Archive release, but in March of 2015, Warner Archive's facebook mentioned there was a clearance issue holding it up.
  • Saturday Supercade will probably never see the light of day due to the rights to Mario and Donkey Kong being nearly impossible to secure, not to mention all the other video game properties used on the show.
    • The Q*bert segments are now on YouTube, but in chopped-up, edited form.
      • Warner Archive does plan to release the show in some format. They still report that they are "researching" the product. Which pretty much means looking at what they do own, what they could license back and what is pretty much gone. The fact a highly chopped up set has not been churned out, holds out hope they have plans to try and make it as complete as they can
  • Jana of the Jungle hasn't been shown on Cartoon Network or Boomerang in the United States. One episode, "The Cordillera Volcano", was on Warner Bros.' Saturday Morning Forever site.
    • Warner Archive also has plans, so why Cartoon Network never aired it, is a matter of whatever reason Cartoon Network has as to why they won't release it. Other shows never aired by them are also available now and others, such as Jana and the Puppy specials, will follow
  • The Banana Splits Adventure Hour is an unfortunate case of this. While the episodes were originally an hour long package of live action and animated segments, the episodes were trimmed to a half hour when syndicated to stations and retitled The Banana Splits and Friends. Only a handful of VHS releases exist, most of them released outside the USA and extremely difficult to find, and the only DVD release available is a first-season boxset, and just to twist the knife further, don't expect to see the DVD in the United States or Canada.
    • And to twist the knife even further, the episodes featured on the DVD and the VHS releases were the trimmed down, syndicated versions that are currently shown on Boomerang, possibly meaning that the original unedited masters are lost permanently.
    • Or not. Warner Archive very much plans to restore the hour versions for the US release.
  • The Fantastic Four (1967), produced by Hanna-Barbera, has yet to be released on DVD. Warner Bros. owns the series, but the Fantastic Four characters are owned by Marvel Comics, a division of Disney.
  • Don Coyote And Sancho Panda was never officially released on any format and seems to have been largely forgotten by the public. All the episodes are currently available on Youtube for the time being.
    • Once again Warner Archive has plans
  • Fish Police. Only three of its six episodes aired in the US, but all six aired in certain European markets. There are copies of varying quality on YouTube and other sites, however.
    • Warner Archive has plans once clearance issues are met
  • There are still a boatload of Looney Tunes cartoons that still haven't been released to DVD, most of which, like the Censored Eleven and some of the more brutal World War II cartoons ("Bugs Bunny Nips the Nips" and "Tokio Jokio"), probably won't be released unless Warner Bros. implements a DVD-by-request program or releases it as a special historical collection with Content Warnings out the wazoo about the Values Dissonance.
    • According to various sources, this is all on a "party" in the legal team, that does not want those or those two "evil" Tom and Jerry cartoons released. As a result, none of those sets are coming until the legal team stands aside, and that could be even more years.
  • Xiaolin Showdown only got one home video release, in the form of a Season 1 boxset. Warner Bros. doesn't seem to have any plans to release seasons 2 or 3. What's extra insulting is the fact that Season 1 ended on a cliffhanger. However, there are some people on YouTube who have uploaded the entire series, and it can be found online very quickly, especially with the sequel series Xiaolin Chronicles adding to its popularity.
  • Invasion America has had only bootleg VHS tapes to its name and, eventually, some relatively poor-quality downloads based off said VHS recordings. No DVD release has ever even been rumored.
  • Krypto the Superdog has only ever gotten 2 DVD releases containing 5 episodes each out of 39 episodes; however, Boomerang frequently reruns the series.
  • Toon Heads, an anthology series, is never aired on Boomerang and has only appeared on DVD twice; both times being specials on a Looney Tunes Golden Collection DVD (one about lost, rare, and forgotten animated pieces and one about World War II cartoons).
  • The Mask: The Animated Series had four VHS tapes with some episodes (with two more in Australia), and only one DVD (the pilot, released on Wal-Mart on a special edition of the infamous Son of the Mask). The show has aired on Warner Archive instant, and will more than likely be release by them on DVD.

    MTV 
MTV is pretty terrible about this when it comes to its animated shows:
  • The Brothers Grunt has no DVD or VHS releases in sight and is unlikely to get one because it's an Old Shame for the MTV and what little people remember it hate it almost as much as MTV does. The Brothers Grunt got its hatedom when it aired as a replacement show for Beavis And Butthead, which had to be put on temporary hiatus due to complaints of kids imitating the dangerous stunts on the show (most notably, the kid who accidentally burned down his trailer home and killed his younger sister, and another kid who dropped a bowling ball off a bridge and the ball hit a baby in a carriage and killed him). The only person who doesn't feel this way is creator Danny Antonucci, who could always make a deal to buy back the rights to the show).
  • Another example of this trope is Downtown, which is odd, as that show actually had original music, not music from other artists used for a soundtrack (it could be a "not enough commercial appeal" thing). However, Chris Prynoski is currently offering a DVD of the series.
  • Clone High nearly qualifies, with a full series collection that was released in incredibly limited numbers...and only in Canada.
  • Only a handful of the music video segments from Beavis And Butthead are on the show's "official" DVD releases. Also, Mike Judge hates about a third of the episodes, and has refused to license them to DVD. Given the nature of all those record labels (most of which had since then been bought up by some giant conglomerate, assuming they hadn't gone out of existence altogether) it's a miracle they managed a handful to begin with.
    • In the early episodes of said series, all references to Beavis being a pyromaniac ("Fire! Fire! Fire!") were edited out of the episodes following an incident where a young boy burned down his home and killed his little sisternote  The references to Beavis' pyromania were never put back into the episodes (not even for the DVD releases, as according to creator Mike Judge, the master tapes were permanently altered), so the only way you'll see them is if you recorded the episodes on VHS when they first aired.
    • The "official" DV Ds actually don't present any of the episodes in their original airing format. Besides the unavailability of many of the "video reviews", those that are available are only viewable as separate clips, cutting them out of the episodes that they originally aired with in an "act one/music video/act two/music video/etc." format.
  • Apart from 2 "Best of" DVDs and a few bootleg releases, there are no copies of Celebrity Deathmatch to be found. It has shown up on YouTube, but only as individual clips versus a whole episode.
    • That said, the revival show on MTV 2 has the full run available on iTunes.
  • Liquid Television and Cartoon Sushi have had a few shorts on various VHSs and DVDs, but most of them have not, and it's doubtful full episodes of either show will be released anytime soon (the revival Liquid TV episodes on iTunes nontithstanding).

    Other 
  • All of the black and white Fleischer and Famous Popeye cartoons (and the three Fleischer color specials) are on DVD, but the color Famous Studios shorts have yet to see an official home video release, and are otherwise only available in old public domain copies or bootlegs. Likewise, some of the 60's made for TV Popeye cartoons are on DVD, but not all of them.
  • There has been no Region 1 DVD release of Felidae in the United States, but in 2013, was legally released on Youtube for free viewing.
  • While all of the Disney Silly Symphonies have been re-released on DVD, very few of its competitors have had such a benefit, especially the MGM Happy Harmonies cartoons, which have yet to see any kind of DVD release (save making it as a bonus feature on some vintage movie DVDs) and the only major release of many of them is an old, long out of print laserdisc yet. Many of them still air on Boomerang early in the morning, but some shorts, such as the redesigned Boskos, may never see the light of day again.
  • The current Classic Media releases of the two Rocky and Bullwinkle series (Rocky and His Friends and The Bullwinkle Show) have completely eliminated the shows' original formats, separating individual segments (Rocky and Bullwinkle, Dudley Do-Right of the Mounties, Peabody's Improbable History, and Fractured Fairy Tales) into "best of" collections.
  • Chris Colorado aired on Toonami for a while, before it was taken down and forgotten. It only ran for a single season and ended in a cliffhanger, and was released to DVD. Practically no copies remain, and the only way you can view it these days is to download it from the single torrent on the whole Internet that contains it.
  • It seems it'll be a long time before we get beyond the first two volumes of the Woody Woodpecker collections, since we still have over 100 cartoons left to cover and we still haven't seen a U.S. release of The New Woody Woodpecker Show!
  • Almost all of the works of the seminal Czech animator Karel Zeman are unavailable in America, outside of the semi-butchered American version of "Journey to the Beginning of Time" and a terrible dub of "Baron Prasil" on an ancient and long out-of-print VHS tape. For the curious, a number of his works are available on YouTube, e.g., [1].
  • Exo Squad ran for two seasons, of which only the first one (one-third the length of the second) was officially released on VHS and DVD. IMDb has cover arts of "second season VHS", but these are merely bootlegs. So it's either them...or BitTorrent.
    • Both seasons are now available legally for streaming on Hulu (minus, strangely enough, Episode 1.11).
  • Action Man...or at least, the cartoon made by Mainframe Entertainment. It aired on This TV at one point...and then DHX Media acquired Cookie Jar Entertainment and took down This TV's entire children's block along with it.
  • Season 3 of The Tick has still not seen a Region 1 release; with no indication from Buena Vista Entertainment when it might be available. On top of that, Seasons 1-2 are missing one episode each, and have been consistently criticized for their dismal production quality.
    • There is a full, three-season box set available in the United Kingdom (Region 2 PAL), which includes all of the episodes for all three seasons, and a higher production quality than the U.S. release. However, there is still a comparatively minor flaw with this release as well, since it uses a considerably shortened version of the opening credit sequence and its frenetic jazz theme music.
  • Muppet Babies, with its use of actual TV and movie clips from various sources, would be near impossible to re-release without major butchering for copyright reasons. There were several VHS releases in The '90s (three were part of a line of tapes designed for the "Video Buddy" interactive handset system; some of the others were a part of the "Yes, I Can!" series of Jim Henson videos, which had puppet filler segments in between the episodes), but that only provided 16 episodes out of 107. Worse, the syndicated reruns ended with episode 96 — though at least four of the final 11 episodes made it to VHS.
  • The Twins of Destiny, a French animesque cartoon about two kids who had special powers bestowed upon them, has never been released on VHS or DVD, as far as internet searching can tell.
  • TUGS, the sister series to the Thomas the Tank Engine television series made in 1986. The only place you can watch it is on video tapes which are gradually wearing thin and illegally over the internet. It does not help that the rights for the program are tied up with at least two different companies.
  • Fox's Peter Pan & the Pirates. Despite it being one of the (if not the) most faithful adaptions of the original play/story, not to mention being a show Tim Curry won an award for, there is no box set yet — because it probably was just not considered financially viable. But you can preorder it from Amazon UK. Which will be selling it in January 2020. Five years from now. There is also the slight matter of Disney having bought the show after buying out Fox Kids and selling the series to TMS Entertainment.
  • If you liked the show Wild West C.O.W.-Boys of Moo Mesa and wanted to see it again, good luck. It got a couple of VHS releases that are long since out of print.
  • Almost anything made by Marathon. Totally Spies! also fell into this for a long time, but Flatiron/New Video released the first three seasons in 2013 and 2014, which was a much better fate than what it previously got: Ten episodes from season 1, and the season 2 two-parter "A Spy is Born". Most likely, it was just hard to clear up the rights to "Here We Go" by Moonbaby. Also, The Movie and the final season were aired on Cartoon Network in May 2010.
  • Hanna-Barbera's animated version of The Little Rascals wasn't even shown on the USA Cartoon Express. Presumably this is due not only to the fragmented ownership of the Our Gang propertiesnote , but also to a lawsuit in which Eugene "Porky" Lee accused Hanna-Barbera of unauthorized use of his likeness. It has, however, been shown on many international networks: Cartoon Network UK and Ireland, Australia's Seven Network and Singapore's MediaCorp Channel 5. There are also a lot of episodes on YouTube and DailyMotion.
  • What A Cartoon! Show, Random! Cartoons, and other animation compilation shows, such as MTV's Cartoon Sushi. This is because, after a number of years, the rights to the short revert to the creator if it wasn't picked up for a series. So even if a network did want to make a DVD, getting all the creators to agree to it would be more trouble than it's worth. You're better off waiting for the original creators to release their shorts either online or through a DVD on demand business.
  • Mighty Max came out in the precious early 1990s, before DVDs but after VHS. The series was made only to push the (unsuccessful) toy line, so they probably didn't consider a cult following that demanded the show's re-release.
  • Kidd Video would be possible if released in its Superstation WGN form, with no original music or music videos. But it wouldn't be the same.
  • Speaking of Nintendo and DiC: King Koopa's Kool Kartoons, a show related to The Super Mario Bros. Super Show that occasionally aired (but only in southern California!), and featuring Pat Pinney in his first TV role before taking on SpongeBob SquarePants' live-action segments. Of course, considering the show barely seems to have existed as it is...
    • There's also the Club Mario segments of The Super Mario Bros. Super Show; one was available when the show was on Yahooligans! TV. Most fans of the Super Show, however, will most likely tell you that it should stay this way.
  • On the other hand, the 1990s Spider-Man cartoon only had about 24 of its 65 episodes available on DVD, and completely out-of-order (they were mostly collections of mini-arcs, such as the Venom Saga and the Daredevil cross-over). Season 1 became available through iTunes (and Xbox Live), but a complete release is yet to be seen in America; this, while the United Kingdom got all five seasons on DVD.
    • All of the episodes are now available on the official Marvel website, along with X-Men, Fantastic Four, Spider-Man (Japan), Spider-Man 1967, and others.
    • Also, the Spidey series is so popular that it's never off of television for long, even during the runs of other Spider-Man series. Of course, as Power Rangers fans learned, don't take that for granted.
  • Many of the Rankin/Bass animated shows and specials are not available on DVD, but only as grainy, fading VHS tapes made 20 years ago. They will be lost forever when the tapes inevitably wear out and VCRs break — most notably, Wind In The Willows (the one with the theme song sung by Judy Collins). This feature-length production from The '80s has quite a few grateful comments over on YouTube where some amazing person has uploaded a marginal-quality copy in several parts, for those whose VCRs have already broken. (The good news is that, along with feature-length films like Mad Monster Party, The Daydreamer, and The Flight of Dragons, most of the company's famous Christmas specials are on DVD as stand-alone releases or in collections, as are their three Easter specials from The Seventies.)
  • Max Steel (the Kids' WB and Cartoon Network versions, not the Disney XD version) has almost completely disappeared, thanks to Sony no longer having the license from Mattel to produce Max Steel media. There is only one fansite with any episodes available for download, and most of them are low-quality, aim-the-videocamera-at-the-TV clips where the dialogue is nearly incomprehensible. One episode in particular, the Season 2 premiere, has vanished completely without even a transcript to mark its passing. Oddly, Sony continued to produce movies that are very loosely based on the original show in Latin America, but there were no English dubs or subs, and they stopped once Sony completely lost the license and the new series was announced.
    • The Season 1 DVD set had been released in the United Kingdom, both in two volumes and later a box set, but all three are no longer in print.
    • Series 1–3 were available to watch on Hulu.com until at least 2013, when hosting stopped for it, likely to avoid conflicts with the Disney XD series.
    • Crackle, Sony's digital streaming service, also streamed some episodes on YouTube in 2009, but later took them down as well.
  • The 1993 version of Biker Mice from Mars has Season 1 on DVD, but good luck trying to find Seasons 2 and 3 anywhere. Even worse, Season 1 is out of print.
    • The remake has some DVD releases in Bulgaria, Australia and other countries, but good luck finding any DVD releases in the US. Thankfully, every episode is on YouTube.
  • Extreme Ghostbusters has no DVD releases. At least there was some VHS tapes.
  • To this day, Princess Gwenevere and the Jewel Riders is lost to the murky mists of some lost archive, frustratingly getting only the briefest of DVD releases that vanished almost as soon as it was announced (luckily, it's region-free).
  • Seven Little Monsters only had a very rare DVD release of a few episodes.
  • The 30-minute animated Little Engine that Could feature from The '90s only exists in the VHS tapes that remain and an upload on YouTube every now and then. Despite being such a famous story, whoever owns it doesn't seem to hold any interest in it.
  • Monster Farm is an incredibly obscure show that was on Fox Family. The only episode anywhere online is the premiere...in Polish (it's on YouTube). What makes it even more infuriating to try and find anything about this show is the fact that it shares its name with Monster Rancher (in Japanese). It's as if it never even existed, seriously.
  • Of the six original Strawberry Shortcake animated specials from The '80s, only the first two (The World of... and ...in Big Apple City) are available on DVD, leaving only the mid-1980s VHS releases of all six as official sources.
    • Of the 2013 series Strawberry Shortcake's Berry Bitty Adventures, the only U.S. releases have been compilation sets of Story Arc episodes. The compilations don't extend to the entire series though and searches on the Internet reveal there have been complete season releases, but only for Asian countries. Thankfully, the series is still shown on Discovery Family early in the morning so you can watch it then.
  • The animated movie Animalympics. Though it has had a few VHS releases, most of those were a while ago, and its only DVD release was in Germany. While the German version had the original English language track attached, good luck hunting it down!
  • Fievel's American Tails had some of the episodes released on VHS back in the day, but no DVD releases in America. However, there have been DVD releases in Europe since it is apparently popular in Germany, and the remaining episodes can be found in its German dub.
  • For that matter, this trope covers any instance in western animation that could be considered remotely racist, as a lot of cartoons from The Golden Age of Animation loved their blackface gags. Native Americans are still Acceptable Targets, though, apparently.
  • No DVD release for the Attack of the Killer Tomatoes! Animated Adaptation in America.
  • Rhino planned on releasing the entire Crusader Rabbit series. After the first two volumes were released (on VHS, this was pre-DVD), they found that the people who had sold them the release rights no longer actually held those rights. There apparently was a lot of confusion over who did hold the rights, with the result being that Rhino could sell the copies they had already made but could not make any more.
  • The Magi-Nation animated series. Only two DVDs, containing four episodes each, have been released out of the 26-episode run.
    • As of March 2012, the complete series is now on Netflix for instant streaming.
  • Captain Star, a quirky English cartoon parody of Star Trek, ran for only 13 episodes. Rumor has it that the first three episodes were released on VHS, but nothing more.
  • The Legends of Treasure Island. VHS tapes of Season 1 exist, as does a movie VHS comprising of Episodes 1-3 of Season 1 and the final two episodes of Season 2, though they will be all but impossible to find (one VHS was reported to be found in a Salvation Army shop). 7Two in Australia is currently showing episodes at 9:30 a.m. every Sunday.
  • Mutant League, a 40-episode series which is based on the video games "Mutant League Football" & "Mutant League Hockey", has never been released on DVD. The only release of it was a VHS was merely a 69-minute mish-mash of segments of episodes edited together. It is also impossible to find online, not even poor quality copies.
  • Pingu: Out of the 157 episodes of the two incarnations, only 40 of them have been released on DVD in the United States as of 2011 (not surprising, given HIT Entertainment's No Export for You policies), mostly because of licensing issues, offensive material ("Pingu at the Doctors", despite being shown PBS Kids Sprout with little to no controversy, is one of the episodes left out from DVD, as it depicts blood), or maybe a completely different reason. No VHS releases of the program ever materialized in the U.S., while the United Kingdom got such treatment.
    • And to make things more unsettling, only the remastered versions of the episodes HIT Entertainment issued in 2002 were featured on the DVD releases. Only the VHS releases featuring unrestored episodes contained the original broadcasts. Although the last two seasons had their original soundtracks preserved in the restorations, the soundtracks for nearly both of the first two seasons had greatly worn out to the point of having to be almost completely redone. While the original soundtracks occasionally continue to be used whenever Pingu is broadcast on the BBC in the United Kingdom, whether or not they will ever be released on home media outside VHS is anyone's guess.
  • The Twisted Tales of Felix the Cat, a 1990s show about Felix participating in various bizarre adventures or situations, is remarkably hard to find - a few episodes were released on VHS way back when, and only a handful of them have ever even existed on the internet. It's true that they did put out a few DVD releases for some episodes as well, but they were only released in Hong Kong, despite the show itself having been created in the United States.
    • There may be a U.S. DVD release.
  • Phantom 2040 has yet to see a release of the complete series. A few episodes were made available on VHS in the late 90s, and a Compilation Movie of the first four episodes was released on DVD in 2004. However, torrents and streams of the full series occasionally pop up, as do bootleg DVD sets.
  • The Kids From Room 402. It has never received any English-language home video releases (though two DVD sets with a few episodes were released circa 2005 in Europe), and the series has not been aired on U.S. television for over a decade.
  • The Raccoons. Some scattered box sets here and there, but nothing close to a full release. Luckily, almost all of the series is available through YouTube and torrents, thanks in part to repeats on Teletoon Retro.
  • Calvin And The Colonel, a 1960s prime-time cartoon, will likely never get a legit DVD release. About one-third of the episodes (most in black and white despite being made in color) are in collectors' hands, some of which ended up in public domain cartoon compilations even though the show is still copyrighted.
  • The Where's Wally?/Where's Waldo? cartoon. Five VHS tapes were released in the United Kingdom and that was it.
  • The British/Canadian cartoon The Baskervilles. Possibly because of the Hell-like setting, which is much more obvious than Miseryville. The only surviving footage online is the opening and two episodes, which can be found on YouTube.
  • Funimation released the first season of Braceface and then stopped because it didn't sell well. All three seasons have been uploaded to YouTube, however.
  • The Get Along Gang. Though a DVD release was announced in 2007, American Greetings (owner of the franchise), pulled the plug on it for no known reason, though it could be due to the (later shelved) revival of the characters going on at the time. The original pilot and a few episodes were released on VHS and can be found online. However, a small "best-of" DVD release was announced by Mill Creek Entertainment and released in April 2011; it includes 20 out of the 26 individual episodes (or 10 of 13 half-hour episodes). The following year, the remaining six episodes were released as bonus material of other Mill Creek DVD releases, taking the series officially outside this trope. However, the original pilot is unlikely to be released on DVD due to royalty issues with Nelvana and John Sebastian's singing on the episode.
    • The series did receive a DVD release in Brazil.
  • The Cosgrove Hall stop-motion adaptation of Truckers was released on VHS by Thames Television back in the early 1990s, but ITV Plc. (the current owners of Cosgrove-Hall and successors to Thames Television) has never released it on DVD. This is presumably due to the same issues that caused the adaptions of the two other books to be shelved.
  • The Star Wars animated canon from the 1980s, including Droids (and its follow-up special, The Great Heep) and Ewoks (which lasted two seasons). The two series were released on DVD as part of an "Animated Adventures" series - the only problem? The releases are simply two sets of six episodes edited into mini-features - more than half the run of Droids is still unavailable, and more than an entire season of Ewoks is also unaccounted for. Even though the two series have both been referenced in various Star Wars-related material over the years, neither have been released as a complete series. Lucasfilm has said a DVD release is "possible" - meaning you're better off scrounging for the old VHS releases of the series, which had all the episodes.
  • The 1940s Columbia Cartoons series of short The Fox And The Crow was off the air for decades until 1999, when it was included in the Totally Tooned In series - and even then the series was only aired in Latin America. U.S. television audiences finally got to see them in 2011 on Antenna TV. A DVD release for these cartoons is not yet in the works (although the final three UPA-produced shorts are on the TCM Jolly Frolics set, and the first cartoon is an extra on the Hellboy DVD) either because of the prohibitive costs of restoring the entire cartoon library, or that Sonynote  just doesn't think the public is that interested in Columbia Cartoons outside the UPA library.
    • The main stumbling block for the DVD released is the absence of a color print for the cartoon "Mysto-Fox" (only black-and-white prints currently exist).
  • The Bluffers had VHS releases that went out in the late 1980s and at least one Betamax release. The only trace of it on YouTube, at least for the English dub, is a single episode lifted from said Betamax tape by someone who just managed to catch it somehow.
  • The Pink Panther is an interesting example of this trope, as all the original 1960s-1970s shorts are on DVD, but its companion shorts The Texas/Tijuana Toads, Roland and Rattfink, Hoot Kloot, etc., are not.
    • Roland and Rattfink was released on DVD, but only as part of a multi-disc set that includes the Panther, The Inspector, and The Ant and the Aardvark.
    • Of the 1993-1996 series, only Series 1 (1993-1994) exists on DVD, and even then, episodes like "7 Manly Men" (which has slight Ho Yay), "Voodoo Man" and "Hamm-N-Eggz" missing off the DVD; basically, no full 1993–96 series exists on DVD. You can get them all, but as torrents, and even then, the quality is variable.
  • The Legend of Calamity Jane, a 13-episode series, has no oficial VHS or DVD release, but somebody uploaded most of the episodes into YouTube, except episodes 10 and 11. However a certain somebody watched episode 11, got it burned into his brain, and gave a summary of it with crude drawings in a video.
  • Sabrina: The Animated Series, a 65-episode series, currently only has the first 32 episodes on DVD. The show's Made-for-TV movie Sabrina: Friends Forever had a limited DVD release after its airing in 2002 and is very hard to find. The entire series is available on Netflix.
    • The 26-episode spin-off, Sabrina's Secret Life, is only available on English DVD in Australia, and only the first 18 episodes were released. One episode ("Lather, Rinse, Repent") is available as a bonus feature on the complete series DVD set of Archie's Weird Mysteries. All 26 episodes can be downloaded through torrents (and are actually very good quality aside from the Cartoon Network bug present throughout), and they are also available on Netflix.
  • Twice Upon a Time was a George Lucas-backed animated production in The '80s made by the risk-taking Alan Ladd Studios (Body Heat, Blade Runner, etc.). It popularized improvisation and adult themes in comedy voice-acting, launched the career of Henry Selick (who would go on to make The Nightmare Before Christmas), and fostered or influenced a number of Pixar people. It has all the traits of a classic of monumental cultural impact (and in an indirect way, it has), yet got a minor VHS and laserdisc release in the early 1990s and then aired twice on Cartoon Network in 1999. Due to disputes between its writers, it seemed unlikely it would ever get a public showing again (and the naughtier Bill Couterie cut only had a one-time showing on HBO before the aforementioned disputes occurred)...until February 2015, when Turner Classic Movies aired it as part of its TCM Underground block. So you better have recorded it.
  • Birdz, one of the last things on CBS' Saturday morning lineup in 1998. Scottish TV channel STV Entertainment has official uploads of the whole series on YouTube, but they're not accessible in the United States. And there aren't even any torrents. (However, it aired on KidsCo in Australia until 2014 when it was shut down.)
    • All episodes are now available on Amazon Instant Video.
  • Bionic Six was considered one of the best animated series of the eighties, notably due to Osamu Dezaki as animation director (he of Lupin III and Golgo 13 fame), but it has never seen a VHS release, let alone a DVD one. The tapes keep circulating from the old Syfy airing of them.
  • The MLP shorts from My Little Pony and Friends have been released and are at least available via Netflix; however, the same can't be said for the Potato Head Kids, Glo Friends and Moon Dreamers shorts that accompanied them on the show's original run.
  • Many of the Time Warp Trio episodes are unavailable on DVD, and those that are go for an exorbitant price.
  • The Australian series Arthur! and the Square Knights of the Round Table has only had one DVD release, not in Australia but the United Kingdom, and that contains only eight episodes.
  • The Franco-American series Space Strikers: The only evidence of its existence is the intro, and its page on IMDB. There hasn't even been any official release from the distributors. Seems it has been forgotten except for those few who got to watch it.
  • While you can technically get almost of all of the second Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series on DVD in the United States—assuming you're willing to buy multiple sets with a handful of out-of-order episodes for seasons 3 and 4—the last season of the series, Back to the Sewer, was never released in that manner. Similarly, getting a legal version of the complete Turtles Forever is currently impossible without importing from abroad.
  • Late in its life, mall owners Mills Corporation created a kids' club called Muggsy's Meadow, which provided activities for kids and parents to do while at the mall. They also commissioned Flying Rhino Junior High creator Ray Nelson and his studio to create a Too Smart for Strangers animated short called Get Muggsy!, which included the club's four mascots. Since the club itself was only around for three years, and closed when Simon Property Group bought out Mills, the DVD is extremely hard to find. Nevertheless, it is on YouTube.
  • As far as we can tell, it's impossible to find any full episodes of Wapos Bay: The Series and its movie, Long Goodbyes, despite the movie winning Kidscreen and beating the Heart Catch Pretty Cure movie and Zhu Zhu Pets: Quest for Zhu. You can only find promos.
  • Lady Lovelylocks, and how. Two episodes are missing from the U.S. and British VHS and DVD releases of the series, and only came to Australia.
  • Odd Job Jack, a Turn of the Millennium Canadian animated sitcom, has an entire missing season. While the second season had a DVD release (available wherever not-so-fine DVDs are liquidated) and seasons 3 and 4 are viewable on Hulu (ironically, not viewable in Canada), Season 1 does not seem to exist in viewable format outside a single Google Video copy of Season 1 ep 13.
  • The Beatles' eponymous animated series is currently owned by Apple Corps, the group's corporate entity, having acquired them from King Features (Hearst Corporation entity). There was talk as early as 2004 of putting the cartoons out on DVD but no effort had been made since. Apple Records now owns the Beatles' movies and they have re-released Yellow Submarine on DVD, so this may still happen somewhere down the line. In the meantine, bootleg DVDs recorded off local TV stations in the 1980s turn up online and at comic book conventions.
  • Many Peanuts specials from The '80s and The '90s are still missing on DVD since Warner Bros. stopped bringing out complete collections by decade.
    • A Charlie Brown Celebration (1982 double-length anthology special)
    • It's an Adventure, Charlie Brown (1983 double-length anthology special)
    • Snoopy!!! The Musical (1988 double-length special)
    • It's the Girl in the Red Truck, Charlie Brown (1988 double-length, Roger Rabbit Effect special focusing on Spike the dog)
    • You're in the Super Bowl, Charlie Brown (1994; licensing issues with the NFL affect this one. It got one VHS release, and those copies were only sold as promotional items in Shell gas stations)
    • It Was My Best Birthday Ever, Charlie Brown (1997; ironically, it was a Direct-to-Video release)
  • Episodes 200 and 201 of South Park only aired on their respective premiere dates (the latter of which didn't even get a Pacific Time re-broadcast, and didn't even air at all in some territories). Responses from radical Islamic groups convinced Comedy Central to pull any future publishing of the episodes, as well as the Season 5 episode "Super Best Friends", which also featured Mohammad as a character despite predating the controversy by 9 years. "201" and "202" have been completely removed from the Region 2 and Region 4 DVD sets, but they exist deep in the corners of the internet with no download required, while "Super Best Friends" is still available on old DVD copies of Season 5. Chances of any of the three episodes being re-released in the near future is slim-to-none.
    • Comedy Central has also relegated the first ten seasons of the show almost entirely to syndication. This means any televised broadcast is going to be butchered by additional censorship and being restricted to 4:3 Pan and Scan (regardless of whether it's on CC HD or not). This despite the fact that episodes as early as Season 5 are in 1080p HD when they, on rare occasion, air in prime-time. And with each successive season, CC stops regular prime time airing of another one. Episodes on South Park Studios lack pre-prime time censorship but are still Standard Definition up to Season 11. Finding widescreen versions of Seasons 5-10 are very difficult, and so far none of them have been re-released on Blu-ray (meaning you may get widescreen but only 480p resolution). Your best bet is to luck out with recordings made at the very launch of Comedy Central HD.
    • There's another problem in the waters of SP: Blu-Ray releases of the show only go back to Season 12, the first season to be natively produced in HD (the second half of it, anyway). The other cheek was turned in early 2015, when Comedy Central started airing all episodes of the show in HD and on Hulu, going all the way back to Season 1. However, there's no way to legally own the remastered versions of episodes prior to that season outside of making tape/DVR recordings and trading them with friends. And you can't even watch every episode on Hulu without a subscription: only a maximum of 30 are available at any time, with about two-thirds of these that gradually shift in-and-out of free territory at any time (the rest are episodes that are always available, which include classic/notable episodes like "Cartman Gets an Anal Probe", "Make Love, not Warcraft", "Major Boobage", and about half of the episodes from the most recent season). Also, good luck finding the remastered version of "Super Best Friends", which Hulu doesn't have at all.
  • Any U.S. Acres segment on Garfield and Friends with the original "U.S. Acres" title card, as the DVDs used the "Orson's Farm" title card. This is because the DVD releases are based on the international masters.
    • Also missing from the international prints for time constraints are two Screaming With Binky cartoons: one about baseball, and one about a pizza parlor. Nothing other than the baseball plot is known about the former, but a fansite has a description of the latter.
  • Stickin' Around is particularly frustrating due to its devoted cult following. It aired on Canada's YTV from 1996 to 1998, and ran in syndication for almost a full decade afterward. A proposed Region 1 DVD release was planned in 2000 but never happened, and the only official release the series had was in Australia. The only ways to find the episodes now is to hunt for the old VHS releases (which had all the episodes) or look up episodes on YouTube. Also, when it aired on Fox Kids and Fox Family in America, all episodes had lots of scenes butchered out to make room for commercials, and its American run was also incomplete. The complete series was on kidlet.tv (which was navigation blocked, and many of the belching sounds used in episodes were silenced), but kidlet.tv is now defunct.
  • None of the seasons past the sixth of King of the Hill are available on DVD, although the full series can be streamed on Netflix. However, with the advent of DVR and Cartoon Network showing all the episodes in order on Adult Swim, it was probably deemed not cost-effective to release any more seasons to DVD (the last set was released in 2006, when DVR was a novelty). The series is also available on iTunes.
  • Fates of some of the Hanna-Barbera (and by proxy the Ruby-Spears ones) shows not owned by Warner Bros. aren't so far grand.
    • Toho licensed The Godzilla Power Hour first season to Classic Media. But took forever to get them the last episodes. And then the license ended. So all three volumes are now out of print and there are a lot fewer copies of volume 3 in circulation than volumes 1 & 2. And the second season? Toho doesn't seem to have done anything with it since getting it back from WB.
    • Remember Gravedale High, a 1990 Hanna-Barbera Saturday Morning Cartoon starring Rick Moranis? Unless you live in the United Kingdom (despite this show being made in America), good luck finding it outside YouTube because NBC Universal, who originally broadcasted the show and somehow still owns the license, seems to forget that it even existed. However, all 13 episodes got a DVD release, but the release is not official (it was ripped off VHS recordings).
    • The majority of the episodes of the animated Punky Brewster show appear on the DVDs of the main series. But due to the laziness of Shout! Factory, one of the shorts was skipped over music rights. More than likely to never be rectified. Unless when Universal licenses Gravedale High they include it as a special feature?
    • Foofur has apparently been in the hands of the creator domestically. Hence why it's been missing from TV reruns since the 1980s in the States.
    • The original The Harlem Globetrotters cartoon has been retained by CBS with little interest shown in putting out along with the odd special where they met Snow White.
    • There are several specials from the ABC special years sitting over at Disney. Maybe Disney would trade them to WB in exchange for the Fantastic Four and Thing cartoons Hanna-Barbera made that WB still own?
    • While most of the toy themed shows lucked out to be retained, two interesting lost eggs here is Hanna-Barbera's Star Fairies and Ruby Spears' Sectaurs. Two very strange pilots that are apparently now in Hasbro owned limbo.
  • The Brady Kids got a few episodes as part of the Brady Bunch Complete Series pack, but other than that the show is elusive.
  • "It's Itsy Bitsy Time", a preschool-aimed anthology Fox Family/Treehouse TV series that also had some imported series on there, barely seems to exist anywhere, legally (considering the rights issues) or illegally.
  • Gary and Mike (and how). Not only did it get the shaft after 13 episodes and one season (on a cliffhanger), but it only reran on Comedy Central once and at late night. At this point, it's like the show never even existed in the first place.
  • There's no DVD release for Spliced, not even in Canada.
  • Likewise for My Life Me, which only had a very short run back in Canada (though France and Germany had a longer run of the show).
  • CJ the DJ is virtually unknown and unavailable outside of its native Australia, except for a couple of clips, and one episode in English and a couple more episodes in Portuguese, but that's about it.
  • A Bunch of Munsch was an old Canadian cartoon that based its episodes off children's picture books by beloved author Robert Munsch, and it was also derangedly animated. The show is extremely hard to find, and its extremely rare VHS releases from Golden Book Video fetch a pretty penny. You may have a very scarce chance of finding it in your local library.
  • Victor And Hugo - Bunglers in Crime, despite being a Cosgrove-Hall show (usually pretty good with show releases), had only one VHS tape release during its TV run. One of the episodes ('Panda-Monium') was subsequently re-released on DVD (ironically called 'Most Wanted') but that's it. Thankfully, there are a lot of episodes on YouTube, some taken from recent Australian re-broadcasts.
  • Urban Vermin, another Canadian toon. The only channel that ever aired it in America was the short-lived Animania HD network. The YouTube channel dhxkidstv has them, but you have to pay $2.99 an episode.
  • A lot of HBO Family shoes are MIA:
    • Like Happily Ever After Fairy Tales For Every Child? Well, you better have HBO Family because it's impossible to find online and only a select few stories made it to VHS and DVD. However, the entire series can be found on Comcast On Demand.
    • George and Martha hasn't been aired on that channel in six years. Despite being part of Sony Wonder's Doors of Wonder banner for some time, VHS copies are a rare find these days. As with A Bunch of Munsch, you might find it at your local library due to it being based on picture books. As of now, the entire series is available on iTunes.
    • The HBO Family TV series Animated Tales of the World hasn't been released on DVD; only a few episodes have been shown on YouTube.
    • Yet another HBO example is Braingames. Although every episode from the pilot to episode 5 can be found on the Internet Archive, episode 6 cannot be found. The show was released on three VHS cassettes from Thorn-EMI/HBO Video, but said tapes are now extremely hard to find and are usually snatched up the time they appear for expensive prices on eBay.
  • Outside a VHS showing the best episodes of season one (that is now out of print), Toonsylvania hasn't been released on home video. It is, however, available for streaming on Netflix — in Brazil and Mexico. Unless you have the money or know-how to access Netflix feeds from other countries (or you live in Mexico or Brazil), you're boned.
  • Only three episodes of the 1991 Little Shop have popped up online. The 10 other episodes as far as we all know are lost forever unless they surface online in the future, and a DVD release is very unlikely.
  • The Canadian series Katie and Orbie (which has Leslie Nielsen as a narrator) once had four of its six seasons available on DVD from an online retailer that sold the discs on demand, but that online retailer no longer exists. The other two seasons were unavailable for unknown reasons and aside from a few episodes that have been posted online (including some in Spanish, as the series was seen in the Latin American version of CBeebies from 2008-2010) and several videos of the series' theme song, the series is practically impossible to find on the Internet, despite the long run. In fact, if it weren't for the reruns on the Latin American CBeebies, barely any information about the series would be available (the Wikipedia article was a stub with little data before then). The TV series was adapted from a children book series published in the early 1990s, which is also very obscure (not even one image from the books can be found online). On top of that, reruns in Canada from 2007 to 2012 only included the last two seasons, and currently it is not aired anywhere on the world.
  • The poorly received Mortal Kombat: Defenders of the Realm hasn't been seen on television for more than decade, and only a handful of episodes made it to VHS domestically. The only DVD releases came in both the United Kingdom and Australia, and the UK releases are missing one episode. You can ask any U.S. fan about the series and he/she may tell you that the series doesn't deserve a DVD release (or that it actually does).
    • The american Darkstalkers cartoon, not as widely remembered as the Street Fighter cartoon but considered equally So Bad, It's Good by those who do remember it, was released on DVD by ADV Films and subsequently went into limbo when the company went under. While it currently has yet to be license-rescued, Discotek Media rescuing the Street Fighter cartoon and Darkstalkers has aroused hope that they'll eventually give this show the same treatment.
  • Only the first season of Dan Vs. has ever been released on DVD. The second and third seasons allegedly won't be released due its low sales.
  • Frosty the Snowman originally had June Foray voicing Karen (and all the other children) when it aired in 1969. However, for some unknown reason, in 1970 all of Foray's lines (except for her singing parts, bizarrely) were dubbed over by an unknown actress (an actual child), and after that the Foray version was quietly pushed under the rug, never to see the light of day again. So, if you for some reason happen to have a copy of the original version with June's speaking vocals, do not get rid of it!!
  • Hammerman, the ABC Celebrity Toon starring MC Hammer, has only a handful of its 13 episodes available on YouTube, with the rest apparently lost. The current rights holders for the series refuse to release the series on DVD for the time being. Not that they'd want to.
  • Budgie The Little Helicopter. The complete series was released on VHS in America, but was never on DVD, except for two releases in the UK.
  • Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: While the original 1964 stop-motion film has been released and re-released several times over the years, the 1998 Good Times Entertainment animated film has only ever had a single VHS release, shortly after its theatrical premiere, much to the dismay of those who prefer it over the original.
  • The United States English dub of The Smurfs and the Magic Flute from 1983 has never gotten an official release on DVD as of now. (The Shout Factory DVD release uses the United Kingdom version instead, which has also been released on DVD by Fabulous Films in the UK.) This version was released on VHS by Vestron Video during its original release and then again by Goodtimes Entertainment during the 1990s. The film was originally planned to be released on DVD by Morningstar Entertainment in 2008, but ended up getting cancelled, though Televista ended up a limited unofficial DVD release during the same year. This edition is currently out of print.
    • There have also been a few different versions of the U.S. dub with Johan sometimes being called "John" and two different voice actors for Papa Smurf. A TV version of this film has also moved the Smurfs' party scene to the beginning of the film with narration added.
  • The 1977 animated Christmas Special Why The Bears Dance On Christmas Eve only aired once and was never seen again on any channel because of Author Existence Failure: the head of the company that made it (Tele-Tactics) suddenly died and the company went bust shortly afterwards. Unlike Christmas Dreams, it did make its way to YouTube because someone who remembered it got a copy from someone who worked on it.

     Shows rescued after a stint in limbo 
  • Robot and Monster: Reruns air weekdays on Nicktoons while Nick plays the show weekends at 7AM (If they feel like it). It was also a pretty hard to find on the internet outside of Nick.com. Surprisingly, the entire series will be released on DVD sometime in 2014. (Including the two episodes that haven't even aired!)
  • There are 11 Warner Bros. cartoons, known as "the censored eleven", that were banned because of stereotypes. As of 2010, Warner Bros is planning on releasing these on DVD/Blu-Ray.
    • Several of the later 1960s Looney Tunes shorts have yet to see the light of day; "Injun Trouble" (the 1969 Cool Cat cartoon, not the 1938 Porky Pig cartoon, also the final Warner Bros. cartoon during the golden era) is an infamous example. However, as of 2008, some of these have seen release on DVD (including "Norman Normal" and "The Door", two of the rarest WB cartoons).
  • The Animals of Farthing Wood was once only available in poor-quality online bootlegs, but as of February 2012, the entire series has been released on DVD in Germany, with both German and English audio available on the discs.
  • Daria was not commercially available from its finale in 2002 until the summer of 2010. Fans wanting the show either had to hunt down the Real Player versions of the series (which were taken from the original airings of the episodes/movies on MTV) or more mainstream AVI/MPEG video captures that were (unfortunately) taken from the show's run on Noggin, who butchered the episodes mercilessly, both for content and to make room for commercials. Now the show is finally on DVD and on TV (LOGO has the rights to it), though with the trade-off of having all of the music yanked and replaced with generic replacement tunes or no music at all.
    • Even more annoying: While all 65 episodes of the series itself are uncut (new masters were made à la "The State" with the replacement music), "Is It College Yet?" is the same old butchered version that aired on MTV after its initial commercial-free airing, which was used for the original DVD release of said film.
  • Thanks to Warner Home Video's "Cartoon Network Hall of Fame" DVD collection, the first seasons of Courage the Cowardly Dog and Johnny Bravo now have DVD releases as of Summer 2010, with Dexter's Laboratory coming the following October.
    • And after years of dormancy with no new releases, the series will release second season of Courage in October 2014.
    • Also, those shows have had their complete series note  added to the iTunes store.
  • In addition, the Warner Archive Collection has resulted in a number of older Hanna-Barbera/Ruby-Spears cartoons finally being distributed. These include SWAT Kats, The Pirates of Dark Water, Jabberjaw, Thundarr the Barbarian, Inch High, Private Eye, Centurions, Chuck Norris Karate Kommandos, the animated series of Pac-Man and Dragons Lair and all the Superstars 10 movies that weren't Scooby-Doo themed (since those were already openly released).
  • While still no signs of the DVD, Megas XLR has had official releases for iTunes and Xbox Live Arcade.
  • Seasons 1-3 of X-Men: Evolution have had DVD releases, but the fourth hasn't. iTunes has somewhat rectified this, as well as the Marvel YouTube channel having EVERY episode available to watch.
  • Bump in the Night, which got yanked when Disney took over ABC, got a DVD collection in July 2010.
  • Sonic Sat AM was caught in this state for over a decade until, finally, a worthy DVD set was released. Same goes for Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic Underground—the latter most likely due to its usage in YouTube Poop.
  • Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures was caught in this trap, but then the entire series came out on DVD in 2010, with the picture digitally remastered from the original film negatives and bonus features. Quite a big treatment for a show that hadn't aired in years.
  • The 1990s X-Men cartoon subverted this: after years of having to wait for a DVD release, and feeling all hope was lost, the first 32 episodes were released on DVD (in two 16-episode sets) for the first time in 2009 (presumably to cash in on X-Men Origins: Wolverine), with three more sets later released completing the series.
    • Every episode is freely available to stream on Marvel.com as well.
    • Interestingly, Disney seems a little more willing to sell comprehensive DVDs of Marvel cartoons than for cartoons they made themselves. The 1967 Animated Adaptation of Spider-Man had a complete series DVD in 2004 (which went out of print a few years later) to cash in on Spider-Man 2, and The Marvel Action Hour also has DVD boxsets. (The Fantastic Four segments became available shortly after the release of the 2005 movie, while Iron Man came around the same time as Iron Man 2.)
  • Warner apparently releases seasons of Superfriends at random, and it seemed unlikely that the "lost" 1980s shorts and the fan UN-favorite Wendy & Marvin season would ever come to DVD. That is, until one set of the "lost" shorts made its way to DVD in August 2009, and the Wendy and Marvin episodes the following year.
  • It took damn near 22 years, three distribution companies, and a very dogged fanbase to get Adventures of the Galaxy Rangers on DVD in the United States. Cue massive Squee when Koch finally released a two-part set.
  • The 1992 telefilm Tiny Toon Adventures: How I Spent My Vacation was placed into this for almost a decade after Warner Bros. ' 75th anniversary reprint of the 1996 re-release in 1998 went out of print several years later. By that time, the only way to watch that film was through either airings on Nicktoons Network (until 2005 to be exact), finding a used copy, or possibly bootlegs. These practices continued until a DVD release was announced in May 2012 and was officially taken off this in August of that year.
  • In North America, the only place you can view Kappa Mikey's two full seasons, besides on its practically non-existent presence on TV, is on iTunes. For some reason, Australia is the only country that legally distributes a full season DVD.
  • Jonny Quest The Real Adventures, which ran for a total of 52 episodes in two seasons during 1996-1997, had a few single-episode VHS tapes and Laserdisc releases during its run, but was all but forgotten after that, especially after the Time Warner merger. Most of the episodes can be found online, though, thanks to the shows' faithful fanbase. Finally in 2009, Turner released a DVD set of the first 13 episodes of season 1, including director/producer commentary and "making of" mini-features. There have been no announcements about releases for the rest of the series as of yet, but the fans remain eager... hopefully it won't take another 13 years this time around.
  • Kim Possible had a couple of episode DVDs, but for years, Disney didn't seem to see the value in season box sets. DVD sets of the first two seasons finally became available in October 2010, but only through the Disney Movie Club. Now, fortunately, they have put up the entire series for streaming.
  • Shout! Factory has started to release Madeline on DVD, in random compilations.
  • Code Lyoko only got Season 1 and five episodes of Season 2 to DVD before Funimation quietly dropped the title. It was thought that the rest of the series would never see an official release unless one lived in its home country of France until Taffy Entertainment began distributing the seasons on iTunes in November 2010, with XANA Awakens available free, and the first six episodes available free on their YouTube account. As of January 2011, all four seasons have been released.
  • Tales of the Gold Monkey was released in mid-2010.
  • Rover Dangerfield was released December 2010.
  • The Phantom Tollbooth was set for a 2008 DVD release but got delayed. It is now available to order off the Warner Bros. website.
  • Most of the Nicktoons, again. For the longest time, the only Nickelodeon originals with full DVD sets were Spongebob Squarepantsnote , The Ren & Stimpy Shownote , Invader Zimnote , and Avatar: The Last Airbendernote . In 2010, the floodgates finally opened, thanks to a licensing deal with Shout! Factory. Releases include Aaahh!!! Real Monsters, and Hey Arnold!, followed by Rocko's Modern Life, The Angry Beavers, CatDog, The Wild Thornberrys and Danny Phantom. On the other hand, Doug has been released exclusively by CreateSpace.
    • Likewise, the live-action shows. Kenan & Kel became available on iTunes in 2011, and Hey Dude got DVD sets starting in 2011.
  • As Told by Ginger has only had two DVD releases with the following episodes: "The Party" (the unaired pilot), "Ginger the Juvey", "Stealing First", "Dare I Darren", "Far From Home" (3-parter), and "The Wedding Frame" (3-part series finale). The only version of the show that was even close to getting a full series release was the Russian version, which only had the first 45 episodes (out of 60) released. In 2008, the first 13 episodes were made available on iTunes before being removed only months later (though "Ginger the Juvey" and "An Even Steven Holiday Special" remained available through other Nick releases). However, in 2013, the entire series became available on iTunes, including the telefilms and the seldom-aired "high school" episodes of Season 3. The 60 episodes (the telefilms count as 3 episodes, except for "No Turning Back" which counts as 2) are divided chronologically into 6 volumes. However, it was removed from iTunes in January 2015, and has yet to see a similar release on Amazon or DVD, though.
  • Gargoyles so far only has season 1 and half of season 2 released on DVD, but the complete series is now available for streaming on Disney's website - the only Disney Afternoon series to get this so far.
    • In 2013, the second half of season 2 was released as a Disney Movie Club exclusive.
  • Quack Pack has had a few individual episodes released on DVD, but never the entire series.
  • The Adventures of Sam & Max: Freelance Police hardly saw daylight after its initial 13-episode run. It wasn't until the popularity of Telltale Games's Sam and Max games that it was able to get a release through Shout! and many new fans were able to experience the show for the first time.
  • Several Marvel Comics cartoons that never received comprehensive DVD releases will become available to stream on Netflix, such as Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends, Spider-Man: The Animated Series, and The Marvel Super Heroes.
    • And of course, as mentioned before, Marvel themselves do have a online video section on their site where one can catch most episodes of the older Marvel cartoon and TV series (including the Japanese Spider-Man), with no region-blocking whatsoever in place note . Although as of 2013, sadly, this is not the case.
    • While we're on the subject of Spider-Man: The Animated Series, as of August 2014, all five seasons have finally been released on iTunes.
  • Heavy Metal was theatrically released in 1981, but only got to VHS after 15 years - with a DVD one year later - due to copyright issues (the film has much, much licensed music). The Agony Booth recap even says the movie got much of its Cult Classic status for its rarity than for actual quality.
  • Where on Earth Is Carmen Sandiego? had some Compilation Movies released by Lion's Gate and the first season released by Shout! Factory, then five years passed without any other releases. Thanks to Mill Creek Entertainment, a DVD of the complete series came in February 2012.
  • Jem — Rhino Video released seasons 1-2 and part of 3 on DVD. The rest? Left in limbo. To make matters worse, the first two sets of DVDs went out of print and cost a pretty penny to buy a secondhand copy. Shout! Factory has decided to release a complete series DVD boxset, including the long-unavailable season 3 episodes—mostly due to the upcoming live-action movie.
  • One of the most egregious examples of this trope was The '80s incarnation of Alvin and the Chipmunks, considering that musical numbers were their entire shtick. But, with the success of the movies, several compilations of the show and associated specials have been released.
  • ReBoot. ADV Films never released Seasons 1 and 2 on DVD, only four episodes from Season 1 ever came out on VHS. Seasons 3 and 4 came out on DVD, but went out of print. Fortunately, Shout! Factory eventually released DVDs of the complete series.
    • Season 3 also airs on Teletoon Retro...IN CANADA! (Well, it was made in Canada...)
  • The 1980 animated feature adaptation of Gnomes languished in copyright limbo after the production company wound up. However, CCV of Norway announced that a DVD release would come in December 2011.
  • In late January 2012, Warner Archive released the first season of Pac-Man as a manufacture-on-demand (MOD for short) DVD title. The second season was released in September in a package that includes the Pac-Man Christmas Special.
  • The Jetsons was among the first Hanna-Barbera series to receive a DVD boxset, but it contained only the original episodes, broadcast from 1962 to 1963. These also became the only episodes to air on Boomerang. The 1980s revival did not come to DVD, or air on Boomerang, until 2009. Even then, only half of Season 2 became available on DVD, as well as the theatrical 1990 movie. Now, fans can buy the second half of the season, the two concurrently produced TV movies, and the third season through Warner Archive.
  • The 2003–2007 Strawberry Shortcake series appeared to be in limbo when the series was dropped off Kewlopolis before the 2007 Season 4 episodes could air, and rights for the series went from Playmates to Hasbro (and animation rights went from DiC to Moonscoop). DVD releases of the series became slow and erratic, and many fans initially believed in 2009 that the releases would grind to a halt and the last eight episodes would not see the light of day upon hearing the news back then. However, stopping of releases is one thing that did not happen, and the last DVD of the series came out in March 2012.
  • Recess is now available on iTunes in Germany. (An iTunes release in the U.S. is unknown, but Recess: School's Out and Recess: Taking the Fifth Grade are available.)
  • The Swan Princess and The Swan Princess III: The Mystery of the Enchanted Treasure came to DVD in 2004, but The Swan Princess: Escape from Castle Mountain did not. People wanting to complete the set had to wait five years for that film, which was retitled The Swan Princess: The Secret of the Castle.
  • The third season of Transformers Animated was only release on DVD in Japan (the Japanese dub, obviously), Hasbro has stated they have no plans to release it, and Cartoon Network dropped reruns of the show from their lineup fairly soon after it ended. However, in 2012, The Hub picked up the rights to show reruns, saving it at least temporarily.
    • Shout! Factory has announced that it will be releasing a DVD set of the unreleased third season and a complete series set.
  • The For Better or for Worse animated specials from the 1980s and 1990s became available since Lynn Johnston acquired the rights in 2008; they're sold exclusively through the FBorFW website.
  • Dog City - The series was made only a couple of years after Jim Henson's death, so the Jim Henson Company never really took much notice of it, despite earning a following. Only seven episodes were released on three extremely rare tapes, and the JHC refused to let the rest be uploaded to Youtube (save for one episode in German). There was a brief Hope Spot when they were all made available on Amazon Instant Video, but only in the United States. A petition started on the website Rostam Entertainment for a full DVD release and a crossover film with All Dogs Go to Heaven, but before they could get halfway (about 10 signatures out of 29), Rostam Entertainment was taken down and later rebooted as Cartoon Reviewer, and the petition became stuck in Development Hell. Finally, a YouTube user known as "Alexmantv" has uploaded all the episodes (presumably from Amazon).
  • Any Garfield and Friends episode past Show 73 was this once CBS ended the series. It got a full release when the live-action/CGI Garfield movie and its sequel came out.
  • After years of waiting, the fourth and final volume of Animaniacs was released in February 2013.
  • Eight years after finishing, and with only one episode ("The Green Loontern") released in the interim, Duck Dodgers got its first season released in full in February 2013.
  • For a few years, a majority of the episodes of The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin were missing for what seemed like forever because Hi-Tops and YES! Entertainment only decided to release a certain number of episodes, the most notable missing ones being story-building episodes like the finale. Enter Mill Creek Entertainment, who released the complete series circa 2005. Once those went out of print, the series was released in a box set with all 65 episodes by Image Entertainment in June 2012.
  • Doug's 1st Movie was released on video in 1999, but not on DVD despite the fact that Disney moved into that market that year (ironically, it was originally intended as a Direct-to-Video title). Other countries released it on VideoCD, but those copies are long out of print. It was finally released on DVD in 2012, albeit as a Disney Movie Club exclusive.
  • "Poor sales" killed all plans to release the remainder of the ALF animated series on DVD after the first nine episodes. The entire series is now available through Hulu Plus.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic is an odd case of being preemptively rescued from tape circulation limbo. The few DVD releases the show gets are small handfuls of Out of Order episodes, and most international networks outright refuse to carry the show... but this doesn't matter because the bronies will, without fail, upload each episode to YouTube in high definition with all commercials cut out within an hour of it airing on TV.
    • And should Hasbro (or someone posing as them) start taking down episodes for copyright, Shout! Factory (who also released those Out of Order sets) has complete DVD releases for the first three seasons as of May 2014, though as Amazon.com exclusives. Amazon and iTunes also have the entire series to date available for download, and Netflix has the first fourth seasons up so far.
  • Disney's The Weekenders will be given a full DVD release as a Disney Movie Club Exclusive in February 2013, making it the very first show from One Saturday Morning to get a full DVD release.
  • Warner Home Video finally released a complete DVD set of The Amazing Chan and the Chan Clan in June 2012. Notable the series won a poll held by the Warner Archive, easily beating nine other shows in terms of demand.
  • As of October 2013, the Beverly Hills Teens series are now available from Mill Creek Entertainment.
  • For awhile, Street Sharks had a couple of VHS releases of the first few episodes, meaning that the later episodes were all but lost after the re-runs ended. Netflix aired the episodes out of order for some time, but the show also finally got a DVD release of all 40 episodes.
  • The ADV Films release of the Mega Man cartoon has gone out of print. Cue Discotek Media licensing the show for a DVD release.
  • As of 2013, Goof Troop, previously only with three episodes available on DVD, now has 54 episodes available. Still not the full (79-episode) series, but much closer than it was.
  • The same year, Disney finally released the last third of TaleSpin.
  • Airing irregularly in Canada and France for years, Cybersix never got released on DVD after its only season was finished. Fortunately, Discotek Media recently announced that they have picked the show up and have made plans for a 2014 DVD release.
  • After the first season DVD set from Shout! Factory fell flat due to low sales, and the compilation DVDs became rarities, Inspector Gadget finally got a complete series release in both volumes and a complete series boxset courtesy of New Video Group.
  • After many years off the air and episodes becoming hard to find, the complete series of Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain got a DVD release in January 2014. Whether or not this is a good thing is up for debate.
  • The Earthworm Jim two-season cartoon series had originally seen only a partial VHS release of eight (out of 13) Season 1 episodes, presented in random order. Word of God was that it will never would be released on DVD, due to the creators considering it an Old Shame they were coerced into creating to support the games. It finally got a U.S. release in its entirety.
  • Once upon a time, The Magic Adventures Of Mumfie had only a very small amount of episodes, plus the Christmas special and movie, on VHS. That changed in 2012 when Britt Allcroft herself released Mumfie's Quest on DVD. In 2013, she then released the Christmas special Mumfie's White Christmas on DVD. On New Year's Day 2014, the series became available on Hulu Plus and Amazon Instant Video, (minus four episodes and the unedited Mumfie's Quest episodes). The latter, however of Mumfie's Quest will be released in the future as well as new merchandise. There's no news for the four missing episodes, though.
  • David The Gnome was this but got DVD releases in the United Kingdom in 2006, in Spain and Italy by 2011, and in the United States by Oasis DVD in 2012. Most episodes are also available on DVD in Germany and the Netherlands.
  • Godzilla: The Series was released on DVD before, but said releases only contained a few episodes, and have gone out of print by now. Fortunately, Mill Creek Entertainment is planning a DVD release of the full series (which will include two episodes that were never aired on television) to coincide with Godzilla (2014), similar to the Garfield example above.
  • Challenge of the GoBots: The cartoon was made by Hanna-Barbera, so it's now owned by Warner Bros. The toys were made by Bandai, who still owns the designs (and thus the look of the characters). The character names were devised by Tonka, which was bought by Hasbro, who therefore own the names. Getting rival international toy companies to agree to cooperate was a significant hurdle—until April 2014, when Warner Archive announced a DVD release of the complete series. The Five-Episode Pilot was released in 2011.
  • After what has been over a decade later, the Grand Finale to Animaniacs,Wakko's Wish, was finally released on DVD in October 2014.
  • My Little Pony Tales was only able to be found on DVDs released in Europe and Australia. The entire series later came to Kidoodle TV, which seemed like one step closer to a DVD release. Some time after that, Shout! Factory announced that they would release a North American DVD set in April 2015.
  • After being off the air for years and only having a few episodes released on Nickelodeon compilation VHS and DVDs, ChalkZone has finally been released on Amazon as a complete series DVD set (however, the set is missing "The Smooch" due to music rights).
  • All of the episodes from The Smurfs will be digitized and released on YouTube on a special branded channel, courtesy of IMPS, ODMedia, and Expoza. Also, the entire series has been released on DVD in Australia.
    • However, it doesn't help that the new YouTube channel crops the episodes into a widescreen format and that some of the international remastered versions of certain episodes use the chopped-up edited versions from the syndicated "Smurfs Adventures" series. The international release of the show also uses a re-modified version of the 1st season intro and credits for seasons 1-8, along with two different alternate foreign theme songs, instead of using the updated intro sequences for later seasons.
    • In the U.S., the only episodes released on DVD as of now are the complete season 1, selected episodes from season 2, and the Christmas specials. Most of the series is also available on iTunes. (Luckily, these editions include the original respective intro sequences for each season as well).
  • Road Rovers didn't receive a DVD set until a February 10, 2015 release through the Warner Archive.
  • Warner has announced an April 2015 DVD release for the first season of The Scooby-Doo and Scrappy-Doo Show.
  • Nine years after A Boy Named Charlie Brown and Snoopy Come Home were released on DVD, Paramount finally released Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown on February 10, 2015, with Bon Voyage, Charlie Brown scheduled for October 6, both because of the upcoming The Peanuts Movie.
  • Even though Beware the Batman was affected by the same write-off as Sym-Bionic Titan, as mentioned above, it was able to get a release through the Warner Archive on both DVD and Blu-ray in the fall of 2014. Toonami was also able to air all of the episodes just before their license went up in flames.
  • The infamous Street Fighter cartoon, initially released by ADV Films on DVD, was sort of rescued when it was included on a single Blu-Ray disc as part of the Street Fighter 25th Anniversary set. It was then definitely rescued when Discotek Media announced that they licensed the show for a DVD rerelease.
  • Timothy Goes to School was first seen on PBS Kids' block "Bookworm Bunch" in 2000 then disappeared after the block ended. It later returned to television on Discovery Kids, but only for about a year. The show's most recent appearance was on the Qubo network for a spell. There is no doubt that DVD's are hard to find - good thing there's YouTube.
  • Mummies Alive! only had one VHS release, and its few DVD releases, for both Regions 1 and 2, contain only some episodes. There exists a complete series set, but its legality is debatable.
  • Dragon Tales will have a hard time getting a season-wise DVD or Blu-ray release instead of individual DVD compilations. The major culprit for this, aside from music licensing issues, is that the show is jointly owned by the non-profit organization Sesame Workshop (which also produces Sesame Street) and the media giant Sony, and the two are more than likely to argue about where the money for such releases will go. Give Netflix a round of applause for streaming the entire series, unless you live somewhere where Netflix isn't available.
    • Doesn't help that the Netflix releases have all the songs and PBS funding credits edited out from the episodes, again due to licensing issues. You know something is wrong with Sony when they choose not to license their own TV shows' music to their own sister music corporation.