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Take That, Audience!
As if hearing Bouapha explode into Ludicrous Gibs isn't enough.note 
"We did the rather cruel thing of destroying a fanboy. There was a lot of laughter on the set when we finally executed that fucker, I can tell you! Well justified."

Aiming a jab at the audience, usually for being such losers that they'll waste their time watching/reading/playing this nonsense, such moral degenerates that they'll enjoy sleazy pandering to their base impulses, and/or so dumb they'll pay good money for it. In pinballs, videogames, and other similar works, this extends to mocking the player's lack of skill.

Not to be confused with This Loser Is You. May overlap with You Bastard. Straw Fan is a subtrope where the audience is personified by a character in the work. Usually tied up with Self-Deprecation, possibly saying that the creator is a talentless hack who got lucky or is just in it to squeeze money out of the fans, but they're too dumb to realise it. Compare with Biting-the-Hand Humor, where the show mocks their paymasters, such as the network or publishers, as well as how some of these examples attack the very people who are paying for or watching the product. May also overlap with Easy-Mode Mockery if a video game makes fun of the player for playing the game on the easiest difficulty setting.

This is usually just a friendly ribbing; it's rare for the creator to actually hate the fans and try to drive them away. However, it is sometimes combined with Artist Disillusionment. This is sometimes a result of a Trolling Creator. If it goes along with a Dear Negative Reader, on the other hand, look out!

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 

    Comic Books 
  • Superboy-Prime in Infinite Crisis & Countdown to Final Crisis has been all but a big middle finger to obsessive comic book nerds who were constantly complaining about how the DCU was better "before" and how everything should be back like it used to be. In hindsight the first writer, Geoff Johns, actually delivered this message with much greater subtlety than the writers of ''Countdown" who ironically only ended up inadvertently showed off how badly the character was being written by them. Given that its the same writers and editors who've insisted in bringing back Silver Age concepts and characters while removing and dismissing, if not simply killing off, modern characters they don't like, the irony of them making a character mocking those who complain about change has sadly been lost on them.
    • Adventure Comics took it Up to Eleven, while adding some self-aware humor and good-natured Lampshade Hanging, due to Geoff writing the character again.
  • The very first issue of the New 52's Justice League International has a character calling a bunch of protestors "nothing but a bunch of Basement Dwellers who spend all day whining on the 'Net. Not a single open-minded one in the bunch."
    • However, Booster Gold admonishes him and says that it's their job to prove the protestors wrong.
  • During his time writing Jungle Action, Don McGregor was frequently criticized by white reader for not having any white characters in the book. His solution? He had Black Panther fight The Klan.
  • In the first Great Lakes Avengers, Squirrel Girl and Grasshopper appear in an offstage prologue. Grasshopper says "The only people reading comics now are overweight thirty-year-olds living in their mother's basement." Squirrel Girl's sidekick replies in an inset: "Hey, fanboys, don't take that lying down! Write angry letters to Marvel today!"
  • Jhonen Vasquez is notorious for this, especially when Fan Dumb is concerned.
  • Wanted spends its last few pages mocking the readers for enjoying the book; given its written by Mark Millar, that's not unexpected.
  • One More Day: Peter encounters an alternate version of himself who is bespectacled, overweight and talks about how people who buy comics and video games are losers who don't have anything better to do with their lives. This character feels very much like a plug from writer/editor Joe Quesade who's vocal about how he hates comic fans.
  • The final issue of James Robinson's cricially-panned Justice League of America run had (among other things) Dick Grayson state that he didn't care if "the public" didn't like his incarnation of the team.
  • Grant Morrison's Flex Mentallo takes a shot at readers (and by extension writers and editors) who think edgy comic books are the only kind with any value. The finale of the series has one of the characters claim that only immature adolescents think something being Darker and Edgier automatically makes it better.
  • Similar to Grant, Mark Waid does something similar in his Daredevil run. When The Punisher's new apprentice is cornered by Hornhead, she gives a small rant about how the only people who are actually serious about being heroes are those who've suffered tragedy. DD chews her out and gives a long rant about how he finds this line of thinking disgusting as, while he himself HAS suffered tragedy (in fact, probably more tragedy than any other character in comics), he finds the idea that doctors, police officers, fire fighters, and heroes who are heroes because they want to do good are somehow not as heroic as he is just plain disrespectful and appalling to think. It's almost definitely an Author Filibuster aimed at fans who think the only interesting heroes are the Darker and Edgier angsty miserable sort, which is a line of thinking Waid is well known for hating with a passion, but the speech was still pretty awesome and befitting Daredevil's character.
  • In Fungus the Bogeyman, Raymond Briggs describes comic strips as "A form of entertainment for the simple-minded".
  • The last issue of Marville is basically one big diatribe against the readers, saying that nobody read Marville because they just want to read about super-heroes fighting instead of Bill Jemas' long, inconsistent and factually inaccurate ramblings about God and evolution, which will somehow lead to world peace.

    Fan Works 
  • Fans of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic tend to portray Lyra Heartstrings as an overly obsessed fan of humans. Fan art has had her doing everything from playing with human action figures (and thoroughly embarrassing her friend Bon Bon), to wearing pants and even masturbating to human porn. She's essentially a parody of the most overzealous brony in existence, and images of her fulfilling pretty much every brony stereotype exist. What makes this an odd example is that it's the audience themselves making the insults.
  • An odd example from the original release of Calvin and Hobbes: The Movie — the Credits Gag shows the characters watching the movie itself, and The Stinger is a static image saying "DROP DEAD!" They all take offense and start trying to destroy the screen.

    Film (Animated) 

    Film (Live Action) 
  • The horror satire/social commentary film Funny Games is intended as a giant Take That at the concept of viewers enjoying watching non-real people suffer and die for their own amusement. It carries itself as a psych-horror film, but it breaks the fourth wall several times to ensure that the viewer feels guilty for enjoying the film as a horror film. There's even an in-character debate about whether or not fiction and real life are the same thing.
  • The Cabin in the Woods uses the same premise in a more subtle manner, where the horror movie tropes present are literally enforced because the Earth will be destroyed by a rampaging Eldritch Abomination or few if it doesn't happen. The audience is basically that abomination.
  • Wanted leaves you with this message as its ending.
    Wesley: What the fuck have you done lately?
  • Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back: "A Jay and Silent Bob movie? Feature length? Who'd pay to see that?"
  • Sucker Punch according to Zack Snyder. The brothel-goers are supposed to represent the male nerds in the audience watching for the fanservice.
  • The film seminar scenes in Woody Allen's Stardust Memories are widely believed to be an unflattering representation of Woody's own ardent fans:
    Fan: What was the car in the scene supposed to be symbolic of?
    Woody: It was symbolic of a car.
  • Nixon:
  • Shock Treatment (the disconnected sequel to The Rocky Horror Picture Show) parodies the only audience that would ever give it attention - Rocky Horror fans. The TV studio audience shouts in unison at what they're watching, seem hopelessly (and happily) glued to their seats, worship Brad and Janet's every move, and blindly follow the characters, even when they're all led into a mental institution. Subtly, they're also wearing costumes from Rocky Horror.
    • On top of that, cheerleader Francine DEMANDS to be called "Frankie". And only "Frankie".
    • On a fourth-wall-breaking basis, the film also includes quite a few tenuous references for those trying to make a connection between this film and RHPS - to name a few, a fictitious TIME magazine with Rocky lips on the cover, sitting in plain view; dialogue references to "a rocky marriage" and "anticipation" (the latter being said while Frank's now-red throne is visible); the newspaper headline "UFO spotted over Denton"; Riff and Magenta expys discussing 'their old series'; etcetera, etcetera.
  • The Lone Ranger: Churchgoers are either fools or hypocrites. The military are dupes, then willing lackeys of the villains. Capitalists are either cowards or actively evil. Either the entire creative team AND studio behind the enormously successful Pirates franchise threw a Critical Failure on "What is the audience for Westerns in general and the Ranger in particular?" or this was a deliberate slam at those fans (that also failed to please the rest of America)
  • The Hunger Games: Catching Fire includes a scene of one little girl telling Katniss that she wants to volunteer as a tribute, just like her, and Katniss' horrified reaction. It is likely directed to fans who glorify the games and want to be a tribute.

    Literature 
  • Multatuli did this to his readers, who praised his writing. Multatuli wanted his work to inspire action, not just literary acclaim, causing him to make bitter remarks about despising his public with great fervour.

    Live Action TV 
  • Done to an extreme extent by Glee. When the makers of Glee wanted to get Brittany and Sam together, they used this. They actually made Brittany say that she couldn't be with him since a whole army of angry lesbians would be coming after them. This was a reference to the Brittana fandom that actually got pretty pissed about this.
  • In The Late Late Show, the live studio are often called dirty hobos who are only attending 'cause they were bribed with food.
  • This jokey example from Red Dwarf: In the episode "Backwards," in which time (and dialogue) flows backwards, the manager of the pub in Retsehcnam is actually addressing "the one prat in the country who has bothered to get a hold of this recording, turn it round and actually work out the rubbish that I'm saying. What a poor sad life he's got!"note 
    • The "Back to Earth" miniseries dumps Lister and company into a universe where Red Dwarf is just a television show, and they're all fictional characters. Naturally, the show's fans are all mentally disturbed. Craig Charles (Lister) has publicly lamented wasting "half (his) adult life at Red Dwarf conventions" in the past.
    • In the Emohawk episode, Duke of Dork Duane Dibbley is described as "Looking so geeky I don't think he could get into a science fiction convention".
  • The Price Is Right: Bob Barker responds to an audience that is loudly booing a contestant for thinking a 1 is the first number of a Lincoln Mark VII.
    Bob: Now, look, don't start throwing things, you might hit me!
  • Have I Got News for You, especially the earlier series. A tie-in book even claimed the 'typical' HIGNFY fan was a Serial Killer.
  • The videogames episode of Screenwipe concludes:
    Charlie Brooker: "Yes, videogames are going through a renaissance, and you should not miss out - like you are now, by choosing to watch TV instead like some kind of medieval throwback farmhand fuck."
    • During the sixth episode of Nathan Barley (a collaboration between Charlie Brooker and Chris Morris), there's a brief shot of a police sign appealing for witnesses to a crime to step forward. The small text at the bottom of the sign insults the viewer for being sad enough to pause the DVD to check if the shot contains a Freeze-Frame Bonus.
    • A similar thing happened on the fourth episode of the first series of Newswipe. Charlie Brooker was talking about the G20 summit and a long list of the economies part of the G20 scrolled down the screen. However one of the entries was:
      "Bottom Land. No,not really. We made that one up. And you bothered to pause this to read the phrase "Bottom Land". What a dismal little prick you are."
  • Of course, there's also William Shatner and his Saturday Night Live skit Get A Life.
    William Shatner: "I mean, for crying out loud it- it's just a TV Show!"
  • The Community episode "Paradigms of Human Memory" takes a jab at shippers. In it, Annie uses a series of Flashbacks to try and assert that she and Jeff are in a torrid Will They or Won't They? situation, which mostly consist of completely innocent and innocuous actions on Jeff's part. Once it's over, he even flat out says that Annie is desperately overanalyzing things to find romantic overtones that aren't actually there.
  • Doctor Who
    • In "The Almost People." There is a small but loud group of Who fans who dislike Matt Smith because of no other reason than he's not David Tennant. There also is a smaller, similarly annoying group of Who fans who dislike Matt Smith and every Doctor since Tom Baker, for no reason other than they aren't Tom Baker. That had to have had something to do with this scene, when a clone of Eleven is having his skull runneth over coping with his past regenerations:
    The Doctor: (Tom Baker's voice) Would you like a jelly baby? (screaming) (David Tennant's Voice) Hello, I'm the Doctor. (Matt Smith's Voice) No! Let it go! We've moved on!
    • Whizzkid, from the Sylvester McCoy story "The Greatest Show in the Galaxy," was intended as a slap in the face to obsessive Doctor Who fans. He enjoys the Psychic Circus a bit too much to be tolerable, but claims 'it's not as good as it used to be' (a common fan gripe at the time), despite not having even SEEN it in the past. As described in the page quote, he meets a nasty end.
  • Heroes: Tim Kring's infamous "saps and dipshits" comment, in which he insulted any viewer of the show who used DVR.
  • One episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, via a Soap Box Sadie on the witness stand, all but called the audience monsters (she's addressing the court gallery, but it's clear who the message was really intended for). For what, you may ask? Owning computers. Granted, it was an anvil that probably needed to be dropped (relating to the Congo War and how metals used in computers might finance African Terrorists), but how very accusatory it is is mind-blowing.
  • Played for Drama in the Battlestar Galactica (Reimagined) Season 3 finale. When Gaius Baltar is placed on trial, Lee Adama gets called to the stand to explain exactly why the panel should vote to acquit. He delivers a blistering monologue about how everybody in the Fleet has been willing to forgive the various transgressions commited throughout the series, and how quickly they changed their mind for this one person. Must be read in its entirety:
    Lampkin: Why do you believe that the defendant, Gaius Baltar, deserves to be acquitted?
    Lee: Well, because the evidence does not support the charges.
    Lampkin: Come on...
    Lee: Did the defendant make mistakes? Sure he did, serious mistakes, but did he actually commit any crimes? Did he commit treason? No. It was an impossible situation. When the Cylons arrived what could he possibly do? What could anyone have done? I mean, ask yourself, what would you have done? What would you have done? If he had refused to surrender, the Cylons would've probably nuked the planet, right then and there. So did he appear to co-operate with the Cylons? Sure, so did hundreds of others. What's the difference between him and them? The President issued a blanket pardon. They were all forgiven, no questions asked. Colonel Tigh? Colonel Tigh used suicide bombers, killed dozens of people, forgiven. Lieutenant Agathon and chief Tyrol murdered an officer on the Pegasus, forgiven. The admiral? The admiral instituted a military coup d'etat against the President, forgiven. And me? Well, where do I begin? I shot down a civilian passenger ship, the Olympic Carrier, over a thousand people on board, forgiven. I raised my weapon to a superior officer, committed an act of mutiny, forgiven. And then on the very day when Baltar surrendered to those Cylons, I, as commander of Pegasus, jumped away! I left everybody on that planet, alone, undefended for months. I even tried to persuade the admiral never to return, to abandon you all there for good. If I'd had my way nobody would have made it off that planet. I'm the coward, I'm the traitor, I'm forgiven. I'd say we're very forgiving of mistakes. We make our own laws now, our own justice, and we've been pretty creative with ways to let people off the hook. For everything from theft to murder. And we've had to be, because we're not a civilization anymore, we are a gang, and we're on the run, and we have to fight to survive. We have to break rules, we have to bend laws, we have to improvise! But not this time, no, not this time, not for Gaius Baltar. No, you, you have to die! You have to die, because, well, because we don't like you very much. Because you're arrogant, because you're weak, because you're a coward, and we, the mob, want to throw you out the airlock because you didn't stand up to the Cylons and get yourself killed in the process! That's justice now! You should've been killed back on New Caprica, but since you had the temerity to live, we're going to execute you now. That's justice!
    (crowd murmurs angrily)
    Judge: Order, order!
    Lee: This case, this case is built on emotion, on anger, bitterness, vengeance, but most of all it's built on shame. It's about the shame of what we did to ourselves back on that planet. It's about the guilt of those of us who ran away, who ran away. And we are trying to dump all of that guilt and all that shame onto one man, and then flush him out the airlock, and just hope that that gets rid of it all. So that we can live with ourselves. But that won't work. That won't work. That's not justice, not to me. Not to me.
    Lampkin: No further questions.
  • The Monkees' TV special, "33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee" did this in the "Wind-Up Man" number.
    • I'm a wind up man / Programmed to be entertaining / Turn me on / And I will sing a song about a Wind-up world / Of people watching television / Wind up man / Can you hear me laughing at you?
  • Owing to her nature as a Brainless Beauty, Ms. Fanservice and Margaret's rivalnote , Lucy became the most hated character rather early in the first season of Boardwalk Empire, and some particularly mean fans extended the hate to her actress, Paz de la Huerta, claiming that she was as much a mess as her character and just behaving as usual rather than acting. In Season 2, the character was given a tragic arc and finally received a couple of centric episodes. One of them had a scene where she rehearses the real 1921 play "A Dangerous Maid" in front of a mirror, filmed with her talking straight to the camera, and it totally comes as if she is talking back to the audience:
    "I know what everybody says about me behind my back. That I'm just some flibbertigibbet with cotton wool between the ears. Well, I'm wise to a thing or two. I guess you think I'll fall for any old bean with pomade in his hair and keys to a coupe?"
    • Sadly, the scene's power was undermined when it was leaked that Paz was really difficult on the set, and her character was Put on a Bus.
  • While encouraging people to read The Great Gatsby, Stephen Colbert jokingly suggested most of the viewers of The Colbert Report are illiterate.
  • From Vicious, a series that stars nerd icons Sir Ian McKellennote  and Sir Derek Jacobinote :
    Violet: Will there be a lot of single men?
    Freddie: It's a science fiction "fan club" event; they'll be single, but they'll be disgusting.
  • From Wizards of Waverly Place: In the finale, Alex says she put peanut butter on the outside of a sandwich because "that's what a 40-year old gets for ordering off the kid's menu."
  • Supernatural has this in spades as it likes regularly Leaning on the Fourth Wall. In one episode, Sam and Dean end up attending a Supernatural convention, encountering various hyper critical and overly obsessed fans.
    Dean: What’s a slash fan?
    Sam: As in Sam slash Dean... Together.
    Dean: (horrified) Like... together together?
    Sam: Yeah.
    Dean:...They do know we’re brothers, right?
    Sam: Doesn’t seem to matter.
  • Forever Knight opened its last episode with the suicide of a character with the same name as the president of the show's fan club.

    Magazines 

    Music 
  • Blues Traveler's single "The Hook" is basically about how the lead singer could sing anything as long as the audience thinks it sounds good.
  • The Nirvana song "In Bloom" is squarely - or at least as squarely as anything the typically cryptic and abstract Cobain ever wrote - aimed at that sections of Nirvana's audience who just liked the tunes and didn't much care for or were even aware of the underlying message. In the unused liner notes for In Utero, Cobain was brutally direct:
    If any of you hate homosexuals, people of different color, or women, please do this one favor for us — leave us alone! Don’t come to our shows and don’t buy our records!
  • Inverted in Molly and the Tinker's "The Anti-Singalong Song", in which the performers get the audience to sing about how they won't sing along, because the singers are just being lazy and not doing their jobs.
    • Fridge Brilliance also plays it straight, as the lyrics profess that folksingers assume audiences are spineless patsies who can be conned into doing their work for them. And, hey, the audience is singing along, even if it's about how they don't want to...
    • There's a Liar's Paradox in there somewhere.
  • The Fall's "How I Wrote Elastic Man", about a singer who complains that whatever he does, everything everyone ever wants to know is how he wrote that one song... and they don't even get the title right.
    And they will ask me
    How I wrote "Plastic Man"
    How I wrote "Plastic Man"
  • Showbread's song "Shepherd, No Sheep" from their 2009 album "The Fear Of God" is a whole song consisting of this trope coupled with Misaimed Fandom and Artist Disillusionment, talking to their old fans who latched onto their first album "No Sir, Nihilism Is Not Practical" because it was a high-energy, distorted rock album with screamed vocals released at a time when Screamo and Metalcore were steadily gaining popularity.
  • Frank Zappa: "This here song might offend you some. If it does it's because you're dumb."
  • Mindless Self Indulgence frequently takes jabs at their audience, both through their lyrics and hurling between songs during their live shows.
    • Their third album has a song called 'You'll Rebel To Anything (As Long as It's Not Challenging)' which seems to be dedicated to insulting their fans. As the chorus says:
    You're telling me that fifty million screaming fans are never wrong,
    I'm telling you that fifty million screaming fans are fucking morons
    • The same album has another song titled "Stupid MF." It pokes fun at the audience for being unable to understand Jimmy Urine's fast-paced singing.
    "Is it simple enough for you? Can everybody understand me? You all still following me?"
    "Should I talk slower like you're a retard? Should I talk slower like you're retarded?"
    • The live segment at the beginning of "Backmask," where Jimmy talks to the audience:
    Jimmy: "You guys, man, you gotta get organized. Come on! When I say we, you say suck! We!"
    Audience: "Suck!"
    Jimmy: "We!"
    Audience: "Suck!"
    Jimmy: "DICK!"
  • Tool: "Hooker with a Penis" has a few, combined with self-admitted The Man Is Sticking It to the Man:
    All you know about me is what I've sold you, dumbfuck
    I sold out long before you ever even heard my name
    I sold my soul to make a record, dipshit
    Then you bought one.
  • "Admit It" by Say Anything is six and-a-half glorious minutes of frontman Max Bemis blatantly saying how much he hates hipsters.
    Prototypical non-conformist
    You are a vacuous soldier of the thrift store Gestapo
    You adhere to a set of standards and tastes
    That appear to be determined by an unseen panel of hipster judges (BULLSHIT!)
  • "Three Little Pigs", by Green Jelly concludes with the following:
    And the moral of the story is
    That bands with no talent
    Can easily amuse idiots
    With a stupid puppet show.
  • The Dead Kennedys weren't very happy with how they were becoming popular with neo-Nazi punks misinterpreting their songs, so eventually they wrote a track just for them, entitled "Nazi Punks Fuck Off."

    Pinball 
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation has several if the player tilts during a game.
    Worf: "You are without honor."
  • If you press START without any credits in Sega Pinball's South Park, the game replies "Come on! Even Kenny's family has a quarter."
  • In Red & Ted's Road Show, finishing multiball without getting a single jackpot prompts Red to shout, "You missed EVERYTHING!"
  • Playing poorly in Spider-Man (Stern) results in various snarktastic remarks from J. Jonah Jameson.
    Jameson: "Play better!"
  • Also done in No Fear: Dangerous Sports if you drain too quickly.
    Skull: "Play better!"
  • Family Guy has lots of ways to insult the player.
    Peter: "Only a jackass would leave Happy Hour early."
  • Done repeatedly and incessantly in No Good Gofers, as the game is all about Buzz and Bud trying to ruin the player's day.
    Bud: "You hit your own cart!"
    Buzz: "You're dumber than Bud!"
  • Similarly, this is Gunther's primary schtick in the earlier Tee'd Off.
    Gunther: "Did anybody teach ya how to play this game?"
  • Tilting The Shadow causes the game to comment:
    Khan: "You still think you can control the game with brute force?"
  • Many of the Ringmasters' quotes in Cirqus Voltaire are insults like this.
    Ringmaster: "You're a disaster and I'm still the Ringmaster!"
  • There's a decent amount of this in The Simpsons (Data East).
    Grampa Simpsons: Don't you know how to use the flippers?
  • Centaur will sometimes taunt, "Slow, aren't you?"
  • Done occasionally in Indianapolis 500:
    Pit Crew: "Shoot the blinking light, you wanker!"
  • One-Eye the talking skull from Bone Busters has these among his repertoire.
    One-Eye: "You're a bonehead!"

    Professional Wrestling 
  • Brian Pillman's infamous "smart mark" promo in the ECW Arena is one enormous middle finger to the much more inside ECW fans. He even compared them to the much maligned Eric Bischoff to prove his point.
  • In the quote/unquote "Reality Era", both WWE and TNA on-screen authority figures have seemed to have gotten very good at mocking fans who support Smart Mark internet favorites, either by teasing success for said favorites only to snatch it away in lieu of more conventional choices for the main event scene, or by straight up getting on the mike and comparing such fans to spoiled crybabies that whine when they don't get what they want.

    Radio 
  • A staple part of the humour in The Now Show is making fun of BBC Radio 4 listeners.
  • Part of the (very thorough) Self Deprecating Humour of I'm Sorry I Haven't A Clue.
  • Pretty much every episode of the XFM The Ricky Gervais Show contained some form of insult to the listeners, usually berating how few listeners there were and that the minority listening should just turn over or switch it off.
  • An episode of The News Quiz in which they discussed accusations that the Radio 4 audience was too middle class.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Violence: The Roleplaying Game of Egregrious and Repulsive Bloodshed by "Designer X" (Greg Costikyan in a very bad mood) is this in spades. It's available under the Creative Commons license now; download the PDF here if you're so disposed.
    You puerile adolescent- and post-adolescent scum don't give a tinker’s cuss. ...there's no point in trying to write a good set of rules because you idiots can't tell the difference between a good set and a bad set anyway.

    Theater 
  • Aristophanes's plays were written to be performed only once, in front of an audience he knew personally, so he did this a lot, (making this trope Older Than Feudalism):
    • The Clouds: During an argument between the personified Stronger Argument and Weaker Argument, Weaker tells Stronger to look out at the audience and tell her what he sees. Following her advice, he exclaims "By the gods, they're all gay!" (Various translations render this anything from "faggots" and "assholes" to "blackguards" but the meaning is pretty clear from his very next exclamation that "Every one of them is one of those spreaders of their butt cheeks!")
    • The Frogs: "Wait, if we're in Hell, shouldn't there be a lot of sinners around?" "Sure, check out the audience."
  • In Hamlet (written of course by the English William Shakespeare and performed for English audiences, but set in Denmark), the graveyard scene has this exchange:
    Hamlet: Ay, marry, why was [Hamlet] sent into England?
    First Gravedigger: Why, because he was mad: he shall recover his wits there; or, if he do not, it's no great matter there.
    Hamlet: Why?
    First Clown: 'Twill, a not be seen in him there; there the men are as mad as he.
  • Near the start of Lucky Guy, Courtney Vance's character Hap Harrison says the time period is from 1985 to 1998. “(New York) City had become polarized between rich and poor." Harrison indicated the people in the front row as "rich" and the people sitting the balcony as "poor." In the performance this troper saw, the audience responded "harshly" to this, briefly taking Harrison aback.

    Video Games 
  • Starflight: A newspaper you can find on the ruins of Earth discusses how people in the distant past (the present time) would spend countless hours in front of screens and living out fantasies. The article goes on to state that the historians believed it caused the downfall of society.
  • Do really badly in Fire Emblem (a.k.a. Rekka no Ken) and the ending will note about the player "To this day, historians look back and question how these incomprehensible strategies ever led to victory."
    • If the player loses enough units in Shadow Dragon to be unable to meet the maximum number of units deployable for a chapter, they will receive filler units named after numbers. Lose them, and (in the US translation) you receive more... with names like Owend, Lucer, and Auffle (Owned, Loser, and Awful).
  • Miss all of El Oscuro's eggs in Rise of the Triad, and you're treated to a fake ending where you save the world.... well, until El Oscuro's spawn rises to power and explodes the Earth. Complete with a .wav file going "Youuuuuuuuuuu suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuck."
  • Lose enough times in a Mortal Kombat game, and Shao Kahn will go "it's official: YOU SUCK."
  • Collect all of the DNA (hidden collectibles) of the The Lost World: Jurassic Park tie-in game, and you get a video transmission from Jeff Goldblum as Dr. Ian Malcolm... who tells you to go outside.
  • In GoldenEye Source extended camping will "earn" a player the Octopussy achievement. The Quantum of Solace game did the same thing for players who finished the game on the easy difficulty.
  • In Blaze Union, one battlefield depicts a gaggle of delinquents first trying to score with the female party members, then actually attacking and trying to rape them when that fails. Said delinquents are given the same kind of musical cues and attention that the player characters do—and they're portrayed as laughably ineffectual scum of the earth that will most likely die virgins even if their attacks on women don't get them killed. This appears to be a stab at a Vocal Minority of rape fantasy loving otaku in the Japanese fandom, Unfortunately, no attention was paid to the women who enjoy such hentai.
  • In The Lost Vikings, the eponymous vikings routinely Lean On The Fourth Wall. Fail often enough and they'll comment on it. If you have to restart fifteen times, Thor will tell them they're doing very badly and they need to shape up.
    • The second game will say you really suck if you die on the first level. As you have to intentionally work at it to die, this is clearly an Easter Egg and doing it will give every character otherwise unobtainable Game Breaker abilities.
  • One of the Dave Mirra BMX games would actually use this as a cheat code - if you saved and quit enough times in practice mode, the game would eventually display "My grandma can play better than you". You'd then unlock a grandma as a playable biker...
  • The Dude will insult you for Save Scumming in Postal 2.
    • "Didn't you just save?"
    • "My grandmother could beat the game if she saved as much as you do."
    • "Are you saving AGAIN?"
    • He also gets on your case if you cheat, with phrases like "If you say so." and "Wussy!"
  • N's dialogue in Pokémon Black and White against the trainers who only use Pokémon as tools and only care about competing seems to be a jab against the "Stop Having Fun" Guys part of the fandom.
  • In Tokimeki Memorial 2 Substories: Dancing Summer Vacation, at around the middle of the game, if you decide to train at Dance Dance Revolution before paying a visit to your DDR tournament partner Miyuki, she'll phone you between two training sessions, and, all while being happy to see how serious you are at training, she'll say the following (and will fail to notice afterwards why the protagonist, aka you, feels awkward after that!):
    Miyuki: But~ Miyuki is so happy to hear this~! After all, with su~ch a beautiful day like this, young people shouldn't shut themselves in their room the whole day playing video games~!
  • The Freespace 2 level editor will call you a moron if you try to confuse its ship naming system.
  • Metal Gear Solid 2 has a somewhat humorous, fourth-wall-breaking one during the "Colonel"'s malfunction, "Honestly, though, you have played the game for a long time. Don't you have anything else to do with your time?"
    • Some might see the entirety of Metal Gear Solid 2 as being a Take That - the game's core design element was basically a recreation of the first game, and the plot is revealed to be your main character (Raiden) is just a lame wannabe from the video game generation trying to be Snake and the Patriots are assisting that goal by making him play over and over through the same formulaic iterations of Solid Snake's adventures. Kojima seems to somewhat hate his fans.
  • A subtle one is in the Infocom game Suspect where the behavior of an NPC detective is implied to be a recreation of how most players acted when assuming the detective role in the earlier Witness... which is to say, not very competent at all.
  • An NPC in Morrowind, Oblivion and Skyrim named "M'aiq the Liar" basically tells the series' massive Unpleasable Fanbase to can it. But as of Skyrim, he even makes a couple Take That, Us comments too.
  • Sonic 1 Remastered, a ROM Hack of Sonic the Hedgehog, changes the text on the normal "No Chaos Emeralds" screen from "SPECIAL STAGE" to "YOU SUCK AT SPECIAL STAGES".
  • In Umineko no Naku Koro ni, Episode 8's climax is one massive Take That towards the audience, as the creator had gotten tired of the fans demanding 'the true solution' to everything instead of trying to work it out themselves. The main characters are Zerg Rushed by massive, stupid-theory-sprouting Butler-Goats that ate away at the mystery and demanded answers. Subtle.
  • When the first trailers and screenshots of Diablo III were released, there was a lot of backdraft over the game not being "dark enough", to the point everyone thought the game was going to be a Lighter and Softer cash-in. Blizzard's response? Whimsyshire, the game's new cow level, which has you fighting your way through a Tastes Like Diabetes landscape of rainbows, smiling clouds, dancing flowers, and unicorns.
  • Similarly, World of Warcraft had complaints from beta players who felt the Maelstrom was not "epic" enough, considering its importance in game lore. Blizz's tongue-in-cheek response was to add Epicus Maximus, a guitar-axe-playing undead riding a T-rex riding a rocket-powered shark with lasers on its head. It has since had cameo appearances in a hologram of what appeals to degenerate tech-lovers and the Brawler's Guild.
  • After some players complained about the endings of Mass Effect 3, the developers added a fourth ending option...which leads to the Reapers wiping out the galactic civilization. Then, for good measure, included a different stargazer scene implying the next cycle did what you were supposed to do: use the Crucible. The game made it clear that the galaxy was not going to win without the Crucible, and the Extended Cut made that clear.
  • Distorted Travesty, your Mission Control best friend Jeremy mocks you for dying every single time it happens. And the game is actually pretty tough, so you will probably die quite a lot. Playing on Easy Mode only increases the insults. The sequel has a different Mission Control character who encourages you upon death instead, but the third game brings Jeremy back and with him, his insults.
  • Spec Ops: The Line is simultaneously a deconstruction of the modern military shooter, a Take That at the same, and a huge take that to the players, with plenty of leaning (and breaking) of the fourth wall as the game culminates in an incident where the player murders innocent civilians and blasts the player for finding violence fun. Even the loading screens near the end have such gems as "Do you feel like a Hero yet?", "You're still a good person.", and "This is all your fault."
  • I Wanna Be the Guy: The infamous sword.
    "It's dangerous to go alone! Take this."
    "YOU JUMPED INTO A SWORD, YOU RETARD!"
  • The ZX Spectrum version of the shooter Sqij, in addition to being a Porting Disaster which is an unplayable, glitchy mess even if you fix the Game-Breaking Bug that prevents the player from moving in the first place, goes out of its way to insult a losing player: "What a plonker. You got yourself killed."
  • DmC: Devil May Cry has a particular scene which pokes fun at the HUGE Internet Backdraft that occurred among the franchise's old-time fans after trailers unveiled Dante's re-design. While fighting a giant demon at a fair, an attack destroys a building and leaves Dante wearing a long-haired white wig and a smashed mirror in front of him. He looks at himself, smirks, says "not in a million years", and then tears the wig off and goes back to fighting. Some fans saw this as a light-hearted joke, and others, especially the old-timers, saw it as a further middle-finger directed at them. However, this whole scene ends up being a case of Hypocritical Humor at the end of the game, as his hair turns permanently white as a side-effect of the Devil Trigger. Also later DLC allowed you to play as classic Dante.
  • Valve Software pokes fun at a specific type of Team Fortress 2 modders in this page. And this is after it was discovered that Gabe Newell watches the show.
  • Poker Night 2 has the following exchange:
    Sam: Hey! I thought we were all friends here?
    Max: It's playing computer poker by itself, Sam. It doesn't have any friends.
    • If the player is eliminated from the tournament:
    Claptrap: You can't leave now! If you're gone, who'll regale me with tales of their epic battles with hygiene and interpersonal relationships?
    • GLaDOS (who's the dealer) does this basically every single time she speaks to you. But then, it is GLaDOS after all...
    Although usually a sign of a weak hand, a check can also be used to disguise a stronger hand. In your case, I'll assume it's a sign of confusion.
    The judicious poker player knows the importance of a well-timed fold. And then there's you.
    Wow. That was a clever move that won't come back to bite you in your ample posterior.
    Congratulations, you've stopped listening to your frontal lobe and are going with your gut, where all the feces are.
    The player has been eliminated due to lack of funds. And intelligence.
  • Beat the first Special Place in Sonic Erazor and the game insults you.
    "If I see such a pathetic excuse of what you call skill again, I will go ahead and disable the checkpoints until you can do this stage while you are asleep!"
  • Done via Leaning on the Fourth Wall in XCOM: Enemy Unknown. During a plot mission the peanut gallery sees an alien entertainment device (a weird colored light show doohickey) and remarks:
    Dr. Shen: Is this what the aliens do for fun? At least they're not playing ... computer games.
  • Get a game over in the 3DO adaptation of Demolition Man, and Sylvester Stallone will appear and personally tell you how much you suck. Then an audience of children will laugh at you.
  • Cranky Kong in the Donkey Kong Country series does this all the time. His end quote in the Donkey Kong 64 manual translates to 'buy the strategy or just get better at the game', and his comments in the games themselves come down to 'stop dying and you won't have to buy all these expensive items'. Like Crash into too many things, and even this stuff won't save you. Or Why are you falling into holes anyway? And that's not even getting into what he said when he took over Nintendo of America's Twitter account.. Old enough to remember when falling in a pit in a platformer was called “lack of skill” and not “cheap.”
    • If you lose a life when playing through Ashley's story mode/microgames in WarioWare, the character will pretty much call you an idiot in the process.
  • Super Paper Mario. The entirety of chapter 3 is one long Take That aimed at Nintendo's fanboys/audience. Complete with a stereotypical nerd called Francis who complains about video games he hasn't played on internet message boards and talks about how his first love was an anime character.
  • There is a point in GUN where you have to break out of a jail cell by grabbing the jailor as he drunkenly stumbles into your reach. If you miss the first time, he does the same manuever again, with different dialogue. Miss three times in a row, however, and the only new dialogue you get is "You are the dumbest sumbitch I ever seen", which is obviously aimed at the player.
  • The trailer for the Edition Select mode for Ultra Street Figher IV opens with a man representing a fanboy tossing and turning in bed, having nightmares about Sagat's new balanced gameplay and clutching a piece of paper with things like "FIREBALLS TAKE NO DAMAGE!!!!! UPPERCUT TAKES NO DAMAGE!!!!!" written on it to his chest.

    Web Comics 
  • The 8-Bit Theater strip "Unwisely Pissing Off the Fanbase" claims to do this but is actually more Self-Deprecation. Many feel the strip's vast overreliance on Anticlimax is one of these as well. Brian Clevinger has repeatedly stated that the best jokes are the ones played on the reader.
  • In The Order of the Stick, the mass-murdering barbarian Thog became a fan-favourite, which is then mirrored in-universe when he becomes a gladiator of such efficacy that he becomes too popular to simply kill off. The following line lampshading this has the additional bonus of applying to the speaker, a mass-murdering, sociopathic Tin Tyrant who also became a fan-favorite by merit of his sheer charisma and being Dangerously Genre Savvy.
    Tarquin: It's weird, no matter how many people he kills, the audience still thinks he's lovable.

    Web Animation 
  • Strong Bad from Homestar Runner does this a lot in his Strong Bad Email series. The episode that took the cake and ran with it, though, was SBEmail #188 "fan club", where it turns out that his loser brother Strong Sad formed an SB fanclub with Strong Mad and The Cheat called "the Deleteheads". He also mercilessly took a jab at Fan Fics and Mary Sues in the same episode.
    • In the very first Strong Bad Email, SB closes out by saying "Keep sending me your questions, and I will make fun of you... I mean, answer them."
    • In "Trogday 08", Strong Bad accuses "you Internet types" of running his creation Trogdor the Burninator into the ground.
    • A promo video for Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive People had Strong Bad, after dropping the title of the game, turn to the audience and add "But you can play, too."
  • From Zero Punctuation (also getting in two digs at himself at the same time):
    Yahtzee: A nerd, after all, is someone who obsesses over something, like the cultural impact of gaming, or people who criticise same in silly internet videos."
    • Also, seeing the face of the viewer is apparently enough to make an imp's head explode.
  • Ultra Fast Pony:
    • The episode "A Library With No Twilight" gives quite a bit of characterization to the series' Lemony Narrator. Specifically, his name is Phil, and he's a complete creepazoid. Then the episode ends with the text, "Phil is a brony, exactly like you! YES! JUST LIKE YOU!"
    • In "Derp and Destruction", Twilight justifies her completely gratuitous recaps by claiming that they're for the audience's benefit.
    Rarity: Nobody's that stupid, Twilight.
    Twilight: They watch this show. They have to be a little bit stupid.

    Web Original 
  • Andrew Hussie, creator of Homestuck, does this all the time to the Fan Dumb if something is misinterpreted or some logical leap not made.
    GA: Sorry I Thought That Was Obvious.
    • The cherubs are parodies of the fandom and the Hate Dumb respectively.
    • Many of the Pre-Scratch trolls are based on Flanderized fanon portrayals of their descendants.note 
  • Spoony gets one in during his LP of Terror TRAX: Track of the Vampire:
    Graves: I get it. She was scamming losers who can't get real dates.
    Spoony: Same kind of losers who watch let's plays instead of meeting girls.
  • In an episode of Game Grumps Jon and Arin had just finished some very stressful levels in Zombies Ate My Neighbors. The password for them at the end of the Ants level comes out to be "FKYQ"
    Jontron Dude, the..dude the password is "FKYQ"! "Fuck you" it seriously is.
  • In The Nostalgia Critic review of The Care Bears Movie, when a character brainwashes an audience and makes them start fighting, the critic yells "Oh no! He's turned them into Youtube commenters!"
    • He died in 2012, but then returned in 2013 with a different wall colour behind him. When fans made comments about how the old wall was better (with vrying levels of pleasantness and obnoxiousness), he delivers one of these:
    "I thought the most important part of the Nostalgia Critic... was the Nostalgia Critic. Not the wall behind him!"
    • From Son of the Mask onwards, the trope has been included more often in reviews. The most glaring example was "The Top 11 South Park Episodes", a topic the fans chose when Doug asked if he was allowed to do a Top 11, where he started out hating the fans, them annoying him, and finally him screeching virgin-shaming insults at them.
  • Death Note: The Abridged Series (Kpts4tv) has a chart featuring the brain-size of the average abridged series viewer.
  • In Chapter 26.3 of Worm, Clockblocker complains that "[s]ome dingbats online speculated that I had a thing for Weaver, and it took off." This is, of course, a direct jab at the substantial Shipping contingent among the fans who insist these two characters would be awesome together.
  • Becoming YouTube has a lot of this.
    Ben: Thanks for watching my first YouTube video. Next week's video is about you, the audience. You'll come back for that, won't you, you narcissist!
  • The What the Fuck Is Wrong with You? episode "Hummingbird Hell" contains this jab:
    Nash:...Gentlemen, and I'm using the term loosely because you're watching my show...
  • AMV Hell during its Challenge series had nearly Once an Episode appearances of Jem, eliciting complaints from fans that she was a Western cartoon and so didn't belong in an anime compilation. In Challenge 19 an entire clip was dedicated to Jem singing while pasted clips of user comments and her Japanese creator mocked the whiners. During the voting for best clip in that video, it tied for first.
  • Meduka Meguca: After the creators received a massive amount of hate-mail for how long episodes took to come out, they used Kyoko's after-episode scene to tell the 'fans' what the team thought of their responses - even replying directly to a few - and culminating in a simple message: "Sending nasty messages won't make an episode come out any faster [...] Leave Director Chii alone."
  • In Dragon Ball Abridged, the Ginyu Force is reinterpreted as some sort of professional wrestling troupe and Vegeta's response to their schtick is "What kind of sadistic retard watches this crap?"

    Western Animation 
  • Adventure Time has the episode "Fionna and Cake," a gender-swapped version of Finn and Jake. The whole episode is filled with cheesy dialogue, fight scenes, and a song. The fans loved it, and ate it up...until the end, when it's revealed that the whole episode was the Ice King's fanfiction about Finn and Jake, and the big bad Ice Queen was an Author Avatar for the Ice King! It was like a giant (albeit affectionate) middle finger towards the show's more zealous fans who write that kind of fanfiction and obsess over Finn and Jake just as much as the Ice King does.
    • "All The Little People" also pokes fun at shippers and fanfic writers when Finn discovers a bag of miniature versions of himself and his friends (left in his pocket by Magic Man) and starts messing around with them, only to start feeling guilty when he sees how unhappy he's making them with his meddling in their relationships.
  • There's a playful dig at comic fans in an episode of The Super Hero Squad Show:
    Scarlet Witch: What do they write about me on your message boards?
    Scarlet Witch: Liar! Nobody ever writes positive things on message boards!
  • The Batman: The Brave and the Bold episode "Legends of the Dark Mite" contains an Author Filibuster from Paul Dini, in which Bat-Mite takes a jab at overzealous adult fans who think everything needs to be Darker and Edgier to be good, as well as those who negatively compare every subsequent Batman production to Batman: The Animated Series (which Dini co-created).
  • Animaniacs made fun of the more overzealous members of their Periphery Demographic in the famous "Please, Please, Pleese Get a Life Foundation" sketch (which features geeks rattling off Animaniacs trivia and nitpicks culled from an actual list found on a newsgroup).
  • The announcer on Danger Mouse would start prattling off hypothetical questions at the end of some episodes, and at the end of a particular episode he quipped "Why do you watch this stuff?"
  • Family Guy: "You know what really grinds my gears? You America. Fuck you! Diane?
  • From the Futurama episode The Why of Fry:
    The Big Brain: "Detecting trace amounts of mental activity, possibly a dead weasel or a cartoon viewer."
    Gender-Swapped Leela: Thank God most of our fans are huge perverts!
  • Invader Zim episode "GIR Goes Crazy and Stuff," was a direct hit at the fans who think GIR is cute. To recap, GIR unleashed his evil mode that's hidden deeply inside himself, assaults a police officer by picking up his car and carrying it back to the house note ), quickly tried to gain the knowledge necessary to conquer Earth (much faster than Zim ever did), and tried to KILL ZIM! Jhonen Vasquez hoped the episode would make people "uncomfortable" with the robot. It didn't work, probably because the episode was still quite funny.
  • The Phineas and Ferb episode "The Beak" has an odd example in its second song, making fun of the viewers for being weaker than the eponymous superhero.
    "You really are pretty lame compared to the Beak!"
    • There's also Irving, a nerdy outcast sort of character whose obsession with the titular duo is taken by some fans as a playful dig at the fandom.
  • In the "Ember Island Players" episode of "Avatar: The Last Airbender", the writer of "the Boy in the Iceberg" made Katara and Zuko a couple, Actress!Katara considering Actress!Aang more like a little brother than a lover (which ticks off Katara to no end). This is most likely a "Take That!" to the people who ship the actual Katara and Zuko.
  • The Simpsons episode "Bye, Bye Nerdie," in which Lisa discovers that bullies detect nerds via their scent, ends with the bully Francine sniffing straight ahead of her and leaping at the audience.
    • In the later seasons of the show — starting around season 8's "The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show," an extended riff on this theme — nearly any appearance of Comic Book Guy heralds one of these. In "Saddlesore Galactica" he practically breaks the Fourth Wall in order to make the point.
    Homer: Does anyone care what this guy thinks?
    • An in-universe example appears in a sequence where Bart has a daydream about being a jaded, bitter rock star. During a concert he informs the audience that he's going to play a new song entitled "Me Fans Are Stupid Pigs". Cue an outburst of squealing and fawning from said fans.
  • South Park: When Stan and Kyle finally reach their goal in scoring 1,000,000 points on Guitar Hero, instead of saying something along the lines of "You're a rock star!" the game mocks them and says they're fags for playing the game so much.
  • During the episode of The Boondocks where Grandpa fights an old blind man, the show stops before the killing blow and Huey muses to the audience that they could be reading a book right now. The screen stays still a few more seconds, like the show is telling you to do something better with your time than watch two old men beat each other.
  • ReBoot: When Enzo and Dot are in a zombie shooter game, they discuss the brutality of it.
    Enzo: In the next level, the zombies have flesh!
    Dot: What kind of sick creature gets enjoyment out of playing this sort of game? ''*both glare at the camera*
  • In season 2 finale of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, Princess Cadance comments on Pinkie Pie's plans for her wedding reception: "Perfect! ...if we were celebrating a six-year-old's birthday party", even though that's basically the target audience of the show. Justified, though, since it's really the Big Bad impersonating real Cadance.
    • "Spike at Your Service" pokes fun at Fanfiction writers. Rainbow Dash mentions writing a novel about an awesome pegasus who's the best flyer ever and becomes captain of the Wonderbolts, to which Rarity snarks "However did you come up with that ingeniously woven intricate plot-line?"
    • In the season 3 finale, "Magical Mystery Cure", Princess Twilight Sparkle's final line, "Yes, everything's gonna be just fine!", was interpreted by the Bronies as a swipe to the Hate Dumb and the critics who continued to have doubts about her turning to an alicorn. In actuality, it's a Callback to Spike's last line in "The Crystal Empire, Part 2":
    Yeah, I knew everything was going to be fine. — Spike
  • The creators of Daria pulled this in the episode Camp Fear where Our Heroine is accosted by a clingy "friend" from her childhood who's completely obsessed with her. The real kicker, though is that MTV had earlier held a contest where Big Name Fans Erin Mills and Michelle Klein-Hass won the right to get their likenesses made into background characters, it was this out of all the episodes they could have done, that they were used in.
  • The Powerpuff Girls episode "City Of Clipsville," with the girls and the Professor recounting past adventures, was intended as a Take That to PPG fan fiction, most notably those that paired teen Powerpuffs with teen Rowdyruff Boys. It backfired, as it didn't happen.
  • The special features for Metalocalypse are LOADED with these. At the end of an extended scene of Nathan Explosion recording a Shakespeare audiobook, the viewer is told to take his hand off his cock, get off the couch, and get a job. At least one Credits Gag repeatedly tells viewers to go fuck themselves. Facebones, the band mascot, has blistering contempt for Klokateers and civilians (in-universe) AND for viewers (in special features).
  • The American Dad! episode "Familyland" starts with Bullock (ie, Sir Patrick Stewart) giving a voiceover that involves reading the sign for Familyland to the audience. He then asks why he had to read it since presumably the audience could do that for themselves, only to be told that, no, the audience can't read.
  • A Youtube-like template seen in some episodes of Teen Titans Go! (used when someone is watching a video online) has a pretty noticible video in the suggestions box titled: "TEEN TITANS NO!!!1!" uploaded by: "Childhood Ruined" and bears the thumbnail of a crying baby, suggesting that the writers see fanboys of the original Teen Titans who long for new episodes of the real Teen Titans as immature crybabies and basically that their "tears are delicious". Videos related to the Too Good to Last action-oriented shows (which the same fans accuse TTG! of replacing) Young Justice and Green Lantern: The Animated Series (such as advertising a lost episode or something like that) are also seen in the same area.
  • The Robot Chicken sketch Meteor! has Steven Tyler throw up and claim to have just shot smack into both his eyeballs. Cut to a stereotypical overweight nerd in a bedroom crammed with memorabilia spitting his drink out and yelling that he has to write an angry letter because Steven Tyler's been clean for years.

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