Film / Back to the Future Part II

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Marty McFly: You're not gonna believe this, we gotta go back to 1955!
Doc Brown: I don't believe it!

Back to the Future Part II is the second part of the Back to the Future trilogy.

Picking up from the first movie, Doc Brown takes Marty and his girlfriend Jennifer to 2015 in an attempt to save his identical son from trouble. While successful in their plan, a series of complications involving a sports almanac from the future leads to the the elderly Biff Tannen stealing their DeLorean and making his young self rich, altering the present (i.e., 1985) into a dystopia where he is an all-powerful billionaire. Now Marty and Doc have to return to the 1955 school dance from the first movie and Set Right What Once Went Wrong, whilst remaining unseen lest he cause a Time Paradox. But fixing the time-stream and getting home won't be easy...


This film provides examples of:

  • Abusive Parents: Biff-A is really abusive, not just to Lorraine, but also to Marty. Lorraine's line "They must have hit you over the head hard this time..." after Biff's tirade implies that Marty-A gets hit over the head a lot.
    • Not to mention that Biff-A has no qualms about shooting Marty once he reveals he knows about the sports almanac.
  • Added Alliterative Appeal: "The pitfalls, the possibilities, the perils, and the promise..."
  • All Bikers Are Hells Angels: In 1985-A there is a biker gang in the square outside the casino.
  • All There in the Manual: The reason our real life 2015 doesn't have Mr Fusion, Self-Lacing Sneakers and Hoverboards, according to the 30th anniversary boxed set, is that the items would have brought on an apocalypse in 2045, so Doc removed them from the time stream.
  • All There in the Script: When elderly 2015 Biff came back from 1955, he shown bending over in pain. The rest of the scene, which was edited out, has him disappearing. Word of God says that Lorraine shot and killed him in the mid 1990's.
  • Alternate History: 1985-A. Not only did Biff change the history of Hill Valley for the worse, he also changed world history by helping Richard Nixon remain president for more than a decade, making the The Vietnam War last longer.
  • Ambiguous Syntax: Played for Laughs: When the two female cops take '85 Jennifer to her 2015 home, they tell her, "And be careful in the future." What they meant, of course, was "Be careful from now on", but Jennifer took it literally, as in, "Be careful in this future world we live in."
  • And This Is For...: Biff says "This one's for my car!" when kicking Marty.
  • And Your Little Dog, Too!: Biff-A to Lorraine-A, in 1985-A, threatens to put Dave and Marty in jail if she walks away from him, just like jailbird Joey (who apparently is the one thing in the timeline that hasn't changed).
  • Angry Black Man: The dad of the family living in Marty's house in the alternate 1985. To be fair, he did catch Marty breaking into his daughter's room, so the anger was justified. His wielding a bat made him into a Scary Black Man.
  • Apocalypse How: Several potential paradoxes in this film could destroy the entire universe, which would be a Class X-4, worst-scenario. (The effect might actually be localized to their own galaxy, which is a Class X-3.) Then again it could be a Red Herring, as several characters do meet their past/future selves and the worst that happened was that they both passed out from shock.
  • The Apunkalypse: Not directly employed, but the inspiration behind Griff's gang in the future.
  • The Artifact: The picture of Buford Tannen from the museum video was an early makeup test, which is why he looks different than when we finally see him in Part III (Buford is pictured with a Beard of Evil instead of a mustache). Word of God said that if they had the time, they would have replaced that picture with one featuring his final look.
  • Artificial Outdoors Display: In 2015, the McFly home has a window with a view of a pleasant sunny meadow. It turns out that the view is artificial, and is projected onto a Venetian blind which is pulled down over the real glass window in order to hide the view of the urban sprawl.
  • Ascended Extra: Biff's 1955 gang plays a bigger part. In 1985-A, we see they're still with Biff, and in 1955, they chase Marty into the gym while his other self in the original movie is playing. Because they mistake that Marty for this film's Marty, he has to stop them from attacking his earlier self.
  • Ascended Fridge Horror: If you look carefully at the USA Today issue, you see a reference to the "Thumb Bandit". Recall that people make transactions with their thumbprints. A criminal who steals people's identity by chopping off their thumbs? Word of God confirms that this, in fact, the case.
  • As Long as It Sounds Foreign: 2015 Marty works for a "Mr. Fujitsu"; "Fujitsu" is the name of a Japanese company, but it's short for "Fuji Telecommunications Equipment Manufacturing"note , not a surname. Bob Gale remarks on this screw-up in the DVD commentary, and says that it would be like calling somebody "Mr. General Motors."
  • As You Know:
    • Played with cleverly; Griff's gang drops a piece of exposition as something they expected Marty Jr. to know, but young Marty Sr. doesn't.
    Data: Hey McFly, you bojo! Those boards don't work on water!
    Whitey: Unless you got POWAH!
    • Later on in the movie, when it's revealed that the 1985-timeline has been altered, it's revealed that Biff has become insanely rich through the almanac 2015-Biff gave him and addition to that, he has married Lorraine after murdering George McFly. Marty asks Lorraine what has happened to George and the world, to which she excuses his behavior that "they must have hit your head hard this time", which implies that he should know where George have gone. She answers anyway that he's dead.
  • Ax-Crazy: Griff's got "a few short circuits in his bionic implants", which apparently ties in with how, more than any of the Biffs running around, he comes across as downright psycho.
  • Bad Present: 1985-A. Hill Valley was reduced to the armpit of the west coast, and as mentioned above, Biff's political clout kept Richard Nixon in office for at least fifteen years. It's so bad that Doc Brown says that hell couldn't be much worse.
  • Balls of Steel: There is a clang when Marty punches Griff in the groin. Subverted in that he feels the blow.
  • Batter Up:
    • A self-telescoping baseball bat is Griff Tannen's weapon of choice. He even says the trope name before attacking Marty with it.
    • When Marty returns home in 1985-A, he discovers that his family doesn't live there in this timeline. Since a different family now lives there, his room is now occupied by a young girl; her father rushes in, wielding a baseball bat, and forces Marty to escape.
  • Berserk Button:
    • Don't call Marty chicken.
  • Big Bad: With Doc's improvements making time travel easier, Biff graduates from antagonist into Big Bad with his villainesque alteration of the timeline.
  • Big "NO!": Marty after finding out that Biff-A married Lorraine-A.
  • Big, Screwed-Up Family:
    • The McFlys. Grandma Lorraine and Grandpa George can only shake their heads in bewilderment, inverting the plot of the first movie.
    • The Baines-McFlys-Tannens-A's also count, but counting them as just "screwed-up" is a nice way of looking at their current situation.
  • Big "YES!": Marty when he thinks he got his hands on Grey's Sports Almanac from Mr. Strickland's trash can in 1955, only to find out by opening the contents of the book that it was actually Oh-La-La! with the sports almanac cover over it.
  • Binocular Shot: When Marty uses binoculars to spy on the Tannen's house, at the dance in 1955, and when the DeLorean is flying above Biff's car.
  • Biting-the-Hand Humor: "Shark still looks fake." Also doubles as Take That, Us since Steven Spielberg was the executive producer for the series, and his son Max Spielberg directed Jaws 19.
  • Book and Switch: Biff hides a girly magazine inside the dust jacket of the sports almanac, which Marty mistakes for the real thing. An earlier scene in 2015 established the dust jacket for the purpose of this scene.
  • Breast Expansion: Lorraine-A was forced by Biff to get breast implants. Even Marty is alarmed.
    You're so... big!
    • Also, one of the six channels that Marty Jr. is watching in 2015 has a commercial for inflatable breast implants.
  • Briefcase Full of Money: Upon returning to 1955, Doc unveils a silver attaché case full of emergency funds. It contains different denominations from various time periods.
  • Broken Bird: Lorraine-A is a shattered woman, trapped in an abusive/loveless marriage to Biff, staying with him only so that her children can live in relative comfort.
  • Call-Back: In Part 1, Marty tells 1955 Doc something along the lines about how weathermen can't actually predict the weather. By 2015, Doc remarks that the rainstorm ended right on the tick, and that it's a shame that the post office isn't as efficient as the weather service.
    • Further, towards the end of the movie, Western Union delivers 1885 Doc's letter to Marty immediately after the DeLorean was hit by lightning.
  • Can't Get Away with Nuthin': It takes only a few seconds, about four to eight, for Future Marty's boss to call him, lay into him, and send him the "YOU'RE FIRED!!!" faxes after Marty engages in an illegal business deal with Needles (the boss, Mr. Fujitsu, was watching for the scan the whole time).
  • Captain Obvious: "All I have to do is bet on the winner, and I'll never lose." Of course, this is completely in character for Biff to say.
    • The "Wallet Guy".
  • Cassette Futurism: The store is an in-universe example.
  • Celebrity Paradox: Cafe '80s in 2015 shows '80s TV shows, including Family Ties (starring Michael J. Fox) and Taxi (starring Christopher Lloyd).
    • A subtle one when USA Today released a defictionalized front page article closely resembles to the one shown in the movie, an article about a movie adaptation of A Match Made In Space, based on George McFly's novel is going to be directed by Robert Zemeckis and casts Christopher Lloyd to be part of it.
  • Chalk Outline: In 1985-A, Marty comes across the outlines of two drive-by shooting victims — complete with puddles of blood on the ground — shortly after he is chased out of his 1985 house by the family that resides there in this timeline.
  • Chekhov's Gun
    • In 1985, Biff tries to give Marty a new matchbook for his company when Marty leaves. Later, in 1985-A, Marty takes a matchbox from Biff-A's office, and after destroying Grey's Sports Almanac, he sees its writing change from "Pleasure Paradise" to "Auto Detailing".
    • Did you remember that truck that almost stomped Marty when he was fighting in the tunnel with Biff for the Almanac on his hover-board? Yes, it's the manure truck that Biff would crash with later on.
  • Chekhov's Gunman: Buford Tannen, the Big Bad of Part III, is first shown in the Biff Tannen Museum biographical video.
  • *Click* Hello: Mr. Strickland thinks Marty's the son-of-a-bitch who's been stealing his newspapers from his porch.
  • Concealing Canvas: In Biff-A's office.
  • Contrived Coincidence: Lampshaded by Doc, who ponders why Old Biff chose November 12, 1955 to return, the same day that Marty went there and the night of the storm. He wonders if there's some cosmic significance to the date - or if was all just one huge coincidence.
    • It's possible that Old Biff chose that particular date because of the football game he shows Young Biff, given that it was a very close call. If Old Biff had called the answers to a game where one side won by a huge margin, Young Biff would say it was just a lucky guess.
  • Cool Car: Several from the first movie re-appear. However, a couple of the 2015 cars also double as a Shout-Out.
    • The Star Car from The Last Starfighter is parked on the street during the hoverboard chase.
    • Two Spinners from Blade Runner can be seen (a black one during the hoverboard chase and one in Hilldale).
    • The majority of the cars seen are either concept/prototypes (Pontiac Banshee IV, Pontiac Fiero, Oldsmobile Aerotech II), specialty/Kit Cars (Gene Winfield's Strip Star, Owosso Pulse), or then-new, available cars (Ford Probe, Ford Mustang) with extensive body modifications.
    • The flying taxicab Biff uses to get to Hilldale is a Citroën DS, a car which was introduced in 1955.
  • CPR: Clean, Pretty, Reliable: Subverted — Biff comes to just as someone (named "CPR Kid" in the credits) asks, "What's CPR?", and Marty knocks Biff out again. Amusingly, the "Universal Animated Anecdotes" included in the DVD had to clarify that CPR does not mean punching someone in the face.
    From the Actual DVD Commentary: No, kids, that's not CPR.
  • Crapsack World: "Hell Valley" indeed.
  • Cue the Rain: It starts raining soon after lightning strikes the time machine and Marty is left stranded in the past again. Justified, of course, because this is the same storm that played a role in sending Marty back to the future in the first film, and there were all sorts of signs of a storm brewing the whole time anyway.
  • Curse Cut Short: During Marty's confrontation with Biff on the rooftop in 1985-A, Marty says "You son of a...", but is cut off when Biff cocks his gun at him.
  • Cyber Punk: Defied. According to the behind-the-scenes featurette, Robert Zemeckis intended the future he wrote to be a counterpoint to the darker dystopian visions of cyberpunk, Blade Runner in particular. Hill Valley really is "a nice place to live" in 2015; technology seems to make life better instead of worse, and the police don't seem overly concerned for their own safety even in the rough neighborhood of Hilldale. That said, apparently no lawyers in 2015.
  • Dark Action Girl: Leslie "Spike" O'Malley in 2015. She's every bit as tough, vicious and nasty as any male member of any Tannen gang.
  • Darker and Edgier: Compared to Part I.
  • Darkest Hour: Often cited as the darkest movie in the trilogy, since Biff "wins" in alternate 1985 and it's up to Doc and Marty to fix the timeline.
  • Determinator: Western Union. Upon receiving a letter in 1885 with specific instructions to deliver it to somebody not yet born, at a spot in the middle of nowhere, the company sees to it that a representative is on that spot, with that 70-year-old letter. How much of a delivery fee did Doc pay?!
  • Disproportionate Retribution:
  • Domestic Abuse: To no one's surprise, Alternate Universe-Biff is a philanderer who's grown bored of Lorraine, keeping her around only as a Trophy Wife and a symbol of his victory over George. Marty goes berserk when Biff shoves her to the ground, earning a punch in the gut. That's right, Biff even slugs his step-children.
  • The Door Slams You: Marty does this to himself at the school dance.
  • Dope Slap: Old Biff dope-slaps Young Biff for mangling a joke after giving him the Gray's Sports Almanac. And no, they don't explode (specially since Young Biff is too stupid to recognize himself).
    Young Biff: Why don't you make like a tree and get out of here?
    Old Biff: (whap!) It's "LEAVE", you idiot! Make like a TREE and LEAVE. You sound like a damned FOOL when you say it wrong!
    Young Biff: ALRIGHT THEN, LEAVE!!
  • Double Take:
    • Jennifer does one when she lays eyes on the 47-year-old, drastically different Marty from the closet she's hiding in.
      • A double-double take (quadruple take?) when Old and Young Jennifer meet. Each look at the other, go back to entering/leaving the house, then whip around and stare at each other a few moments, before throwing their hands up and screaming "I'm old!/I'm young!" and passing out. In opposite directions, of course.
    • While driving his car, Biff distractedly looks to the side, but doesn't react immediately at the sight of Marty trying to steal the Gray's Sports Almanac.
  • Dramatic Irony: In alternate 1985, it is established that Lorraine ends up marrying the obscenely rich Biff. Earlier in 1955, when Biff torments Lorraine, she responds, "Biff Tannen, I wouldn't be your girl even if — even if you had a million dollars!"
  • Droste Image: Biff in his office, standing in front of a painting portraying him in a similar pose.
  • Drowning My Sorrows: Lorraine-A is a bigger alcoholic than in the first 1985 from the first film.
  • Drunk with Power: The first film established Biff as a petty schoolyard bully who would continue to be so in his adult life in one timeline, or would become relatively harmless if a little sneaky in a better timeline. This film reveals how Biff would become an absolute monster if he had access to real wealth and power, even happily committing murder and getting away with it.
  • Easily Forgiven: When Doc explained that the whole alternate 1985 was caused by the Sports Almanac, Marty had a "It's All My Fault" crisis. Doc did not blame him; he preferred to focus all their attention on fixing things immediately.
  • The Easy Way or the Hard Way: Directly quoted when Marty gets knocked out by Biff's gang.
    (WHACK!) "The easy way."
  • Equal-Opportunity Evil: While Biff has a "white guys only" rule in 1955, as did his great-grandfather Buford in 1885, Griff Tannen's cybernetically-enhanced teenage gang includes at least one Asian and a blonde girl.
  • Eureka Moment: After realizing all he did was find Biff's dirty magazine in Strickland's office (and that Biff still had the Almanac), Marty talks to Doc on the walkie talkie that he has no idea what to do now... only to hear the sound of a certain struggle going on in the parking lot.
    Marty: OF COURSE! (to Doc) I gotta go, I got one chance, my old man is about to deck Biff!
  • Evil Lawyer Joke: “The justice system works swiftly in the future now that they’ve abolished all lawyers.”
  • Evil Sounds Deep: Or, rather, electronic in the case of Griff.
  • Evil Tower of Ominousness: Alt-Biff converted Hill Valley's historic courthouse into a gaudy testament to his own penis — er, wealth and prestige.
  • Exact Eavesdropping: Marty and Doc have the misfortune of being stalked and heard by Biff during their argument about time travel for profit.
  • Failed a Spot Check:
    • During the exchange between Griff's gang and both Marty and Marty Jr., after Marty Jr. is thrown over the counter and lands on the floor next to our Marty, Marty tells him to keep quiet rather than say he's in on Griff's opportunity, then puts on Jr.'s hat and stands up. Somehow, Griff must be too thick-headed to notice that Marty visibly has a red t-shirt underneath his jacket, whereas Marty Jr. has a white shirt, or the fact that Marty Jr.'s left sleeve is ill-fitting, unlike Marty's. Not to mention that his eye color changed from brown to blue, and Marty Jr. seemed to be wearing some sort of hair gel while Marty wasn't.
    • The multiple times that people should be seeing two versions of Marty or Doc. Biff's gang in 1985-A should see a Marty on stage and in the opposite wings, and Doc literally meets himself. At least Doc's a little absent-minded.
    • Biff repeatedly fails to notice Marty hiding in the back seat of his car, particularly when Marty is loudly talking to Doc on the walkie-talkie while Biff is driving.
  • Fake Shemp: Word of Bob Gale says that Crispin Glover got an ego and started making outlandish demands for his return in the sequels. Gale and Zemeckis decided to forget Glover and get creative by using a double actor and some nifty tricks with stock footage and computer effects. It backfired on the producers and Glover sued. The suit was settled out of court and the Screen Actors Guild revised their rules on stock footage use. It should be noted that Glover is still listed in the film's credits as "George McFly in footage from Back to the Future".
  • Fan Disservice: Lorraine in 1985-A has breast implants and a cleavage-revealing top...because her abusive husband Biff made her get the former and it's quite likely he makes her wear the latter.
  • Five-Token Band: Griff's gang includes a blonde girl and an Asian guy, whereas the other Tannens in the series (Biff and Buford) have gangs composed exclusively of white males. Perhaps the filmmakers assumed there would be more diversity in the future.
  • Flying Car: The DeLorean flies in this movie.
  • Forced Perspective: The Lyon Estates site, and the tunnel.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • When the "DESTINATION TIME" readout on the time circuits flash to "JAN 01 1885 12:00AM" and Doc remarks "Damn, gotta fix this thing." By the time Marty catches up with Doc in the third part of the trilogy, he had already been there for nine months.
    • As Doc is punching in the "Destination Time" of October 26, 1985, 9:00PM to return the group from 2015 to their home time, if you look quickly at the "Time Recently Departed" field, you'll see the date of "November 12, 1955", hinting at the Time Machine's theft by Old!Biff Tannen.
    • Biff-A is watching A Fistful of Dollars, and crows when Clint Eastwood showed he was wearing a stovetop under his poncho, "A bulletproof vest! The guy is brilliant!" Guess how the showdown in III is resolved? Also doubles as a Call-Back to how Doc saved himself from the Libyans' attack in the first movie.
    • Doc tells Marty that his visit to the rejuvenation clinic "added a good 30-40 years" to his life; Word of God said this ensured he could start a family with Clara and be around long enough to see their sons grow up in Part III.
    • Doc tells Marty that telling the police they were time travelers in order to save Jennifer would get them committed. Guess what Doc's fate is in 1985-A?
    • It's blurry, but when Strickland is thumbing through what is supposedly Grey's Sports Almanac after taking it from Biff, you can see pictures... of women.
    • Spread out over two movies, but near the end, when Marty proposes that Doc lands the DeLorean on top of Biff's car to stop him, Doc comments on how fragile it is compared to Biff's car; "It'd rip through us like tin foil." Part 3 shows that Doc is not exaggerating; the Delorean is struck by an oncoming train and is completely obliterated.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: Many of the examples listed under "foreshadowing" count, but there's a subtle one in that when Marty wears clothes exactly like his future son, he has a red shirt on under the jacket, but when his son gets to the Cafe 80s, he has a white shirt. None of the characters in-universe seem to notice this discrepancy when they switch.
  • Future Imperfect: Deliberately invoked with the '80s-themed diner; the aesthetic mashes together major icons of '80s pop culture like Max Headroom and Ronald Reagan.
  • Future Loser: Marty in the unchanged future due to a car accident with a Rolls-Royce he had no sooner then getting home from the first movie. He wound up busting his hand, ending his music career and was forced to pay for damages leading to Marty being stuck in a dead-end job, Jennifer marrying him out of pity and in a cheap chapel and later on getting fired when his bosses monitor his calls and find he was in an illegal transaction. 1985 Marty never finds this out; it's Jennifer who does after she's brought to their house after being mistaken for the 2015 one.
  • Future Slang: It's actually weird how you wouldn't be surprised if actual teens from the 2010s actually used many of the words, with the rise of nonsense words and terms that have come to existence in the decade.
    Spike: What's wrong, McFly? You got no scrote?

    Whitey: Hey McFly, you bojo, those boards don't work on water!

    Police officer: Hilldale, nothing but a breeding ground for tranks, lobos, and zipheads.

    Marty Jr.: Don't drive tranq'd, low-res scuzzball!
  • Future Spandex: 2015 fashion tends toward the "unbelievably silly" version of this trope. Marty does a Double Take seeing one girl wearing spandex leave the Cafe 80s.
  • Futuristic Superhighway: The movie begins with Doc, Marty, and Jennifer arriving in the year 2015 inadvertently flying against traffic on a highway specifically designed for Flying Cars.
  • Gag Boobs: Judging from one of the commercials, women in 2015 can modify their breasts to expand or deflate at will, even use them as dual flashlights, should they purchase the necessary cybernetics.
  • Gangland Drive-By: In 1985-A, a truckload of gang members shoot up Strickland's house. Strickland responds with a shotgun.
    Strickland: Eat lead, SLACKERS!
  • Genre Blindness: In retrospect, 1985-A Biff should've pulled out his pistol and shot Marty the minute he mentioned the Almanac instead of going through a Just Between You and Me.
  • Gilligan Cut: Marty needs to get some Fifties clothes:
    Doc: Something inconspicuous!
    (Cuts to Marty outside Biff's house, wearing a not-so-inconspicuous leather jacket, hat, and shades)
  • Groin Attack:
    Spike: What's wrong, McFly? (shoves a long and razor sharp nail between McFly's trousers) Ya got no scrote!?!?
  • Guess Who I'm Marrying?: We don't actually see when Lorraine-A tells her kids who she is going to marry in 1973-A, but the reaction of the Marty from our timeline fits the bill.
  • Half-Identical Twins: Marty Jr. and Marlene, possibly. Some scripts have both children mentioned as being 17, and both were played by Michael J. Fox — so they're commonly believed to be fraternal twins.
  • Hand Wave: Christopher Lloyd didn't want to put on the "1985 Doc" make-up for the two sequels, so they made an in-universe explanation for a slightly younger looking Doc: He had extensive plastic surgery and organ replacements in 2015. They also replaced his spleen and colon.
  • Help Yourself in the Future: Inverted: Marty has to stop Biff's gang from attacking his first film's counterpart during "Johnny B. Goode".
  • Heroic B.S.O.D.:
    • Doc at the end, when all of the implications of Marty's return from the future hit him. He faints.
    • Marty also has one when he finds out that his dad was murdered in the alternate timeline - and that it's basically his fault, because Biff stole the almanac that Marty bought in 2015 after finding out about the time machine.
  • Hesitation Equals Dishonesty: At the end of the first film, Doc lies about Marty and Jennifer not being "assholes in the future." When the scene was reshot for the start of the second film, Doc hesitates before answering their question.
    • He didn't so much lie in the first film, it's that there were no plans for a sequel at the time. So this was a minor Retcon.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: When future Biff gets back to 2015 from the past, he hits himself in the chest with his cane while getting out of the DeLorean, and apparently dies. Word of God is that this was because in the bad future that was created after Biff gave himself the Sports Almanac, he gets shot by Lorraine sometime in the 1990s; Biff's collapse was supposed to be the beginning of the altered past causing him to fade out of existence.
  • Hold Your Hippogriffs: "Hey, McFly, your shoe's unvelcked!" (loose — think "Velcro")!
  • Hologram: Marty McFly is attacked by a holographic shark advertising Jaws 19 playing at a holographic movie house in Hill Valley of 2015.
  • Hypocritical Humor: "Just get in the car, butthead." "Who're you callin' butthead, butthead?"
  • I Hate Past Me: Old Biff isn't all that thrilled to be giving anything to the idiotic, amoral, young Biff, but is willing to do so because then he'll be rich in the future.
  • I Have to Wash My Hair: Said by Lorraine in 1955 when Biff "invites" her to the dance with him in an attempt to get him to stop harassing her.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy:
    • A convertible full of gangsters emptying their rifles at Strickland's home, reducing it to a two-story block of Swiss cheese, and they manage to completely miss both Strickland and a cowering Marty.
    • Biff-A firing at Marty in his suite has tastes of this as well.
  • Improvised Weapon:
    • Lorraine communicates her distaste for Biff by clocking him with the box carrying her prom dress before running away with her friend as Biff shouts after her that she'll be his wife one day. That must be some hefty dress.
    • When confronted by Biff in 1985-A, Marty grabs a matchbox tray that conveniently has sharp metal triangles facing outwards along its edge and throws it at Biff like a Frisbee, forcing him to duck as it embeds itself into the back of his chair.
    • The Frisbee attack is later recalled in the third movie, with Marty throwing a pie tin at Biff's ancestor, Buford.
  • In Spite of a Nail: The only things that have been confirmed not to have been changed in the 1985-A timeline are that Michael Jackson still becomes a famous pop star, A Fistful of Dollars still gets made, the Wounded Knee Occupation still takes place, and Lorraine's brother Joey still turns out to be a jailbird.
  • Insult to Rocks: Marty comparing 1985-A with Hell. Doc retorts he's not giving Hell enough credit.
  • I Own This Town: A filthy rich Biff has corrupted Hell Valley and is now its overlord.
    Biff: Kid, I own the police!
  • I Remember It Like It Was Yesterday: Marty, when he returns to 1955. Doc mentions that he was there yesterday. From the time Marty left 1955 at the climax of Part I (arriving on October 26, 1985, 1:24AM), to the time he returns with Doc to 1955 in the middle of Part II (leaving 1985-A at around October 27, 1985, 2:00AM), is a real-time passage of about 24 hours. And of course, another Marty had been there yesterday. And about five more days before that.
  • It's All My Fault: Said by Marty when he realizes Biff stole the almanac.
  • I Want My Jetpack: Hover-boards, holographic movie posters, auto-adjusting clothes, ubiquitous robots, dehydrated pizza, weather reports accurate to the minute, commercially available fusion reactors small enough to power car, flying cars in such numbers to cause traffic jams. October 21, 2015 came and went and none of these things were available.
    • Nike did make a limited line of self-lacing shoes, and all money paid for went to Fox's Parkinson's foundation.
  • Jaded Washout: 2015 Marty Sr. is a sour salaryman who gave up his guitar dreams when he injured his hand and was targeted with a lawsuit after a car accident. Driven home by him busting out his guitar after being fired and strumming a few chords — he's not rock-star level, but he plays decently. It's likely he gave up more out of lack of confidence than the hand being a serious problem.
  • Japan Takes Over the World: 2015 was partly based on the assumption that the Japanese economy would have overtaken the US one by the early 21st Century.
  • Just Between You and Me: Biff-A tells Marty the circumstances of how he received the Almanac, then pulls out a pistol mentioning that his older self told him to kill anyone who ever asked about it.
  • Karma Houdini: It's left ambiguous whether Needles gets reprimanded for deceiving Marty into performing the illegal scan in 2015.
  • Kavorka Man: The hotel's museum includes a slideshow of Biff's past conquests — which include the biggest pin-up gals of the day — each with Biff making sleazy Night at the Roxbury faces to the camera.
  • A Lady on Each Arm: In the alternate timeline, the wealthy and corrupt Biff Tannen (who, by the way, forced Lorraine to marry him after he murdered her husband) is seen in his private quarters lounging in a hot tub with his arms wrapped around two ladies, watching a Clint Eastwood film.
  • Lightning Can Do Anything: A lightning strike sends the DeLorean—with Doc inside—back to 1885, without the DeLorean having to hit the requisite 88 mph.
    • According to the commentary, the idea was that the lightning strike spun the DeLorean on its axis fast enough to hit 88, which is why the fire trails are in a circular nine-esque shape rather than the traditional parallel lines.
  • Male Gaze: While trying to keep track of Marty, Jr. through some Star Wars-esque binoculars, Doc Brown's line of vision constantly shifts to the very busty women that passed by him. Although this may just be the auto focus feature of the binoculars, the trope still applies on a meta level.
    • Marty does a double take as a rather attractive woman exits the Cafe 80s as he is entering.
    • He also keeps looking down at his mother's enhanced boobs in alternate 1985, although this is more shock and disbelief than titillation.
  • Manly Tears: Marty when he finds his father's grave in the alternative 1985 timeline. Thankfully things turn out differently in the end.
  • Married in the Future: Doc takes Marty and Jennifer into the future where she sees their future home and kids, but everything else sucks. In Part III, however, Marty manages to avert the event that led to that timeline.
  • Mean Boss: Ito T. "Jitz" Fujitsu. In fairness, he had good reason for firing Marty Sr., but he made no indication of coming down as hard on Needlesnote .
  • Meaningful Echo: The confrontation between Marty and Biff in the tunnel, with Marty trying to use his hover-board to outrun Biff's car, then being pulled up by Doc with a kite string just as Biff gets to him, causing Biff to crash into a manure truck, is practically a repeat of the confrontation between Marty and Griff's gang in 2015.
  • Megacorp: Biffco.
  • Money to Burn: Biff's image is depicted on the front of his casino doing this.
  • Mood Whiplash: Going from the bright, lively Hill Valley of 2015 to the dark, terrifying "Hell" Valley of 1985-A.
  • Mordor: 1985-A is a smoggy futuristic Mordor. Marty's neighborhood looks more or less the same (only shabbier, with the Lyon Estates lion statues being defaced with graffiti, and a pack of stray dogs roaming around), but smokestacks are visible everywhere else, including the graveyard.
  • More Dakka: The police in 1985-A keep what tenuous order they can by being armed with automatic rifles and patrolling in an Armored Personnel Carrier.
  • Mundane Utility: The DeLorean is at its most useful for purposes other than time travel in this movie after Doc had a hover conversion job done on it. Its ability to fly comes in most useful in time periods where there are no other flying cars, such as rescuing Marty from nearly meeting his father's fate in 1985-A, or in their effort to swipe the Almanac from Biff in 1955.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Marty after realizing that the entire future has changed for the worse due to his idea of using the almanac for selfish purposes.
  • Never the Selves Shall Meet: Doc explicitly warns Marty to be careful in following Biff to get the Sports Almanac back that he must not be noticed or interact with his previous self.
  • Newspaper Dating: Marty performs it again when in 1985-A. Lampshaded by Strickland: "So you're the son-of-a-bitch who keeps stealing my newspapers!"
  • The New '10s: A good chunk of the movie takes place here.
  • Nice Hat: Marty and Doc get nice hats past the movie's second half.
    • Heck, Marty gets a pretty nice hat just to imitate his own son.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: Really, everything that happens after 2015 in the franchise is Marty's fault. His greedy scheme to use the almanac to make himself rich started the whole mess.
    • All the cheating that Biff did to win would have been done by Marty himself if the didn't lose the almanac. Who knows, it may have turned Marty into the same kind of creep.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed:
    • Word of God says the 1985-A Biff was inspired by Donald Trump. The portrait from Biff's office is even based on an actual Trump portrait.
      • Now that Trump's President, one wonders if Real Life didn't follow the future of 1985-A. We never did see what 2015-A would look like, so …
    • 1985-A Lorraine was modeled after various female televangelists of the 80s, particularly Tammy Fae Meissner (aka Tammy Fae Bakker).
  • No Doubt The Years Have Changed Me: Parodied with Doc in 2015. Played straight with Lorraine in 1985-A, who looks radically different from her 1973-A self, when she was shown marrying Biff.
  • No-Paper Future: Averted, at least in the case of "YOU'RE FIRED!!!" faxes and "dust-repellent paper".
  • Notably Quick Deliberation: It's mentioned in passing that Marty's son was tried, convicted and sentenced within a mere two hours of his arrest. Doc Brown explains that the criminal justice system is much more efficient since the abolition of lawyers.
  • Not So Great Escape: Marty finds himself trapped in Strickland's office while trying to retrieve the almanac and has to desperately hide beneath the desk and in other spots to avoid being discovered, including getting his hand crushed by Strickland's chair.
  • Off to Boarding School: The Marty of 1985-A was put by Biff in a Swiss boarding school.
  • Oh, Crap!:
    • Griff, already as imposing as his father at his age, starts to get bigger as his cybernetics kick in. Marty looks a little worried.
    • Marty's understandable reaction when a very furious bat-wielding father pursues him in 1985A.
    • Marty, when he realizes Biff-A is going to shoot him for knowing too much.
    • Biff-A's reaction to seeing Marty standing on the flying DeLorean.
    • This is Jennifer's reaction to pretty much the whole time she trapped is in her future home, trying not to be seen. Her biggest one comes from coming face-to-face with her 47-year-old self, causing BOTH of them to faint.
    • When Marty learns that Griff is actually Griff Tannen, Biff's grandson.
    • Marty's horrorstruck reaction when he sees not only what has happened to his home in the alternate timeline, but perhaps even worse when he realizes that Biff has married his mother.
  • Oppressive States of America: Besides Biff running Hill Valley of 1985-A like his own personal kingdom, there's news of Richard Nixon going on his fifth term as President of the United States (meaning Biff's influence got the 22nd Amendment overturned), and (in the novelization) the Vietnam War still being waged in the 1980s.
  • Paid Harem: Biff-A's got buxom blondes in the hot tub in 1985-A.
  • Papa Wolf: See the Angry Black Man example above.
  • Plot Hole: As with many time travel movies, this film has quite a few:
    • No one ever bothers to mention that by changing Marty and Doc's 1985 timeline (Marty ends up in a boarding school, Doc ends up in a mental hospital) there's no way that they could have gone to 2015 and given old Biff access to the time machine in the first place.
      • In the comic, Doc himself realizes after visiting his lobotomized 1985-A counterpart that the new timeline is a massive Temporal Paradox waiting to happen.
    • Building on this, as old Biff goes back and changes his own past, he would have ended up in an alternate timeline once he went to 2015 again. Instead, he ends up back in the exact same future he came from, and history changes first when Doc and Marty go back to 1985 again, which makes no logical sense.
      • He simply arrives to 2015 before the changes he caused begin to overtake that year.
  • Police Are Useless: In 1985-A; somewhat justified as Biff has used his wealth to take control of Hill Valley, where the police department is corrupt and answers mostly to Biff in a city that under his watch has become an almost literal hellhole.
  • Pre-emptive Declaration: Doc and Marty watch the newspaper article about Marty Jr.'s arrest, headlined, "Youth Jailed: Martin McFly Jr. Arrested For Theft" change to the headline, "Gang Jailed: Hover-board Rampage Destroys Courthouse. Gang Leader: 'I WAS FRAMED'", under a photo of Griff being taken to a police car in handcuffs. Doc looks up and sees Griff being perp-walked down the courthouse steps to a police car in handcuffs as a USA Today camera is lowered from the sky. Griff shouts, "I WAS FRAMED!" at which point the camera snaps his picture.
  • Prince Charming Wannabe: Again, Biff with Lorraine in 1955.
  • Punctuated! For! Emphasis!:
    • "Read. My. Fax!"
    • "Gray's. Sports. Almanac!"
  • Revealing Reflection: While trying to get the almanac from Biff's car, Marty begins creeping up along the driver's side on his hoverboard, but Biff sees him in the side mirror and is ready when he gets close enough.
  • Revolvers Are Just Better: Biff's snub revolver. Handy for silencing environmental activists, popular sci-fi authors whose wives you covet, and meddling kids who know too much.
  • Ridiculous Future Inflation: A single-serving bottle of Pepsi costs about $50 in 2015.
  • Ridiculous Future Sequelisation: A holographic advertisement for Jaws 19, directed by Max Spielberg, with the tagline: "This time it's really, really personal." All Marty has to say is, "The shark still looks fake." Well, to be fair, the very first thing he has to say is, "AAAAAAAAHHHH!"
    • Jaws 6 was made for pure pleasure, Jaws 7 and Jaws 8 featured Cyber Jaws and Robo Jaws respectively, Jaws 9 has the grandson of Chief Brody assemble an elite team to fight sharks, Jaws 11 goes to outer space and Jaws 15 sees the shark battling a Russian shark adversary - to name a few.
  • Rooftop Confrontation: Biff vs. Marty on the top of the casino.
  • Running Gag: Biff has seen the time machine in every single time period they go to:
    • 1985 Biff sees a "flying DeLorean" leave the McFly home and disappear.
    • 2015 Biff sees the DeLorean again and chuckles that he hasn't seen one in 30 years, but is distracted by seeing two "Marty's"
    • 1985-A Biff doesn't have time to register fully either as he's knocked cold by the gull-wing door.
    • 1955 Biff sees it in flight, but smashes into a manure truck right after.
  • Sadistic Choice: In their confrontation on the roof, Biff gives Marty the choice between jumping off to his death or getting shot.
  • Say My Name: Marty's future Boss does this right after he does the illegal transaction with Needles.
    MCFLY!!!
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Money!: "Kid, I OWN the police!"
  • Sean Connery Is About to Shoot You: Taken to a whole new level by the animated holographic advertisement for Jaws 19 (this time, it's really really personal) that Marty encounters, in which a shark eats you.
    Marty: Shark still looks fake.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The nostalgia curio shop window has a plush Roger Rabbit doll (another Amblin movie directed by Zemeckis and featuring Lloyd).
    • It also features the Jaws NES game and a VHS copy of Jaws 2. (Not to mention the Jaws 19'' hologram.)
    • The virtual Michael Jackson, Ronald Reagan and Ayatollah Khomeini are modeled after Max Headroom.
    • The tv screens in the Cafe 80s all display tv shows owned or produced by Universal Television (Miami Vice, Knight Rider, etc. can be seen).
    • Marty Jr. shouts "Hey, I'm walkin' here!" at a taxi.
    • Many references to It's a Wonderful Life during the 1985-A sequence. 1985-A Hill Valley is a not-so-subtle reference to Pottersville, and you just substitute Biff in Potter's place.
    • One of the articles in the paper in 1985-A about Doc Brown being committed reads "Nixon to seek fifth term", a possible shout-out to Watchmen.
    • In 2015, there's a poster which says "Surf Vietnam". This doubles as foreshadowing, as the Vietnam War is still grinding on in a dystopian Biffverse.
    • Biff's line "I own the police" is a reference to a similar line in Chinatown concerning Noah Cross, another morally bankrupt magnate whose power leads to a dystopian reality.
    • Blink and you'll miss it, but the StarCar from The Last Starfighter can be seen in 2015. You can catch it just as the Jeep rockets down from the sky in the chase sequence.
  • Shown Their Work: The college football scores Biff hears on his car radio are the actual scores of actual college football games played on Saturday, November 12, 1955 — except, oddly, the Texas A&M-Rice matchup, which the radio announcer says A&M won 20-10 when the actual score was 20-12. Bob Gale said he personally researched the scores of that day to avoid the wrath of sports fans who would call him out if they weren't accurate.
    • It's true that nobody really knew what CPR was until roughly two years later.
    • October 21 2015 did fall on a Wednesday.
  • Shrine to Self: Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the Biff Tannen Museum! Dedicated to Hill Valley's #1 citizen, and America's greatest living folk hero, the one and only Biff Tannen! Of course we've all heard the legend, but who is the man? Inside you will learn how Biff Tannen became one of the richest and most powerful men in America. Learn the amazing history of the Tannen family, starting with his great-grandfather, Buford "Mad Dog" Tannen, fastest gun in the West. See Biff's humble beginnings and how a trip to the racetrack on his 21st birthday made him a millionaire overnight.note  Share in the excitement of a fabulous winning streak that earned him the nickname "the Luckiest Man on Earth."note  Learn how Biff parlayed that lucky winning streak into the vast empire called BiffCo. Discover how in 1979, Biff successfully lobbied to legalize gambling and turned Hill Valley's dilapidated courthouse into a beautiful casino-hotel! note  Meet the women who shared in his passion as he searched for true love. And relive Biff's happiest moment as in 1973, he realized his life long romantic dream by marrying his high school sweetheart, Lorraine Baines McFly! note 
  • Significant Reference Date: George was killed on March 15, 1973; Julius Caesar was killed on March 15th.
  • Signs of Disrepair: In 2015, Hilldale's sign has been vandalized from "The Address of Success" to "The Address of Suckers". In 1985-A, the "Welcome to Hill Valley" sign says "Hell Valley" instead.
  • Slasher Smile: Griff gets off a good one on Marty's failed Look Behind You.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: The guy in 2015 trying to collect a donation from Marty. The only other thing he does in the movie is commenting on his desire to go back in time to bet the Cubs will win that year's World Series. That comment starts the Almanac plot and is the reason Doc and later Marty go to 1885, resulting in Clara Clayton being saved from falling into a ravine and Jules and Verne Brown existing. If not for this, Doc would have disassembled the Time Machine after he and Marty returned from 2015.
  • The Smurfette Principle: Jennifer Parker. Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale say that had they intended to do a sequel at the time they made the original film, they would not have put "the girl" in the car at the end. Sure enough, in the second film, she's sedated less then five minutes in and pretty much spends the rest of the series that way.
  • Spear Carrier: The kids unimpressed by Marty's gun skills.
  • Spinning Paper: The video at the Biff Tannen Museum uses this editing trick while showing newspaper headlines documenting the Alternate Biff's life story, including his winning streak.
  • Suicidal "Gotcha!": Marty, on the roof of Biff's Pleasure Paradise. Biff-A gets knocked out by the DeLorean doors as well.
  • Surprise Vehicle: The DeLorean in the above scene.
  • Take That!: The fake shark from Jaws 19, alluding to the Jaws franchise and its not-so-well-received sequels, especially Jaws: The Revenge, which came out between Part I and Part II and was ripped apart by critics.
  • Tap on the Head: Marty gets knocked out by Biff's thugs outside the Pleasure Palace and wakes up with no injuries. This is a part of a running gag, as Marty gets knocked out and wakes up perfectly fine in all three movies. Then there are Biff's flunkies in 1955, who get sandbagged (literally) by Marty at the school dance.
  • Tell Me About My Father: Marty, asking Lorraine-A about the alternate version of his father.
  • They Don't Make Them Like They Used To: Implied.
    Marty: Let's land on him, we'll cripple his car.
    Doc: Marty, he's in a '46 Ford; we're in a DeLorean. He'd rip through us like we were tinfoil.
    • Absolutely Truth in Television. DeLoreans feature a fiberglass body overlaid with relatively thin sheet metal (which would sometimes crack during manufacturing). Some of the crash tests show an unbelievable amount of crumpling when hitting a solid wall, so the Doc is quite accurate with his observation.
  • Threw My Bike on the Roof: There's a scene in 1955 where Biff gets a hold of a ball belonging to a bunch of kids, and while listening to them plead to have it back, he mocks them and then throws it onto a second story balcony. The kids stand there, crestfallen, as Biff walks away while cackling to himself(!).
  • Timeline-Altering MacGuffin: Gray's Sports Almanac, the former trope namer.
  • Time-Travel Tense Trouble:
    Doc: (after Marty realizes that he's responsible for Biff's actions) Well, it's all in the past.
    Marty: You mean the future.
    Doc: Whatever!
    • There's another one, in the middle of the movie:
    Doc: While we were in the future, Biff got the sports book, stole the time machine, went back in time and gave the book to himself at some point in the past.
  • Title Drop: The ending.
    1955!Doc: No! It can't be; I just sent you back to the future!
    Marty: No, I know; you did send me back to the future. But I'm back — I'm back from the future.
    (beat)
    1955!Doc: Great Scott! (he faints)
  • To Be Continued: Audiences were upset they actually showed scenes from III. It was deliberately Invoked by Zemeckis and Universal to assure audiences that the last chapter would be finished in a matter of months, not years.
  • Took a Level in Badass: 1985-A Strickland. Living in a crapsack world infested with trigger-happy gangs doesn't help.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: The preview for Part III includes a shot showing Marty, in cowboy gear, makes out with Jennifer on her porch, spoiling Marty's successful return to 1985 at the end of Part III.
  • Trophy Wife: Marty's mother has been coerced into becoming Biff Tannen's trophy wife, complete with unwanted breast augmentation.
  • Trust Password: Biff challenges his future self to prove that the Gray's Sports Almanac has the results of every sporting event in the next 50 years. So old Biff plays a sports broadcast and demonstrates it.
  • Two Decades Behind: Invoked and parodied with Gale/Zemeckis' "user-friendly" 2015 A.D. The fashions of the era reflect the 80's at their pastel, animal print and peroxide worst. Kids still wear acid-washed jeans (albeit with the pockets inside-out) and souped-up versions of Marty's vest and Nikes. The biggest offender might have to be Marlene Mcfly, who would fit right in with Saved By the Bell with no alterations whatsoever.
    Michael K.: I wonder what drugs BTTF P2 predicted we’d be doing in 2015, because Marlene McFly is on some new shit.
  • Uncanny Family Resemblance: Michael J. Fox plays all of Marty's future family, including his daughter.
  • Unfazed Everyman:
    • Red the bum. 1985-A hasn't changed him, or his lot in life, one bit.
    • Strickland may count (more like Unfazed Nutball), as he is the same hard-ass disciplinarian he ever was.
  • Unintentional Period Piece: A weird case; the Cafe 80's scene (remember that this movie was made in 1989), invokes this trope directly. The result was rather bizarre at the time, and still is. This is probably intentional, as Doc referred to it as "one of those nostalgia places that were not done very well."
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight: 1955's Biff does not seem surprised (angry, yes, but not surprised) when Calvin Klein tries to steal his sports almanac on a freakin' flying hover-board!
  • The Un-Reveal: Did Needles set Marty up in 2015? We'll never know.
    • His mischievous smirk before he hangs up implies it, though.
  • Unstoppable Mailman: The Western Union man at the end manages to arrive at exactly the time he was told to. Justified in that he and other mail carriers were holding bets on whether or not Marty would be there.
  • Vice City: 1985-A. Marty's old neighborhood is now a ghetto overrun by wild dog packs(!). The city square has been replaced with a cluster of strip clubs, casinos, bikers, and roving six-wheeled army vehicles (suggesting a police state which is answerable only to Biffco). These scenes were reportedly the hardest to shoot due to filming near factories (which stank) and motorcycles (which also stank); the whole sequence reminded the filmmakers of Hell.
  • Video Phone: The Future McFly household's video phone is connected to the television set. Personal information about the individual on the other end of the line is scrolled through on screen, including name, age, occupation, home address, spouse, children, and assorted hobbies and preferences. Video calling is also sponsored by AT&T. While such tech does exist today, it's provided courtesy of Skype.
  • Villain with Good Publicity: Biff Tannen in 1985A, if his museum video is to be believed.
  • We Will Not Have Pockets in the Future: Thoroughly averted by the fashion in 2015.
  • Wham Line: Marty, after seeing how Biff treats Lorraine in 1985!A, asks what happened to George. And, in retrospect, he probably shouldn't have:
    Lorraine: Marty! George- your father is in the same place he's been for the past 12 years... Oak Park Cemetery...
  • What, Exactly, Is His Job?: In the future, we're never told what Marty does at CusCo, or what "the plant" actually produces. His conspiracy with Needles (Embezzlement? insider trading?) is ambiguous and left to the imagination.
  • Which Me?: A few times, given that Michael J. Fox is playing our Marty, 2015 Marty, Marty Jr., Marlene, and his past 1955 self. Meanwhile, Thomas F. Wilson is playing 2015 Biff, Griff Tannen, 1985 Biff, and 1955 Biff.
  • With Friends Like These...: Needles isn't a bully in the sense that the other McFlys faced, but he does antagonize Marty in his own (ahem) needling way.
  • Women's Mysteries: Doc mentions this while musing that he won't get to visit The Wild West.
  • Worst News Judgment Ever: In the alternate future (courtesy of Biff), Doc holds up a newspaper where the front page story is about how he was proclaimed insane and committed. While he is a strange, prominent figure in the town, it doesn't really merit the front page. Particularly implausible is the fact that "Doc Brown" is used to identify him in the banner headline, while the sub head refers to him as "local inventor" or whatever. Because yeah, only a minority of readers would require clarification.
  • Would You Like to Hear How They Died?: Biff crows to Marty about murdering his father and getting away with it.
  • Write Back to the Future: Doc's letter from 1885 to 1955, informing Marty of his current situation, and the location of the DeLorean.
  • "You!" Exclamation: Biff to Marty, after awakening from being knocked out by George.
  • You Just Had to Say It: Just after Marty warns Doc not to get struck by lightning at the end of the movie, he does.
  • You Killed My Father: Biff-A murdered George-A.
  • Zeerust: Done on purpose; the filmmakers didn't want to try to accurately predict the future, so they just combined Jetsons-esque devices with some obvious jokes (the McFlys have a fax machine in every room of their house, which apparently all print the same message at once).note 
    Ironically, some of their predictions actually came pretty close. Things like 16:9 flat-screen TVs with the ability to watch multiple shows at once don't sound too crazy in a world with Google TV. Hell, think about Marty Jr. watching about eight shows at once, then ask yourself: how many tabs do you have open in your browser right now? (Of course, they completely missed the internet, but so did nearly everyone.)
    • The film shows machines that respond to voice commands, not at all implausible now that we have things like Siri.
    • And the thing of a video-phone being integrated into those 16:9 flat-panel TVs? Smart TVs as early as 2012 were being touted as supporting Skype video-calls when equipped with an attachable USB camera/mic combo (sold separately, of course)
    • Enforced by Major League Baseball- they could have sent the Miami Marlins to the American League, potentially setting up a Cubs-Marlins World Series in 2015, but instead chose to send the Houston Astros to the AL. Half of that may come true, as with the hiring of manager Joe Maddon and signing of Jon Lester, the Cubs have become serious NL contenders for the World Series.
    • The Chicago Cubs finally won the World Series in 2016. So the movie was off by a year in its prediction.
    • The idea of a robot dog-walker (like Marty sees in Hilldale) doesn't seem so farfetched, given the growth of the personal robot market in recent years. The flying thing's unlikely, though.
    • A minor one: 80s nostalgia had already fizzled out in 2013, making the 80s Cafe seem even more timely than it already was.
    • College Humor did a parody of what Part II's 2015 sequence would be like if 2015 as it's turned out for real was used.
    • The October 21, 2015 episode of Jimmy Kimmel Live had Christopher Lloyd and Michael J. Fox playing Doc and Marty arriving in the actual 2015 and being disappointed with it.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/BackToTheFuturePartII