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Right-Hand Cat
Proof that pets resemble their owners.

"That makes me angry, and when Dr. Evil gets angry, Mr. Bigglesworth gets upset. And when Mr. Bigglesworth gets upset... people DIE!"
Dr. Evil, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery

In an evil contrast to how much Heroes Love Dogs, Diabolical Masterminds are cat people. If they don't have a face, they will always have a pet cat, usually some shade of white, sitting on their desk or in their lap, that they stroke as they describe their Evil Plan.

Why do bad guys like cats? Maybe because Cats Are Meanthey kill birds and mice, just so they can offer you the corpse. Cats are lap-sized and perfect to pet while scheming. Or maybe it's because Cats Are Superior and believe they are entitled to be worshipped and revered by humans, or deserve to Take Over the World themselves. Dogs are faithful and loyal, but cats are fickle with a superiority complex. Villains and cats just fit. It's the perfect accessory for a Card-Carrying Villain.

The Big Bad's Right-Hand Cat will have varying degrees of a personality depending on the context of the series. Some will display sentient facial expressions and even an evil laugh, showing a morality in sync with their master's. Some just sit there, emotionless, yawning and purring like any other ordinary pet. Even in animation, the cat will probably never speak, but it will almost always have a name.

This may stem from the tradition that All Witches Have Cats and often use cats as their familiars. See Kindhearted Cat Lover for examples when a character simply likes having a cat around.

In real life, this is almost entirely untrue. Famous cat haters throughout history have included Caligula, Nero, Bonaparte, Hitler, and Stalin. Oddly, all of the above were fond of dogs, perhaps because of their obedient, worshipful nature. (Alternately, for a psychopath terrified of assassination, a German Shepherd is a little more comforting than a tabby.)

However, Cardinal Richelieu was a famous cat-lover (he owned 14 cats at the time of his death) and he got a Historical Villain Upgrade since Alexandre Dumas' The Three Musketeers. Most adaptations picture him petting a white cat while scheming, making Richelieu the likely Trope Maker.

Pirate captains will have a Pirate Parrot instead. See also Feather Boa Constrictor, Right-Hand Attack Dog.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime & Manga 
  • Giovanni with his Persian, from Pokémon. For a while, the Team Rocket trio's Meowth from the same series had it as his overriding goal to become a Right-Hand Cat for Giovanni. For another definition of "right hand", he also had Mewtwo for a short time.
  • In Peacemaker Kurogane, after going crazy and gay, Suzu is depicted as having a fondness for cats.
  • Djibril pets his black cat in Mobile Suit Gundam SEED Destiny.
  • In the manga of Death Note, Teru Mikami has one.
  • Parodied in a Fullmetal Alchemist Omake. In a picture of members of the cast as members of organized crime, Al is "Da Boss", and has an Adulr cat which is referred to as "demon henchbeast".
  • In Urusei Yatsura, the principal of Tomobiki high is sometimes seen petting a white cat while plotting against the students. He's hardly a villain (more of a Cloudcuckoolander), but the parody is obvious.

    Comic Books 
  • Atrocitus comes to Earth looking for the other Lantern Corps. entities in Brightest Day and brings only one fellow Red Lantern with him: a blue house cat named Dex-Starr, who is the most sadistic of the entire Corp. Then, in Green Lantern #55, we learn Dex-Starr's origin, cue waterworks.
  • Gargamel's cat, Azraël, from The Smurfs. Leans into Right-Hand Attack Dog territory, since the Smurfs are small enough to be frequently chased by Azraël.

    Films — Animation 
  • In Disney's version of Cinderella, Cinderella's stepmother has a cat named — I kid you not — Lucifer. He is intelligent enough to understand that Cinderella is unfairly put-upon with the chores, and mean enough to complicate them at one point in the movie. His opposite number is Bruno, a nice dog who sleeps in the basement.
  • Junkman in the The Incredible Crash Dummies (a 1993 half-hour CG movie) has the Hubcat.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • ''And Then There Were None
    • In the 1945 film adaptation, Judge Warwick, who turns out to be the evil mastermind behind the murders, holds and strokes a house cat while explaining his scheme to one of the survivors.
  • James Bond
    • Ernst Stavro Blofeld, from the early films, as pictured above. His ever-present fluffy white cat is probably the Trope Codifier, being responsible for most, if not all, of the parodies and references listed below.
    • A Funny Background Event shows that while the base in You Only Live Twice is being attacked, the cat is dead scared and trying to escape Blofeld's grasp!
      • It goes one step further in the opener to For Your Eyes Only - when Bond gains control of the helicopter and comes after the Blofeld expy, his cat promptly runs off!
    • Diamonds Are Forever plays with this a little, when Bond confronts Blofeld and his double. Unsure of which is which, Bond kicks the white Persian in the room and shoots the Blofeld it jumps to for safety. Sadly, it doesn't work, as there's more than one cat too.
    Blofeld: Right idea, Mr. Bond...
    Bond: But wrong pussy.
  • Austin Powers
    • Dr. Evil, a parody of Blofeld, with Mr. Bigglesworth. Starts as a Persian, becomes a Sphinx cat after the cryogenic revival.
    • Mini-Me, in turn, has a Mini-Bigglesworth (a Sphinx kitten).
  • In The Godfather, the title character is seen stroking a cat in the opening scene, as a kind of Pet the Dog moment, establishing him as both a deadly gangster and a devoted and loving family man. This was not in the book or script; Brando just made friends with a cat and they decided to Throw It In.
  • In 'Erich Von Stroheim's' 1929 silent film Queen Kelly, the wicked and beautiful Queen Regina owns a white Persian cat that she often strokes, sometimes when nude.
  • Auntie in the Japanese horror film Hausu has Shiro, a white Persian, who the heroines discover provides Auntie with her immortality and magic abilities. It turns out Auntie lied and even killing Shiro won't stop her. Not to mention, Shiro is immortal, too.
  • In the Japanese ninja movie Shinobi no Mono, Oda Nobunaga is shown petting cats in several scenes. Notably, Roald Dahl saw the film while writing the script for You Only Live Twice, so while the (unseen) Blofield stroked a pet cat in earlier Bond movies, this film might have been an inspiration for his iconic representation doing it in You Only Live Twice.
  • In the modern film verson of Hairspray, Velma von Tussle gets a fluffy white Persian to stroke in one scene.
  • In the infamous Going Overboard, Noriega has a Cute Kitten. The last you see of it is when it gets killed along with a suicidal Noriega by a grenade.
  • In Enter the Dragon, Han, trying to recruit Roper into joining his organization, carries a fluffy white cat. To test Roper's resolve, Han sets the cat down in the business area of a guillotine and offers to let Roper pull the chain. Roper declines.
  • In the 1937 Dick Tracy film serial, Moloch is often seen stroking a black cat.

    Literature 
  • In 1956, even before Blofeld made it cool, back in the original book of The Hundred and One Dalmatians, Cruella de Vil had a white Persian cat, as opposed to the heroic dog-loving Dearlys. When they actually met the cat, Pongo and Perdita Missis found she was actually nice (we had already learned of Cruella's drowning of her kittens — as if that woman needed extra Kick the Dog credentials). She then joined the dogs in wrecking Cruella's private fur collection.
  • In the 1632 series, it is briefly established that Richelieu likes cats after he is given a Siamese kitten as a diplomatic gift and plays with it.
  • In Yulia Latynina's Inhuman, when Mehmed Lee "Eat-Alive" Trastamara (an incredibly old, infamous man, the right-hand of the Evil Overlord that founded the empire, the inventor of many nasty viruses, as well as a brainwashing symbiont, and the great-grandfather of the Villain Protagonist who comes to him for advice) finally appears in the flesh, he is sitting in a chair with a big white and red cat resting in his lap. Despite being both ancient and retired, "Eat-Alive" still has a hand in almost everything that happens in the Human Empire and more, to the extent of eventually organising a successful coup d'etat and establishing himself as the most adroit and savvy opponent of the alien conspiracy. Let's just say, he earned that cat.
  • One of the earliest examples of this trope would be Victorian Era supervillain Dr. Nikola, who was always accompanied by a huge, black cat named Appolyon.
  • Etienne Galant, the Big Bad in The Corpse in the Waxworks by John Dickson Carr, is seen stroking a white persian. The book was published in 1932.
  • In the Novels Of The Change, Chessmaster Sandra Arminger pets her Persians as an aid to concentrating on her schemes.
  • She doesn't hold her cats in her hand, but Dolores Umbridge from Harry Potter, probably the second most sadistic person in the series behind Voldemort himself, is seemingly addicted to cats. Her office is lined with plates and pictures depicting cats. As well, her Patronus was in the shape of a Persian cat, and it paced in front of her during the courtroom scene in Deathly Hallows to protect her from the dementors. Averted in the case of Professor McGonagall, a good character in the same series, who also has a cat Patronus and can transform into a cat (an ordinary tabby rather than something fluffy and expensive). In between the two is Argus Filch, the Jerkass caretaker at Hogwarts, with his unpleasantly scrawny and dust-colored Mrs. Norris. His genuine love and affection for her (to the point of being driven to tears when she was nearly killed) is one of his few redeeming traits. Must be remember that Hermione Granger herself also has a pet cat.
  • In Flannery O'Connor's short story "A Good Man is Hard to Find" an escaped convict called the Misfit murders an entire family, who is stranded by an isolated road after an accident,and afterwards picks up and strokes their pet cat (that had caused the accident).

    Live-Action TV 
  • While she wasn't a villain per se, Mrs. Pynchon, the (cold and typically unlikable) newspaper publisher (and everyone's boss) in the TV series Lou Grant, has a cat who resides on her desk at her office.
  • Conan O'Brien's impression of an NBC executive involves talking in an "evil" voice and miming petting a cat in his arms.
  • Mick of Kamen Rider Double is the pet cat of The Don/Big Bad Ryubee Sonozaki. Mick also happens to be one of the high ranking villains: the Smilodon Dopant.
  • Another non-villainous example: Cee Lo Green strokes a white cat in this fashion during Season 2 of The Voice.
  • Star Trek: The Original Series used this a few times.
    • "Assignment Earth". Gary Seven has a black cat named Isis that appears to be intelligent. At the end of the episode it's revealed that Isis is actually a beautiful humanoid female who can take cat form.
    • "Catspaw". Korob has a pet black cat. Since he's dressed (and acts) like a wizard, Spock assumes that the cat is his familiar. Later on the cat changes into the form of a beautiful woman, and it turns out that she's really the episode's Big Bad.
  • Referenced in the finale of The Shadow Line:
    Gatehouse: People don't do bad things just because they want to stroke a white cat.
  • Will and Grace episode "Bully Wooley" had Karen Walker confronting Scott Wooley/Jeff Goldblum (right after he drank cat pee thinking it was champagne) in the climax while stroking a white Persian.

    Radio 

    Tabletop Games 
  • The cover to the Paranoia splatbook "High Programmers" has a High Programmer petting a cat with one eye.
  • Intentionally invoked on this forum as a suggestion for a good use for a template that creates an undead made from a taxidermied skin that can pass for a living creature to all but the most keen-eyed of observers... until they look into its eyes and see the inside of its scalp, or it deflates and slithers away.
  • Warhammer's Vampire Queen Neferata has a ghostly cat familiar called Bastet, and her vampiric descendents - the Lahmian Sisterhood - also tend to go in for cats in a big way.

    Theater 
  • Pyewacket, Gillian's familiar in Bell, Book, And Candle.

    Video Games 
  • In World of Warcraft, Kel'thuzad, The Dragon of the Lich King, has a cat named Mr. Bigglesworth after Dr. Evil's cat in his dungeon. If it is killed, Kel'thuzad gets quite upset with the players and threatens to send the Scourge to hunt them down.
    "NO! A curse upon you, interlopers! The armies of the Lich King will hunt you down! You will NOT escape your fate!"
  • The Big Bad of Ace Attorney Investigations has one to go with his Slouch of Villainy
  • In Puyo Puyo, Accord carries a black cat puppet called Popoi.
  • Parn is a black cat owned by the Crooked Man in Cursery: The Crooked Man. Parn can actually take on a human form thanks to the curse on him and his master and serves to create obstacles for the player. It's revealed that he was a stray cat adopted by the Crooked Man's fiancee before her death.

    Web Comics 
  • In The Brick Testament, the evil pharaoh of Egypt in Exodus is portrayed with a pet cat.
  • Dr Nonami. Dr. Mechano has Destroyer, an adorable little kitty who he insists is a vicious killing machine.
  • In Overlord of Ravenfell, Razin maintains cuddling kitties is perfectly acceptable for an Overlord. Since cats are evil, so are the cuddles.
  • In Homestuck, Her Imperious Condescension appears to have control over a cat. Which happens to be the First Guardian, and therefore has the powers of Becquerel. It is unknown if G Cat is planning anything, if he is being manipulated, or if he is a willing servant of the Condesce.
  • But I'm a Cat Person's Ann Walker has a tiger. Well, a shapeshifting Being that she usually keeps in tiger form. (In contrast, the house cat Being is owned by a protagonist, and, back when she was owned by a crazy cult leader, was almost always kept in human form.)
  • According to Sev Trek this is the reason Blofeld's mooks aren't allowed to see his face. "It's not a pleasant sight. I'm allergic to cats."

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • Ahuizotl in Daring Do, from the episodes "Read It and Weep" and "Daring Don't" of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic. It's worth pointing out that the cat is every bit as aggressive and dangerous as the panthers and tigers it's with, though.
  • Mildly parodied in Danny Phantom, to the point of Running Gag status. In several episodes of the first two seasons, Danny encourages his arch enemy, Vlad, to get a cat, to which he usually gives an emphatic "No!", but lo and behold, the second episode of the third season had him sitting in his study, petting — what else — a white cat, named after Danny's mother, Maddie.
  • Even Angelica, the Devil in Plain Sight on Rugrats, has a pet cat named Fluffy.
  • Skeletor with Panthor, from He-Man and the Masters of the Universe (1983). Though this was somewhat reversed in that it was the cat who carried Skeletor, rather than the other way around.
  • Catwoman didn't start with one, but Batman: The Animated Series provided her with Isis, proving this trope fits on her pretty well.
  • Inspector Gadget: Dr. Claw has Mad Cat, his constantly laughing cat that would endure all the abuse that happened when his master would suddenly pound his table (which he apparently liked to do, even when it wasn't necessary), rub his fur a little too hard, or simply whack him because he was in the way or because he did something he didn't like.
    Claw: Why are you laughing? I'm the one who did all the work!
  • Roger, the bully from Doug, has a Right-Hand Cat called Stinky, whereas Doug has a reliable, intelligent dog called Porkchop. One episode gives him A Day in the Limelight when Roger makes Doug look after him while Roger's away. He trashes the house, and eats pizza and ice cream, and is generally nasty. Then, he gets sick and Doug freaks out, thinking that this is because he let the cat get its own way, and worries about what Roger will do...turns out, he was neither sick nor a "he". She was pregnant.
  • An episode of Goldie Gold and Action Jack has a villain with one.
  • Baudelaire, Max Madison's cat in Phantom 2040.
  • One of the Freakazoid!! villains has a white, menacing cat. Freakazoid himself has a fat orange cat in The Godfather-spoof episode.
  • Geraldine has one in the Totally Spies! episode "Return of Geraldine".
  • Ravage from Transformers is usually this to the Decepticons.
  • Daedalus from The Mighty Hercules has his pet cat Dido. Despite how over-the-top villainous he is, he is surprisingly kind to it.

Subversions and Playing with the trope

    Anime & Manga 
  • Double Subversion in Yu-Gi-Oh! GX: the fact that Daitokouji-sensei had a pet cat could have been a clue he was The Mole, until he was further revealed to be a Double Agent. And after his Redemption Equals Death, the cat takes over his job.
  • In Medabots, the Right-Hand Cat contains the soul of the Big Bad; the human body is just a robotic shell.
  • Tailmon (Gatomon in the dub) of Digimon Adventure started off as Vamdemon's (a.k.a. Myotismon) Right-Hand Cat (though, being a Digimon, she could talk and fight), but it later turned out that she was the missing partner of the eighth Chosen Child.
  • The anime Now and Then, Here and There has the resident psychotic leader pet a cat in the first episode he appears in. And then break its neck when getting his first but not last on-screen psychotic episode.
  • Played with in The Prince of Tennis, where the main character is an antisocial and skittish kid who is very attached to his pet cat, Karupin. He may not pet him ŕ la Blofeld, but likes to have the feline sleeping in his bed.
  • What the hell the fat cat in FLCL actually was is unclear, but Haruko spends a remarkable amount of time and attention on it. Apparently, she was using it to communicate with her boss. For those unfamiliar with FLCL, don't even try to work out how said communication is supposed to in any way work.
  • Russia in Axis Powers Hetalia has a cat - the only animal that doesn't flee from him - but oddly enough, he is never depicted stroking it (though he does pet him with apparently genuine affection), and whether he's actually evil is up for debate.
    • Not to mention, he's not the only cat-owning nation-tan. Japan is seen feeding his own cat Tama/Japaneko, and it's implied that most if not all the other Nekotalia cats belong to their corresponding nations.

    Comic Books 
  • Bomb Queen's eponymous supervillainess/Evil Overlord has a black cat named Ashe who, in the most recent volume, has been revealed as an ancient demon who's been using Bomb Queen and her city.

    Fan Works 
  • Goldentusk's video for the James Bond Theme Song parodies plenty James Bond tropes, including the Right-Hand Cat.
  • Referenced in Yu-Gi-Oh! The Abridged Series; Ishizu tries to tell Marik that he's not really evil, because evil people do things like stroke cats while sitting in revolving chairs. Shortly thereafter, Marik tells his henchman to drive to Wal-Mart so he can purchase a revolving chair and a kitten.
  • Plan 7 of 9 from Outer Space by Odon. The heroes have been captured by the Big Bad, whom they assume is some form of Cat Folk alien when a Persian cat appears on the viewscreen. The Big Bad then tells his incompetent henchman that the camera is too low, and to point it at his face instead.

    Films — Animation 
  • Ratigan from The Great Mouse Detective has a white cat, Felicia, do some of his dirty work for him — but, being a "large mouse", he naturally can't carry her around. Henceforth, he uses a bell to ring her up whenever some hapless fool needs to become dinner.
  • On Bolt, the villain of the Show Within a Show has two cats. The actors who play them love to torment Bolt (who thinks the show is real) by going to his trailer and make threats in character. After Bolt is lost, he mistakes stray alley cat Mittens for one of the Right-Hand Cats and tries to get her to take him back.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Inverted in Cats & Dogs where the villains of the film are cats who just happen to be led by a white Persian. The leader Persian Cat invokes this trope to interact with humans, using a comatose man in a wheelchair. The human's mouth has a bandana or something around it, so the cat make others think the human is talking, so as not to freak everybody out with a talking cat.
  • In one of The Cannonball Run films, a Mob boss is seen stroking a cat. Then he looks down...and says (quietly and with no special tone), "This cat is dead. Bring me another cat." The mooks do.
  • Inverted in The Spirit. The Octopus sacrifices a white Persian cat just to demonstrate to his Arch-Enemy, the Spirit, the drawbacks of his potion. As the Spirit points out, that's reason enough to kill him.
  • In Licence to Kill, James Bond is stopped by armed men and led to a man who is stroking a cat. Turns out M was getting bored waiting for him and a cat happened to wander in.

    Literature 
  • Gregor Brastov in Kim Newman's alternate-history vampire novel Dracula Cha Cha Cha (a.k.a. Judgment of Tears) is a Blofeldish cat-stroking archvillain who turns out to be just a puppet manipulated by the real archvillain — his cat. Hamish Bond should have remembered that some vampires have Voluntary Shapeshifting.
  • Discworld
    • Parodied in the series, when Lord Vetinari, a Magnificent Bastard dictator who began as a sort of Blofeld spoof, had an old terrier called Wuffles, even though other characters and the narrator had him pegged as the "white cat stroking type".
    • In the Time Travel Prequel Night Watch, the young Vetinari's aunt has a Right-Hand Cat, but it's a borderline-feral and rather flatulent moggy, which Vetinari feels isn't really appropriate. He even thinks it should be a long-haired white cat.
    • Evil Harry Dread, a wannabe-dark lord from The Last Hero, had intended to play this trope straight, but found out he's allergic to cats. The closest he could come was a fluffy white hamster in a diamante treadmill.
  • In the book 1633 (in which an American town is transported to 17th-c. Europe), the people of Grantville send Cardinal Richelieu a Siamese cat as a "diplomatic offering". He takes it and strokes it in exactly the way described here. (Persians evidently were introduced in Europe in 1620 according to T.O.W., so one of them wouldn't have been quite as impressive a gift, though a modern Persian's appearance is evidently very different-looking to those times'.)
  • In the Malloreon saga by David Eddings, Kal Zakath has a cat that serves more as an opportunity for quiet humor than a villainous icon; the (seemingly) ruthless and cold-hearted emperor of all Mallorea frequently attempts to pawn off newborn kittens to heads of state, the main characters, and whoever else seems likely to claim a cat. Of course, the frequent Pet the "Dog" moments only foreshadowed Kal Zakath's eventual Heel-Face Turn from not-quite-villain antagonist to ally of Belgarion. Even if he did make one of his primary reasons for turning face. "You know, Garion, I've just realized that you're functionally omnipotent. So how's about I just give up and make peace before you eventually kill me?"
  • Subverted in The King in Yellow. Evil psychopath Mr. Wilde has a cat. At the end, it tears out his throat, thus foiling Hildred Castaigne's evil scheme. To express his annoyance, Hildred kills the cat. So the Right-Hand Cat made the Heroic Sacrifice to save the day.
  • Billingford in The Jennifer Morgue by Charles Stross has a classic Right-Hand Cat as part of his Bond-based destiny trap, which eventually turns out to be posessed by the Eldritch Abomination he's working for.
  • A rare heroic example: Honor Harrington and her treecat Nimitz. Though he's usually perched on her shoulders, which are covered with reinforced pads.
  • In Rivers of London, Peter imagines the faceless man with a Right-Hand Cat Girl sitting on his lap and chatting on the phone.
  • Inverted in The Dresden Files. The protagonist Harry Dresden lives with a gigantic grey cat named "Mister," whom he (Harry) rescued from a dumpster as a kitten.
  • Completely averted in Tamora Pierce's fantasy novel Wolf Girl (book 2 of The Immortals). The villain HATES cats.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Star Trek: The Original Series
    • Gary Seven with Isis in the episode "Assignment: Earth" is initially thought to be a villain, but this is Subverted at the episode's end when Gary Seven is revealed to be trying to save the human race from a nuclear war, and Isis is revealed to be a shapeshifter.
    • Also, in the episode "Catspaw", the villain Korob has a black cat, who turns to be another shapeshifter, Sylvia, who later turns into a giant black cat.
  • Parodied in Happy Endings, when Jane (once again cast in a loveable villain mode) is shown sitting ominously in a chair while petting the neighbours' white cat. She goes from standing in front of Brad and Dave, no cat in sight, to sitting behind them in a chair, stroking the pet-all without them noticing. Brad questions where she got the cat, and she says she told him earlier they were watching a friend's cat-tied into the episode's theme of Gaslighting.
  • Police Squad!
    • The TV comedy has fun with this one in a few episodes, including one scene where a man is stroking a white cat until someone enters his office, at which point he casually puts the cat away in a desk drawer. He has a puppy in another desk drawer, not to mention a flock of doves in his filing cabinet.
    • The Boss is first shown via a Blofeld-style lap-cam pointing at his cat, until he gets tired of this and leans down to speak directly into the camera.
  • The Dirty Harry parody Sledge Hammer! has one episode where a crime boss is always seen with a cat and ends up throwing the cat out of the window when he is upset. It is not surprising when Sledge kicks him out the window at the end of the episode (and even more ironically, the cat lands safely on the crime boss' chair).
  • Scrubs
    • After having sworn revenge against Dr. Cox and then overheard something that would aid him in said revenge, the Janitor turns around in a swivel chair, stroking the nonexistent Leonard.
    Janitor: So, you don't want to know the ending of something. I can relate to that.
    Dr. Cox: What is that in your lap?
    Janitor: Leonard. Half-kitten, half-monkey.
    • Dr. Cox also makes use of this trope when confronting a pediatric physician in his office full of toys (sorry, collectibles), by stroking a plush white Persian cat.
  • La Femme Nikita: A villain is shown holding a white Right-Hand Cat, before demonstrating nerve gas on him for buyers.
  • House, in one episode of season 4, deals with Death Cat. To confuse his team, he puts it on his lap, plays with a cigar, and says, "No, Mr. Bond, I expect you to die." More than one Bond fan has noted that this was said by Goldfinger, not Blofeld, though he gets Blofeld's mannerisms pretty well.
  • The "Spy Car" episode of Ultimate Car Buildoff gives us co-host Lou Santiago playing the part of a foreign spymaster with, get this, a bobcat.

    Theater 
  • Creepily subverted in the play Woyzeck (as well as the opera and rock opera based thereon). Although the Doctor has a pet cat, he throws it out the window just to see whether it lands on its feet.
  • In a version of The Pink Wasp and Yellow Jacket, the villain has a cat that he would periodically forget he was holding and accidentally throw into the air. At one point, Yellow Jacket, played as a Asian stereotype, picks up the cat and tries to eat it.

    Video Games 

    Visual Novels 
  • Played with in Umineko: When They Cry: Bernkastel (a Cat Girl to boot) has a seemingly infinite number of cat minions that she can use. But it's later revealed that she is herself the pet cat of the Bigger Bad Featherine. A very snarky cat.

    Web Comics 

    Western Animation 
  • Played with at least thrice in Kim Possible.
  • Subverted in The Powerpuff Girls. The girls once defeated an archetypal faceless villain who stole a valuable jewel to power a laser, and took his pet cat home afterwards. The cat was actually the villain all along and hypnotized The Professor into almost finishing the mass brainwashing project.
  • Subverted in the Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers Five-Episode Pilot, wherein Fat Cat debuts as Chlordane's Right-Hand Cat, only to become a villain in his own right for the rest of the series (while Chlordane is never heard from again). Even during the pilot, after helping Chlordane steal a ruby, Fat Cat steals the ruby from Chlordane for his own purposes, making sure to return it before its absence is noticed.
  • Played straight at first when Peter meets The Don in an episode of Family Guy. However, when Peter meets him again, it looks like he's petting a cat, but the camera cuts to behind him, and he's really grating cheese.
  • Twisted around in Earthworm Jim with Bob the Killer Goldfish, who has a massive cat (known only as "#4") that acts as his bodyguard. This is the only reason why anyone takes a freakin' goldfish seriously.
  • Parodied a couple of times on The Simpsons:
    • In "When Flanders Failed", Homer goes to see Mr. Burns in his office and finds the old man stroking a cat on his lap.
    • In "Itchy and Scratchy: The Movie", Bart holds the family cat, Snowball II, in his arms while roasting a 007 action figure in the microwave: "Stick around, Mr. Bond. Things are really starting... to cook."
  • Mistress Leevil, the president of BET in The Boondocks, has a pet dog used in this fashion; it seems to be dead, though.
  • In the Futurama episode "That Darn Katz!", a grumpy professor named Katz, who rejects Amy's proposal for harnessing the Earth's rotation for energy, has a white cat in his lap. It is later revealed that Katz was really a puppet operated by the cat, who (like all cats, as it turns out) is actually an intelligent alien who wants to use Amy's device to stop Earth's rotation and transfer it to his homeworld.
  • In The Fairly OddParents episode where Timmy wished that life was an action movie, Jorgen turns villain complete with pet cat, who he accidentally abuses so much it does a Heel-Face Turn.
  • Parodied in the Total Drama Action episode "Dial M for Merger". As a parody of spy movies, Chris introduces the challenge wearing an eyepatch and petting a white cat. Afterwards, the cat attacks him.

Right-Hand Cat Substitutes

    Anime & Manga 
  • In Read or Die, The Gentleman has a turtle instead.
  • Played with in the Hellsing manga and OVA with the Major and Schrödinger, a Cat Boy subordinate fond of sitting on the floor next to his superior's chair with his head at convenient scratching height.

    Comic Books 
  • Adrian Veidt from Watchmen has Bubastis, some kind of bright-red mutant lynx-thing. Until he disintegrated it.
  • The demonic Lord Arux from Lucifer has an advisor, Praxspoor, also a demon, who chooses to take the form of a panther-size black cat because he finds it helpful to be underestimated.
  • The comic book version of The Thrawn Trilogy often depicted Grand Admiral Thrawn cradling and stroking a ysalamiri, a nearly vegetative lizard creature, like it's a cat, when in the books, he carried one in a nutrient frame strapped to his back or connected to his command chair. Ysalamiri negated the powers of his psychotic dark Jedi ally, and occasionally, he reached up and stroked it to remind C'baoth that he couldn't be choked, electrocuted, or charmed, but he didn't carry one around in his arms or on his lap. You can't really do that with ysalamiri. Plus, they smell. Still, the depiction is universal enough that it's practically an extension of his Iconic Outfit. Said Iconic Outfit, while not being the same as Blofeld's, certainly resembled it.

    Films — Animation 
  • Heavy Metal film. The Big Bad of the "Taarna" segment has a Right-Hand Rat: a giant rat-like creature with a nasty snarl. He petted it while it sat next to him.
  • In Twice Upon a Time, Synonamess Botch has a pet armadillo named Ratatooie.
  • In Despicable Me, Gru has a bizarre-looking mongrel dog named Kyle.
  • Early on in Megamind, the title villain uses one of his Brain-bots for this purpose.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Spoofed in Spice World, where Roger Moore, unseen, strokes a series of increasingly ludicrous pets as he plays the Spice Girls' corporate boss.
  • Dirty Work (1998): the villain holds his tiny dog a lot. The protagonists speculate that their relationship is not entirely platonic.
  • The Fifth Element: Jean-Baptiste Emanuel Zorg has a bizarre little alien creature that rests on his shoulders at his corporate office (and laughs at him when he chokes on a cherry).
  • The Big Bad from Kiss of the Dragon has a pet turtle that he keeps in a drawer in his desk.
  • He doesn't actually have a cat, but Mola Ram, the villain from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, is briefly shown holding his helmet and stroking it like a cat.
  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock: The Klingon Villain Kruge has a pet "Monster Dog" on board his Bird of Prey, which is said to be a cross between a lizard and a timber wolf.
  • Jabba the Hutt from Star Wars has Salacious Crumb, a mischevious "Kowakian monkey-lizard" which officies as jester in the crime lord's court.
  • In A Fairly Odd Movie: Grow Up, Timmy Turner!, the villain, Hugh J. Magnate, has an evil bunny rabbit who even giggles evilly. It lures Tootie into a trap.
  • In Revenge of Kitty Galore, the sequel to Cats & Dogs, villainess Kitty Galore (who's herself a cat, of course) has a white mouse as right-hand pet, whom she calls Scrumptious. The poor thing is treated pretty much as a Chew Toy and is in a state of near panic for the whole movie.
  • Licence to Kill Big Bad Franz Sanchez is sometimes seen with an iguana. It even has a little diamond necklace, which might be a call back to the one Blofeld's cat had in Diamonds Are Forever.
  • Rurouni Kenshin Big Bad drug lord Takeda Kanryu has a right-hand white rabbit.

    Literature 
  • Behemoth, from The Master and Margarita, is a demon in the entourage of Woland who appears in the shape of a man-sized, bipedal black cat.
  • In Goblin Moon and The Gnome's Engine, the Duchess keeps a tiny indigo-furred ape which she pampers and pets. Was Once a Man is implied, which makes it much creepier.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Spoofed in the "Secret Service Dentists" sketch on Monty Python's Flying Circus: "I'm glad you could all come to my little party. And Flopsy's glad, too. Aren't you Flopsy?" When the villain doesn't get a response, he shoots Flopsy and says "That'll teach you to play hard to get. Well, poor Flopsy's dead, and he never called me mother." Although Flopsy was a rabbit, not a cat, it still sorta works.
  • Red Dwarf. Parodied in the opening scene of "Stoke Me a Clipper", where Ace Rimmer's evil Nazi opponent is first shown via a lap-level view of his hand stroking his pet crocodile, Snappy.
  • In MI High, the evil Grand Master has a Right-Hand Bunny named General Flopsy.
  • In Skippy The Bush Kangaroo, one of the recurring villains has a right hand koala.
  • Star Trek: Enterprise. In the Mirror Universe episode, Captain Archer's dog Porthos has changed from an adorable beagle to a snarling rottweiler.

    Tabletop Games 

    Video Games 
  • Rugal Bernstein and his pet panther Rodem in The King of Fighters. His kids, Adelheid and Rose, have a little black kitten who is apparently the offspring of Rodem. Also included is Zero with Glaugan (a black lion) from 2001.
  • President Evil Rufus Shinra in Final Fantasy VII had (very briefly) a panther named Dark Nation. Very briefly because it only shows up in the battle where you first meet Rufus, where Cloud promptly kills it.
  • To an extent, Chen of Touhou. A cat youkai at the service of Yukari Yakumo.
  • Donkey Kong Country. K.Rool has a Right-Hand Klaptrap for the cutscenes of Donkey Kong 64. In a manner very reminiscent of Dr. Claw, no less.

    Web Animation 
  • Homestar Runner: from the Dangeresque films, Baron Darin Diamonocle (played by Bubs) is a parody of the Blofeld-style supervillain. He uses The Cheat as his cat-substitute.

    Web Comics 
  • In Umlaut House 2, ASCII is briefly seen with a robotic cat (he's an android) during his supervillain phase.
  • In Niels, Niels has spent way too much time at home due to a work-related "accident", so when Agent 300 comes to check up on him, he prepares to have a little fun. Of course, Niels doesn't have any pets, so he uses Kiddo instead.
    Kiddo: Woof!
    Agent 300: He's supposed to be a dog?
    Niels: Mayyyyyybe...
    Kiddo: Oink oink!

    Western Animation 
  • ReBoot:
    • Hexadecimal, as an insane anthropomorphism of a computer virus, somewhat inexplicably, has a small round cute thing with a feline face called Scuzzy (as in a pun on "SCSI") as a pet. In one episode, Bob and Mike the TV find to their horror and sorrow that Scuzzy also doubles as Hexadecimal's Right-Hand Attack Dog: one that can grow impossibly large, move very fast, has very sharp teeth, and can clone itself as necessary.
    • Her male counterpart, Megabyte, has Nibbles, a slug-like creature that was formerly sentient but reduced to that form after losing a game. Nibbles used to be, in a sense, Megabyte's father. Nibbles is the Null of Doctor Matrix, the father of Enzo and Dot, and the designer of the Gateway Command.
  • In Danger Mouse, Baron Silas Greenback's Right-Hand Cat is a furry caterpillar named Nero.
  • A few Kim Possible villains have toyed with the concept of the Right-Hand Cat:
    • Gemini, the most straightforwardly "Bondish" villain on the show, has a yappy pet Chihuahua named Pepe.
    • Camille Leon, who is a parody of Paris Hilton as a shapeshifting villainess, has a Sphinx cat named Debutante, who lives in her designer handbag.
    • Ron Stoppable, when he is changed into a villain in "Bad Boy", takes to stroking a confused Rufus in a Blofeld-esque manner during a hand-wringing rant.
  • Phineas and Ferb:
    • Suzy Johnson (Jeremy's Devil in Plain Sight sister) has a Right-Hand Poodle whom she has trained to attack Candace.
    • Also, in "Spa Day", Dr. Doofensmirtz adopts a stray kitten he dubs "Mr. Fluffypants", but the mischievous feline proves to be more trouble than he's worth when he accidentally sets off several of Dr. Doofensmirtz's old evil inventions.
  • Parodied in an episode of Invader Zim titled "Voting of the Doomed". The shadowy figure of the Principal is seen stroking a beaver, which itself strokes a little green...thingy (it drops it and starts to cry).
  • In Beast Wars, Megatron's Right-Hand Cat is his... actual hand. In two of the three forms he uses over the series (So Last Season at work), his beast-mode head is his robot-mode arm. He actually pets it at times, and at one point, when he's "asleep", the head-hand is looking around on its own. Near the end of the series, he turns from the monitor he's watching, the head-hand turns toward it, and tracks back and forth as things happen onscreen. He also has his rubber ducky.
  • A mad scientist on Courage the Cowardly Dog had a right-hand rat named Rat. Rat mostly carried out errands for his manic-depressive master, but would also allow himself to be held and stroked if the morose scientist needed comforting.
  • Dr. Robotnik from Sonic Sat AM has a pet robotic bird named Cluck.
  • The Big Boss of COPS has Scratch, a vicious pet weasel, in case subtlety isn't your thing.
  • Like Daedalus (see above), The Sea Witch Wilhemine from The Mighty Hercules has a pet bird named Elvira.
  • An episode of the Powerpuff Girls had Mojo Jojo becoming a mob boss and the girls finding the him sitting in the mayor's chair, with a little boy sitting on his lap while stroking his head in this manner. Mojo was using said boy as a way to intimidate the girls, who they believe had "cooties" that would kill them.

Non-Human SidekickLoyal Animal CompanionParrot Pet Position
Riddling SphinxThis Index MeowsSchrödinger's Cat
Revenge by ProxyEvil TropesRock Me, Asmodeus!
Rich BitchVillainsRight-Hand Attack Dog
Room 101Administrivia/No Real Life Examples, Please!Rose-Haired Sweetie
Cats Are MeanObviously EvilClasp Your Hands If You Deceive
Elaborate Underground BaseImageSource/Live-Action FilmsMoonraker

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