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"Just watch the Wiz, baby."
"Quit talkin' and start chalkin'."
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Cue Ball Wizard is a 1992 Physical Pinball Table designed by Jon Norris for Gottlieb (under the Premiere label), with illustrations by David Moore and Jeanine and Constantino Mitchell.

Unsurprisingly, a game called Cue Ball Wizard has a cue ball prominently featured on the table, along with an eight ball in an oscillating kicker on an upper playfield. If the player shoots the cue ball correctly, it hits a target on the kicker, which knocks the eight ball into an upper set of targets. This is used during 8-Ball Multiball; hit one set of targets (solids or stripes), sink the eight ball, then use the kicker during multiball to hit the upper targets for a Super Jackpot. Alternately, complete the six game modes on the Wagon Wheel for Pool Ball Mania, then finish it with a quick round of 9-Ball for a 500 million bonus.

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Among pinball buffs, Cue Ball Wizard is well-regarded for its innovative playfield, tricky shots, numerous hidden bonuses, and smooth flow, a game that's not too difficult for beginners but fairly challenging for experts. If there is a downside, it's in the cartoonish sound effects and voice clips, which are too lighthearted to sell the game's "Urban Cowboy" motif. Regardless, Cue Ball Wizard became one of Premiere's best-selling tables of The '90s, a record it held until the company closed its doors.

Digital versions of Cue Ball Wizard appear in Microsoft Pinball Arcade (PC version only) and The Pinball Arcade.


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Just watch the tropes, baby:

  • Cowboy: Everyone in the game is a cowboy or cowgirl, with over-the-top dialog to match.
  • Expy: The Shooter is clearly meant to be one for Clint Eastwood.
    Shooter: "Make my day."
  • Fake Difficulty: Not on the real table, but the Microsoft Pinball Arcade version of this game makes going up the ramp a much more frustrating task than it needs to be (especially considering you're supposed to be able to shoot it without too much effort). Get ready to hear a lot of "You shore need that ramp, shot." Thankfully the later version in The Pinball Arcade was a bit nicer.
  • Golden Snitch: Completing 9-Ball rewards an overwhelming 500 million points, which becomes more lopsided if DOUBLE is enabled at the time.
    • DOUBLE can be considered this, too. It doubles EVERYTHING. Including Extra Balls and Specials.
  • Medium Awareness: If you drain the ball down the outlanes, the Shooter comments, "I hate these outlanes."
  • Off-the-Shelf FX: The cue ball and eight ball on the playfield are genuine pool balls. Operators can also remove the cue ball to make the game easier for players.
  • Score Multiplier: DOUBLE doubles all points on the current ball. Having it on turns the 500 million points for winning "9-Ball" into a 1 Billion bonus.
  • Shout-Out/Spiritual Successor: This game has so many references to Bally's Eight Ball Deluxe, designer Jon Norris' favorite pinball game, that it could be considered a Spiritual Successor. The game's theme and white-hat opponent aren't coincidences.
    • One of the possible things to find behind the curtains in the "Where's the King?" video mode is Cactus Jack from the Gottlieb table of the same name.
    Cactus Jack: Surprise, tendafoot!
  • Skill Shot: Time the launch so the rotating shooter strikes the eight ball into the center (blue) targets.
  • Spelling Bonus: P-O-O-L enables the Video Modes and the Sweet Spot, W-I-Z-A-R-D lights the No Way target for 10 million points per hit, and D-O-U-B-L-E doubles all subsequent scores for the current ball.
  • Take That Player: A weak ramp shot will result in the Shooter asking, "What kind of cow pie shot was that?"
  • Timed Mission: 9-Ball, which gives the player 90 seconds to shoot down the 1 through 7 targets, hit the 8-Ball saucer, then shoot the 9 ball.
  • Video Mode: Two of them.
    • "Catch the Pool Balls" is a simple version of Avalanche or Kaboom!, where you move a pocket to catch cue balls as they fall from the top of the screen.
    • "Where's the King?" is a simpler guessing game, where you try to find Elvis Presley behind one of three sets of curtains.
      Elvis: "You found the King, darlin'."
  • Welcome to Corneria: The game's instructional callouts quickly get repetitive.
    "You shore need that ramp shot."
  • World of Ham: The dialog is a nonstop cavalcade of Western clichés.
    "Yeeeee-hah! Multiball, awayyyyyyyyyy..."
  • Zonk: One of the possible results in "Find the King" is a cow pie, which is worth nothing.

"You ain't thinkin' of leavin' now, are ya?"
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