YMMV / Samurai Jack


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    General YMMV 
  • Accidental Innuendo: Just before Jack fights the Shinobi robot, we get this exchange.
    Jack: Shinobi, warrior of the night. Trained to use the darkness of the shadow. I know your arts as well. (proceeds to strip off his robe)
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • The Aku Infection from the titular episode. Aku sneezes on Jack and accidentally corrupts him into a Jack-Aku hybrid. Is Jack-Aku just a pawn manipulated by Aku himself to take over Jack's mind? Or is Jack-Aku just Jack being twisted by the evil that Aku is made of? Or is Jack-Aku the beginning of a new creature that is Aku's spawn much like how Aku was the spawn of the formless evil from before time?
    • Due to their similar designs the robot hitmen from "Jack and the Gangsters" are often speculated to be members of the X-Series from the "Tales of X-9." Either as a faction of similarly retired robot mobsters or an offshoot of the models that were dismissed from service once the Beetle Drones were distributed.
  • Awesome Art: The show has a cinematic visual style meant to evoke classic Science Fiction, Akira Kurosawa films and anime. The geometric character designs and impressionistic/abstract backgrounds really pushed the artists to rely on color to make everything look distinct, and it really shows. One could argue that other, similarly ambitiously-designed TV shows from this era and beyond owe a lot to how big a risk the artists took with this show.
  • Awesome Music:
    • Crowning Soundtrack of Awesome for the whole series. Honestly, with all the other sounds telling the story, you won't miss dialogue.
    • Rave in the Forest.
    • The opening for "Jack and the Three Blind Archers" is also pretty cool. Sounds a little like something from Red Alert with the marching/stomping going over into the beat and all.
    • The Sirens' song is hauntingly beautiful.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment:
    • In that episode where a rabbit steals Jack's clothes (that episode on its own was kind of a Bizarro Episode), there's a scene where an... elephant... fairy... thing randomly flies by with this ghostly, wailing noise. Never mentioned, never explained. What's worse, at the end of that episode, right before the credits start, it flies past The Stinger AGAIN with that same creepy noise!
    • The last we see of the metal eating family is the family literally eating each other. No mention of them is ever made again (it's unknown if they were sent by Aku).
  • Bizarro Episode:
    • "Jack and the Farting Dragon." There are no words.
    • Also, "Chicken Jack." As the title suggests, Jack is a chicken for this episode.
  • Broken Base: The ending to the IDW Publishing comic. Many fans see it as a letdown and not a satisfactory ending due to concluding with Jack and his allies planning one final assault on Aku's domain and leaving it open to interpretation whether his attack was successful or not, but there are some who consider it a decent enough finale, at least until the revival airs.
  • Chewing the Scenery: Aku, to Narm Charm levels.
    Aku (into the phone): Thirty minutes or it's free? Excellent! HA HAAAA HA HA HAAAAA HA HA!
  • Common Knowledge: Jack has never said that an innocent person can't be hurt by his sword because it was made with the essence of a purely good person, just that an evil person can't use it to hurt others because of it's pure properties.
  • Counterpart Comparison: Has its own page.
  • Crazy Awesome: While many characters are strong in spite of their eccentricities, others are strong because of them.
    • The Scotsman, a ridiculously muscled Large Ham of a man with a machine gun peg-leg, penchant for bad music, and a claymore bigger than Jack. He's got a wild and erratic fighting style wherein he opts to tank hits that would kill normal men simply because he thinks he's beefy enough to do so.
    • The Scotsman's wife to a degree even more so than her husband. When you piss her off she becomes a savage force of nature capable of tearing multiple armed opponents apart with her bare hands in a blind berserker rage.
    • Mad Jack representing Jack's evil side is an unhinged, Ax-Crazy and savage fighter.
  • Creepy Awesome: The show has its share of comedic villains, but there are a handful whose chilling presence left an impression.
    • Demongo. His demonic design, oily voice, and the seemingly limitless amount of warriors he can summon made him this.
    • The Minions of Set may have brought Jack to his most desperate. They were relentless, powerful, and unable to be harmed by conventional methods. They kept Jack on the run in-between handing out a savage beating.
    • The demon Jack encounters in the house. The episode was decidedly horror themed with this thing having invaded and consumed a family and paraded them around to consume Jack as well. There's nothing we know about this creature other than how scary it can be.
    • Aku in his more serious appearances can be this way. His surprise entrance in the latter half of "Jack and the Zombies", where he manages to take the sword from Jack and goes all out trying to kill the samurai, is a big example.
  • Crossover Ship:
  • Designated Villain: The Elemental trio from "Jack and the Gangsters." Sure they try to kill Jack, but only because he's trying to steal the jewel they're guarding which they're trying to keep out of Aku's hands. It's almost odd that the show treats them as monsters of the week while similar characters like X9 were given a sympathetic POV. Perhaps this is why they're ultimately incapacitated after accidentally shooting each other rather than killed by Jack.
  • Ear Worm: Gotta get back, back to the past, Samurai Jack, HWA-CHA!
  • Evil is Cool:
    • Aku. He has ruled of the world for years and defeated many warriors in his way, as well as determined in his war with Jack. However, what makes him truly awesome is that he's different from other “dark“ villains. He's capable of being an epic and ass-kicking villain, while still being lovable and fun at the same time.
    • There's also Demongo, the Collector of Souls.
    • Let's not forget the coolest villains in the show, the Minions of Set. They're demonic creatures from the past who are too strong for Jack to face head-on.
    • Shinobi, a deadly ninja who takes advantage of the show's lack of outlines to seamlessly blend into the shadows. His duel with Jack is well remembered for how beautifully stylized the whole thing was.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • The Scotsman, the fact he's got a machine gun for a peg leg should show how cool a character he is.
    • Demongo, apparently enough to get him a profile on Cartoon Network's site at one point in their old shows archive. He also makes an appearance on the game FusionFall. He returns in "XCVII", with no explanation on how he survived his death.
    • Exdor, who seemed very similar to Dexter. He later appeared in the 2004 video game.
    • X9. His episode was an excellent noir episode, and he had an delightful 1920's mobster theme. Shame he was forced to go against Jack... which only meant one thing.
    • Ikra, Aku's female alter ego, is popular enough to be shipped with Jack. Despite the fact that, you know, "she" is really Aku.
    • Da Samurai has also been picking up some steam as well. People seemed to enjoy his change towards the end of his episode, and some even hope he comes back for Season 5. They got their wish in "XCVII", where it turns out he's become a humble bartender.
  • Esoteric Happy Ending: Played for Laughs in "Jack and the Farting Dragon", where Jack saves the day only for the baby dragon to basically set the town on fire. Everyone is too busy celebrating to stop it.
    • Even Jack questions if what he did was a good thing.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
  • Fanfic Fuel: What adventures was Jack up to in the 50 year timeskip? Genndy says it's up to you. And to help with that, the episode number skips from LII (52) straight to XCII (92), allowing fans to fill their stories in with the numbers in between.
  • Fanon: There are an alarming amount of people who think that Samurai Jack takes place in the same universe as Dexter's Laboratory and The Powerpuff Girls, due to the fact that the remains of what looks like Townsville are seen in the first episode, and some people have commented on how Professor Utonium and Jack look a lot alike. Some people have even made some pretty interesting theories here and there.
  • Foe Yay: Jack and Aku (as Ikra).
    • Believe it or not, Aku pulls this off a second time in one of the CN Action Pack comics. He takes the form of a beautiful geisha for what is implied to be several months, only to change back right after Jack confesses his love for her. This time there wasn't even any threat or time portal involved; he just wanted to screw with the poor guy. His last words?
    Aku: "You will always be alone. HA HA HA HA HA!" (returns to his lair) "But I will never be alone... as long as I have you."
  • Fountain of Memes: Aku, for obvious reasons, is just so damn quotable. See Memetic Mutation below.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • "The Aku Infection" had Aku having a horrible coughing fit, coughing up a bit of evil that infects Jack and slowly spreads. Mako (Aku's voice actor) died of esophageal cancer.
    • "Aku's Fairy Tales" had Aku trying to brainwash children with Aku being the hero and Jack being the villain. It was Played for Laughs and is a light-hearted episode overall. Then Season 5 introduced the Daughters of Aku, seven women warriors who were put to Training from Hell since birth and were raised to believe that Aku is their lord and savior, reminding the viewers that while Aku's first attempt was an Epic Fail, the motive behind it is still terrifying.
    • "Aku's Fairy Tales" tells the story of Jack as the Big Bad Wolf and makes a reference to The Shining. Then Inner Jack appears, the embodiment of Jack's despair and guilt over his failure to stop Aku; he resembles "Jacky" from Aku's fairy tale, with the same Deranged Animation with their presence shown in Dutch Angle, and their face looking quite nightmarish.
    • At the end of "Jack and the Baby" the baby has a scowl on her face and Jack says it's because she had "witnessed death" and now has the spirit of the samurai. Then in XCIV, we learn Jack had literally witnessed death when he saw his father kill a group of bandits.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • In the episode "Jack and the Three Monks", Jack came dangerously close to abandoning his quest after one too many failures, until the titular monks reminded him of all the suffering Aku has caused and what he's fighting for, rejuvenating his spirit to carry on. Then Season 5's premise was revealed, and Jack has pretty much abandoned all hope after fifty long years of still being trapped in the future.
    • In the episode "Jack, the Monks, and the Ancient Master's Son" when Tam Sung expresses awe that Jack has apparently remained unchanged despite all the eons that have passed and believes that Jack had achieved a level of chi even beyond his own before Jack hastily corrects him that he had merely been displaced in time. Come Season 5 and we find out that a side-effect of the time magic Aku used to send Jack to the future has also left Jack The Ageless.
    • In "Jack vs. Aku", the episode is kicked off by Aku having grown tired of the premise of the show and how he and Jack can never decisively kill each other, resulting in a perpetual stalemate. Aku even has a Leaning on the Fourth Wall speech about how his plans to kill Jack and Jack's plans to result home will always inevitably fail week after week, "And then we'll do the same thing all over again." While this is a largely comedic episode, it gets a lot darker after Season 5 premiered. Turns out that fifty years of doing "the same thing all over again," hasn't been kind to either character; Aku has crippling depression and can't even be bothered to run his own empire, and Jack is struggling with PTSD, hallucinations, and suicidal thoughts.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • In "Jack and the Flying Prince and Princess" we meet Verbina, a winged princess with pink hair played by Tara Strong.
    • Might also be Harsher in Hindsight. Aku's Opening Narration, with just some words replaced, might as well be the meta situation between the show and the Cartoon Network.Explanation 
    • During the (non-canon) comics Jack's sword is broken, "Time Passes", and he leaves his hair unbound, carries a staff, and grows a long beard, and wears different clothing, much like after his sword is lost in Season 5. Of course, in the comics the beard and costume change are a play to make himself less recognizable.
    • A retired, almost unstoppable gunslinger is called back into action after an incident involving his beloved dog. Are we talking about X9 or John Wick?
    • A Retired Badass robot adopts an adorable puppy dog. Did I just describe X9 or Thundercracker?
  • Ho Yay: Nearly-naked Jack tickling a nearly-naked sumo wrestler.
  • Iron Woobie: Jack goes through hell and back to try to return to his native time, and comes out of almost all of his fights worse for wear. And yet, he trudges on. Season 5 further emphasizes Jack's plight, showing a tragic hero who's become ever so close to losing all hope and giving up.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Aku when he gets taken seriously. There was also the ninja who followed Jack unseen all the way.
  • Memetic Badass: Jack himself.
  • Memetic Molester: In "Jack and the Warrior Woman", Jack learns to his horror that Ikra, a beautiful woman whom he was clearly feeling love for, was actually Aku in disguise. In these comments, there are so many jokes speculating that the disguised Aku must've had sex with an unwitting Jack.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Jack himself gets a few.
      • "JUMP GOOD!"
      • "No money for you, crazy round man."
    • Let's face it, pretty much anything that comes out of Aku's mouth is this.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Aku crossed it in his introduction when he destroyed Jack's home city while laughing maniacally. Something which he would repeat in many other lands for thousands of years.
  • No Yay: Oh God, when Aku disguises himself as a beautiful woman, he seems to actually show growing chemistry with Jack. Urgh, how far would he have kept up the ruse?
  • Older Than They Think: The ignorant would think that "Jack and the Spartans" is a blatant rip-off of the more Memetic Mutation movie 300, even including many of the same sepia tone visuals. But the episode was made years before and was inspired by Frank Miller and Lynn Varley's 1998 graphic novel, of which the infamous film was an adaptation. It's more likely a Whole Plot Reference to the 1962 film The 300 Spartans, which inspired Miller to write 300. And of course, all these works are based on the Real Life Battle of Thermopylae , which happened in 480 BC.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Very few characters recur, so there are a few of these. X9 spends his entire episode as the protagonist, and deconstructs What Measure Is a Mook?. The Princess and the Bounty hunters were also protagonists, and they spend their episode preparing to fight Jack. Imakandi, the hunting pack who were one of the few groups who bested Jack. Also, The Guardian of a Time Portal, who is the only person to best Jack in single combat.
  • Padding: The show is very slow-paced and often filled with long segments where very little happens (for example, the first minute and a half of "Jack versus Mad Jack" is just a bunch of bounty hunters playing the knife game, and it takes another minute for the main character to show up) or have prolonged shots of repeated animation. Of course this is usually seen as an example of Tropes Are Not Bad, as it helped give the show a unique cinematic style that has been well-received.
  • Periphery Demographic: Tartakovsky said outright that they went to make a show anyone could enjoy. It has aired on both Toonami and [adult swim], a block meant for adults. And now the show is being revived, but will be airing on Toonami... which is now airing on [adult swim] hours instead of regular Cartoon Network hours.
  • Spoiled by the Format: Averted hilariously in the second part of "Scotsman Saves Jack". A heated battle ensues with the sirens with about 10 minutes left of the episode. They defeat them in about 2. The rest of the episode is devoted to a set of competitions set by the Scotsman on who would row the boat to get off the island, since the pirates who brought them there left without them, despite Jack and the Scotsman saving their lives. See More Hero Than Thou in the main page.
  • Squick: The Reveal at the end of The Warrior Woman, even if it was obvious.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Come on, who else would've liked to see Ra himself take on Aku? Curb-Stomp Battle or not.
  • Woolseyism: Occurs occasionally in the Swedish dub. One memorable instance is with the announcer of the Dome of Doom. In the English original he states the line "Well, there you have it folks" in a somewhat disappointed tone. In the Swedish dub he states "Ja, så kan det gå"note  in a flabbergasted and excited tone, changing the context of the scene into something that suggests that whatever happened, it looked painful.
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?: The series is known for using heavy robotic gore, some swearing and sexual comments which is not usually shown in a Cartoon Network show (at least, not at the time).
    • The creator has acknowledged the freedom with Season 5 of the show being on [adult swim], but he knows full well how the show is also watched by kids then and now. It will be edgier, but not to a significant degree.

    Season 5 YMMV 
  • Accidental Innuendo: In the first episode, one of the first things Scaramouch tells Jack is to "whip it out" when referring to his sword.
  • All Adult Animation Is South Park: Averted. Despite the upgraded violence, this show's sense of humor is so far no more or less vulgar than it already was.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Is the mysterious samurai a real being that Jack may have faced at some point during the Time Skip or nothing more than a personification of Jack's guilt and shame that exists because he is dwelling on past mistakes and failures? Or, even worse, is it a manifestation of what Jack is afraid of eventually becoming: a servant of Aku?
    • Does the cult worshipping Aku truly believe that he's a good deity, or have they been brainwashed into believing that he is? Or do they know that Aku is evil and don't care?
    • Is "Inner Jack" the embodiment of Jack's doubt and despair, Mad Jack, or at least born from the same part of Jack's psyche as Mad Jack?
    • The Daughters of Aku dragging out their deceased sister and simply stating "Death is failure." A callous dismissal of someone close to them as a failure, or a Pet the Dog moment filtered through their warped morality? They did take the time to bring the body with them rather than leaving it in the rubble after all.
  • Angst? What Angst?: The Scotsman is rather jolly while rising as a ghost shortly after being scorched to death by Aku and in front of his daughters no less. Granted, if anything he's better off than before (brought back in his prime rather than a barely capable cripple, and his daughters can clearly see and interact with him).
  • Awesome Music:
    • Some of the music for the trailers counts as this, such as Carpenter Brut's "Hang 'Em All" from the main trailer and Lorn's "555-5555" for the teaser to Episode 3.
    • Tyler Bates' hauntingly beautiful "Ecstasy of Gold"-esque cue from the scene of Jack hiding in the tombs.
  • Base-Breaking Character: Ashi became this based on the amount of Character Focus she has, leading some to fear she's become a Spotlight-Stealing Squad. There is also a divide in the fanbase between those who wish for her and Jack to develop a father-daughter kind of bond, and those who ship them romantically.
  • Big Lipped Alligator Moment: In Episode XCVII, Demongo's cameo has absolutely no impact on the plot (which is a Continuity Cavalcade) and only seems to be included due to the character's status as an Ensemble Darkhorse.
  • Broken Base: When the third episode aired there became a split with the show's use of blood and gore. Some felt it was appropriate what with the show's newfound maturity and putting in more blood let the show heightened the stakes by showing Jack wounded. Others felt that the show is entering into the faux-maturity that plagues certain young adult media wherein the creators are trying too hard to be Darker and Edgier. A third group disregards the debate on maturity and argues that the blood worked with the striking stylized aesthetic of the show.
  • Cry for the Devil:
    • Not even an episode in, and many viewers feel genuinely bad for the Daughters of Aku. As vicious and dangerous as they are, they're ultimately just seven women who were raised from birth in horrible conditions (including being brutally beaten for the smallest slights by their own mother) to become the Tyke Bombs they are with zero choice in the matter. It says quite a lot that instead of being excited for their eventual battle with Jack fans actually dread it, not wanting either side to be hurt. And it only got worse in the second episode, in which Jack kills one of them, not knowing that it's a human being and not a machine until he does so. In the third episode, Jack kills off the rest of the Daughters (save one). Granted, he did give them a choice to give up their pursuit or to be eliminated.
    • After Episode 3 it got so bad that fans have actually called Jack a murderer, accusations that Jack himself actually ends up hallucinating in Episode 4. While he did give them a chance to leave, many would argue the daughters aren't of sound mind to actually be able to choose, in fact Jack's ultimatum is probably the first choice they ever had. That said, Jack would have no way of knowing that, and in actuality if someone is to be blamed for their deaths it falls squarely on the High Priestess.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: The Daughters of Aku are gaining a lot of sympathy from the fans who see them as tragic villains who've had no choice over their own fate.
  • Ensemble Darkhorse:
    • Scaramouch from the first episode, partly for being the comic relief to break up the heavy drama and tension for the rest of the episode, and for how his fight with Jack is the perfect blend of intense, creative and ridiculous. Suffice to say, a lot of people were happy when it turned out that he survived as a head.
    • There's a lot of fan art of the Emoji Family (this name was allegedly used by Genndy at Comic-Con) that Jack saves, despite them only appearing in the beginning few minutes of the first episode. Most agree that it's because of the way they communicate a la Atom Ant, it's pretty cute.
    • Surprisingly enough, the White Wolf that serves as a metaphor for Jack in "Episode XCIII" is rather well-liked, mostly because of how badass its fight scenes were. Some fans began to rejoice when it was revealed that not only was the wolf real, but it somehow survived.
    • The Scotsman's daughters got a lot of positive attention for how little time they got in their debut episode, all for being very attractive yet heroically built young women.
  • Evil Is Sexy: The 7 Daughters of Aku are beautiful, shapely female ninja warriors wearing skintight catsuits with tragic backstories and can actually give Jack the fight of his life. Naturally, this gained them a lot of fans before they actually appeared on the show.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: Jack's battle with the Daughters of Aku forces him to accept that Killing In Self Defense is justified. As his memories of his father's deadly encounter with a group of bandits drive home, everyone is ultimately responsible for their own choices and the ensuing consequences.
  • Fandom Rivalry: The fandom developed one with Rick and Morty within hours of the latter show airing its Season 3 Premiere. On any other day this would be fine, but as an April Fools' Day joke Adult Swim chose to air it unannounced on a loop until midnight, delaying Samurai Jack until next week. Needless to say, fans were less than thrilled.
  • Foe Yay: Scaramouch playfully calling Jack babe/baby throughout their fight along with his generally flamboyant demeanor caused quite a bit of this.
  • Growing the Beard: Not to say that the show wasn't already great before, but the revival takes it to new heights.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • Harsher in Hindsight: The Daughters of Aku sure are sexy with their skintight catsuits that look like it was painted on, right? Turns out it is painted on... or rather charred on after some rather extreme torture.
  • Internet Backdraft: As mentioned above, not a lot of fans were happy at Adult Swim for the April Fools prank they pulled by delaying the next episode ("XCV") in favor of airing Rick and Morty on a loop until midnight.
  • Jerkass Woobie: The main 7 Daughters of Aku were just girls who endured Training from Hell from their abusive mother so they could be raised as child soldiers who would kill a man they knew absolutely nothing about all for the sake of carrying on the Jerkass God Aku's revenge while having no lives of their own and just being living weapons.
  • Like You Would Really Do It:
    • Due to the fact that Ashi gets the most characterization out of the Daughters of Aku, very few doubted she actually died from the fall in Episode 3, especially since Jack was going to survive it. Indeed, she not only survived, but furthered her Character Development.
    • Episode 5 featured the Scotsman being reduced to nothing but ash less than two minutes after he appeared. However, due to the suspiciously short amount of screen time and his massive popularity with the fandom, it was quite easy to guess that he'd still be around in some form.
  • Memetic Loser: The 7 Daughters of Aku being hilariously curb stomped by Jack has people questioning, jokingly or not, if their training was even all that efficient.
  • Memetic Molester:
    • In S5 E4, a crab-like monster kidnaps Ashi while Jack's back is turned. One would think it just wants to eat her, but the way it whisked her off suggests it had other motives in mind.
    • In S5 E5, the Dominator kidnaps hundreds of alien children, drains them of their energy like batteries, and uses mind control to turn them into his enslaved minions. You can't be the only one who got a pedophile vibe off this guy.
  • Memetic Mutation: It seems like Genndy went an extra mile to make every scene of Season 5 as memorable as possible. With the addition of thousands of hyped fans over the Internet, every episode produces something that gets shared a lot.
    • GUN Explanation 
    • Many jokes have been made about the Daughters of Aku cult and their seeming ignorance of how easy Aku is to contact. Aku's seeming ignorance of their existence only makes it funnier.Explanation 
    • Case in point, the still shot of Jack carrying a kanabō has gotten a lot of edits.
    • The pose that Ashi strikes in S5 E4 has become quite popular.explanation 
    • He looked like a talking penis! Explanation 
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • The High Priestess crosses this line with severe prejudice in the way she raises the Daughters of Aku. She puts them through hellish, year-long training which entails her repeatedly demoralizing them, encouraging them to callously leave each other behind when hurt and almost killing them several times herself, having them viciously beaten by older cult members, and burning them alive.
    • Scaramouch crosses this as soon as he appears, casually mentioning that he massacred an entire village (men, women, and children) to draw out Jack from hiding.
    • The Dominator kidnapped an entire alien community's children so that he could, well, use them as an energy source. When Jack and Ashi came to their rescue, he uses mind control to make them attack Jack, knowing he'd be unwilling to fight innocent people against their will. And then he tried to torture and kill Ashi with several thousand volts of electricity.
  • Older Than They Think: The 2017 season is produced by Cartoon Network Studios... for airing on Toonami on [adult swim]. Shocking as it seems, this isn't the first show that Cartoon Network Studios has produced a season for that aired on [adult swim].
  • Shipping Goggles: Already, fans are starting to see Jack and Ashi growing into a couple thanks to him relentlessly saving her life out of the goodness in his heart and how she performed a Heel Realization thanks to his noble influence.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: People's beliefs of right and wrong cannot simply be changed, if they can be changed at all, simply by making them "see the light." It's something they have to come to terms with on their own. Ashi couldn't care less about Jack saving her life, as she values his death over it, and still wants to kill him once he brings both of them to safety. It isn't until she sees that he's equally kind to others and not only her that she starts questioning her beliefs.
  • Stoic Woobie: Jack has lost his idealism and grown into a nearly emotionless warrior who still carries on saving others despite his life falling apart and losing hope of ever returning to his home time. Whenever he's Not So Stoic you could expect the worst.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Some were disappointed that The Scotsman was killed off despite being a Handicapped Badass Grandpa who could've received a lot more character from his life experiences in war. True, he returns as a ghost, but still...
  • True Art Is Angsty: Much like another [adult swim] program's final season, this one is much darker and bleaker than the earlier ones and has so far received nothing but praise from critics, audiences, and fans who claim it to be an animated masterpiece and one of the best shows of 2017.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Advances in digital technology has been kind to this show and the more streamlined process has allowed for some incredible animation, especially any of the battles in the dark where the characters are illuminated with each blow, as well has a handful of chase sequences animated on ones. The ride on the water dragon in Episode XCVI is particularly beautiful.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: It has the same animation as the first four seasons, but in the second episode one of the characters gets their throat slit, a giant beast mauls a wolf with blood spilling everywhere, and Jack wants to commit ritual suicide. It's one of the biggest examples of Darker and Edgier and Bloodier and Gorier, as it was a TV-Y7 show upgraded to a TV-14 rating, and it airs on [adult swim].

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/SamuraiJack