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Western Animation: God, the Devil and Bob

God, the Devil and Bob (2000) was a short-lived American animated series with only 3 episodes out of 13 shown in its first run.

The show opens as God decides that Humans Are Bastards and he's going to end the world; The Devil, of course, is delighted with His decision. God eventually has second thoughts about the idea, though — saying that He's "not that kind of God" — and He decides to give the world one last chance: if a single person can somehow prove that humanity as a whole is worth saving, God will put off smiting the entire world. The Devil is none too happy about this, so God decides to make things fair by letting The Devil choose the person. Enter the third titular character: Detroit's own Bob Alman, an under-educated, beer-drinking, swearing, selfish person who — by his own admission — downloads a lot of porn from the Internet. In the first episode, Bob manages to redeem humanity, and for the rest of the series, he becomes God's "go-to guy" for new ideas on how to help humanity further redeem itself — all while The Devil tries to interfere with God's plans.

Side characters include Bob's wife Donna, their kids Megan (a teenager) and Andy (a six-year-old), Bob's work buddies (a white pervert and a black guy/occasional Deadpan Snarker), and Smeck (The Devil's demon henchman/Chew Toy).

The show touched on many family issues, including death, puberty, and bullying, among others. The show caused a good deal of controversy due to its presumed mocking of the Christian faith, a largely inaccurate accusation leveled almost entirely by people who had never actually seen — and indeed refused to watch — the show (like they did with Monty Python's Life of Brian and The Last Temptation of Christ). Ironically, the show's creator was an ordained clergyman with a favorable attitude towards the faith. It eventually made it to DVD in the US, several overseas markets did air the full series, and in 2011, the show's full run made its way into the [adult swim] lineup.


This animated series contains examples of the following tropes:

  • Cross Dresser: The Devil and Smeck in a couple episodes.
  • Deal with the Devil: Bob (and inadvertently his wife) makes one of these involving a palm pilot.
  • The Devil Is a Loser
    Bob: Get out! There must be somebody else that you can annoy.
    The Devil: That's all I am to you? Is annoying? I am the source of all evil in the universe, and I'm annoying?
  • Drunken Montage: Subverted - "I never knew neon signs were so interesting."
  • Easily Forgiven: No matter how much destruction he causes, the Devil is always on friendly terms with God by the end of the episode. Most of the time it's God who ends up apologizing to him. He's an unusual example as he's the main villain of the show. It's justified with the fact that God could easily reshape everything the Devil destroys in a matter of seconds if he wanted to.
  • Epic Fail: The fourth circle of Hell has been neglected for a while. The result? It's a golf course.
    Smeck: That one got away from me, sir.
  • Everyone Loves Blondes: While trying to tempt Bob into cheating on Donna, Lucifer transforms an old homeless woman into a stunning young blonde in a hot red dress.
  • Everything's Better with Rainbows: God makes a double rainbow appear over Detroit to cheer people up without making the atheists feel left out.
  • Evil Brit: The Devil has an English accent and is voiced by a Scottish actor. Everyone else is American, including God.
  • Evil Is Petty: Among other examples the Devil makes his debut in the first episode by popping a child's balloon, kicking an old lady's cane out from under her and keying a car.
  • Evil Plan: The Devil wants to tempt Bob into sin so he'll go to hell, just to spite God and see Him recreate everything.
  • Figure It Out Yourself: Inverted: God gives clear instructions most of the time, yet Bob doesn't get the point. This is why He's so frustrated in the first episode. "This is not new stuff! It's written down on scrolls, and books and stone tablets. What do you want me to do!? Scribble it on a bar napkin?"
  • Fire and Brimstone Hell: What hell looks like except for the Fourth Circle, which turned into a giant golf course when the Devil wasn't paying attention.
  • Flaming Devil: This happens when The Devil gets angry.
  • Fluffy Cloud Heaven: How heaven is depicted.
  • Flying Car: God's driving it, so Justified Trope.
  • Forgotten Birthday: "The Devil's Birthday." God apparently forgets every year which hurts the devil more because God is supposed to be omniscient.
  • Go Among Mad People: "Bob Gets Committed" and does God's bidding with the residents of an insane asylum.
  • God Is Flawed: Some episodes portray God as less "perfect being" and more, for lack of a better word, "human". Examples include the weariness and disappointment he feels in the first episode, having someone "accidentally" crushed under a tree in order to get onto Bob's baseball team, His relationship trouble with a human, and His estranged relationship with his fallen angel creation.
  • God Is Good: He wants people to get along with each other and be happy.
  • Godly Sidestep: Bob asks God why He allows evil to exist. God takes a deep breath and explains to Bob, just as a train passes between them and the audience. Bob is impressed and accepts God's answer, but we only hear the very last part.
    "...like a cork caught in whirlpool."
  • God Karting with Beelzebub: Many episodes begin with the two hanging out together: going for a walk, playing golf, bowling, etc.
  • Go Into the Light: Parodied. Turns out it's God's porch light. Which he only left on once.
  • Heterosexual Life-Partners: God and the Devil certainly look like this at times considering how much time they spend together.
  • Humans Are Bastards: Why God wants to destroy earth in the first place.
  • Humanity on Trial: The first episode, with Bob as the star witness for the prosecution.
  • Incredibly Inconvenient Deity: Neither God nor the Devil is above popping into Bob's bed when they want a word.
  • Ink-Suit Actor: Both Bob and the Devil bear a resemblance to their respective voice actors. God, however, is more based on Jerry Garcia.
  • Invisible to Adults: God can be seen by "innocents," which includes children like Andy (but not teens like Megan). However, this seems to be averted for people who have lost their adult sense of rationality and cynicism, such as the mentally ill. For what it's worth, Andy could not see through the Devil's disguise when he imitated Bob, but still realized right away that he was some sort of an impostor and God can make Himself visible to whoever He wants.
  • The Internet Is for Porn: Discussed - if people had no porn on the television then they would have to find it on the internet instead.
  • Jerkass God: One episode shows God casually talking about restarting the world with marsupals as the dominant species, while humans are "somewhere on the food chain". Usually averted; see God Is Good.
  • Jumping Out of a Cake: Parodied in "The Devil's Birthday". A world without evil means the cake contains an eldery married couple who give advice ("Never go to bed angry"). Bob is horrified.
  • Let's Get Dangerous: Both God and the Devil come across as rather unimpressive but God certainly shows us that He's the All Mighty in the first episode and the Devil transforms into a real demon at one point and is capable of some real evil at times .
  • Minion with an F in Evil: Smeck is a horrible devil which means he's closer to a Nice Guy or a Salary Man.
  • Moral Guardians: After an assload of blasphemy complaints in the United States, NBC canceled it after only four episodes, and it was not shown again in the U.S. until a decade later on [adult swim]. The whole series was aired overseas earlier.
    • Funnily enough the final episode of the series has Bob start his own group of moral guardians which descends in bickering; the moral of that story was Kevin Bacon is a really good dancer.
  • Multi-Character Title: Three of them.
  • Never My Fault: From the first episode; Bob's daughter spreads a rumor about herself that she's a slut, causing her boyfriend to dump her for being a slut, at which point she turns around and blames her mother.
  • Nigh-Invulnerability: Bob thinks that as "God's special guy" he has this so he decides to wrestle a robber with a gun and skydive without a parachute. God tells him he's not and it's just a fluke while the Devil encourages it. We don't find out one way or another.
  • Noodle Incident: Satan once comments that he "promised [Smeck]'s mother" to take care of him, though further circumstances are never explained.
  • Odd Friendship: God and the Devil, of course.
  • Pals with Jesus: Bob is God's Go-To Guy and pops in to talk about stuff or some plan of His.
  • Parting Words Regret: In "Bob's Father" just before Bob's father dies he tells him to go to Hell.
  • Pass the Popcorn: Andy and Megan are enjoying a bowl while watching the neighbors having a lovers spat.
  • Place Worse Than Death: When the Devil takes all the evil out of the world, God insists Bob visit Hell to talk sense into him. Bob is less than comfortable with this plan. "Oh, for Pete's sake, you've been to Branson, Missouri. It's not that different."
  • Rebel Without a Cause: Megan will whine about the family not spending enough time together and then complain when she has to spend time with them; Rebelling for it's own sake.
  • Record Needle Scratch: In the pilot when Bob asks "What's in it for me?"
  • So Proud of You: According to the Devil, one of his reasons for rebelling against God was that God never told The Devil how proud He was of him back when he was an angel.
  • Sycophantic Servant: Smeck always agrees with his boss because the alternative is pain.
  • Take That: Almost Once an Episode, usually involving a celebrity or politician casually mentioned as being involved with The Devil.
    • When God decides to see what it's like to be human, The Devil realizes that he's now the ultimate power in the Universe, and decides that his first act will be something so diabolical even he will be disgusted by it. Smeck suggests Tony Danza on Broadway. The Devil responds that he wants "something on that level".
    • Another episode had Smeck try to cheer The Devil up by showing him several of his acts of cruelty throughout the ages: The Nuns of Loudon, the Salem Witches, and who could forget, the Warren Court.
    • Another episode had God experimenting with possible back-up plans in case he ever decides to destroy the universe. One of them is much the same as the old one, but he got rid of France, and he "also made a few other improvements".
  • This Loser Is You: Bob, a dim witted, perverted and bumbling man is supposed to represent all of humanity. In the pilot Satan chose him for this role to give himself the advantage.
  • Too Spicy for Yog Sothoth: The Devil is on the receiving end of this more than once.
    • When he hires Martha Stewart to help him redecorate the fourth circle of Hell, he is completely pushed aside.
    • When he pretends to be an ordinary teenager to get close to Bob's daughter, he realizes he's forgotten how depressing teenagers can be and abandons the scheme halfway through their date.
    • He also point blank refuses to take Richard Nixon. "I don't want him in hell! It's not fair to my other guests!"
    • God spends half of an episode trying to get away from His former prophet Sarah, who He fears has a crush on Him.
  • Twerp Sweating: Subverted. At first Bob is eager to do this with Megan's date but ends up having a guy crush on the guy himself ("You come around any time! Megan doesn't even have to be here!"), all because they share an interest in hockey. (Her date turns out to be the Devil in disguise.)
  • The Unreveal: Right when God is about to reveal why He allows evil in the world, a train comes by and its toot censors out everything He says. Strangely enough, He gives the answer in a later episode: "without evil being good is meaningless."
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight: In the pilot:
    Andy: Hi, Bob. Hi, God.
    • God Himself generally averts this, as most people who see Him don't know who He is, and He usually appears in a humanoid form or makes Himself invisible. The Devil, on the other hand, always appears in a demonic-looking form unless he's trying to pull a trick, and routinely does things like burn down buildings with his mind or give flowers sentience in full view of the public.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Again in "Bob Gets Committed", the Devil thinks God's instruction for Bob are arranging at least 4 moves, so he decides for 5 (he just does one, the one that mattered). His action that puts Bob in the looney bin turns out to be part of God's plan.
  • Villain Song: "Rain on my parade" is the most extended of the Devil's temptations of Bob.
  • Voluntary Shapeshifting: The Devil does this, and to a lesser extent, so does God.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: In the episode "Bob Gets Committed" the devil is defeated by Bob singing a Tony Orlando song.
  • We Want Our Jerk Back:
    • In one episode, the Devil starts being nice to Smeck, which disturbed him greatly.
    • Also in a later episode where the Devil removes all evil from the world, Bob does all he can to bring back the jerk in everyone.
  • "Well Done, Son" Guy: The Devil's animosity toward God stems from this. Yep, Lucifer's Morningstar's fall from grace and subjugation of Hell were all caused by daddy issues. "Knowing you were good, but never good enough." In turn, Gods estranged relationship with Lucifer is due to him feeling betrayed by him, having considered Lucifer Morningstar to have been his greatest Angel.
  • What the Hell, Hero?: Bob is eventually overwhelmed by his new responsibility in the pilot, not to mention being threatened by Satan, and calls out God for seemingly allowing him to languish in a situation he has no control over.
  • Your Favorite: For God - Poptarts and Space Food Sticks.


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alternative title(s): God The Devil And Bob
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