Video Game: Far Cry 4

"Now, before we begin... ah... to whom am I speaking? Hm? The son who returned to scatter his mother's ashes, or the lunatic who has murdered his way to the top of my mountain?"
Pagan Min, summing up the entire game

The fourth game in the Far Cry series (yet another Spiritual Successor to its predecessors, but with references to Far Cry, Far Cry 2, and Far Cry 3), set in Kyrat, a fictional region in the Himalayas.

You play as Ajay Ghale, a young man visiting Kyrat to scatter his mother's ashes. After a violent border crossing, Ajay meets Pagan Min, the flamboyant and insane self-proclaimed ruler of Kyrat. Violence ensues. So do selfies. The game features a greater sense of verticality than its predecessors, with a grappling hook and miniature helicopters joining the wingsuit from the previous game as major methods of traversal.

Far Cry 4 also features drop-in drop-out co-op, with players on Playstation systems being able to join a friend's game for co-op free-roam without owning a copy.

It was released 18 November 2014, with versions for the PS3, Xbox 360, PS4, Xbox One and PC.


Far Cry 4 provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Action Bomb: Hurk's exploding, C4-covered monkeys from the Rook Islands appear in at least one hallucination.
    • The C4-covered monkeys make a non-hallucinatory appearance in one of the Hunting sidequests, in which an escaped convict who used them to break out of prison hires you to put them down. Ajay tells the convict that he's heard of this stupid idea before.
    • In the Shangri-La segments, Beasts summoned by Hunters.
  • Affably Evil: Pagan Min seems to be very friendly towards Ajay. This is right after murdering a soldier in front of him for shooting at the bus he was on, and just before kidnapping him. With blood still all over his face. A secret ending shows Min personally transporting Ajay to the site where his mother wanted to be put to rest. At the end of the game, he chooses to Face Death with Dignity, though he has one final plea for his life. You then have two options: "Execute", where Ajay puts a bullet in his head after Pagan Min has had his final meal, or "Negotiate", where Ajay accepts his pitiful 'surrender'. Even in the "Negotiate" ending, the only retribution he reaps upon Ajay is pulling a Screw This, I'm Outta Here!, right after crowning Ajay as the next king of Kyrat, even going so far as to call a "do-over" after all of the pain Ajay has caused him.
  • Agent Peacock: Pagan Min likes to dress flamboyantly and isn't afraid to wear his more theatrical influences on his sleeve. Doesn't make it any less terrifying when he stabs Ajay's companion in the back and dares him to cry for help.
  • And Then John Was a Zombie: Also counts as a Gainax Ending. Valley of the Yetis ends with Ajay being turned into a Yeti after destroying Yalung's relic. Assuming the DLC takes place after the end of the main campaign and this is the ultimate end of Ajay's and Far Cry 4's story, it comes pretty close to Bioshock Infinite: Burial At Sea levels of WHAAAAT?!.note 
  • Animals Hate Him: Just like Rook Island, Kyrat is full of animals who want to destroy you. Crocodiles, super-tough rhinos, tigers, dholes, honey badgers, bears, and demon fish all want a bite of you. Even eagles get in on the action.
  • Animal Motifs: Elephants and tigers mainly. The elephant represents wisdom and defense, while the tiger represents ruthlessness and offense. The elephant covers all your defensive or crafting abilities in the skill tree, and stealth and shooting is covered by the tiger. This is also the main divide between the two would-be leaders of the Golden Path: Do whatever it takes to get an edge, even if it means sacrificing all traditional morals, or stick to what you know, even if it stands in the way of progress.
  • Anti-Climax: The secret ending. If you just sit and wait for Pagan at the beginning of the game, he'll come back, tell you everything about your mother, and leads you to where your mother wanted her ashes to be buried without issue.
  • Arbitrary Mission Restriction: The game has several examples.
    • The "Hunting" and "Assassination" Side Quests require the player to track down specific animal or human enemies and kill them, but the deed must be done with a specific weapon. This is in stark contrast to most of the game, which encourages the player to use whatever tactics and equipment they see fit. Stealth-centric players aren't likely to ever touch a shotgun during the campaign, but some of these side missions require it.
    • The "optional objectives" variant is featured on some assassination missions, where an extra cash bonus can be obtained by hiding the target's body in a specific location before fleeing the area afterward.
    • In what is probably an unintentional example, the game has very restrictive ideas about what constitutes "out of the mission area", to such an extent that some missions make it very difficult to use a "long-range sniper" play-style, as the game simply won't let the player get far enough away before failing them for going out-of-bounds.
  • Authority Equals Asskicking: Assassination targets have about twice as much health as the most heavily armored regular enemies (not counting Heavies). Similarly, Pagan Min's body double, Sabal, and Master Sandesh from The Valley of the Yetis all can survive quite a bit more damage than regular Mooks, though none of them last long against headshots or high caliber rounds.
  • Automatic Crossbows: One of these serves as Ajay's go-to stealth weapon. However, you can still use the bow from the last game, if you want to be able to use fire or explosive arrows.
  • Awesome but Impractical: The Harpoon Gun from the "Hurk's Redemption" DLC kills most human enemies and animals in one shot and looks really cool. Unfortunately, it can only load one harpoon at a time, makes a lot of noise, and does pitiful damage against Heavies, rhinos, and elephants. Its description in the shop menu lampshades this.
  • Battle in the Center of the Mind: Yuma is a master of Mind Rape drugs and only faces you when you're under the influence, effectively making her some sort of Master of Illusion. This merges with her obsession with Shangri-La; she actually becomes the famous warrior who discovered Shangri-La (the same guy YOU play as in the Shangri-La segments) during your encounter with her.
  • Bears Are Bad News: Asiatic black bears make an appearance as a predator species.
  • The Beastmaster: Ajay can ride elephants into battle. This is a VERY high step up from Far Cry 3, where every animal would either run away or bite you in the neck. As for the Shangri-La episodes, the protagonist of that story can summon a giant spirit tiger to kill demons.
  • Bee Afraid: Once in a while, you may find a Himalayan honey bee hive hanging from a tree or awning. If you shoot the hive, needless to say they'll be a little pissed off! Which you can use to your advantage if there are enemies around the hive, provided you don't get too close.
  • Bigfoot, Sasquatch and Yeti: It is heavily implied that Ajay encounters a Yeti in the main game when he sees a giant ape-like silhouette in the middle of a blizzard just after he escapes Durgesh Prison.
    • The Valley of the Yetis DLC features Yetis front and center as Ajay is trapped in the eponymous valley with a Cult hell-bent on offering him as a Human Sacrifice to the mythical beasts.
  • Bilingual Bonus: Crosses over with Suspiciously Apropos Music in some instances. Hindi-language songs by The Bombay Royale play at pivotal moments in the story, foreshadowing later revelations.
    • The opening escape from Pagan's palace is set to You Me Bullets Love, a song about a violent love affair, mirroring Pagan's and Ishwari's.
    • The penultimate mission wherein Ajay storms the palace with the intent of killing Pagan is set to Jaan Pehechan Ho, an otherwise upbeat song about courtship that opens with the lines, "If I knew you, life would be easier." The lyrics become much more appropriate if he chooses to spare Pagan and find out about the dictator's motivations after their "do-over."
    • Half the phrases spoken by Pagan's Elite Mooks in near-perfect Cantonese are that of cursing Ajay out during combat (typically along lines of "You piece of trash!", except harsher, along with "Fuck your mother!", which is one of the most common Cantonese profanities), while a few are of the "No!" variety when he performs stealth takedowns.
  • Black and Grey Morality: The rebels aren't very good people, with Amita believing the best way to help the people is turn their nation into a narco-state while Sabal is a reactionary conservative. Turns out, it's actually Black And Black Morality, with unfortunate mooks on both sides taking shades of grey. While Pagan Min is undoubtedly a mass-murdering insane tyrant, he is a Noble Demon, stimulated the economy through drugs, and the rebel leader Mohan snapped and murdered Pagan's infant daughter, Lakshmana Min, which is what turned a Pragmatic Villain into The Caligula. If Amita takes over, she enforces child slave labor and child soldiers, and is implied to have murdered Bhadra. If Sabal takes over, he plans on killing almost everyone, in front of Bhadra no less, because they didn't follow his religion. Pagan Min even encourages you to murder the surviving rebel leader to keep the nation out of their hands.
    • Pagan Min also doesn't take nicely to unplanned killings. If his henchman killed someone without his knowing, they would be punished severely.
    • The rebels and Royal Army themselves. Most of the rebels are good people, if extremely violent towards the Royal Army and wild animals, but are just trying to save Kyrat. However, some of them are blindly devoted to Amita or Sabal, and will perpetrate unforgivable acts in their name. Likewise, some of the Royal Army are just Punch Clock Villains who are devoted to Pagan Min but have families and personal lives (some of them keep virtual pets for fun, others will worry about their children with their dying words), others are just complete dicks who enslave and murder civilians.
  • Bland-Name Product: The GoBro camera Ajay uses for the Kyrati Films Racing sidequests.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: Rare animal variations encountered in the animal-skin sidequests plays this straight, but regular rhinoceros will do a good number on you. Even with 4 bars of health, you can still be reduced to barely any health if one hits you head on. And they topple cars too, which can instantly kill you. And they take a lot of bullets.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: Pagan Min has obnoxiously loud taste in outfits and quirks. Many, many quirks. Oddly enough, he's the Only Sane Man in many other respects given he sees clearly many of the problems with the Golden Path as well as the nation. There's also the fact he's a drug lord who went on to become a king, so he probably has an idea as to what he's doing and how to do it effectively.
  • But for Me, It Was Tuesday: Heavily implied on the part of the Golden Path. The group's leader, Mohan, murdered Pagan Min's daughter with Ishwari, Lakshmana, to make a point to Pagan, causing Ishwari to flee Kyrat with Ajay after killing Mohan herself in revenge. However, when Ajay asks the members, especially Sabal, about where he can find "Lakshmana", something he only knows as a name, he is treated as if the Golden Path have absolutely no idea what he is talking about, and they believe that "Lakshmana" is some kind of shrine. The implication is that either the Golden Path's members are deliberately lying to Ajay to further their cause, or they are actually ignorant to the identity of Pagan Min's daughter. Of course, this happened at least a couple of decades ago with Sabal being a child during Mohan Ghale's leadership.
  • But Not Too Foreign: Pagan Min rose to power as a son of Chinese Triad leader, but he is also partially European (makes sense, given he comes from Hong Kong), so he doesn't stick out like a sore thumb in an Indian/Nepalese environment and can relate better to the protagonist of the game.
  • But Thou Must: Whether or not Noore's demise happens at your hand or not, she will die. Also, Yogi and Reggie's missions tend to be like this. Even though Ajay clearly objects to the things they do, such as drugging him against his will multiple times, going along with their repeated injections of foreign substances into Ajay's body is the only way to complete these missions. You can choose not to do the missions, but where's the fun in that?
  • Calling Card: One of the many categories of collectibles in the game are the "Masks of Yalung", demonic masks left by a Serial Killer at the scenes of their grisly murders. Radio DJ Rabi-Ray-Rana wonders on-air what his Calling Card would be if he were a serial killer: Playing cards are too overdone, masks are already taken... so maybe he would just take a shit on his victims. This is something of a theme with him.
  • Camp Gay: Mumu Chiffon, if the name weren't a big enough hint. Played with a bit in that he's well-dressed and somewhat mincing, but has no sort of lisp, and clearly has at least some survival skills.
  • Camp Straight: Despite dressing flamboyantly and his unique personality, Pagan Min makes it clear he is straight.
  • Catch Phrase: The propaganda broadcaster's is "May Pagan's light shine upon you all".
  • Chainsaw-Grip BFG: The MG-42 machine gun and by extension, its Signature variant, the Buzzsaw are held with a chainsaw grip that's bolted onto their sides. The Harpoon Gun from the "Hurk's Redemption" DLC also qualifies.
  • Character Blog: For marketing, Ubisoft made one. It belongs to an Indian journalist who goes to Kyrat before the events of the game and in the end meets Pagan Min.
  • Civil War: The player is said to become embroiled in a civil war between the people and Pagan Min's despotic regime. It started over thirty years before the story with a conflict between the monarchy and La Résistance, and continued when Pagan Min usurped the throne.
    • By the beginning of the game proper, Pagan Min has reduced the rebels to nothing more than an annoyance. Ajay can change that.
  • Climax Boss: Yuma. She takes on the avatar of Kalinag by drugging you. The result is that you have to fight her while she commands an army of elite mooks and a tiger, all while using a bow. Also, when you're the one playing as Kalinag, the final boss is a giant demon raven that can summon enemies and shoot fireballs out of its mouth.
  • Co-Op Multiplayer: Hurk from Far Cry 3 returns as a secondary character.
  • Cold-Blooded Torture: Pagan Min's Royal Army do this to dissident citizens on a regular basis. Pagan Min's second in command, Paul "De Pleur" Harmon, is fond of electric wire beds.
  • Color Motif: Bright blue and orange, representing the elephant and tiger respectively.
  • Continuity Nod: Longinus was a warlord from an war-torn African country and was saved by a priest named Maliya, who helped in hiding him in a church in Pala and baptized him at Goka Falls.
    • Several sellable items qualify as continuity nods as well: A butchered wahine (with Vaas' head), conflict diamonds from Bowa-Seko, a knockoff GPS with a map of Rook Island, and malaria pills, to name a few.
      • There's also a gamebook that mentions Jack Carver and Dr. Krieger.
  • Could Have Avoided This Plot: Pagan Min flat out points this out in the finale, that the entire conflict could all have been avoided if Ajay had just listened to his Exact Words; "Stay right here. Enjoy the Crab Rangoon. Don't move. I will be right back." In the beginning if you do exactly as he asks of you a secret ending is revealed. If Ajay listens to Pagan Min and waits 13 minutes while he takes care of the Golden Path infiltrating his facility, Min returns and takes Ajay right to Lakshmana's resting place and Pagan Min even tells Ajay the big secret, bypassing the entire game.
  • Country Matters: Pagan Min calls Ajay's father a cunt in the secret ending.
  • Crossover: With Childish Gambino in the Far Cry 4 and Childish Gambino: The Collaboration trailer.
  • Deconstruction:
    • The game attacks the idea of Freudian Excuse and Morality Pet as an enabler and/or self-justification for doing terrible actions. Noore Najjar killed many people in the hopes of rescuing her family from Pagan Min only to be faced with the fact that they were dead a long time ago and she had killed for no reason. Likewise Amita and Sabal both fall into self-justifications when they decide to turn on each other in your respective branch of choices. De Pleur likewise uses his genuine love for his daughter as a ground of sanity while working as a brutal Torture Technician, so long as he can concentrate on her as an innocent in his life, he can completely bury his wrongdoings psychologically. Pagan Min himself Lampshades this, stating At Least I Admit It regarding his brutal crackdown of the Golden Path and the villagers who support them by noting that his daughter Lakshmana was killed by Mohan, the leader of the Golden Path.
    • In the end, Ajay Ghale has to consider this as well. His entire quest to return his mother's ashes to Lakshmana gets sidetracked by the Golden Path where he gets pulled into becoming an Icon of Rebellion but as Pagan Min points out he was always the heir of Kyrat and had he stayed with him and become his heir, he could perhaps have done more good by bringing peace from the top rather than becoming "one of the monkeys who throws their shit at each other". He also points out that once he brings the ashes to Lakshmana he would lose all connection with the pre-Kyrat Ajay, the one his mother wanted to keep out of the conflict. Though to be fair, this may be a bad idea: by becoming Pagan Min's student and heir, Ajay would effectively be HATED by Kyrat, whereas by massacring the army and saving innocents along the way, he becomes a heroic dictator. And yet, being called a "hero" for murdering punch-clock villains really puts the "double standard" to mind.
    • The game explores The Messiah trope and how it does more harm than good. Throughout the game quite a few characters including the main protagonist, his father, Bhadra and Pagan Min take or get elevated to this status. Far Cry 4 shows how it can be used, abused and downright manipulated to cause others to commit horrible atrocities in the name of whoever achieves such a status. A prime example is the post-credit sequence with Sabal.
    • Far Cry 4 also takes time to savage the idea of clearly defined Black and White Morality in war. While Pagan Min runs a authoritarian narco-state and violently oppresses the population of Kyrat, he tried to bring some order (although such efforts were intended to eliminate those hampering the development of his heroin fields) to a country which had suffered an 80-year civil war before he even arrived and was allegedly on the verge of phasing out the violence his army utilized and negotiating a peace settlement with the forces opposed to him at the gradual prompting of Ishwari Ghale, his lover. The Golden Path on the other hand claim to fight for a free Kyrat but their two leaders bicker constantly and ultimately try convince the player to murder their rival for control of the group, their founder was fine with murdering the infant daughter of Pagan Min and whatever vision ultimately wins out in the faction fight is no better or a whole lot worse than the current situation.
    • With its secret ending, the game makes a massive dig at the inevitable power fantasy of a traditional melodramatic video game conflict by letting the main character achieve what he wants without firing a single shot.
    • Far Cry 4 smashes the idea that any sort of group styling itself as La Résistance should immediately be considered heroic and should be supported regardless of context through showing us the horrific results of the Golden Path taking power in Kyrat and to a lesser extent the story behind Mohan Ghale and how his resistance group was in fact a bunch of religious extremists who were more concerned with archaic religious traditions rather than the well-being of the people as a whole and how their leader was fine with murdering the innocent infant daughter of his arch-enemy.
    • Adding onto the above, the game takes the time to ridicule the Evil Overlord trope and the idea that such characters who fulfill the role are always irredeemable with no good reasons for their actions by allowing Pagan Min to show the side of the story behind the conflict which the leaders of La Résistance don't tell the main character.
    • Finally, the game uses the ultimate result of its balance of power missions to ruthlessly parody the concept of a moral choice system in video gaming. Ultimately, neither rival vision for Kyrat benefits the people, especially considering one is a nation consumed by religious fanaticism and purges while the other had Kyrat becoming something akin to Pol Pot's Cambodia. The third option really isn't any better: If Ajay takes over (by killing Amita and Sabal), nothing changes. He doesn't become king, the Royal Army doesn't surrender or leave, and you still keep fighting as though Pagan was alive (albeit in an eternal coma, FINALLY). It's implied that Ajay's only plan is to keep using the Royal Army as an excuse plot and target practice. Did you ever have a plan to better Kyrat, or were you just there to keep killing people to make money to buy guns to kill people in bigger, more badass ways?
  • The Dev Team Thinks of Everything: At the beginning of the game, you are asked by Pagan Min to stay in a room and enjoy the plate of Crab Rangoon before you while he goes and tortures a Golden Path terrorist. Instead of exploring the mansion and eventually escaping, as you are supposed to, you can simply wait and do as Pagan Min instructed. After about 13 minutes, Pagan Min will return, and take you to Lakshmana, the place you are supposed to go, without any problems, creating a secret ending. By simply being patient, you skip over the rest of the plot without any trouble.
    • At the end of the game, after the credits, you can kill the person you sided with (Amita or Sabal), if you didn't like what they ended up doing with the Golden Path.
      • You can find Amita or Sabal going about doing mundane tasks if you spare them during the above post-credits scene. The same applies for the Golden Path leader you didn't side with and were ordered to kill, if you spared them when given the chance.
    • You can also kill Pagan even if you pick the "good" ending, if you have an RPG you can shoot down his chopper before he flies off, you'll then find his body down the mountain and you can loot it for quite a bit of cash.
  • Difficult but Awesome: The LK1018 rocket launcher has a scope which guides the rocket to where the crosshair is pointing, so long as you are aiming through it. Undoubtedly useful, but it comes with the risk of leaving yourself exposed and unable to retaliate to enemy fire as you direct the rocket to its target. One needs to secure a well-hidden vantage point before using it.
  • Disc One Nuke: You can acquire many top-tier weapons before they are unlocked in shops just by looting them off slain enemies. Also, if you are willing to grind the appropriate sidequests, you can unlock some of the best Signature Weapons fairly early into the game.
    • Doing Himalayas missions (such as the DLC missions or Hurk's missions) will pit you against Royal Guard much earlier in the game than you're normally supposed to encounter them, and subsequently lets you loot their endgame-level weaponry (most notably the .50 BMG sniper rifle) within the first couple hours of the game.
    • The Bushman assault rifle exemplifies this best. You get the chance to unlock it barely a third into the storyline, long before its stock version, the P416 is introduced. It has an excellent fire rate, solid damage, a silencer, and a decent scope for mid-range sniping, making it a very versatile weapon. It's somewhat balanced out by the fact that you have to reach rank 10 in the Shanath Arena just to get it.
    • You can get the M-79 grenade launcher after liberating a mere eight bell towers. With it you can take out vehicles in one hit and Heavily Armored Mook Heavies in a couple of hits. Unlike the rocket launchers and regular grenade launcher it loads really fast and you can carry a lot of ammo for it, and you can use it in vehicles, ending car chases immediately and using it to rain explosive deaths down on your enemies.
  • Dreaming of Times Gone By: Supposing Shangri-La is a real place in the game's universe, then the Shangri-La episodes fall under this trope. The player assumes control of the episodes' protagonist, Kalinag, and follows his mythical journey when the primary protagonist, Ajay, falls into a deep dream while searching for the paintings that depict it.
  • Dull Surprise: A common complaint about Ajay is that he reacts to some genuinely CRAZY STUFF with less than even Jason Brody's understated reactions.
  • Easter Egg: If you can find Pagan's corpse at the end, you can loot it and get the pen he stabbed the guard with at the start of the game, along with a large sum of money.
  • Eldritch Location: Much like Rook Island, Kyrat is heavily implied to be one the further you get into the game and the more collectibles you dig out. To say nothing what happens to Ajay when he's experimenting with the local plant life.
  • Elite Mooks: The Hunters. These guys are the real deal - unlike the rest of the army, they respect the traditions and culture of Kyrat, and then use those traditions and culture to murder everyone in their way. These guys have brains - they perform stealth (basically, they are resistant to the game-breaking tagging system, and have their own detection system which you won't be warned about), keep their distance and use bows to deal high damage without tracing themselves, shoot at anything close to Ajay that explodes, and can use traditional Kyrat drugs (with some hallucinogens in the mix) to become beastmasters and instantly convert powerful wild animals to their side, forcing Ajay to fight the animals and army instead of having them fight each other like they usually do. It's implied that using bows in a world of guns has honed their skills and brains... or that all the dumb archers were naturally selected already. These guys become player characters in the multiplayer, they're that good with bows and hunting.
    • Interestingly, there are elite Hunters encountered during the fight against Yuma. The only difference between them and their regular counterparts is that the elite Hunters are wearing body armor, allowing them to take an extra arrow shot (headshots still level the playing field, though, not to mention the time dilation while aiming).
    • A more mundane variety appears later in the game. Unlike the Kyrati-based Royal Army, the elite Royal Guard consists almost exclusively of Chinese mercenaries fighting for Pagan Min. They are first encountered when the player gets access to Northern Kyrat. They use superior tactics, utilize heavier body armor, utilize Heavy troopers of both the flamethrower and machine gun varieties more often, drive around in more heavily armed vehicles, carry more powerful weapons compared to the Royal Army and generally carry themselves with more professionalism. Essentially they're the equivalent of Hoyt's Privateers from Far Cry 3.
  • Establishing Character Moment: Pagan Min arrives in his crazy outfit, corrects one of his subordinates on failing to carry out his orders, executes him, and then takes a blood-splattered selfie with Ajay.
  • Everything's Better with Monkeys: A monkey is seen in the bus during the intro. Considering Hurk's behavior last time, this is to be expected.
  • Even Evil Has Loved Ones: Pagan Min claims to have felt this for Ajay's mother. He did. There's hints in the game he feels something similar to Ajay due to the possibility he's his son. He's actually just fond of Ajay due to the fact he's the son of his lover and half-brother to his daughter.
  • Evil All Along: Mohan Ghale murdered Pagan Min's infant daughter. Likewise, the resistance he established was a reactionary religious terrorist group if Sabal is to be believed. The modern incarnation isn't much better.
  • Evil Brit: Pagan Min is extravagantly British. This makes complete sense given he's from Hong Kong, grew up there when it was still a colony and is half British on his mother's side.
  • Exact Words: Pagan Min may be a madman but he damn makes sure to be precise with his orders. This character tic of his is subtle Foreshadowing of how the secret ending is achieved, and in the standard ending he calls out the player character on not heeding his instructions to stay put and enjoy the food.
  • Failure Hero: Mohan Ghale, most definitely. He fails to protect the king, fails to stop Pagan Min from betraying him and taking the throne himself, fails to take down the tyrant, fails to keep his marriage because of a fanatic belief in Stay in the Kitchen, fails to realize that Yuma (Pagan's sister) is tearing Kyrat apart to find the one thing that can save it and then hides said thing in pieces that are only found by Ajay decades later, fails to realize that his ex-wife is consorting with the enemy not as Lady Macbeth but as Love Redeems, and ultimately brings about the fall of Kyrat by murdering Pagan Min's daughter, which drives Pagan Min off the deep end for real and causes him to pull out all the stops in destroying the Golden Path. He then tries to murder his ex-wife to reclaim his son and is shot to death in self-defense. The moral of the story here is that sometimes, things change for the worse, and sometimes, things are changing for the better; if you try to stop the latter (Mohan didn't want any change period), shit will start flying.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • During the drug-trips caused by Yuma, you'll see the end result of the person you side with. This gives you a chance to side with someone else, if you didn't like the foreshadowing.
    • Pagan Min's seemingly throwaway comment regarding his kingdom's currency is a subtle hint about his body double, Eric, from Australia whom Ajay murders at one point in the game.
    • In Valley of the Yetis, the Yetis have prominent root-like lesions on their backs which foreshadows the fact they're apparently humans transformed by contact with a large tree-like organism that the cult worships as a relic of Yalung.
  • Full Boar Action: Wild boars appear in the game and are hostile to Ajay.
  • Full-Circle Revolution: Zig-zagged. Ajay really is making a difference by putting someone else in power, but Pagan Min is basically hated for three different traits: slavery, mass executions, and whimsical violent rampages. Each of the three possible leaders will exaggerate one of these traits to a logical extreme. Amita will turn Kyrat into an opium-driven agrarian communist state, Sabal will go Knight Templar on the good atheist people of Kyrat, and Ajay will take over as king and keep doing what he has been doing for the past sixty hours - killing random people and animals on the roads and in the forests for fun and profit. You have a fourth option, but that involves becoming the heir without bloodshed, at the cost of becoming Pagan Min's student. Which is probably a bad idea.
  • Full-Frontal Assault: At one point Ajay is stripped naked and forced to fight in an arena. His penis is even visible at some points, although censored in the European version.
  • Freudian Excuse: Defied in the game as Pagan Min's past is clearly established as irrelevant to his current crimes. Played with at the end when Pagan Min reveals the majority of the violence and bloodshed he committed was because the Golden Path murdered his infant daughter. Subverted, because Pagan Min admits he wanted to do it and was using her death as an excuse.
  • Glass Cannon: Hunters can wreck you... but they've got no body armor and will drop just like any other unarmored mook when you shoot them.
  • God Damn Bats: Just about all of the wildlife. Honey badgers don't give a shit, demon fish will eat you, bears hate you, wolves and dholes will swarm you, and eagles will swoop out of the sky to assault you. However, with the right perk you can ride elephants into battle.
  • Go-Karting with Bowser: A brief, modern variation of the trope occurs in the game's opening cinematic. After brutally murdering one of his own soldiers, Pagan Min stops to take a selfie with Ajay. Ajay looks appropriately confused and terrified.
  • Hawaiian-Shirted Tourist: Yogi and Reggie, and then some. They're completely ignorant of the local culture and think everyone is there for their amusement or to give them drugs.
  • Heavily Armored Mook/Giant Mook: Heavily armored machine gunners and flamethrower users similar to those seen in Far Cry 3 appear regularly throughout the game, which is unsurprisingly given that the human enemies in Far Cry 4 are largely palette-swapped versions of the human enemies from Far Cry 3.
  • Hell Is That Noise: All the animal roars can be this if you are not looking for a fight, but there's just something awful about the honey badger's screech.
  • He Who Fights Monsters: OH HELL YES. This is actually a recurring theme in Kyrat, where the leaders of different factions are either sociopaths from the start or go crazy from fighting against/alongside sociopaths for years.
    • Mohan Ghale started out as an honorable member of the King's Guard, but years of witnessing constant failure, betrayal, and sacrilege turned him into the same monster that he was fighting. He justified it by saying that he wanted the monsters to kill each other so that his son would be safe from the monsters... and then he went and killed Pagan Min's baby daughter, which ruined Kyrat.
    • Willis started out in Far Cry 3 as a superspy for the CIA. For twenty years. By Far Cry 4, he's insulting Jason, killing his own team members, and was involved in a conspiracy to collaborate with tyrants, much like Hoyt was (Hoyt in Far Cry 3 had connections to human trafficking markets in "Rio, Hong Kong, New York"). He pretty much betrays Ajay at the end of his sub-plot.
    • And finally, Amita or Sabal will become a Well-Intentioned Extremist once one of them is taken out of the picture, which results in the now-unbalanced one to become an extremist after years of escalated but balanced arguing. A foreshadowing trance reveals Amita's future if given rein of the Golden Path, throwing away her dreams of democracy and becoming an in-interim dictator who oppresses civilians into fueling the industrial sweatshops. Sabal's future involves killing everyone, Golden Path or not, who ever committed any sacrilege against his religion — which is a LOT of people after years of Pagan Min's cult of personality.
  • Heroic Fantasy: The Shangri-La episodes dip into this. They follow the journey of Kalinag the Seeker as he liberates the kingdom of Shangri-La from the evil Rakshasa's influence. Kalinag mentions his allegiance to the game's Fantasy Pantheon as part of his motivation, but outside of the Rakshasa, none of them play any direct part in the action.
  • High Speed Hijack: A new ability is to leap from your vehicle and onto another, taking out the driver and commandeering their ride for yourself.
  • Idiot Ball: Amita or Sabal will take over the Golden Path, create their own dystopia right in front of Ajay, and torture/kill Bahdra. And they thought that Ajay would just let that slide?! You can shoot them and their entourage in the head while their backs are turned, or point a gun in their faces and they won't defend themselves until you fire.
  • Improvised Weapon: Pagan Min's pen. To be fair, it's made of steel and is very thick, which allowed him to stab the soldier who let things get out of control.
    • Looting it after the credits will reveal that it's actually a custom built dagger, effectively a spike which allowed Pagan to pull off his Establishing Character Moment.
    • If an enemy is trying to attack you while you are using a blowtorch to fix a vehicle, you can use the blowtorch to fry them.
  • Ink-Suit Actor: Most characters are modeled after their actors. Sabal, Yuma, Willis and many others.
  • It's Personal: Pagan Min for the Golden Path. They killed his infant daughter. A fact you only learn at the end of the main campaign and in a secret ending.
    • In a way, Bhadra is like the little sister Ajay never had met. So when Amita implies that she exiled/enslaved/murdered Badhra, or when Sabal turns her into a worshipped icon, either Dead and Stuffed or Forced to Watch her former allies be murdered, having Ajay kill them and any of his former allies who have sided with them can be interpreted as a Roaring Rampage of Revenge.
  • It Is Pronounced Tro PAY: Ajay Ghale, having grown up in America, pronounces his own name "AJ Gale". However, since his name is natively Kyrati, everyone else in the game, Pagan Min included, pronounces it "Ah-Jay Gah-Lay". Rabi-Ray-Rana of Radio-Free-Kyrat comments on this.note 
  • Just a Stupid Accent: Local Kyratis speak English in North Indian/Nepali accents. Though the accents are Truth in Television.
  • Karma Houdini: Pagan Min, potentially. Given the circumstances, it may also be a case of Redemption Equals Life. Played with as Pagan Min hasn't changed in the slightest. He's just making the same offer he did to you earlier: to take you to your sister's mausoleum, which you've been looking for the entire time. And then give you Kyrat.
    • Ajay attempts (if the player doesn't shoot her) to enforce this with Noore, after revealing her family was murdered years ago by Paul Harmon. She quickly dismisses why she doesn't want to be a karma houdini, and offs herself, due to her guilt of years of crossing the Moral Event Horizon by pitting people against increasingly high odds to survive for a quick buck, with it being all for naught.
    • Willis manipulates Ajay into murdering the CIA informer network in Kyrat and flies to safety after shoving Ajay out of his plane.
    • Yogi and Reggie never get any comeuppance for turning Ajay over to Noore, or for all the times they drug Ajay without his consent.
  • Killer Rabbit: Gulo the Honey Badger. The rumors are that she's unkillable, but your hunting contact shrugs it off as a series of memetic mutations with no truth whatsoever. He's wrong. When you get to the hunting area, there's multiple Royal Army soldiers dead with their throats ripped out along with several other predator animals including several tigers and a Rhino. Gulo can deal at least four bars' worth of damage in a single bite, and is so high in HP that you need an LMG to pump three times her weight in bullets into her hide to kill her. The game makes a joke of this by tampering with the mission selection screen for Gulo, warning the player multiple times that they have a death wish.
    • To a lesser extent, normal honey badgers can be this too, due to their speed and surprisingly high health.
    • There's a sidequest where you have to kill honey badgers, coming from a guy who claims his wife was killed by them. Ajay's response is to burst out laughing at his claim, until he realises the man was being serious, awkwardly backs up and agrees to help.
    • Dholes, too. Quite similar to foxes, they don't look that imposing. But underestimate them at your own risk. A pack of them can do a surprising amount of damage to an unaware player.
  • Kukris Are Kool: Ajay wields a kukri for use in close combat and the Golden Path's logo (and the loading screen icon) utilizes a pair of kukri under a golden sun.
  • Kung-Fu Proof Mook: Hunters turn all of your tricks against you. They can see you in bushes, so stealth doesn't work so well. They can charm animals, even the ones you lure against them. They don't show up on radar, disappear from tagging and are virtually silent. You go from being the hunter to the hunted very quickly when they're about.
  • Lampshade Hanging: The subjects of Pagan's rants to Ajay through his radio are often these regarding various things found around Kyrat, such as one that has him asking who's going around and lighting all of those hundreds of candles you find all over the place. (He then declares all candles illegal!)
    • His Good Counterpart is the DJ of Radio Free Kyrat, Rabi Ray Rana. For instance, one of the Rabi's rants expresses annoyance that the brutal tyrant he is risking his life to oppose is a bizarrely dressed weirdo with a bad haircut.
    • If you consider that The Dev Team Thinks of Everything then they probably realised that players would do the secret ending first since you can only get it at the very start of the game, Pagan's last line before the credits is:
    Pagan: Maybe now we can finally shoot some goddamn guns.
  • Large Ham: The gun-dealing preacher Longinus, always ready to give Ajay a couple of bombastic Bible quotes before sending him on his way.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: In one easter egg, namely, the secret ending you get for waiting at the dinner table with Crab Rangoon, Pagan Min takes you to Lakshmana and you get all of the plot reveals dumped on you very quickly and casually: Lakshmana was Ajay's infant half-sister, daughter of Pagan Min, killed by the Golden Path, and now you're there to deposit mom's ashes. Pagan Min takes you back to the chopper and his last words are "Maybe now we can shoot some goddamn guns!" (Implying that you might be teaming up with him in that timeline, but more importantly, the game resets and you are encouraged to play normally, where you shoot a lot of guns.
    • Then there is at the end of the game where he states that if you had just listened to him and stayed put at the beginning this all could have been avoided. Play the game again and do just that and you get the secret ending.
    • The item descriptions, just like the the last game in the series seem to be directing both the protagonist and the player themselves.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: The developers have admitted that the reason Hurk is Ajay's co-op partner is so that it doesn't feel out of character when your partner inevitably Leeroys your carefully crafted outpost takeover plan.
  • Lighter and Softer: Sure, the game itself isn't exactly sunshine and lollipops, but in comparison to Far Cry 3's lovely mix of torture, rape, and slavery, it's certainly lighter and softer than its spiritual predecessor, especially since it embraces sociopathic humor more.
  • Lightning Bruiser: Yetis in The Valley of the Yetis are tough enough that even a direct rocket launcher hit won't down them (it takes almost 200 assault rifle rounds to kill one without using takedowns), are fast enough to outpace some vehicles, and can knock out more than 5 health bars in one punch (you max out at 6 health bars with a fully upgraded character).
  • Love Triangle: A particularly tragic and vicious one. The participants are Pagan Min, Mohan Ghale and Ishwari Ghale who became increasingly estranged from her husband and had a daughter with Pagan.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: It's implied that this is Pagan's motivation — he had a brief fling with Ajay's mother, and is stated to be terrified of Dying Alone with no heir. Whether he's aware of her other lover, the founder of the resistance, who most everyone believes to be Ajay's real father, is yet to be seen. Subverted. Pagan Min and Ajay's mother, Ishwari, had a daughter named Lakshmana, who Mohan, Ajay's father, murdered. The objective Ishwari gives her son to "take her to Lakshmana" means to actually place her ashes next to Lakshmana's.
  • Mama Bear: Ajay's mother killed Mohan Ghale to avenge her daughter's death.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Willis. With a few well placed lies and vague promises, he manages to make Ajay dispose of an Agency informer network for him.
    • Amita and Sabal, while Well Intentioned Extremists, compete with each other on who can guilt-trip, cajole, browbeat, and just plain bully Ajay into doing what they want.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: Ajay has numerous visions of an ancient Kyrati warrior he may or may not be a reincarnation of. He's usually tripping balls during them, though.
  • The Messiah: All over the place as there's numerous characters who either see themselves as one or have been elevated to such a role by the people. Ajay's dad is a militant variation of one. He was actually a Dark Messiah who murdered an infant.
  • Minimalist Run: Here are the parameters for one possible run: Don't do any sidequests. Don't buy anything from the store. Don't take any skills. Don't craft any bags. Don't take over any Bell Towers or Outposts. Don't destroy any Propaganda Posters or Masks of Yalung.
    • You may use only those weapons you've looted from enemies or otherwise found in the world. You may use the store to change your loadout.
    • You may do Karma Events if you like, but since they won't reward you with anything useful except looted weapons, you might as well not bother.
    • Don't bother looting any chests or enemies; you won't be able to use anything you pick up that way.
  • Misplaced Wildlife:
    • Being based on Nepal, nearly every animal species encountered in Kyrat is one that's native to Nepal... except for the demon fish. They're based on the goliath tigerfish, a species found only in Africa. Ironically, it would have been right at home in Far Cry 2, but that game didn't have any predatory animals. A more appropriate choice for this game would have been the goonch catfish, which is just as large, just as dangerous to humans, and a native Nepalese species.
    • Another is the Malayan tapir, which is native to Southeast Asia.
    • Mugger crocodiles are native Nepal and Pakistan, as well as India. However, they almost exclusively exist in lower altitudes, not the higher altitude regions that make up the majority of Kyrat.
  • Mission Pack Sequel: The engine and gameplay are essentially the same as Far Cry 3, although with new items such as weapons, vehicles, animals, and characters. It also incorporates elements from Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon, such as the hostage rescue missions, the ability to throw bait to lure predators towards enemies, and certain elements of the HUD. There's also the ability to put Ajay to bed to rest and advance time, a feature returning from Far Cry 2.
  • Mood Whiplash: The opening sequence goes from a high-tension attack scene (where the main character is nearly killed, and Pagan Min brutally executes the soldier who assaulted the vehicle) to Min pulling out his phone and taking a "selfie" with a bewildered Ajay and promising that they'll both "tear shit up" in Kyrat just before the title hits.
  • More Dakka: Far Cry 3 featured a composite bow for silent ranged kills. Far Cry 4 has an automatic crossbow instead.
  • Motive Decay: An actual theme within the game. The violence of Kyrat results in individuals who come to the land with dreams and aspirations of changing things losing those goals as they become, instead, focused on the means they were using to achieve them. Sabal, Amita, Pagan Min, Mohan, and even Ajay may suffer this as they get swept up in the conflict to the point they forget what they're trying to achieve.
  • Multiple Endings: Depends on the choices made in key story missions. One of which is not exploring in the beginning of the game, which leads to a secret ending.
    • There are two major decisions which lead to four major endings. Choose Sabal or Amita as the final leader of the Golden Path, which eventually leads to one of them becoming an extremist. You can kill or spare Pagan Min. Sparing him allows you to take over Kyrat as the new king. Killing him means you leave questions unanswered but ensure that the old regime is finally over.
      • You can, in fact, combine the last two versions of the ending if you think to bring a rocket launcher to the confrontation against Pagan Min. You get the final bit of exposition and resolution of the ashes plot thread... and then shoot down Pagan's chopper as he's flying away.
  • Mushroom Samba: The game continues Far Cry 3's tradition of exposing protagonists to drug-fueled hallucinations. Most notably, the Yogi and Reggie quest chain requires Ajay to endure increasingly reality-bending visions in order to get upgraded recipes for his syringes.
    • In one of the Balance of Power missions, taking Amita's side will require you to capture an opium factory from the Royal Army. Entering said factory during your siege results in another humorous hallucination.
    • A more terrifying hallucination occurs towards the end of Act 2 when Ajay is jailed and drugged by Yuma at Durgesh Prison. Ajay believes he's being stalked by a Rakshasa and must evade capture without his weapons.
    • Ajay also hallucinates several visions of Shangri-La where he may or may not be an ancient Kyrati warrior reincarnated.
  • My Country, Right or Wrong: Many of the Royal Guard's last words state they are proud to have died for their country.
  • Mythology Gag: One of the GPS loot items has the map stuck on Rook Island.
    • There's a loot item that's a Call Back to Far Cry 3's antagonist: a bobble head with the body of a hula girl and a head that looks suspiciously similar to Vaas Montenegro's. Which was a physical object included in that game's special edition.
    • There are a few other call backs to other games in the series. Longinus is implied to be a warlord from Bowa Seko, mentioning that he was baptized at Goka Falls, a major location in the game. He also sends you on a quest to go after conflict diamonds utilizing a GPS locator. There's even a call back all the way to the beginning of the series: one of the items you can get is a Choose Your Own Adventure book that references the very first Far Cry.
  • Nerfed:
    • Tigers and Bears are much less effective against enemy soldiers than they were in Far Cry 3. In Far Cry 3, a single Tiger or Bear was usually sufficient to clear out an entire enemy outpost, while in Far Cry 4 they usually get taken down after only managing a few kills. This is most likely to balance out the new ability to summon predators on command by throwing bait. The game also adds Elephants and Rhinos, four-legged tanks who can easily solo an outpost in this game.
    • The mid-range assault rifles have reduced lethality or functionality. The MS16 now deals as much damage as the entry-level STG-90, despite having a bigger round. The F1 can no longer mount an optical sight, leaving it with the low-magnification open reflex sights. This is presumably to ensure that they won't make the new Signature Weapons redundant.
  • Never Smile at a Crocodile: After all those paranoia-inducing riverside hikes you endured in the last game, you might think you're safe from crocodile attacks in the cold mountains of Kyrat. The local mugger crocodiles beg to differ. The only upshot is they're not nearly as common in Kyrat as their saltwater cousins were on the Rook Islands.
  • Noble Demon: Pagan Min is a mass-murderer, Bad Boss, and imperialist but treats Ajay like a son. The game's opening leaves it open whether or not this is a facade.Easter Egg ending 
  • No, Mister Bond, I Expect You to Dine: Pagan Min sets this up after the first scene of the game. He later repeats it. The trope is subverted, too, because Pagan Min is actually just inviting you to eat and talk both times. There's nothing sinister going on at all.
  • Noodle Incident: Nearly everything that Yogi and Reggie talk about is a hazy recollection of a noodle incident. They do make it clear that they're not allowed back into India due to an incident with some cows. The loading screen information does note what they're wanted for.
  • Not Even Bothering with the Accent: Naveen Andrews voices Sabal with his natural English accent. This makes his voicework stand out when compared to co-star Janina Gavankar's portrayal of Amita and the many other instances of Just a Stupid Accent in the game.
  • Not in This for Your Revolution: Ajay makes some rather small protestations to this effect but finds himself swiftly swept up in the Golden Path's cause. This may be due to the fact he's already killed several of Pagan Min's soldiers by the time he reaches the Golden Path's sanctuary and the dictator has already shown interest in "acquiring" Ajay. By the time he meets Hurk, he's saying, "We're the Golden Path."
  • Orcus on His Throne: After Ajay flees Pagan Min, Min makes almost no effort to capture Ajay, content to talking to Ajay over the radio. He also doesn't seem to mind Ajay dismantling his country piece by piece and killing off his lieutenants. Makes sense, since he was planning on retiring and handing Kyrat over to Ajay anyway.
  • Panthera Awesome: Kyrat has tigers, snow leopards, and clouded leopards.
  • Papa Wolf: Despite being a crazed nutcase, Pagan has clearly demonstrated that he is this. As this is why he stabbed the soldier to death that open fired on the bus since the guy disobeyed orders and could have accidentally killed his (possible) son. In fact, he knows Ajay isn't his son. Ajay is, however, the son of the woman he loved and that's worth protecting as well. We also find out his hatred of the rebels is fueled by the fact they murdered his infant daughter.
  • Path of Inspiration: Two of them. The first one is a Buddhist-Christian hybrid religion that revolves around the teachings of the "Daughter of God," Kyra. It seems like a traditional, long-standing religion that has led Kyrat into a religious state with a natural flow between pacifism and zealotry. But as you progress through the game, you find unimportant yet disturbing clues about how the religion of Kyra may be as fucked up and insanity-inducing as the Rakyat from Far Cry 3. The second is Pagan Min's cult of personality, in which Pagan Min sets himself up as the divine ruler of Kyrat, and that anyone who questions this will be ripped to shreds by wild animals that are supposedly bent to serve his will. They're not lying about the animals.
    • As it turns out, most of the worshippers are nice people... who have no problem with arranged marriages of very young children. Or mass slaughter of blasphemers in Sabal's ending — though this could be something Sabal's followers are unique in doing. And, as it turns out, they were hoarding enough wealth to buy their way out of Pagan's regime, but didn't dare sell any of it to outsiders even as their people were suffering for eighty years. Pagan Min lampshades this, claiming that before he stole Kyrat, the temple stole its wealth, while two members of the Golden Path prove they're better than this by selling relics to archaeologists for much-needed supplies.
  • Poor Communication Kills: Pagan Min loathes this with a passion and tries to avert it with his Exact Words schtick. Yet it still happens and he usually ends up doing the killing.
    • Ishwari could have saved her son a ton of trouble if she had been more detailed in her instructions, something like: "Ajay, I had a daughter named Lakshmana with Pagan Min, the ruler of Kyrat. Please place my ashes with hers, they should be at the palace. Be careful around Pagan, he's a little unstable."
  • Predators Are Mean: Even worse than in Far Cry 3. At least there are no lions to gang up on you with the tigers and bears. And honey badgers and black eagles and demon fish...
  • Promoted to Playable: Hurk, the subject of Far Cry 3's "Monkey Business" DLC, returns as the second Player Character of the Co-Op Multiplayer.
  • Race Lift: In-universe, Pagan Min's body double, a man named Eric.
    Pagan: He wasn't even Asian, for Christ's sakes! He was from... Melbourne, I think.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: The co-leaders of the Golden Path, Amita and Sabal, come off as this, and regularly switch which oni they are. On one hand, Amita believes the way to victory is to create a brighter future for Kyrat while Sabal wants to preserve the traditions and legends of the Kyrati people. On the other hand, Sabal can be rather cold and harsh, while Amita is more passionate about helping the citizens of Kyrat.
    • Unfortunately, they don't realize that they need each other to balance their extremist views. At the end, the one who becomes the official leader of the Golden Path will start showing traits of extremism. This is further reinforced by a foreshadowing trace (like in Far Cry 3) which shows the dystopia that will happen if the current leader of the Golden Path becomes the only leader. Basically, there's a reason why the blue oni and red oni don't split up.
  • Refuge in Audacity: This is implied to be Pagan Min's hat. After all, he's a drug lord who takes over a nation. Which, by itself, isn't all that audacious as he was wealthy enough to buy the men and firepower to do so. He then declares himself king by divine right.
  • The Revolution Will Not Be Civilized: The Golden Path's leaders run on this trope. Sabal aims to conduct a religious purge at the end of the civil war while Amita takes a leaf out of Pol Pot's book and begins a mass forced exodus of civilians from towns and villages in order to gain forced labor for heroin cultivation and industrial sweatshops.
    • And then you can shoot them (and your former allies) in the face, thereby taking over through betrayal and violence. Though, at this point, they probably deserve it.
  • Rhino Rampage: Kyrat has Indian rhinoceroses.
  • Running Gag: Radio DJ Rabi-Ray-Rana really likes to talk about poop. He talks about the possibility of Pagan Min having a golden toilet; he talks about how he can't just shit in the woods, he needs a bowl (and a bidet); he muses that if he were a Serial Killer, his Calling Card would be shitting on or near his victims, etc.
  • Sacred Hospitality: Pagan attempts to get Ajay to relax and talk with him over a meal at his home. Twice. Ajay, however, completely misses it the first time in a normal playthrough. It's up to the player whether he chooses to let Pagan Min's "do-over" work like this.
  • Scenery Porn: The mountains of Kyrat are breathtaking.
  • Second Hour Superpower: You get a wingsuit much earlier in the game than in Far Cry 3, which is very useful in navigating Kyrat's mountainous terrain.
  • Seldom Seen Species: When's the last time clouded leopards and dholes appeared in a videogame?
  • Self-Deprecation: A developer case. Willis, who shows up here again, really didn't like Jason Brody.
  • Serial Killer: The collectible "Masks of Yalung" items are the Calling Card of a serial killer called The Goat.
  • Shout-Out: Ajay hallucinating Yuma crawling along the ceiling with her head twisted around is from Trainspotting.
  • Shown Their Work:
    • Honey badgers can indeed be found in the Himalayan foothills, as can Indian rhinoceroses. In fact most of the animals in the game are native to the region.
    • There's also how modern Kyrat is, with the developers admitting they were originally just going to depict how they thought the place would look before they actually looked at photographs of Nepal and India.
  • Simultaneous Warning And Action: Just after you are "rescued" by the Golden Path you have to get past a small army of Pagan's troops. They will state they are only here to bring you back and there has been a misunderstanding, but as soon as they see you they start shooting.
  • Story Branching: The Balance of Power missions each feature two different methods of approach: one suggested by Amita, the other by Sabal. The approach you take affects how succeeding missions will play out, and in the case of the final one, determines which of the two becomes the sole leader of the Golden Path.
  • Surrounded by Idiots: Despite his Bad Boss tendencies Pagan really does have some incompetent staff.
    Pagan Min: (While removing a cell phone from a prisoner) Really, guys? We're not checking for these anymore?
  • Sympathy for the Devil: Essentially every villain in the game. Pagan Min was driven insane when Mohan murdered his infant daughter and caused his lover to flee, Yuma was trying to save Kyrat by tearing the temples apart to find the artifact that would transform her into an avatar of Kyrat's champion, just hearing Paul begging for Ajay to give him his phone so he could talk to his daughter is gut-wrenching, and Noore was made the mistress of the Arena to save her family only to find out her family was killed years ago and commits suicide.
    • You also get to hear one of the Golden Path members call the other out on the things they plan on doing. You can kill them or spare their life.
  • Take That: Dr Noore intends for her suicide to be this towards the audience of her arena.
  • Take That, Audience!: The Lost Letters tell the story of Robert Barclay, a British Colonial officer, and his wife Charlotte. Their correspondences chronicle Robert's descent into madness as he experiences Kalinag's journey much like Ajay does in the Shangri-La episodes. Between Robert rambling about Kyrat's fictional religion and Charlotte leaving him for another man, the letters read like a cautionary tale about video game addiction.
  • The Triads and the Tongs: Before heading to Kyrat, Pagan Min initially started in this world, running his father's heroin growing business and attempting to make a failed power grab for leadership of the Hong Kong underworld.
  • This Cannot Be!/Villainous Breakdown: After Pagan's death, the woman who does the propaganda announcements on the radio is in full denial mode.
  • Took A Level In Jerk Ass: Willis. He's no longer the eccentric, helpful CIA agent from Far Cry 3. Highly abrasive, he manipulates Ajay to do his dirty work in silencing the CIA informer network in Kyrat and later shoves Ajay out of his plane as it takes off.
  • Unbroken First-Person Perspective: Much the same as with 3, the game never breaks from Ajay's perspective.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: Shangri-La episodes change the game formula from shoot-em-up RPG to action adventure. Your only ranged weapon is a bow, but it gets bullet time and multi-shot upgrades. Instead of throwables, you command an unkillable homicidal stealhy sand tiger and in one episode, an elephant with an umbrella on its back. You are expected to rush enemies and use melee attacks. You will fly across valleys all Superman-style. And unlike the regular game, there is an epic boss fight against a giant enemy: The Rakshasa Raven, which can magically summon enemies and shoot fireballs. Aim for the mouth with EVERYTHING you've got.
    • After Yuma drugs you for the first time in the mountains, you end up in a prison cell and have to escape the mountain prison. And then the game goes all Survival Horror on your ass; without any weapons or gadgets, you have to stealth and evade a homicidal Shangri-La demon who roams the labyrinthine caves. Later, you have to get past a small army without your melee or takedown abilities. This is harder than it sounds, as you have to make your knife throws count.
  • The Usurper: Pagan Min is this, being king because, well, he had an army and the locals didn't. That changes.
  • Vendor Trash: OH YEAH. There are also a lot of Call Backs to previous games[note]Please list them below[/note]
    • Malaria Pills, a callback to Far Cry 2's malaria system. The description is also a hilarious Take That to the protagonist.
    • Knock-off GPS, a callback to Far Cry 3 with its pre-loaded map of Rook Island.
    • Maimed Wahine, a callback to Far Cry 3 which is the Vaas bobblehead that was available for pre-order in real life.
    • After you kill Pagan Min, he has two of the most valuable items in the game on his person: Lapel Pin #2, which is a collector's item in a set of five, the one that shows his face, and one of the only copies still intact. Pagan's Golden Pen, the knife-pen that he used to stab the officer at the beginning of the game. They're both worth a small fortune now that he's dead.
  • Villains Never Lie: Everyone in the game, Ajay included, seems to be under layers of self-delusion about their true nature and identity. The only one who doesn't lie, to himself and to others is Pagan Min, perhaps his only real virtue. Although, while Pagan never outright lies, he conveniently 'forgets' to explain crucial information to Ajay.
  • Violation of Common Sense: The events of the game kick off when the player decides to go investigate the horrific screams coming from Pagan Min's basement. Hilariously, doing the more sensible thing and staying at the dinner table, away from said horrific screaming, gets you the secret ending, and finishes the game in about fifteen minutes.
    • Played for laughs, with Ajay's continued visit to Yogi and Reggie, getting him into the weirdest drug-trips. Ajay even questions why he allows it.
  • Waiting Puzzle: The now-infamous secret ending hinges on one. To get it, Ajay must do as Pagan Min asks and wait for 15 minutes at the dining table during the start of the game.
  • War Elephants: Kyrat features wild elephants. They can be manipulated into trampling enemies, attacking enemy fortresses or even be ridden by Ajay.
  • We ARE Struggling Together: A major reason the resistance is a paper tiger in Kyrat. Its two leaders hate each other with every fiber of their being.
    • Ironically, the bureaucrats of the Golden Path end up creating the best compromises for Kyrat's future, like selling temple statues as a way of spreading their heritage and funding the war. Or donating a wide variety of religious/scientific books to the impoverished communities. Or smuggling condoms to brothels. Disturbing yet much more honorable than anything Amita or Sabal do.
  • Welcome to Corneria: Of course there are the usual suspects with both enemy and friendly dialogue, but a more glaring example is Rabi-Ray-Rana's radio broadcasts, which either provide background exposition or comment (and hang lampshades) on the player's actions and accomplishments. His spiels are usually hilarious the first or even second time. They get old after the third or fourth or fifth or sixth or seventh time the player has to listen to him ramble about how clean his asshole is due to his owning a bidet.
  • Whole Plot Reference: Valley Of The Yetis has the same basic premise as the Tomb Raider reboot; the protagonist is stranded in an isolated location occupied by a hostile cult led by a cruel and melodramatic madman, and must also battle supernatural monsters that are hostile to both him and the cult. The finale and the origins of the Yetis is also nearly identical to Uncharted 2: Among Thieves, with you blowing up the Shamballah tree, which turns humans into Yetis and apparently has explosive sap.
  • Would Hurt a Child: Pagan Min claims that Ajay's father killed his daughter.
    • In Amita's ending she forces Kyrati children to work the opium fields at gunpoint. Or become child soldiers. It's also strongly implied that she had Bhadra killed.
  • You Have Failed Me: Pagan Min stabs one of his soldiers to death with a pen. Though it is later revealed to be a Papa Wolf moment as that soldier nearly killed you with stray gunfire.


"Don't worry about a thing, my boy. This will soon be behind us and we'll be off on our grand adventure. Because I have cleared my calendar for you! You and I... ARE GOING TO TEAR SHIT UP!"