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I Hate Past Me

PAST ME IS ALWAYS SO TERRIBLE, EVEN WHEN I LITERALLY JUST FINISHED BEING HIM.
Karkat Vantas, Homestuck

The inverse of Future Me Scares Me, where a character sees the past and either meets or somehow witnesses the actions of their past self, and just can't stand them. Maybe they were once a villain, and now that they've reformed dislike how evil they once were, or, inversely, they're more evil and show disdain for how "weak" their past self is. Maybe they were extremely selfish as a child, and regret their indifference to the needs and feelings of others. Maybe they're just more experienced, and are annoyed with how inexperienced and impulsive they were in the past. In any case, they're constantly ticked off by their past.

See also Future Me Scares Me, so for this from the point of view from the past self, go there. Compare Old Shame, a more mundane version of this trope, and Amnesiac Dissonance, where something similar happens as a result of previously-hidden memories being recovered. Contrast Other Me Annoys Me. See also I Was Quite a Fashion Victim and Former Teen Rebel.

Borders on Truth in Television, as most of us would certainly be quite embarrassed by our own past personality quirks and antics. Fortunately, we can't go back in time and meet our younger selves yet.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime 
  • In Noein, Karasu condemns his past self for being an utter coward. Considering what he's trying to do, not an entirely unreasonable attitude. And then the titular Noein turns out to be yet another future Yuu, who hates both Yuu and Karasu.
  • Naruto, after the Time Skip in Shipuuden, does an omake with his past self. He is shocked by the fact that he was a very annoying, obnoxious loudmouth before the Time Skip.
  • A minor one in Dragon Ball Z: Future Trunks lets his curiosity get the better of him and goes to get a good look at his baby self… who starts pulling his hair.
  • In one chapter/episode of Urusei Yatsura Shutaro Mendō traveled back in time and very literally scared his younger self — the child Mendō acted like such an obnoxious brat to his future self that he provoked the latter into attacking him with a sword. The young Mendō hid in a jar until the older Mendō returned to his own time, but that experience was what gave him his claustrophobia and fear of the dark ("WAAAN! KURAI YO SEMAI YO KOWAI YO!"). And what's more, the reason he traveled back in time in the first place was to prevent himself from getting that claustrophobia and fear of the dark.
  • In a Fairy Tail OVA, when Natsu meets his child self via time travel, he angrily beats him up for being so weak and losing a fight to Gray.

    Comics 
  • In Twisted Toyfare Theatre, Future Hulk (Maestro) couldn't believe how stupid his younger counterpart is.
  • During Genis-Vell's omnipotent madman phase, he brought Rick Jones's teenage self to the present—that is, Rick from before the Gamma Bomb accident that created the Hulk, when Rick was forced to grow up and start taking responsibility for his actions. Naturally, present-day Rick can't stand him.
  • Doctor Strange's villains occasionally attempt mind-games like showing him his life as an arrogant young surgeon. He's never once been tempted to go back.
  • The time-travelling arc from the first volume of Thunderbolts took this to an extreme as the current team, consisting of some of the fully redeemed members of the old team, ended up meeting the first set of Thunderbolts while the con was still on. The Fixer ended up talking to his past self, who was the same morals-less hothead who couldn't believe that his current self had "gone soft." However, the Fixer wasn't known for his infinite patience then or now, so he immolates himself. The temporal ramifications are immediately dealt with, and the Fixer has to enter a Stable Time Loop where he poses as his past self in order to keep the timeline from unwinding.

    Fan Works 
  • Asuka in Evangelion RE-TAKE feels somewhat vitriolic toward her past self, particularly when she enters into a romantic relationship with Shinji, whom future Asuka has much more reason to hate. There's also some self-loathing and jealousy involved.
  • It is discussed in Peggy Sue fanfic The Second Try. Asuka thinks her younger self would hate her since during her Character Development she forsook all what she had lived for during her childhood and became a very different person who does not mind showing her emotions, letting other close and loves being a wife and a mother. Shinji disagrees, stating she is being too hard on herself. Straight after he states he thinks his deeply-insecure, self-loathing, shy younger self would be shocked at seeing him... but he does not hate him since he knows why he was so full of insecurities and neurosis.
  • In Kyon Big Damn Hero, Kyon thinks that Future!Kyon is arrogant and condescending and that Past!Kyon is incompetent. This is played with, as Kyon tells Koizumi that he mostly annoys himself so that he'll remember things that he'll have to do later, but this was played straight during a later chapter when Future!Kyon sent a text to Kyon calling him an idiot for not seeking help from Yuki during an encounter with an enemy slider.
  • In White Devil of the Moon, Nanoha, who is the reincarnation of Princess Serenity, strongly disapproves of the Princess' actions during the era of the Moon Kingdom, (particularly running away and falling in love with Endymion despite the myriad risks, and killing herself after his death) leading to a Calling The Old Woman Out moment against the ghost of the queen.
  • In A Sticky Situation, this is fairly true for Impmon. And for good reason and that's not even considering his canon actions.
  • While he doesn't hate him, Future Danny from the Facing The Future Series is visibly annoyed by teenage Danny's lack of rational thought.
  • In The Infinite Loops, the universe sometimes resets wrong, resulting in the loopers meeting their nonlooping selves. The saner loopers are generally annoyed by their past selves's immaturity (Naruto, Ranma), wangst (Sasuke, Shinji), or some Old Shame (Nabiki).
    Naruto: (drunk) Is it wrong to want to beat the shit out of your younger self?
    Sasuke: (also drunk) Seems pretty common to me.

    Film 
  • In Back to the Future II, Old Biff doesn't particularly like Young Biff, thinking of him as an ignorant macho idiot (like his grandson), but is willing to give him the secret to infinite wealth since it will make himself rich in the future. Unfortunately, the end result is a Biff much more diabolical than either of them.
    • Young Biff didn't care much for Old Biff either, thinking he was some crazy old coot even when Old Biff showed him his plan to make him/them rich was legit. So...I Hate Future Me?
  • A non-Time Travel example in the original Total Recall (1990). Quade learns that he was originally Hauser, one of Big Bad Cohaagen's agents who volunteered to have his memory erased and replaced with Quade's personality, and doesn't particularly agree when Hauser's pre-made recordings start taunting and screwing with him. When Cohaagen tries to reprogram him as Hauser:
    Cohaagen: You'll like being Hauser.
    Quade: The guy's a fucking asshole!
  • Disney's The Kid: The main character, Russ, meets himself as a child, Rusty. All he sees in his past are a bunch of bad memories.
  • Zathura has The Astronaut, who doesn't exactly hate his past self, but since he knows his own callousness led to the loss of his brother and being stuck in the game, is fairly hard on him. However, this does eventually turn into him being very proud that the current Walter didn't make the same mistakes he did.
  • In Triangle, a woman who's been caught in a series of time loops has gone completely over the edge and when she finds herself transported to the start of the day, she sees her past self yelling angrily at her son. Her response? Ambush her past self and beat her to death. Somehow this does not erase her from existence.
  • Bill and Ted think this is what's happening in Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey when their future selves are rude to them ("I'll have to remember to be nicer to myself when I become him!"), only to discover that the "future selves" are actually Killer Robots.
  • Another non-Time Travel variant: In Toy Story 2, as Buzz Lightyear encounters a fresh-out-of-the-box Buzz Lightyear who's acting much like Buzz from the first film, Buzz moans "Oh, tell me I wasn't this delusional…".
  • In Dead Again, an amnesiac woman regains her life but is shocked to find that she's an artist with predilection for scissors. As if that wasn't enough, she was also a man in a previous life.
  • A future version of Doctor Smith uses this trope as a justification for attempting to kill his past self in the movie version of Lost in Space.
    Future Doctor Smith: I never liked myself much anyway.
  • In Time Cop, Senator McComb travels from 2004 to 1994 to kill his then business partner and meets his past self in the process. He remarks that he "remembers having bigger balls", tells his past self to "lay off the fucking candy bars" and punches him in the face.
  • Boris from Men In Black 3 despises his younger self, seeing in him the cocky idiot who cost him his arm. The younger Boris, however, seems his older self the exactly same way, as a fool who made mistakes that he himself has yet to suffer.
  • In Looper, Old Joe has very little patience for his past self, a junkie killer who's too in love with his hedonistic lifestyle to think about the future.
  • In The Long Kiss Goodnight, Charli has little but contempt for Samantha, her amnesiac personality who decided to have The Dragon's baby. She eventually realizes she cares more than she thought, and their personalities kind of merge.

    Literature 
  • In the Mistborn novel The Alloy of Law, Miles burning gold sees two possible "pasts" of himself, and both hate each other.
    • This is a common effect of burning gold, actually, since it shows you either your past or a possible past (it's rather unclear- gold is probably the least understood of the core allomantic metals, since burning it is often a disturbing experience). Vin, the heroine of Mistborn: The Original Trilogy, is also extremely uncomfortable with seeing her pre-Character Development Broken Bird self while burning gold, and never does it again.
  • Upon seeing his decisions from an observer's point of view, Ebenezer Scrooge eventually has little but large amounts of disdain for the choices his past self made, occasionally berating him despite knowing he can't hear.
  • Artemis Fowl is shocked at how ruthless he used to be upon meeting his younger self in The Time Paradox.
  • In Jonathan Carroll's novel The Wooden Sea, the narrator, Frannie, who is a cop, meets his past self, a troubled teenage bully. However, he eventually does come to see that he really was a good kid and manages to help patch things with his (teenage Frannie's) father in the past.
  • In Night Watch Sam Vimes has a more sympathetic reaction to the fact that his young self is a "twerp". As much as he's annoyed at the youth's naivety, he also displays a degree of sadness for his lost innocence and turns down the invitation to see his dearly departed mother again for fear of retreading the grief of her death.
  • In Stephen Baxter's novel The Time Ships, when Moses meets his past self he initially doesn't like his trousers, his waistcoat, his attitude, or him. Damn young turk!
  • In the "Q-Continuum" series of Star Trek novels, Q takes Picard on a trip through his past to show him why breaching the galactic barrier would be a bad idea. Throughout the trip Q laments his past self's actions. Understandable, since he did grant a sadistic Eldritch Abomination and its equally monstrous cronies entrance to our galaxy which led to the destruction of an entire civilization that had actually earned Q's respect.
    • His younger self's rash actions (namely, accidentally dropping a meteor on Earth and wiping out the dinosaurs) have also resulted in the Q Continuum forcing him to become the steward of the human race. He doesn't particularly relish the idea.
  • In Time Enough for Love Lazarus Long goes back to when he was about four years old and visits his family in disguise. He finds his past self to be an annoying little smart-aleck and remarks that he was tempted to wring his own neck.

    Live Action TV 
  • In the Red Dwarf episode Time Slides, Lister goes back in time to visit his teenage self who turns out to be an authority-hating punk who believes everything is 'crypto-fascist'. Also, inverted in Out of Time.
  • In the Doctor Who story The Five Doctors, after the past Doctors return to their respective timelines, the present Doctor (the fifth one) says "I am not the man I was ... thank goodness." This implies that while he might not exactly hate his past selves, he considers them phases he's since outgrown.
    • This is a recurring theme in multi-Doctor stories, which inevitably end up with the various incarnations of the Doctor bickering with each other, such as the Third and Second Doctors in "The Three Doctors" and the Sixth and Second Doctors in "The Two Doctors". In the former it's suggested that the reason the Doctor seemingly can't stand himself is that he's actually more like his past / future selves than each self would care to admit.
    • This is nicely subverted in the short "Time Crash" where the Fifth and Tenth Doctors briefly meet. Five doesn't recognise his future-self at first, and is mostly annoyed that this baffling stranger has broken into his ship and is babbling on about hair and celery. Finally, he works it out, and the two of them share a touching moment. Ten reveals that Five was his favourite Doctor, and he loved being him.
      • Likewise, Five softened up and took an immediate liking towards Ten, invested in becoming his future self one day. Unfortunately, Five doesn't learn the whole truth about Ten, and goes about his merry way thinking Ten will be a happy chapter in his future, without discovering that the chapters that precede him will be very dark, such as the inevitable Time War that will eventually scar his future incarnations, and the menacing side of Ten's personality hiding beneath the surface.
    • However, in "Journey's End", the Tenth Doctor pretty much states that he thinks he's "a better man" than the Ninth, and that his previous incarnation was more violent than him.
      • Conversely, Ten showed an evident dislike for the actions he took in the Last Great Time War as the Eighth Doctor. Whether this is regret for being forced into these actions or outright disgust that Eight made so many foolish decisions in the Time War was never made clear.
      • The short "The Night of The Doctor" shows that Eight was actively avoiding getting involved in the war, but then decided to regenerate into "a warrior". The War Doctor is considered something of a traitor to the Doctor's legacy by subsequent regenerations, and when Eleven encountered him in "The Name of the Doctor", he expressed disgust.
    • A strange version in "The Almost People". The Doctor has been duplicated, making a replica exactly like the original. However, while still stabilizing, this ganger has to cope with all his memories, and starts being consumed by past regenerations. At one point he starts speaking with Ten's voice- before breaking out of it and shouting "We've moved on!" It doesn't necessarily mean that Eleven hates Ten, but considering the low-point of the regeneration, there might be some hard feelings.
    • In "The Twin Dilemma", Six states that he hated having been Five, telling Peri that "he had a feckless charm that was never really (him)." In The 100 Days Of The Doctor, he did, however, grudgingly admit he had truly enjoyed his time as Five and compared it to "a holiday. A very wonderful holiday," and that his dislike of his fifth incarnation actually stemmed from the way the universe was treating him at the time.
    • Likewise, Seven was not too found of Five either, remarking that he was "bland, and not even one of the good ones".
    • Given what Eleven has said about himself in general, not any one specific version, it may be the fact that every other Doctor's face is the face of actions the Doctor detested having had to take.
    • In the Big Finish Doctor Who audio drama Excelis Dawns, the Fifth Doctor regards his past self as a careless freewheeler who thought he was invincible. His words strongly suggest that he was referring to the Fourth Doctor in particular. This is in response to Iris Wildthyme's remark that the Doctor isn't as fun as he used to be. The Doctor remarks that Adric's death came as a wakeup call. In the Doctor's personal timeline, Tegan's abrupt departure due to her disgust at the violence plaguing the Doctor's travels has yet to happen as of this story.
    • In the Eighth Doctor Adventures novel The Eight Doctors it is revealed that the Eighth Doctor didn't like the Seventh Doctor very much. The reasons may be due to the Seventh's reputation as The Chessmaster. Seven was prone to making cold, calculating decisions that would sometimes cross into greyer morality lines.
    • In the Doctor Who New Adventures, Seven in turn had issues with Five and Six. In Timewyrm: Revelation Five represented the Doctor's conscience in his mental world, and Seven sealed him away out of what he thought to be necessity, until Ace freed him, reintegrating him into the Doctor's mind. In Head Games, Six represented Seven's guilt over his morally dubious actions; it took until The Room With No Doors for Seven to come to terms with himself on that score.
    • Subverted and played straight in The Day of the Doctor. Ten and Eleven get along just fine most of the time, even moving in sync at times. However, they still can't stand their previous self, the War Doctor. This changes at the end, when they not only decide to join in on doing, but also avert the thing that they hated him for. They then part on good terms with each other. The War Doctor starts off unimpressed with them, thinking they are nothing more than Man Children, but seeing them in action and their willingness to share the burden with him leads him to deciding his future is in good hands. As for the Curator, he describes the Fourth Doctor as one of his favorites.
    • Played straight in the comic Hunters of the Burning Stone. Eleven stated he had nothing but contempt for One, even going so far as to glare at a psychic projection of his past self several times. When Ian tries to point out all the good things he did in his first regeneration, Eleven counters that it was he and Barbara that kept him doing the right thing.
    • In the audio reconstruction of the Troughton story "Power of the Daleks" narrated by the Fourth Doctor as if he's recounting a story from his life, he seems to regard his regeneration from the First Doctor into the Second Doctor as a significant downgrade, questioning his own decision to trade long white hair and cold dignity for hyperkinesis, scruffiness and flamboyance. It should be observed that the Fourth Doctor's personality is much closer to the latter type, and he also succeeded a coldly dignified, white-haired Doctor... He also occasionally pauses the story to cringe about just how embarrassing his own actions are.
    • Averted with the Eleventh Doctor in the Fourth Doctor audio story in which he cameos ("Babblesphere"), where both of them seem to like each other an awful lot - and the Curator, a far future Doctor who has taken on the Fourth Doctor's personality, seems immediately fond of and affectionate towards the Eleventh in "Day of the Doctor".
    • Also averted in "The Light At The End", where the Eighth Doctor is especially fond of the Fourth Doctor, with a lot of their personality quirks and tastes in common, and they get along easily. And subverted with the Eighth and the Sixth - the Eighth finds him obnoxious and embarrassing as expected, but at the same time has a great deal of respect for him, moreso than any of the others do. He certainly prefers him to the Seventh.
  • In an episode of Charmed, Paige goes back in time to when she was seventeen and is horrified to realise what a brat she was at that age.
  • Samantha Who was about a woman with amnesia and as she puts her life back together is appalled to discover what an awful person she had been.
  • In the American version of Life On Mars, Sam is afraid of talking to himself as a child.
  • Mystery Science Theater 3000: in their episode about Time Chasers Crow is immediately hostile to the Crow of 30 minutes ago because he has to explain to Crow the unforeseen consequences of their time travel.
  • In an episode of Hercules: The Legendary Journeys, when Hercules and Autolycus get sent into the past, Autolycus gets annoyed by his rude past self and punches him out.
  • Ted of How I Met Your Mother damns his and Marshall's past selves for not making a decision on the apartment.
  • Prince Charming of Once Upon a Time openly admits that he isn't a big fan of David Nolan, his curse self. He calls him "weak" and "confused" and says that David hurt the woman he loved. However, he also says that he wouldn't trade away his memories of David, because they remind him of who he wants to be.
  • In the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Tapestry", Picard dies from his artificial heart failing him, and he encounters Q in what seems to be the afterlife. After much prodding by Q, Picard reveals that he regrets getting into a Bar Brawl against Nausicaans (mentioned in an earlier episode), suffering a near-fatal wound to his heart, which is how he wound up with his artificial heart. Picard hates his younger self for how hot-headed and arrogant he was going into the brawl. So he gets the opportunity by Q to go back to avert the brawl, but it makes Picard a lowly Lieutenant in a "new" future who ultimately doesn't stand out in any sense. Q shows that if he hadn't been that arrogant young man, he'd never have become the kickass captain we know and love.

    Music 
  • The Garfunkel And Oates song "29/31". It follows a woman at the ages of 29 and 31; her 29-year-old self is an idealistic Naïve Everygirl while her 31-year-old self is a cynical Deadpan Snarker, having realized her life didn't go as well as she expected it to. Her older self (played by Riki) is annoyed by her younger self (played by Kate), while her younger self is horrified by what she has become.
  • Plenty of country music songs about regretting one's wilder days abound. Prominent examples include "Choices" by George Jones and "Yesterday When I Was Young" by Roy Clark. The point is that, now older and wiser, the singer is filled with regret for their past mistakes and they wished they had never done what they did.
  • Relient K's song "Who I Am Hates Who I've Been."
    "I'm sorry for the person I became
    I'm sorry that it took so long for me to change
    I'm ready to be sure I never become that way again
    'Cause who I am hates who I've been
    Who I am hates who I've been."

    Video Games 
  • In Spellforce: The Order Of Dawn, the Big Bad is the past version of the Big Good. Naturally this relationship applies. At the end of the game, the Big Bad undergoes a Heel-Face Turn and goes back in time to stop his past self from causing The End of the World as We Know It. This leads to a Stable Time Loop, wherein he becomes the Big Good.
  • The World of Warcraft quest, "Mystery of the Infinite," has you fighting along your future self to defend an object from the Infinite Dragonflight. Throughout the fight, your future self mocks you with tidbits such as:
    Future You: Look at you fight; no wonder I turned to drinking.
    • And then when you do the sequel quest "Mystery of the Infinite, Redeux", you're mocked just as much by Past You:
      Past You: I just want you to know that if we get through this alive, I'm making sure we turn out better than you. No offense.
  • Hakumen has renounced his old identity as Jin Kisaragi. He considers killing his "past incarnation" to be atonement for his/Jin's sins.
  • In Fate/stay night this is how Archer feels about Shirou.
  • In City of Villains, one villain "morality mission" has you meet three future versions of yourself, two of which think you're an idiotic weakling. The third is The Atoner, whose pleas for you to do the right thing you ignore.
  • The normally stoic Auron in Final Fantasy X actually attacks his past self when confronted with a phantom echo of his past in the ruins of Zanarkand. Since it's only an echo, he ends up fruitlessly shouting and swinging his sword to no effect.
  • Saints Row IV sees present-day Shaundi come face-to-face with the Shaundi from Saints Row 2. The two don't get along: present-day Shaundi thinks past-Shaundi is a useless drug-addled promiscuous load, while past-Shaundi thinks present-day Shaundi is a joyless, angry killjoy who really needs to light a bowl.
    Present-day Shaundi: My problem? My problem is that I used to be you.
  • The Sam & Max: Freelance Police episode "Chariots of the Dogs" has several differently aged versions of Sam and Max, including a young, nerdy Sam who loves computers and disgusts his older self.
    Young Sam: Wow, I've never seen anything that advanced. It must have at least 640 kilobytes of RAM!
    Sam: Ew. Whatever, kid.
    • Sam also pulls a gun on his younger self after he calls him fat.
  • In Soul Reaver 2, Raziel's past self, a Jerkass Knight Templar, scares him.
  • In Jak II: Renegade, Young Samos and Old Samos do not get along, to the point where Daxter has to mediate.
    • Averted with Young Jak as he's one of the few people that angry Older Jak gets along with.
  • Bioshock Infinite has Father Comstock, the Big Bad of the game, who is also a version of the protagonist, Booker DeWitt from an alternate universe who underwent a baptism following the Massacre at Wounded Knee, got a new name, and found religion. Comstock has nothing but scorn for the Booker we play as, from a universe where he refused the baptism, believing him to be a godless, self-destructive "False Shepard".
  • Fate's final battle in Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha A's Portable: The Battle of Aces has Fate confronting a copy of herself based on her memories of her Dark and Troubled Past. The match revolves around her trying to convince her angst-filled past copy that, eventually, everything will become all right.
  • In Mario & Luigi: Partners in Time, Bowser ends up fighting with his past self over a volcano that both of them think would make a great evil lair. They eventually decide to team up, but neither one ever figures out the other's identity.

    Webcomics 
  • Subverted in The Last Days of Foxhound, where The Sorrow shows the amnesiac Liquid his past in order to to show him how, violent, cruel and indifferent to humanity he was. Cue Liquid gushing over how much of a Bad Ass he was.
  • A book 4 arc of Fans! pits the science fiction club against their book 1 versions, and nearly all of them have this reaction.
  • Karkat of Homestuck gets into arguments with his past selves so often that it's practically become a Running Gag. And his future selves hate him just as much. He provides the page quote. It should probably be noted that the troll reproductive cycle has two reproductive relationships: one analogous to human romance (flushed, obviously represented by a heart) and one based entirely on mutual hatred (caliginous, represented by a spade). Karkat <3< Karkat is all but confirmed by canon.
    • The situation described in the page quote literally happens when he posts a cross-time memo and is immediately responded to by himself 10 minutes in the future. They proceed to spend that entire time arguing, so that mere moments after the argument ends, he sees his past self posting the memo and responds as the other side of the argument.
    • Jade gets sick of Jadesprite's sobbing pretty quickly. When she refuses to do the one thing that could probably accomplish her goal of going back to being dead, present Jade loses it and starts smacking sense into her, literally. It gets stranger: Since Dream Jade went back in time 13 years after dying, Jadesprite is technically older than Jade, but her personality is noticeably more flawed.
    • Vriska is soured on her former Attention Whore Glory Hound behavior when she witnesses Aranea, the alternate universe version of Vriska's ancestor, cause a lot of trouble with her Attention Whore Glory Hound antics.
  • A non-Time Travel example occurs in The Dragon Doctors when Kili and Greg go to part of the Spirit World where a person's past self resides. Kili, a kind, sensitive shaman, is confronted by her bratty teenage self and Greg, a mellow writer, is distraught when he sees his Totally Radical headbanger self.
  • Shortpacked!: Modern Age Batman meets Golden Age Batman. And yes, Golden Age Batman really was that much of a dick.
  • In Manly Guys Doing Manly Things, the Commander fulfills a Stable Time Loop by going back about a minute to beat up his past self and steal his coffee. As he leaves, he tells his past self not to be such a "candy-ass" so that this won't happen again.
  • From Narbonic: "I'm your future, and I hate you. I'm going to electrocute you now."
  • Templar Arizona: In the bonus comic Confirmation the loud, boisterous adult Reagan, meets and torments her insecure, reserved, and racistnote  younger self.
  • In The Greatest Gift, Hazel Lulamoon is actively afraid of the mare she used to be before her Heel-Face Turn, having a nightmare about Past!Hazel and calling her a monster.
  • In Sinfest, Fuchsia is terrified after she has a flashback to her pre-Heel-Face Turn days.
  • In one arc of Full Frontal Nerdity, Frank has Nelson, Lewis and Shawn retire their successful player characters and make up new ones. Their new characters meet their old characters as non-player characters. Frank insists on role-playing them all in character as ruthlessly ambitious Munchkins, much to Nelson, Lewis and Shawn's dismay.
  • Future Stein appears to feel this way about his younger counterpart in Frankie and Stein.
  • The main character of TwoKinds, Trace is suffering from amnesia since the start of the comic, which is good since he was kind of a jerk. It leads to this conversation:
    Eric: "Templar laws have, in recent years, made it a crime for slave traders such as myself to free our slaves voluntarily."
    Trace: "What? Why? What kind of evil person would make a law like th...it was me, wasn't it?"
    Eric: "…Yes"
  • In Sonic The Comic Online this is Sonic's reaction to meeting his past self It leads to this conversation:
    Past Johnny: "Look - there's a PLAQUE on the statue (a statue of Johnny Lightfoot build after his death)."
    Past Sonic: "Heh, probably says 'JOHNNY LIGHTFOOT - PROFESSIONAL SIDEKICK'."
    Present Sonic: "YOU CREEP! Johnny was more of a hero than you'll EVER be!

    Web Originals 
  • This is one of the older Joes' reaction in the College Humor video "Looper Has Sex with Himself" when the younger Joe refuses to give the older ones a blowjob.
  • Crash Course: John Green's general reaction to John-Green-from-the-Past, who plays the role of student.
    Present!John: Can we just pause for a moment to consider the astonishing fact that most T-shirts see more of the world than most of us do?
    Past!John: Mr. Green! Mr. Green! But T-shirts can't see the world because they don't have eyes.
    Present!John: Look, Me-from-the-Past, it's difficult for me to isolate what I hate most about you, because there is so much to hate, but very near the top is your habit of ignoring everything that is interesting or beautiful about our species in favour of pedantic snivelling in which no-one loses or gains anything of value.

    Western Animation 
  • Arthur: In a dream that Prunella has about her giving a gift to Francine, she ends up scolding herself, only to realize that it is her.
  • In the Gargoyles Avalon arc, the Archmage becomes quite irritated with his younger self for being impulsive and not thinking things through. He takes it upon himself to tutor the younger him, and frequently makes jabs about how incompetent he is.
    • Ironically, the past self is only a few days younger then the future self. Granted, a lot happened in those few days, including several magical transformations which increased his intelligence and dramatically boosted his power.
  • In an episode of Justice League Unlimited, old Bruce Wayne meets his past self and, during a suspect's interrogation, comments that "I can't believe I was ever that green." Afterwards, Old Bruce teaches his past self how to properly interrogate a criminal, foregoing the traditional method of terrifying the Mook and instead simply beating information out of him. This leads to an amusing Good Cop/Bad Cop with Batman playing both roles, and past Batman's teammates expressing their disbelief at the Batman they know being able to pull off Good Cop.
  • After the time skip in ReBoot, Matrix expresses constant dislike of the memories of himself as a kid. During a dream in one episode, he even comes face to face with his younger self and they argue. Eventually a copy of his younger self joins the cast and Matrix treats him like a younger (annoying) brother. The relationship is eventually inverted. His younger self dislikes Matrix's bitterness while Matrix tries to regain some of the idealism of his youth.
  • South Park- In the "Go God Go" duology, Cartman tries warning himself not to freeze himself by using a phone designed to make prank calls in different periods in time. However, Past!Cartman doesn't believe Future!Cartman, and just insults him. This leads to Future!Cartman calling his past self an asshole. Then at the end of the episode, when Cartman is clearly going to do the whole mess again, he gets a call from his future self and acts exactly the same way.
  • Ben 10: Ultimate Alien: Following a trans-dimensional mishap in one episode, 10-year-old Ben Tennyson meets his 16-year-old self. Ben doesn't hate his younger self, but he does find him incredibly rude and annoying, scolding him when he makes rude comments.
  • In Generator Rex, the eponymous character, suffering from chronic Laser-Guided Amnesia, finds out that he once sold out his best friends to a crime boss. Also, though he never mentions hating it, per se, Six was a cold-hearted Jerkass and wannabe Casanova before he met Rex, and temporarily reverts to this when he loses six years of memory.
  • A Running Gag in Futurama has characters always acting hostile towards past, future and alternate versions of themselves. Except Bender. Because if there's one thing Bender loves, it's Bender.
  • Vandal Savage in the Justice League episode "Hereafter". It took 30,000 years of self-imposed exile on the ruined Earth (which he ruined) as the last human being alive for him to give up his megalomania. As Savage prepares to send Superman back in time, Savage tells Superman that he must stop Savage's past self no matter what.
  • While it's never directly stated, it's hard to believe future Twilight isn't thinking this in the My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic episode "It's About Time". All she wants is to warn her past self about something, but her past self just won't shut up.
  • In American Dad! episode "May the Best Stan Win", a cyborg Stan comes back in time to steal Francine from his past self, having realized in the intervening 1000 years how much he missed her. He actually convinces Francine to leave Present Stan by telling her "That man's just going to keep letting you down; I know, I was him!" When Present Stan fights back, Cyborg Stan has absolutely no problem beating him senseless.
  • Grouchy Smurf in The Smurfs: A Christmas Carol : "Past me is so annoying."
  • Goes both ways in one Drawn Together episode where Captain Hero finds a way to communicate with his teenage self and decides that he is an absolute loser who deserves to be punished. He repeatedly tricks his past counterpart into performing depraved acts in public, until his younger self, realising what a jerkass future Hero is, retaliates and arranges for him to be arrested. Played with in that both versions of Hero are too dumb to quite understand the implications of them being the same character in different time periods (future hero remembers suffering similar abuse but opts for revenge by continuing the cycle instead of realising that he can break it).
  • In the Daffy Duck short Duck Amuck, the animator deliberately misaligns the tracking of the film so two frames of the film are temporarily visible. Daffy then proceeds to get into a argument and fist-fight with the version of himself from one frame (1/24th second) ago.

    Real Life 
  • Admit it: HOW many times have you looked back on your life and the things you've done/written/drawn/made/whatever and thought "What the hell was I THINKING?!"
    • And just how many times have you ever regretted what you were like in the past so much that you would gladly kick the crap out of said past self?
  • One commentator on Know Your Meme's article on Katy t3h PeNgU1N oF d00m.
    Crimson Locks: Oh, hello, past self. How unpleasant it is to see you again.
  • "Fortunately, we can't go back in time and meet our younger selves yet. ...." except for those of us who kept diaries. This trope is the leading cause of Diary burnings. Don't do it. Years from now you'll wish you'd hung onto it, no matter what it says.


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alternative title(s): Past Me Disgust Me
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