Follow TV Tropes

Following

Game Breaker / Other Games

Go To

Game Breakers that don't fit into any of the other categories.

Games with subpages:


Other games

  • Any game with a finite number of states and which does not make use of randomness may be mathematically solved, resulting in a guaranteed win or draw ("perfect play") for whoever has the correct starting conditions. "Perfect play" does not mean "good play", it means being able to see every potential future state of the game and choosing the absolute best move at each point. Thus, there really is only one way to play these games "perfectly," except when choices are pretty much equivalent. Once a strategy for perfect play is discovered, the game can be considered completely broken, unless played by naive players. The most well-known example of this is Tic-Tac-Toe, which any skilled player can play perfectly to a draw.
    • Connect Four has been solved, and becomes a first player win for perfect play. To two sufficiently advanced programs playing the game, the game comes down to who wins the coin flip for first turn.
    • Advertisement:
    • Checkers may be the most popular solved game. The game has 500 quintillion possible states. No human can comprehend all that. From a sufficiently advanced computer's point of view, Checkers is as trivial as Tic-Tac-Toe. Perfect play results in a draw. Because humans lack this perspective, we cannot play Checkers perfectly and don't grow bored of it like we do Tic-Tac-Toe.
    • Chess and Go, the quintessential games for geniuses, are both in principle solvable by computation, as both games have a finite board and no random elements — though it would require a computer many orders of magnitude better than anything available now. For some perspective, there are about 10^120 possible chess games compared with about 10^80 atoms in the observable universe. Go is worse because it branches out much more, making the options explode too widely to analyze with the methods used for Chess in any reasonable timeframe, with no obvious way of pruning 'bad' choices quickly.
    • Advertisement:
    • On a double-meta level, the strategy-stealing argument, which can prove for many games that perfect play isn't a win for player 2, without anyone having to figure out what perfect play actually constitutes. It works on any game where the players start in the same scenario, and getting an extra turn can never harm you. Notably, this does not include Chess or Go, as there are scenarios in Chess where every possible move weakens your position, but passing isn't allowed, and Go traditionally gives player 2 some extra points to compensate for the known advantage player 1 has.
      • Additionally, as Go's metagame has evolved, the points given to player 2 has risen over time, as players have found going first to be more and more advantageous.
    • Tic-Tac-Toe, Connect 4, and Chess also help introduce some ideas about why a game might be easier or harder to solve. Consider Tic-Tac-Toe. At first, it seems like the first player has 9 options for where to place their first mark, but that isn't the case. The play space is symmetrical. Each corner square is functionally identical, as is each side square. Thus, there are really only three options: side, corner, or center. Suppose first player chooses the center square. Now second player only has two options: corner or side. The number of meaningful choices in the game is surprisingly small, and it can be broken with a brute force search through those possibilities with a sheet of scrap paper.
      • Connect 4 has a symmetrical seven columns the first player can place their piece in, so really they have only four choices for first turn: center, one away from center, one away from the outside edge, and outer edge. If they drop into the center, the second player has the same number of choices (4), but if they drop into any of the other columns, then there is now a difference between all of the columns and second player has 7 choices, and so on. It takes a computer to use brute force to go through that many possible moves.
      • The chessboard is not symmetrical, and there is a difference between moving the king's bishop's pawn one square and the queen's bishop's pawn one square. White has 8 distinct pawns that can move to one of two squares and two knights that also could move to two different squares each, for a total of 20 possible initial moves. Black has the same options, for another 20 distinct responses. That's four hundred possible states for the game after both players have had their first turn: after both players have had two turns there are 197,742 possible states, and after three, 121,000,000.
    • Advertisement:
    • So far, we've looked at board games. In theory, however, there is no reason that a hypothetical computer with enough power couldn't solve a competitive video game or develop a perfect speed run or max score run if the game has no random factor. Time and distance and options in video games by definition are finite and discrete.
      • Consider Pac-Man. Every ghost has a simple script that tells it where to go, which famously gave each ghost its personality. The speed of Pac-Man and every ghost, as well as the duration of each power-up and appearance of each bonus item, was determined from the start of the game. Thus, a hypothetical computer could solve the game for whatever a human determines is perfect play, such as obtaining the maximum possible score before the Kill Screen or else getting to the kill screen as quickly as possible.
      • Remarkably, six humans have indeed managed a perfect score in Pac-Man, so a fair definition for a perfect game of Pac-Man might be, "Get the maximum possible score in the shortest amount of time, as measured in frames."
  • The cast of the webcomic Adventurers!, which is set in an RPG Mechanics 'Verse, have found and exploited a few of these.
  • Plenty of actual RPGs can be broken by sufficiently munchkin-minded players.
    • 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons had the ability for characters to summon allies. One of the available choices was pixies. Because they are low level creatures with only 1 HP, a single summoning of pixies can summon a large number of them. They wouldn't be useful in a fight - but each of them comes with a full load-out of daily use spells, which they can be instructed to use on the party and then leave. One of these is polymorph, which can turn a weak character into a much stronger animal or beast (such as a T-Rex).
    • Pathfinder 1st edition had the dreaded Synthesist, a Summoner variant who turned into their Eidolon instead of summoning it. In other words, they're a magic using class that can turn into a strong melee fighting creature that they can power up with their own magic. Um.
  • In the parodic Let's Play Sonic the Hedgehog 2: Special Edition, playing as Knuckles the Echidna makes any level a cakewalk. In addition to gliding and climbing walls, he can jump really high (as in, high enough to skip entire levels in a single bound or to almost leave Mobius' atmosphere) and he can summon artillery support to take out Robotnik in a single shot.
  • In Armada, in the in-universe game Armada, the aliens start using Disrupters which are almost invincible. The people start complaining that this is a game breaker.
  • In Mythic Quest, the main character's Shadow Sword is so powerful it is often accused of being a hack in that video game by other characters. All the Shadow Spells fall under this, usually ending up in one hit KO territory.
  • Sports are not immune from their own game breakers. In baseball, the bunt used to be a game breaker as it allowed a hitter to take as many pitches as he wanted, able to stand there and bunt off every pitch until he saw one that he wanted to hit. As a result, the rules were changed so that a bunt foul with two strikes would count as a strike out, preventing the bunt from being abused.
  • Another famous baseball game breaker: since a batter's strike zone is dependent on his height, you might have wondered "so why don't they just send little people to hit?" In 1951, the St. Louis Browns (now Baltimore Orioles) did just that; they signed a little person to a contract and sent him to hit, and when he was (naturally) walked, removed him for a pinch runner. When the commissioner's office found out, they promptly invalidated the contract and mandated that all contracts in the future be approved by the league.
  • Basketball used to have a game breaker of its own. It used to be possible to get a lead in the game, then literally sit on the ball, forcing the other team to foul, hoping that the player would miss the free throws in order to get the ball back and have a chance of scoring. To solve this problem, Danny Biasone created the shot clock, requiring a team to take a shot within 24 seconds or lose possession of the ball. This addition radically changed the way that game was played, making old versions of the game almost unrecognizable today. Why 24 seconds? According to Biasone, "I looked at the box scores from the games I enjoyed, games where they didn't screw around and stall. I noticed each team took about 60 shots. That meant 120 shots per game. So I took 48 minutes – 2,880 seconds – and divided that by 120 shots. The result was 24 seconds per shot."
    • This still happens with a shot clock but is thankfully limited to the end of the game. When the game is close enough towards the end that the trailing team thinks they can come back to win they will foul the leading team whenever the leading team has the ball. The team that is leading when intentional fouling starts almost always wins. This strategy tends to annoy the fans of both teams.
    • On the flip side, when a game has already been effectively decided the coaches of both teams will pull their best players (to avoid risking injuries) and will play reserves play that fans would otherwise not be able to watch outside practice.
  • In (American) Football, the "Flying Wedge" is a very effective formation that tends to result in a lot of injuries, which is why it's been banned.
  • At the 1979 U.S. Open golf tournament Lon Hinkle was waiting at the eighth tee when he noticed an alternate route to the hole - hitting the ball through an opening in some trees and landing on the 17th fairway. He then shot from there to the green on 8 and birdied the hole. After the golfer he was paired with, Chi Chi Rodriguez, took the same route, USGA officials planted a tree overnight to block that approach. It's believed to be the only time a course in a major event ever had such an obstacle added during the competition. The tree is now known as the "Hinkle tree."
  • Subverted in Magi-Nation. A power gem could be bought for 8 animite and sold for 12 animite. However, while animite is the currency of the realm, you never need to buy items, as you can recover health naturally, and you need infused animite anyways to forge rings. Basically, its a game breaker in the most technical sense that you need animite, but you don't need it that badly.
  • When Phineas and Ferb create a virtual reality game, Candace gets sucked in, with a Modesty Towel and, more important to the trope, a hairdryer reducing the use of "jumping and ducking."
  • The spartan from Deadliest Warrior the Deadliest Warrior video game is a bit of game breaker. His spear range attack flies at head level (and attacks to the head are almost always one hit kills), and can end a match within a second if the opponent doesn't move out of the way IMMEDIATELY.
  • Alluded to in the title of PC gaming site Rock Paper Shotgun.
  • In ReBoot Bob's Glitch lets him be a cheating bastard in every game he's in. Then there was the one time he (mistakenly) brings a bomb into a racing game, and the explosion crashes the game. And the one time Matrix pulled out his Gun, in a Golf Game.
  • The NES version of Monopoly allows the player to make offers on AI players' property, which the AI will accept a certain percent of the time depending on how high the offer is. However, since there's no limit to how many times an offer can be made per turn, the player can repeatedly offer an extremely low amount for a property and the AI will eventually agree. Effectively, this means the player can take over the entire board with ease.
    • In an old version of PC Monopoly that came on a 5¼-inch floppy, the limited AI meant that a player who made an offer to an AI then had to turn the machine over to the other human players, who would then vote in place of the AI making a decision. Needless to say, in a single player game, this could be abused relentlessly.
    • An early version of Monopoly for cellphones (in the pre-smartphone days) had incredibly stupid computer AI. When the computer offered a trade, you could modify the offer, asking the computer to add all its undeveloped properties to the trade (except for properties in the same colour group it wants to trade from you), and it would accept the trade no matter how bad a deal it was.
  • Throughout its history, Neopets has had several in various areas of the site.
    • In single-player Battledome matches, the Faerie abilities Lens Flare and Warlock's Rage, which have identical effects: they prevent the opponent from acting at all for that turn. Most matches require you to choose a balance between attack and defense. When this is in play, Dual Wielding is a viable option, and many single-player opponents go down in a One-Hit KO after that, especially if your pet is at a high enough level to learn Warlock's Rage in the first place—a minimum of 200. It's considerably less broken in Player Versus Player because opponents have the same abilities, but still considered essential.
    • Formerly, the weapon Shuriken in any Battledome matches, regardless of whether 1-player or Player Versus Player. It dealt damage comparable to the Hidden Tower's weapons and had a 50% chance of stopping the opponent from acting the following turn. To top it all off, it averted Power Equals Rarity, so it was virtually everywhere in the metagame. Since then, however, it's been hit with not only a severe Nerf but also a rarity hike, so while still powerful, it's no longer as devastating and can't usually be found for under one million neopoints on the user market anymore.
    • In 2014, the IP was sold from Viacom to JumpStart, and with the server migration that followed came a Game-Breaking Bug in late September and early October that allowed items to be duplicated. Naturally, a number of exceptionally rare and powerful items were duplicated en masse and flooded the market, including a number of weapons from the Smuggler's Cove. Those items weren't gamebreaking in themselves despite their power due to their extreme rarity, but when people started being able to Dual Wield them and doing 1024 HP of damage in a single turn...
    • Premium membership offers several very strong perks, including the ability for Premium members to change the species of a pet freely once every 365 days. The pet will stay the same color after changing species. There's a catch, though; not every pet is available in every color, so if you try to change a pet that has a color the new pet doesn't, you can freely select the color, preventing a Game-Breaking Bug but in exchange allowing a very quickly-discovered exploit: Magical Chia Pops. They change the pet to a fruit or vegetable Chia, and fruit and vegetable colors are only available on Chias. As a result, using one and then the species changing perk allows a user to get nearly any pet speciesnote  of nearly any color availablenote  without the need of a paint brush, morphing potion, or lucky Lab Ray zap. So when it was introduced, many users who had been trying and saving for a particular desired pet and color combination for years suddenly had a very easy way out.
  • The Porsche 917 was such a good race car that the Le Mans organizers rewrote the rules after the 1970 season to ban it. The primary reason why it destroyed the competition in any of the racing events it entered (especially the infamously loose Can-Am series) wasn't because of its well-designed aerodynamics and all-around performance but because of its ungodly powerful engine. Specifically the 917/30KL version mounted a monstrously powerful turbocharged engine that maxed out at 1580 HP, easily leaving any of the would-be supermachines in the dust without much effort.
  • Pog has two. One, Unoffical slammers were often larger and thicker than official Slammers, making it much easier to score if you were using then, for no real drawback. A much better one was to simply throw the slammer at the SIDE of the pile, which could often knock over more than half of the Pogs on turn one, rendering the game unwinnable for anyone else.
  • In Edward D. Hoch's short story "Centaur Fielder for the Yankees", the New York Yankees sign on a centaur. Think about that.
  • A parachute can turn an egg-drop competition into a joke: if it can handle a ten-foot drop, a parachute-equipped egg can survive being dropped from any altitude up to the point where you need to worry about surviving orbital re-entry. Consequently, many egg-drop competitions ban the use of parachutes.
  • In Wreck-It Ralph, Vanellope Von Schweetz is an In-Universe game breaker. She possess a glitching that allows her to suddenly appear in front of her opponents in the Random Roster Race, which is a very useful ability in a racing game. Even after crossing the finish line and resetting her game, she keeps this advantage.
  • The Order of the Stick (set in an RPG Mechanics 'Verse based on 3rd Edition D&D) parodies this when Roy meets a half-ogre with a "perfect" character build. Due to his size, his wielding a spiked chain (a reach weapon), and his combat reflexes, he was able to score multiple attacks on Roy every time he approached by jumping backwards. After boasting about how invincible he was, he ended up jumping back a little too far and going off a cliff.
  • Tale of Food: Triple Delicacy Boneless Fish is intensely annoying for those having to go against him – his shtick revolves around stealing the enemy side's buffs, which not only greatly weakens your team but also can become a real pain if the buff being stolen is golden body, taunting, or both at the same time.
  • Thumb Wrestling Federation has several moves that could qualify, but what stands out is Senator Skull's "Super Skull", which results in both a pinned opponent & ''a wrecked arena". It is also so violent that it has to be censored, so we don't know exactly what happens when Senator Skull uses it.
  • In Fairy Tail, during the Magic Tournament arc, one game has a house with 100 monsters inside, whose strengths vary from scary (D class) to indescribably scary (S class). Each competitor picks the number that they want to fight at one time, but only gets 1 point per monster (regardless of class), and can't leave until they give up or the monsters are dead. So Erza picks all of them. Even though she only needs 51. When she's done, the other 7 competitors are reduced to punching a device to measure their power level.
  • Not specific to any pinball machines are four techniques banned from all official tournaments (and nearly all unofficial ones too): The Shooter Lane Cradle, the Shooter Lane Juggle, the Death Save, and the Bang Back. The former two are banned because they allow the player to play multiballs with one or more balls resting by the plunger, making it impossible to actually lose. The latter two are banned because they are techniques that rescue a ball that should have otherwise drained and are easy enough to do that an experienced player can consistently rescue the ball until he or she tires out. All four techniques, however, are also banned because they can cause damage to the machine and/or the player.
    • The White Water pinball machine has a mode that makes everything worth 5 times as many points for the following 25 seconds or until the ball drains, whichever comes first. Whenever White Water shows up at a competition, it soon becomes a race to set up different features to yield as many points as possible, then activate that multiplier. It is not uncommon to see people doubling their score or more within those 25 seconds, and any competitor who fails to reach that multiplier is certain to lose.
      • What can make this worse is the issue of applying the 5x multiplier to the Vacation Bonus - the huge wizard award for completing all features in a single game. The issue is that some versions of the machine support it and some do not, and even some simulations vary in support for it - since they may not have used the original firmware, and it's unlikely the developers thought to test the very specific scenario where it's possible.
    • Machines made by Gottlieb tend to have one or more things worth much more than anything else in the game, whether it be the multiball in Cue Ball Wizard and Tee'd Off, the Million Shot in Lights... Camera... Action!, or completing the grid of lights in Surf 'N' Safari. According to Jon Norris, who designed the playfields for most of Gottlieb's machines from the mid-80's and onwards (but not the rules), this was intentional: Gottlieb's machines were not designed with competition in mind, nor did they anticipate the machines' rules would get picked apart in the future, so one or more things were made more valuable than the others as a Comeback Mechanic to allow a less-skilled player to catch up by stumbling onto a high-scoring mode. This did not stop Gottlieb's machines from showing up in major competitions though—Surf 'N' Safari was a game used in the final rounds of PAPA World Championships 18 on March 2015, for instance, as completing the grid is considered no easy task, even by the best players.
    • "Run from Spike" from Junk Yard is the single highest scoring mode on this machine relative to effort and difficulty. In addition, all successful shots leading up to "Run from Spike" safely deposits the ball back onto a flipper. As a result, competitive play in Junk Yard mostly boils down to activating "Run from Spike," then playing it repeatedly until it awards the Hair Dryer, which changes the mode to "Shoot the Dog" (no relation to the trope of the same name), a mode that's harder to complete and awards half as many points. From then on, the game is played normally.
    • Pinball FX implements some of the original Williams pinball machines, but modifies them in ways that can create game breaking strategies. The most common is that the default physics can make both trapping the ball and certain shots much easier than they were on the original tables, although there is an option to play with "classic" and "tournament" physics settings which are much closer to the original tables. More importantly, though, there's survival mode where you have infinite ball save as long as you meet a series of timed score thresholds, and then the game ends immediately without counting up bonus. This can create some bizarre game breaking strategies. For example, on The Party Zone in survival mode, the best strategy is to start multiball and immediately drain out of it to get the "double points for the rest of the ball" bonus which applies after multiball (which will apply for the rest of the game because of infinite ball save), then hammer the way-out-of-control lane over and over (an extremely difficult and risky shot, but there is no risk and it's the highest scoring shot on the game) in the hope of lighting the "1 million per bumper" award - which makes them worth 2 million with the double bonus - and then repeatedly drain the ball and launch it over and over since the plunger gives a guaranteed feed to the bumpers.
  • During both World Wars the British Royal, British Commonwealth, and American Navies had access to the then current uncensored editions of Jane's Fighting Ships. This might not seem like much of a game breaker until you realize that those books contain very detailed technical information about almost every major surface warship that was afloat during both of those wars. All of the following was contained in one easy to reference source:
    • Silhouette line drawings and/or photographs of almost every class of ocean going surface warship (including obsolete and minor ones) in the world.
    • Many of the silhouette line drawings tell you how thick the side armour was and how it was distributed.
    • The planview line drawings almost always showed the weapon layout and often included information about firing arcs.
    • Many entries include information about deck armour and underwater protection. Some have a thick line in the silhouette drawings indicating where, in elevation, the deck armour is located and/or vertical dashed lines showing the location of the watertight transverse bulkheads.
    • Information about things like fuel bunkerage, fuel consumption, fuel type (coal, oil, diesel, or mixed), engine horsepower, maximum speed, and cruising range is extensive.
    • The WWI editions had some fairly detailed information about individual models of naval artillery (shell weight, powder charge, muzzle velocity, range, and more), charts of major harbors with depth and tide information, and information about the size and number of the dry dock, floating dock, and refueling facilities available at those harbors.
    • This is the 1906 entry for the Japanese Battleship Mikasa. It is fairly representative of the typical capital ship entry.
  • In 100% Orange Juice!, the character Suguri has a +2 bonus to evasion, making it pathetically easy to dodge most attacks. Also, she has a card (or rather, 2 copies of it) that allows you to roll 2 dice for every roll in a turn. Including rolls to gain stars, attack and dodge.
  • Ratings Games, the tightly-regulated arena combat Devils use to test each other in High School Dx D, ban the use of Balance Breakersnote  and certain other spells and abilities that have an unreasonable chance of killing the target outright before they could be retired to the holding area. Note that this only applies to Ratings Games, in life-or-death combat these abilities are used with wild abandon. At one point Rias demonstrates the power of a new spell by pointing out it would be illegal in Games.
    • Rias' Peerage is a collective Game-Breaker in ratings games. In theory every Devil in a peerage is attuned to a type of Chess piece, limiting the headcount and roles of stronger members by superior pieces, as well as the amount of grunts/cannon fodder pawns. A particularly adept Jack of All Stats might take several pawns to reincarnate/sign up. Issei is eventually worth twelve pawns , plus her bishop Gaspar is another mutated (read: overpowered) piece, and both can be fielded without taking penalties elsewhere. The only thing balancing this story-breaking advantage is a serious manpower problem, as Ratings Games take place in large arenas where tactics matter and she's outnumbered nearly two-to-one, and the major villains have no interest whatsoever in playing Hell's internal power games.
  • A Song of Ice and Fire, the Targaryens are the only house in the known world to possess dragons, this made them unbeatable against everyone in Westeros.
  • Economy is not immune to this either. There is The Pyramid Scheme, something that if allowed would turn our capitalistic economy into a monarchistic one. The basic principle is simple. There is one guy offering a job to you. You offer him a part of your money to do the job, which is to recruit people doing a job for you in exchange of a part of their money that is partially for you and partially for your boss. The job this guy is going you do is to recruit people to do a job in exchange for a share of their revenue which is going to get shared with you and your boss and the guy recruited for the job has as a job to... I think you get the point by now. As you can imagine, the fact that the system seldom if ever sells goods or services to customers leads plenty of governments to do everything in their power to forbid those systems from being in circulation in their country.
  • In Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Elementary Dear Data", Data has a simple one for the Sherlock Holmes simulations he tries on the holodeck- as the simulations were meant to follow the plots of Conan Doyle's original stories, simply having committed the stories word-for word to memory (possible for Data's android brain) makes him able to "solve" the mystery without playing through the game and picking up the clues. The other characters have to explain to him this is missing the point (the challenge of solving the mystery being what makes the game fun) and set about reprogramming the simulations to provide Data with an actual challenge. (It backfires in the shape of the Moriarty character gaining sapience and trying to take over the ship.)
  • Kiratto Kaiketsu: 64 Tanteidan has a spell that allows you to knock an opponent out for several turns, for a measly four Kiratto points. Not helped by the fact that everyone recovers some points every four turns.
    • Another spell allows you to teleport someone to another part of the board for just eight points. What that means is, the moment someone gets inconveniently close to finishing the game (or delivering something to someone), you can stop them without little trouble at all, and the game can go on and on (especially if more than one person has the spell in question).
  • The Ballad of Edgardo: A severely underpowered PC in an online roleplay manages to reach the top by proper exploitation of a Game Breaker. One of the in-universe locations had a field effect that would instantly refill the Mana Meter of any character who visited it, up to the maximum allowed Cap. One of the perks available to first-level characters removed the mana cap in exchange for not allowing the character to use elemental attacks, restricting them to the Non-Elemental "Raw Spirit", which was pathetically weak but couldn't be resisted. Cue the character walking around with literally infinite power. And just when he thinks he found a snag when infinite power doesn't last long enough after visiting, he learns teleportation, with its distance powered by the same infinite power. He promptly used to teleport-gank the strongest player in the setting (to be fair, said player deserved that).
  • In many virtual reality games that make use of real space tracking, such as the HTC Vive, the player can 'cheat' by simply reaching or stepping into/through physical objects within the virtual space, since it's impossible for the game's programming to physically restrict the player's hands or body. While it's possible to program games to detect this sort of behavior, most games don't, as the technology is still relatively new and VR gaming is an experimental field.
    • In Job Simulator, the play area is locked to coordinates in virtual space, meaning it's possible to reach through virtual obstructions to pick up dropped or thrown items as long as they're still within your play area. Of course, the dropped item itself can still be blocked by other virtual objects, but that doesn't prevent you from phasing through a counter to pick up dropped money, for example.
    • Spell Fighter averts this by relocating the play space within virtual space if you intersect with a solid object. For example, if an in-game table is in the center of your real-world play space and you step forward into it, your virtual position will remain the same, but your physical position (obviously) won't, meaning all you've done is effectively push the table's location closer to the edge of your real-world play space.
    • VRPorize takes no measures to prevent this, meaning you can teleport next to a wall and then physically step inside of the wall as long as there's real-life space to do so, effectively making you unreachable by enemies.
  • Kamen Rider Ex-Aid: Big Bad Kamen Rider Chronus is an In-Universe example, as he is basically a Game-Breaker in human form, and entirely by design. It was created to be the reward for the player who could defeat all twelve of the bosses in Kamen Rider Chronicle, which unlocked the Final Boss Gamedeus, who's so powerful that Chronus is said to be the only thing that could possibly defeat it. When Chronus falls into the hands of Masamune Dan, he starts with the power to "Pause" time and develops several more powers that allow him to completely dominate the rest of the cast for the final third of the series.
  • In the beat-em-up Asterix & Obelix XXL, while it will take quite some time to unlock, once you do, the Tornado combo skill and it's upgraded version Tornado Fusion will almost completely trivialize most encounters. Once activated, it will cover a huge area of the field and almost no enemies can even get close before being sent flying. Oh, and due to a case of Good Bad Bugs, if the player is really quick on the input, they can set it off without it draining the combo meter allowing them to use it immediately again once it wears off. (It normally drains almost the entire meter on use).
  • In the panel show The Unbelievable Truth, four comedians each give a lecture that is entirely false save for five truths which they must try and smuggle past the others. In one episode Henning Wehn, having gone first and gotten a large number of truths past the other panellists, realises that a great way of ensuring victory is to simply not say anything when it's not your turn.
  • Kinuba in Alita: Battle Angel is a motorball player armed with the ultra-deadly Grind Cutters, which turn his fingers on one hand into chainsaw-like whips that can shred through almost anything. Since they’re pretty much the closest thing to projectile weapons as you can get in a setting where projectile weapons are banned, he’s effectively unstoppable on the track and begins rising up the ladder far quicker than everybody else. So Vector kills him for screwing up the carefully rigged odds and breaking the game, stealing his weapons to use them against Alita off the track.
  • Yakuza 0 has two general purpose ones for Majima. The first is the Slugger style, which gives him a weapon with infinite durability, a Heat Action he can use any time whenever he has meter instead of having to set up a situation for it to be available, and a lengthy bat nunchaku combo that gets in a ton of hits. The second is a certain finishing move for the Breaker style where Majima begins spin-kicking low to the ground, which not only makes him difficult to hit, but he can trip up enemies and then hit them multiple times on the ground. The only downside is that the attack is at the end of a lengthy combo.
    • The Slime Gun is the perfect anti-Mr. Shakedown weapon. Mr. Shakedown normally has a lot of durability against bullets, but for some reason the Slime Gun bypasses this, allowing you to shave a ton of health off a max-level Mr. Shakedown before you run out of ammo.
    • Counter moves are generally pretty powerful in Yakuza, but the first one remains the greatest: The Tiger Drop. Huge damage, knockback, and invincibility frames if you pull it off, you'll find yourself spamming it on frustrating bosses. Its power fluctuates between games, but the strongest iteration is arguably in Yakuza 5, where you are given a ludicrous window to pull it off on top of everything else.
  • Bofuri: I Don't Want to Get Hurt, so I'll Max Out My Defense.: Due to having no experience with video games prior to her friend Risa getting her into New World Online, Kaede maxes out her toon Maple's defense stat, making her such a Stone Wall that almost nothing can injure her. As a consequence of the way the game's Skill Scores and Perks system works, she No Sells high-level monsters and players and gains increasingly absurd skills, provoking multiple Obvious Rule Patches from the development team. The devs eventually just give up trying to balance her because they notice her sheer silliness has actually become a selling point for the game.
  • Transport Tycoon and remakes:
    • When the Boeing 747 becomes available, there is little incentive to use anything else for long-distance passenger and mail transportation anymore, also because the Jumbo Jet is an extreme cash cow.
    • The creator of the fan-made UK Renewal Set for OpenTTD once named an interesting reason for his decision to keep the Class 55 "Deltic" out of his new UK Railway Set, at least in earlier versions: It was by far the most powerful locomotive available for decades, and "arcade players" not interested in realism would only use "Deltics" on all of their trains, disregarding all other locomotive classes.
  • Many casino mobile games have accompanying social media profiles that include links in every post which give players small amounts of in-game currency when clicked. Each link also only works once per player, and expirenote  a few days later. More than likely, the links are just an incentive to get players to follow the profiles, as they'd have little-to-no reason to otherwise. Furthermore, the amount the links give are small, and depending on the game, the player will more often than not lose all of it in a short amount of time. However, this didn't stop the creation of fan sites that were made solely to scrape the profiles for these links so players can amass large amounts of tokens all at once. For this reason, the Bribing Your Way to Victory aspect of these games is rarely ever touched by their playerbases, because the abundance of these links negate any real reason to even bother with microtransactions.
  • WarioWare: Get it Together:
    • Ashley is one of the most versatile characters in the game, with completely free movement and the ability to use a ranged attack in any direction, something that makes her much more convenient than most other characters in the game, who either lack ranged attacks or have limited movement.
    • Orbulon also has the ability to move freely, as well as a tractor beam that allows him to pick up objects or suck up enemies and obstacles with its massive hitbox, making short work of games that would be much more difficult for any other character.
  • The edutainment sketch-game show hybrid Crashbox has the "Distraction News" segment, where cardboard news anchor Dora Smarmy gives a report about a certain topic while various actions occur throughout the studio, with the object of the game being to focus on her report enough to answer five questions at the end. Doing so can be incredibly easy if you turn on closed captions.
  • Hitman 2 added the ICA Electrocution Phone as an unlockable item. This thing basically trivialized any missions with one target because it was always treated as an Accident Kill (which doesn't draw suspicion and preserves Silent Assassin) and it was not hard to lure the target to pick it up even if they were surrounded by bodyguards. This was the only item that was removed in Hitman 3, which goes to show how broken it was.
  • The Thunder Element from Little Witch Nobeta. While finding it is a little bit out of the way, once the player actually have it they have access to what is basically a sniper rifle with no need to scope that can one shot pretty much anything they might come across making it stupidly overpowered when compared to the other elements. Even bosses melt in seconds. And while it is supposed to be balanced around its long cooldown timer and heavy mana cost compared to the other elements, it has such an easy time to stagger even bosses that by the time they recover the cooldown has already finished. The mana cost meanwhile turns irrelevant as it deals so much damage that almost everything will be dead before it even becomes an issue. And as if this wasn't enough, when charged it causes the titular witch to enter Bullet Time, giving her free reign to wail on enemies which also recharges her mana even faster making the mana cost even more moot. Finally there is the cast which is basically a giant Kill Sat that hits a huge area that not only deals even more damage, but also ignores line of sight and even walls. Needless to say, all these traits combined results in the element making the entire rest of the game a cakewalk.

Alternative Title(s): Other

Top