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Video Game: Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble!
Trekking on like Dixie Kong

Donkey Kong Country 3: Dixie Kong's Double Trouble is a platform game made by Rare for the Super Nintendo, released in 1996 (though it has since been ported, with some changes and additional content, to the Game Boy Advance). It's Rare's last Donkey Kong Country game and, of course, the third in the series.

After the events of Donkey Kong Country 2, the Kong clan goes on vacation to the Northern Kremisphere to celebrate their victory over K. Rool and the Kremlings. Donkey Kong and Diddy Kong decide to go exploring together, leaving Dixie to nap alone on the beach. But the pair has not returned by the next morning, and Dixie suspects there's evil afoot. Along with her enormous baby cousin Kiddy, she ventures into the wilds of the Kremisphere and discovers that the Kremlings are up to no good once again, this time under the rule of an unseen, mysterious leader named KAOS.

The game featured better graphics than its predecessors (it is a gorgeous game), but also made several changes. It had a broad, cartoon-like art style that disappointed many fans of the previous games' realism, and instead of a piratical / nautical theme, it featured motifs from the industrial revolution. It even took some musical and aesthetic cues from James Bond (Rare was also working on Golden Eye 1997 at the time).

A handheld follow-up, Donkey Kong Land III, was released outside of Japan in 1997, and was later given a Japan-only Updated Re-release for the Game Boy Color in 2000. To date, it is the final game in the Land series.

Fondly remembered by fans of the series, the game was sadly overshadowed by the Nintendo 64 and Super Mario 64 at the time of its release.

Tropes Featured:

  • Art Evolution: This game features a much broader, cartoonier art style than its predecessors. It's a point of contention for many fans of the series. Retro Studios more or less perpetuated this style in Donkey Kong Country Returns.
  • Bamboo Technology: all of Funky's inventions.
  • Beary Funny: The Brothers Bear.
  • Blackout Basement: The stage Floodlit Fish. It's a dark coral reef stage, and all illumination comes from bio-luminescent fish.
  • Check Point Starvation: If you input the "TUFST" cheat you can eliminate checkpoints completely.
  • Credits Medley: In the GBA remake.
  • Crosshair Aware: The Krack-Shot Kroc, an unseen enemy that shoots fireballs at you. Luckily, the crosshairs stay still for a second right before each shot is fired.
  • Door Closes Ending: The Game Over sequence has this.
  • Down the Drain: The pipe levels.
  • The Dragon: KAOS.
  • Eek, a Mouse!!: Stereotypical "scared elephant" version, which makes Murky Mill interesting. Some of you may have wondered why Ellie doesn't freak out when a Sneek's under a nearby light but she's not; her apparently poor eyesight explains the short range of vision, too. This anti-rat panic also sets up the frustrating challenge of Stampede Sprint!
  • Elite Mook: Krumple, this iteration's "strong" Kremling. Dixie is completely powerless against him; Kiddy can trounce him with a Goomba stomp.
  • Everything's Better with Penguins: Not this time. Lemguins are enemies, and irritating ones at that.
  • Foreshadowing: In the GBA version when visiting Cranky's Dojo, Cranky Kong remarks that he's training for his next big adventure. His big adventure finally comes in Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze as the fourth playable Kong!
  • Gadgeteer Genius: Funky Kong is portrayed like this. He'll use discarded items the Kongs pick up to create vehicles for them to travel around in, from a simple motorboat to a helicopter.
  • Gainax Ending: The 103% Completion ending. So K. Rool, who in that game had been presented as a mad scientist, had actually cast a magic spell to trap the Mother Banana Bird, who lives in the clouds. The only way to visit her is to get all of the DK coins, which somehow allows Funky to build a Helicopter that you use to find the last of the Banana Birds trapped in the "Simon Caves", at which point the Banana Birds magically free her and she drops a giant egg on K. Rool as he tries to escape on your Hovercraft. This ending goes to show that it's possible to have a Gainax Ending in a game that's already pretty weird, so long as you include the necessary Gainax elements of introducing a bunch of weird new elements that hadn't been mentioned that really don't fit in with the game's already established weirdness.
  • Gasshole: Belcha, the boss of Lake Orangatanga, and a gigantic living barrel. His name speaks for itself.
  • Get on the Boat / Ability Required to Proceed: You have to change vehicles four or five times over the course of the game.
    • The overworld setting is a somewhat-vast lake. Your first vehicle is a boat. Then you switch to a hovercraft that can surpass rocks protruding from the water. After that is the Turbo Ski, that in addition to the hovercraft's ability, it can jump up waterfalls, somehow. After you collect all of the DK coins, you get a fancy helicopter that allows you to travel over any and every obstacle, including the land itself, and is required for 100% Completion.
  • Guide Dang It: Unlike the previous game, where all you needed to do was beat access the secret world and beat K. Rool there in order to get the best ending, in this game you need to get to the secret world, beat K. Rool and get a 100% completion rating. The game never actually tells you this however, and if you beat K. Rool without getting absolutely everything in the game you'll just get kicked back to the map screen when you beat him in the secret world, without any hint of what you did wrong.
  • Harder Than Hard: Available via a secret cheat code. It removes all checkpoint barrels and DK barrels from the game, but allows you to attain up to 105% completion, the title of Immortal Monkey, and a Cranky Kong trophy on your stats screen.
  • Hijacked by Ganon: Baron K. Roolenstein.
  • Holiday Mode: The "MERRY" cheat, sadly not available in the GBA port. Inputting this cheat makes all of the bonuses have Christmas themes, with green bananas replaced by little presents, stars replaced by ornaments, and the regular bonus music replaced by "Jingle Bells."
  • Human Cannonball
  • Infinity +1 Vehicle: The helicopter. It's a cool ride that allows you to explore anywhere on the map; unfortunately, by the time you acquire it, the only things left to find are a couple of "Simon Caves" and the game's Golden Ending.
  • Interface Screw: Remember the purple liquid Kaptain K. Rool shot out of his musket in the previous game? The one that reversed your controls? In this game, there's a stage called Poisonous Pipeline completely filled with it. It's the final stage before you get to Kastle KAOS. Have fun with that.
  • King Mook: Barbos, the boss of Razor Ridge. A giant version of the smaller Lurchin (urchin) enemies.
  • Lighter and Softer: Especially compared to the second game, though some individual levels such as Poisonous Pipeline and Ripsaw Rage go against this, and a lot of the music is relatively subdued.
  • Live Item: The Banana Birds.
  • Living Battery: K. Rool uses Donkey Kong and Diddy as such, forcing them to fuel the robotic KAOS.
  • Misguided Missile: One of the steps to beating Barbos' Barrier is redirecting seashell-shaped missiles to hit the Lurchins blocking her.
  • Nintendo Hard: It wouldn't be Donkey Kong Country if it didn't make you want to pull your hair out. Notoriously fun stages include Lightning Look-Out, Poisonous Pipeline, Rocket Rush and Kong-Fused Cliffs.
  • Pivotal Boss: Squirt is a rare 2D example, as he sits in the middle of the screen and spins vertically as he shoots water to try to knock you (as Ellie) off the screen.
  • Power-Up Mount: The animal buddies, as usual, including newcomer Ellie the Elephant.
  • Reality Ensues: At Lightning Look-Out, as in Real Life, it is a bad idea to be swimming during a thunderstorm as you'll be shocked regardless if the actual lightning bolt hits you while underwater.
  • Ring Out Boss: Belcha.
    • Squirt is an inversion; he tries to ring you out.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Soundtrack Dissonance: Ripsaw Rage contains a giant saw slowly creeping up a treehouse level as calm music plays. The new happy-go-lucky music in the GBA version is even more dissonant.
  • The Spiny: Bristles, a hedgehog mook that can also curl up into a ball and roll into you.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: None of the original Kremlings or animal mooks from the first two games make a reappearance here. In their place is an entirely new army of baddies, a handful of whom share more than a few of their predecessors' characteristics. Some examples:
    • Kremlings
    • Animal baddies
    • The only exception is Kopter—he's Kutlass from Donkey Kong Country 2, wearing a helmet instead of a pirate hat and carrying helicopter blades instead of cutlasses (keeping the Industrial Revolution motif). This is hard to catch on to because his walking and attacking animations, which showed him using his blades like the swords from the previous game, went unused. In the finished game, he's only ever seen flying. It's much easier to see in the official art of the game, including his picture in the manual.
  • Throw a Barrel at It
  • Trick Shot Puzzle: Some clever planning and carefully timed steel-keg throws will be needed to separate Koin from a DK Coin. note ; Koindozer, by contrast, is not so shy. Sometimes it's necessary to throw the keg and then sucker Koin into facing away from the advancing weapon. Barrel Cannons and walls will occasionally play parts in the solutions to these puzzles. (Bananas will mark a few of the correct positions.)
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: Rocket Rush, the final stage of the game, contains next to zero platforming. Instead, you control a faulty old rocket as it rises to the top of the volcano Krematoa. You have extremely limited fuel, so a single mistake usually means death.
    • Swanky Kong's mini-games involve moving back and forth to hit targets in some carnival game. It can be considered practice for the K3 boss, Bleak, whom you engage with in a snowball fight. In the GBA port, the shooting gallery mini-game is replaced by a "half pipe" game reminiscent of the bonus levels from Sonic the Hedgehog 2.
    • In Krack Shot Kroc, one of the bonus levels has you control Krosshair, where you need to shoot down Kremlings.
    • The "Simon Caves," thirteen secret areas (found by exploring unmarked areas on the map) where you have to play a memory game to free a Banana Bird from its crystal prison. The more Banana Birds you rescue, the longer the sequence of button presses you need to memorize to rescue the next one.
  • Unique Enemy: Loads of them. Some mooks have entire stages dedicated to them, only to disappear entirely once you beat said stages.
  • Video Game Settings:
  • Volcano Lair: Krematoa, the secret hideout of KAOS and K. Rool.

Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong QuestFranchise/Donkey KongDiddy Kong Racing
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong QuestSuper Nintendo Entertainment SystemDoom
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong QuestVideo Games of the 1990sDonkey Kong 64
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong QuestUsefulNotes/The 16 -bit Era of Console Video GamesDouble Dragon
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong QuestGame Boy AdvanceDouble Dragon
Donkey Kong CountryPlatform GameDonkey Kong Country Returns
Lethal Lava LandImageSource/Video GamesPalmtree Panic

alternative title(s): Donkey Kong Country3; Donkey Kong Country 3
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