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Video Game: Pokémon Diamond and Pearl

"Welcome to the next generation of Pokémon! As a rookie Pokémon Trainer, you will need to catch, train and battle Pokémon on your journey to become the Pokémon League Champion. You will face many challenges along the way, as you search for the Pokémon that rules time or space..."
Blurb on the back of the boxes of Pokémon Diamond and Pearl Versions

The fourth generation of Pokémon games, Diamond and Pearl hit the Nintendo DS in 2006. Taking place in Sinnoh, the Pokémon world version of the Japanese island of Hokkaido, the plot is familiar territory for the series: you, a child from the modest little village of Twinleaf Town, and your hyperactive best friend, have a fateful encounter with Professor Rowan, the local authority on Pokémon, and his well-meaning but inexperienced assistant. Said encounter leaves you both with your first Pokémon, so naturally you set out To Be a Master, collecting monsters and badges and challenging/defeating opposing Trainers along the way.

At some point you also encounter Team Galactic, a group that claims to be researching new forms of energy, but isn't above unabashedly illegal acts in broad daylight... what exactly are their goals? As the Player Character, naturally your hero's on a crash course to find out...

A third version, titled Platinum, came out a couple years down the line. Platinum tweaked the storyline a bit, adding more characters, remodeling several Gyms, and naturally including new challenges for players.

Not to be confused with seasons 10 through 13 of the Pokémon animenote , but Pokémon from this era do show up in the show. For the bootleg under the name "Pokemon Diamond", see Telefang.

Tropes used in Diamond, Pearl and Platinum:

  • Anti-Frustration Features: Your Bag of Holding no longer has a limit.
    • If you knock out a Legendary, it will return to the place you encounter it after you beat the Pokemon League again.
  • Adult Fear: A post-game encounter in Platinum with an elderly man who laments that he knew his grandson was living in an emotionally unhealthy home (whether it was abusive or just that severely neglectful is left to speculation), but didn't do anything to help until it was already too late to save him. It's heavily implied that his grandson is Cyrus, the Big Bad of the game. Imagine living with the guilt of knowing you could have prevented that and didn't.
  • Apathetic Citizens: Downplayed. Most people said that Team Galactic was "up to no good". A lot of them probably didn't realize the scale of their mission, since the worst they did in public was steal a Pokémon from a kid. In Platinum, it does seem that the government is at least trying to do something by sending a detective/secret agent on their trails. Inverted in that most of Team Galactic's own members had no idea what they were actually doing and would have probably freaked out if they had known.
  • Artificial Brilliance: Enemy trainers tend to give their Pokémon moves that can cope with their weaknesses. And yes, they will use it on you.
  • Bowdlerise: The P.I. Trainer class. Pay attention to how they talk about chance and how they are flipping a coin in their sprite and you'll realize that they are actually supposed to be the Gen IV version of the Gambler class. Their resemblance to a detective was purely coincidental.
  • Breakout Pokemon: Lucario's popularity surged to the point where it essentially became the mascot of the generation. It got movie focusing on it, was included in Super Smash Bros. Brawl, and was even included as a gift Pokemon in Black and White 2.
  • Broken Bridge: Where to begin. Besides the usual staples of the series like HM moves that are needed to progress through an area, or random mooks standing in the way...
    • Route 210 is blocked by a group Psyduck, which you could defeat easily, but instead you have to get a Secret Potion because they have headaches.
    • A man next to route 222 won't let you pass because of a blackout in Sunyshore City until after you've beaten the Big Bad. This one is at least slightly justified by the fact that not only did Volkner cause the blackout, it likely would have shut down his gym, meaning there would be little point in going to Sunyshore anyway.
    • Random people block your way for no legitimate reason. Route 212 is blocked from the northern side, even after you've beaten Hearthome City's Gym. And they disappear once you reach Pastoria. All this does is make you take a longer path. No badges, no special events, nothing.
    • In Platinum, a battle is blocking the entrance to Canalave City if you manage to Surf there before picking up the HM from Celestic Town.
    • Also in Platinum, after you escape from the Distortion World, you're placed outside the entrance to Turnback Cave. Cynthia just happens to be standing in front of the entrance, and will remain standing there until you defeat her at the Pokémon League.
  • Bubblegloop Swamp: The Great Marsh, as well as some of Route 212.
  • But Thou Must: When you get the Old Rod and Good Rods on Routes 218 and 209 respectively, the Fishermen will ask you if you need an explanation on how to use the rods. Even if you say no, they'll still blab on about them.
    • When you get to the end of Iron Island and Riley offers you the Riolu egg, if you say no, he'll "insist". You have to say yes, even if you have a full party, in which case he'll wait until you come back with a free spot.
    • In Platinum, Cynthia will stop you from going to the bike shop unless you accept the Togepi egg.
  • Canon Discontinuity: If Black and White are any indication, Platinum is the canonical game, and Diamond and Pearl exist in discontinuity.
    • In general, it would seem that the 3rd version in each generation is the canonical version, with the exception being Black and White themselves, which indicate that each version is a parallel universe to the other.
      • ... which actually makes a lot of sense, at least for DPPt, since that series had such a big focus on parallel dimensions.
  • Capture the Flag: A minigame in the Underground.
  • Character Select Forcing: While all the regional dexes count as this, Diamond and Pearl's is by far the worst case in terms of Pokémon you can actually use in game. Most noticeably it contains only 2 Fire-type families, one of which is the starter. This had to be known by GameFreak, they made one of the Elite Four a Fire-type user and predictably, only 2 of his Pokémon are actually Fire-type, and it doesn't actually include every Pokémon introduced in Generation IV. This was fixed in Platinum.
    • In addition to this, the game also retains the tradition of making the first gym the rock-type specialist, making you encounter this trope even if you pick the only decent fire-type in Diamond/Pearl.
  • The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard:
    • The Battle Frontier in Platinum. It's in the game's programming to continually stack the odds against you more and more the higher your win streak goes.
    • A P.I. on Route 214 has a Level 30 Goldeen in Platinum with Horn Drill, which doesn't learn that move until Level 41.
    • The team Galactic admins have Pokemon at levels way before they should be available— Purrugly and Skuntank at level 17 or so when neither is supposed to evolve until its 30s.
  • Darker and Edgier: The story is noticeably darker than previous entries in the series, with the Big Bad being a manipulative psychopath aiming to destroy the universe and recreating it.
  • The Dev Team Thinks of Everything: Platinum has a place in the post-game area called the Battleground that randomly picks 3 of the Gym Leaders and 1 of the "Stat Trainers" every day for you to battle. If Roark and Byron are both in the Battleground on the same day their post-battle dialog changes.
  • Difficulty Spike: The Elite Four and Champion are much harder compared to the eight Sinnoh Gym Leaders - especially in Diamond and Pearl, not so much in Platinum, where the Gym Leaders were upped and the Elite Four and Champion were slightly nerfed level-wise (though many of them get new Pokémon and stronger moves). Special mention goes to Cynthia who has a team with perfect IVs, wide type coverage, and one Pokémon that is such a Game Breaker that it's included in the Legendary tier of the competitive battling circuit. She is by far the toughest battle in the main game.
    • These games themselves, actually - In Generation IV and beyond, Pokémon were much more likely to have access to moves that could cope with their weaknesses. The AI was well aware of this, actually.
  • Elemental Punch: Prior generations decided whether an attack was physical- or special-based solely on the attack type, causing oddities such as Crunch being special and Shadow Ball being physical. While Generation III did make distinctions between contact and non-contact attacks for the sake of several touch-activated abilities, Generation IV was the first generation to actually dismantle the previous system and individually assign moves as physical or special.
    • One particularly amusing note is that under the previous system, Dark-type attacks were all special; with the current system, only one Dark attack (Dark Pulse) is special and it was newly created for the game.
  • Fantasy Counterpart Culture: Geographically Sinnoh is a counterpart to Hokkaido, Japan - but some things about it are suspiciously French. Even the Trainer battle music.
  • Forced Tutorial: Annoying as always, but the really annoying part is that you can have already captured Pokémon by the time it is given and your tutorial giver makes no mention of it.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: Chatot is not exactly a Game Breaker on the battlefield. However, the cry changing properties of Chatter can actually break the game due to glitches, and therefore it is banned from use in Random Wifi. That, and probably the fact that some people would use it to scream obscenities at their opponents.
  • Gravity Screw: Distortion World.
  • Guide Dang It: There's a trick to make the same monster pop up repeatedly while using the Poke Radar. Combine it with a trick that increases the likelihood of held items appearing, and performed in the spot where wild Chanseys appear, and the Lucky Egg can be obtained with an hour's work if your luck is poor (when it was nigh impossible to obtain in previous games). The first trick can also eventually make a shiny Pokemon appear, but it takes considerably more work. Naturally, neither trick is alluded to anywhere in-game, nor is it mentioned in official guides.
  • Incredibly Lame Pun: "As we skiers like to say, 'spur thing!'"
    • Also, from a Birdkeeper with a Noctowl: "We'll show you 'owl' best!"
  • Inn Between the Worlds: You know that one inn in Canalave with the worn-out sign and the perpetually locked door?
  • Karma Houdini: Cyrus tortures the legendary Pokemon, doesn't get his dream, but never suffers for his crimes either.
  • Loads and Loads of Loading: This set of games has small, but noticeable, wait times everywhere, including infamous 15 second save times. There's also considerable lag in battles between animations, even with the animations off. Fixed in Platinum.
    • Diamond and Pearl may give you a message when you save that it's "saving a lot of data," which means it will take about three times as long to load. This caused by the Box System. If you catch a Pokémon and it's sent to the box, prepare to take a while to save. If you look at the Box System for one second and don't even bother touching anything, prepare to take a long while to save. If you go hours on your journey without bothering to mess with the Box System, you'll save in a few seconds.
      • Platinum does fix most of the lag in other areas, but it also has the long saving if you've used a PC.
    • Doing anything with the boxes triggers a flag that causes the game to calculate the checksums of all boxed Pokémon data on the next save, to make sure nothing got corrupted. It's a good programming practice taken into overdrive.
  • Lovecraft Lite:
    • Eldritch Abomination:
      • Darkrai. Simply by being in the presence of a sleeping person, it will give them nightmares.
      • As of Platinum, Giratina, less of a downplay than the former. It lives in an Eldritch Location where time, space, and gravity don't apply. Satoshi Tajiri says that it's the personification of antimatter, and it's on par with Dialga and Palkia.
      • The Lake Guardians.
      Look not into [Uxie]'s eyes. In but an instant, you'll have no recollection of who you are. Return home, but how? When there is nothing to remember?
      Dare not touch [Mesprit]'s body. In but three short days, all emotions will drain away.
      Above all, above all, harm not [Azelf]. In a scant five days, the offender will grow immobile in entirety.
    • Eldritch Location: Distortion World. Whatever world Dialga and Palkia come from. What sort of place can you think of that "gives off an overwhelming feeling of time/space"?
  • Luck-Based Mission: If you want the TM for Explosion, you have to play the slots. Not just to grind for enough coins, but to trigger TEN straight bonus rounds, and your chain can be broken simply due to bad luck.
    • Super Contests, most of all the Acting Competition since bonus points are awarded based on how few other Pokemon choose the same judge. The Visual Competition, though primarily dependent on Poffin feeding, also depends on what theme you get since the opponents choose the same accessories every time (and which accessories correspond to which theme are not always intuitive). The only part that isn't particularly luck-based is the Dance Competition, which can possibly make up for lost ground in the other two sections.
    • The 5-Maid Knockout Exact-Turn Attack Challenge in Platinum pits you against a series of five Maids, all of whom have a single Clefairy. In order to beat the challenge, you have to defeat all five in a randomly-determined number of turns — no more, no less. Sounds easy, right? Unfortunately, every single Clefairy has access to moves like Endure or Bounce that they can use to stall for time. Even with max-level dudes capable of single-handedly wiping the floor with the Elite Four, if your opponents use those moves often enough, you fail. Of course, your only reward for beating the challenge is another battle against someone who has a Blissey (though they shell out plenty of cash and you can steal a Rare Candy from the Blissey, if you're so inclined).
  • Mama Bear: More specific to the fourth generation as a whole than these particular games, Scrappy as an ability voids Ghost-type defenses against normal types, and is learned only by two Pokemon: the powerful Kangaskhan and Miltank, which both have strong associations with motherhood, hence this trope.
  • Mind Screw: Platinum Version's Distortion World.
  • Mythology Gag: Three Trainers from the Pokémon: Jirachi: Wishmaker and Pokemon Destiny Deoxys movies of the Anime/Pokemon appear as Ace Trainers in the Battle Zone. Butler and Diane from movie 6 appear on Route 229, the two of them sharing four of the Pokémon Butler owned in the movie. Rebecca (named "Hitomi" in Japan) from movie 7 appears on Route 224 with her Metagross. The English translation team did not notice this Easter Egg however, as Butler and Diane are renamed "Felix" and "Dana", respectively, and Rebecca/Hitomi is renamed "Jamie" instead.
    • Also possibly the TV program about the red Gyarados that the player character is watching when the game first starts, which is quite possibly referring to the Lake of Rage and its resident red Gyarados in Pokémon Gold and Silver and their remakes. However, this only appears in the original D&P, while the Platinum version has a boring show about Professor Rowan.
    • One guard complaining about his thirst. Luckily, he's not on duty, so he can't stall your progress.
  • Never Recycle a Building: The Old Chateau, which was abandoned several decades ago (at least), still stands more or less untouched since it was vacated despite being literally on Eterna City's doorstep. This probably has something to do with the fact that it became overrun with Ghost Pokémon at some point.
  • No Fair Cheating: Any Pokémon with the ability Mold Breaker will automatically cancel out any ability that prevents it from dealing damage, including Wonder Guard. Among the Pokémon possessing this is Glass Cannon Rampardos.
    • Averted for OHKO + No Guard. This works wonders when used by a fast Pokémon like Ninjask.
  • Obvious Beta: While nowhere near the mess that was Gen I, this was Game Freak's first attempt at using the DS hardware - and it shows. These were fixed in Platinum and HG/SS.
  • Obvious Rule Patch: Platinum has a great deal of fixes both major and minor that make the game dramatically better than the original pair. This ranges from changing stuff in the "how did they screw that up" (The regional dex now has more than 2 Fire-type families and Pokémon new in Generation IV are part of it) to "always a bit of a bother" (guardhouses no longer force you to dismount your bike) categories.
  • Old Save Bonus: The Pal Park feature allow the player to transfer Pokémon from the third generation by inserting one of the games in the GBA slot.
  • 108: Diamond version's Pokedex description of Spiritomb is "A Pokemon that was formed by 108 spirits. It is bound to a fissure in an Odd Keystone."
  • Police Are Useless: Looker, the International Police officer, doesn't accomplish much besides telling you where Galactic is so you can go beat them up. In Platinum, it's subverted: he appears out of nowhere at Stark Mountain with a squad of cops and drags a Galactic commander off to prison before you can fight him.
  • Rewrite: Platinum changes the circumstances of how you obtain your starter, possibly to avoid any Fridge Logic when you meet Looker. note 
  • Scissors Cuts Rock: The starters' secondary typings end up inverting the traditional Grass->Water->Fire triangle. Infernape gains a Fighting Type to beat the penguin's Steel, Empoleon can use Ice Beam to exploit Torterra's quad Ice weakness due to its Ground typing, and Torterra's Ground type beats Infernape's Fire.
  • Sequel Hook: Cyrus is an utterly insane madman, bent on destroying and remaking the world. And he is never apprehended. He is still at large, biding his time, plotting, and waiting, and Cyrus' last line bleeds of this trope, when he warned the player that they will eventually awaken in a world of his own creation, a world without spirit.
  • Sequel Difficulty Spike: This is the point when NPCs really started taking advantage of TMs, Tutor moves, and Egg moves. Combined with the highest level curve since Gen I (which had poor AI and generally restricted move pools to naturally learned moves), Gen IV proved to be quite the challenge.
    • Sequel Difficulty Drop: Specifically the Battle Frontier when compared to that of Emerald. Previously, you had to make sure that all your Pokemon were at the same level (the NPCs' levels would be the same as the strongest Pokemon in your team, similar to the Stadium games), and this level had to be above the base level for all NPCs, 60. Now, you simply have to get them to at least Lv. 50, and the game will bring down any higher leveled Pokemon. The Frontier has been reduced from 7 facilities to 5, none of which have gimmicks anywhere near as frustrating as in Emerald, like the Battle Palace shunning player input so the Pokemon can attack based on their Natures, or the Battle Pyramid's Blackout Basement.
  • Shared Family Quirks: The Rival, like his father, is always in a hurry and always bumps into people.
  • Sheathe Your Sword: An interesting variation. It is perfectly possible to move the plot forward in Platinum by defeating or capturing Giratina, but you can also simply refuse to fight it by running. The game, through Cyrus being astounded at simply choosing to not fight it making Giratina come to its senses, will acknowledge this decision.
  • Shout-Out
    • There's a Trainer in the Marley part of Victory Road that wants to judo chop you.
    • "In return, we'll refrain from causing massive damage to your assistant."
    • The substantial amounts of shout-outs to internet terms and memes can be explained by the fact that the lead translator is a Something Awful regular.
      • One specific SA reference is with the Interviewers that can be battled in the Jubilife TV station - since the female of the pair uses a Wooper, her name was translated as "Roxy", after the player character from Let's Play/Chorocojo's Let's Play of Pokémon Crystal.
    • The area in which the most powerful Steel Pokémon is found is called Stark Mountain.
    • The Pokemon Rotom is clearly based on Pulseman, and one possible translation of Team Galactic's name is "Galaxy Gang". And speaking of Pulseman, a bit of the Pulseman overworld music is used in the 2nd last part of the rival's (Barry's) battle theme.
    • On Iron Island, there is a worker named Noel who says that he is a working-class hero.
    • Who does Looker remind you of?
  • SNK Boss: Cynthia, who even today is still widely regarded as the hardest Champion to date. If there's any Champion who your battle with is all but sure to be a thrill you'll never want to forget, it's her. Unlike most other champions (particularly the ones from the later generations), her team is very well balanced and can handle most types with ease, including Garchomp.
  • Spikes of Villainy: Team Galactic buildings have big honking spikes sticking out from their sides.
  • Sprite/Polygon Mix
  • Suspiciously Specific Denial: The lady at the front desk of the Canalave Library, after the earthquake. "It certainly wasn't me who screamed 'Gyaaah!!' or shouted 'Help meee!!' No really, that wasn't me screaming!"
  • Troll: A lady will trade her Haunter for a Medicham in Snowpoint City. Expect a Gengar without having to buy another game/trading with friends? Too bad. Said Haunter holds an Everstone, so it will not evolve. Even the NPC is apathetic about it.
  • Third-Person Person: Mira.
  • Unsound Effect / Visible Silence: When visiting Dr. Footstep. instead of speaking, a few voiceless Pokémon will say, "Ssshhhnnn... ... Ssshhhnnn... ... Ssshhhnnn... ...", which is similar to the Japanese "sound effect" for silence.
  • What Measure Is a Non-Cute?: Only a handful of 'cute' Pokémon can play in Amity Square. In Diamond and Pearl, even the starters were excluded; this was fixed in Platinum, even allowing you to take all their evolved forms for a walk. Still, this makes for a grand total of 11 or 20 out of 493 getting to go for a stroll.
    • Lampshaded by an angry Trainer who complains about not being able to take his Gyarados or Steelix into the park.
    • Even Pokémon like Pichu aren't able to go inside. Yet Psyduck and Shroomish are. And Torchic, despite not being available naturally in-game. And the rumored child-abductors Drifloon.
  • A Winner Is You: Quoted by a clown in Veilstone when he gives you the Coin Case.

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Pokémon Ruby and SapphireFranchise/PokémonPokémon Black and White
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PokémonUsefulNotes/The Seventh Generation of Console Video GamesPokémon Black and White
Pokémon ConquestEveryone RatingPokémon Gold and Silver
PokémonUsefulNotes/Nintendo DSPokémon Gold and Silver
Pokémon Ruby and SapphireTropeNamers/Video GamesPortal
Pokémon Ruby and SapphireEastern RPGPokémon Black and White
Pokémon Ruby and SapphireUrban FantasyPokémon Black and White
My Name Is ???ImageSource/Video GamesIn-Universe Game Clock

alternative title(s): Pokemon Diamond And Pearl; Pokemon Diamond; Pokemon Pearl; Pokemon Platinum; Pokemon Diamond Pearl And Platinum; Ptitle6ta6tjtj; Pokemon Diamond Pearl And Platinum; Pokemon Diamond; Pokemon Pearl; Pokemon Platinum
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