Follow TV Tropes

Following

Restricted Rescue Operation

Go To

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/bureaucracy.png
Too much red tape. And that's if you're allowed to do anything in the first place.
"They are one of the most unpleasant races in the Galaxy - not actually evil, but bad tempered, bureaucratic, officious and callous. They wouldn't even lift a finger to save their own grandmothers from the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal without orders signed in triplicate, sent in, sent back, queried, lost, found, subjected to public enquiry, lost again, and finally buried in soft peat for three months and recycled as firelighters."
Advertisement:

So you've seen a reason to launch a great rescue operation. There's one problem. If you went all out with helping you'd be less effective than if you were holding back. Reasons include:

  1. Lack Of Supplies: Lack of supplies that wouldn't do anyone any good if spread too thin. Can overlap with Cold Equation although Cold Equation does not necessarily involve a rescue operation.
  2. Secrecy: A need to keep the rescue operation or the true nature of it a secret to avoid whoever is in charge shutting it down. Can involve Rage Within the Machine.
  3. Operational: Restrictions placed by whoever is in charge on how much anyone is allowed to do or what methods can be used. This can include things that take up time and cause delays.

A key aspect of this is that The Hero stays within or at least attempts to appear to stay within the limits given. Appearing to stay within the restrictions is common if the restriction is Operational while launching Secrecy in response to the limits. For Secrecy, it's rarely known exactly how much it's possible to do without someone becoming suspicious. A common trend is that secret operations escalate over time as The Hero figures out that it's possible to pull it off and how to keep the secret.

Advertisement:

May involve Obstructive Code of Conduct or Obstructive Bureaucrat. Another likely situation is any rescue effort La Résistance is running in The Empire. The restrictions can come from any side. Either way the obstructions go further than the other characters having a case of the Bystander Syndrome.

A common outcome of this is a Heroic BSoD. The Hero can blame the authorities for putting up the restrictions or themselves for not doing more to invoke Screw the Rules, I'm Doing What's Right!. Or both. This trope is at it's core both a betrayal of what heroes, especially the idealistic kind, expects from society and a forced betrayal of their own sense of morality. Can lead to Survivor Guilt among those saved.

See also Underground Railroad and Samaritan Syndrome. Contrast No One Gets Left Behind. Super trope of Bruce Wayne Held Hostage.

Advertisement:


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 
  • My Hero Academia: Because only licensed heroes are allowed to use quirks to take down criminals, the students of Class 1-A struggled with rescue missions for the very real fear that they'd be expelled or arrested, and never become professional heroes. This severely limited the mission to rescue Bakugo, as a majority of the class didn't even want to go, and the ones that went had to do whatever it took to stay within the law.

    Film - Animation 
  • Early in Dinosaur there's a meteor strike and Aladar gets the lemurs he can to safety while outrunning the fire. Most of their family is lost. He spends the rest of the movie speaking out in defiance against this trope when Kron wants to leave the slower dinosaurs behind to slow down predators.
  • The plot of The Incredibles is driven by the supers being forced underground and forbidden from using their powers to help people. Notably there's a scene in which Mr Incredible/Bob Parr's boss threatens to fire him if he leaves to help a man who's being robbed. In that scene he was already in trouble for teaching his customers to "penetrate the bureaucracy" of the insurance company he was working for.

    Film - Live Action 
  • Colonel Kwiatkowski: The very first action by Kwiatkowski involves taking out just two men out of the slammer - and each cell he "visitates" contains fifty people tightly crammed inside. After the action, he instantly points out to his underlings the difference of arranging for just two men versus an entire prison, when all you've got is some serious nerve and an uniform.
  • Discussed in The Guardian when training the Coast Guard rescue swimmers.
    Randall: There will come a time when you might have to decide who lives and dies out there. It's a terrible responsibility, but it is one you will have to make as a rescue swimmer.
  • In I, Robot, Spooner was once in a car accident where both cars plunged into the river. The driver of the other car died on impact, but a little girl was still alive. When a robot came to aid the humans, it didn't have enough time to save both and chose Spooner because he had a higher probability of survival. This event led Spooner to harbor hatred for robots as unfeeling machines, saying that any human would have chosen to save the little girl no matter the odds.
  • Schindler's List has this out of necessity to keep the Nazis from catching on.

    Live Action TV 
  • Babylon 5:
    • When the Centauri begin their genocidal campaign against the Narn, Sheridan and Delenn want to help the Narn refugees but their governments are either neutral or allied with the Centauri. They are restricted to unofficially giving them food and medical supplies and smuggling a few out when they can. Delenn later reveals that she knew the Shadows were helping the Centauri but couldn't say anything as that would've resulted in the Shadows killing everyone.
    • It's heavily implied that Vir's efforts during the same war fall under this. He was stationed on the neutral planet Minbar and set up a secret identity to smuggle Narn refugees there while declaring them dead in Centauri databases. He would've had to smuggle a few at a time to avoid suspicion without knowing how many he could get away with while spending time on the bureaucracy of it. Whatever ships he used had a limited size. He talks as if he was making decisions on who to get out.
    Vir: They were females and children, some of the local leaders, the ones who kept their language and their beliefs. Most of them were injured from us bombing their world and sending them to forced labor camps. They weren't getting proper treatment. If I hadn't gotten them out they would've died.
    • In "Confessions and Lamentations", a 100% contagious and 100% lethal disease was spreading through the Markab population. After racing against the clock, Franklin found a cure and prepared 500 doses. There were thousands of Markab on the station. Ultimately subverted, as all the Markab died before the cure was finished. There's also the Markab forbidding their doctors from talking about the disease.
  • Emergency! In the pilot the paramedics aren't authorized to give any medical treatment.
  • In the Game of Thrones episode "Hardhome", the White Walkers attack just as the evacuation is getting started. It becomes necessary to close the gate the Free Folk are fleeing through, as they are getting killed and turned into wights.
  • In Grey's Anatomy Jackson is held at gunpoint during the hospital shooting and told not to save Derek Shepherd. He seems to play by the shooter's rules at first, letting Derek flatline and even telling the others to hold their hands up. Once the shooter leaves, however, he reveals he had only disconnected the machine and gets right back to work.
  • In Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Qpid" Q sends the crew to Sherwood Forest to prove to Picard that he does Love Vash, by casting Vash as Maid Marian who has been taken hostage by the local Lord, and Picard as Robin Hood must save her. Unfortunately for both Q and Picard's plans Vash isn't interested in being rescued by Picard and turns Picard over to the Lord when he's discovered sneaking into her chambers to rescue her. This throws the whole scenario so off the rails even Q is powerless to get everyone back on track with his goals, though he is more amused by this turn than outright angered.
  • Wallenberg: A Hero's Story is filled with this. The Arrow Cross (Hungarian Nazis) puts a limit on how many protective passports they will allow. This results in an Operational and Secrecy versions of this trope. Notably, there's a scene where the neutral diplomats are pulling Jews of the trains headed to Auschwitz.
    Wallenberg: I'm sorry. I can take only so many, so I must take the young. Forgive me.

    Western Animation 
  • Thunderbirds runs on this trope, as the titular craft are designed specifically for rescue. Despite really specific equipment, expect a lot to go wrong, forcing an out-of-the-box solutions. Also, International Rescue must operate under strict secrecy, as they do not wish their technology to fall into the wrong hands.

    Real Life 
  • This occurred following Japan Airlines' Flight 123 crash in 1985 (in which singer Kyu Sakamoto was one of the fatalities); US Military forces stationed near the crash site offered to send personnel immediately to the crash site, but the Japanese government turned down the offer, only sending in their own JSDF personnel the next day. The Other Wiki has more information.
  • During the Grand Mosque crisis in 1979, when terrorists took over the Grand Mosque in Mecca, efforts to retake the mosque were stymied by the ulema, Saudi Arabia's religious elite, who balked at the prospect of violence in the holiest site in Islam. Eventually, they granted permission to use deadly force, but only after the King gave them even more power over the country.
Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report