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Beam Me Up Scotty: Live-Action Films
  • In Soylent Green, Charlton Heston does not run, stop, assume a dramatic pose, and shout out "Soylent Green is made out of people! IT"S PEOPLE!!!!"—that was Phil Hartman on Saturday Night Live. Heston actually delivers the line in a barely audible whisper from a stretcher after being mortally wounded.
  • Jack Nicholson's memorable line from A Few Good Men is frequently misquoted in parodies as "You want the truth? You can't handle the truth." The dialogue between Nicholson and Tom Cruise actually goes, "You want answers?" "I want the truth!" "You can't handle the truth!"
  • Taxi Driver: the monologue is "You talkin' to me? You talkin' to me? You talkin' to me? Then who the hell else are you talking... you talking to me? Well I'm the only one here. Who the fuck do you think you're talking to? Oh yeah? OK." People often get it wrong. Also, parodists often put that line in the mouths of stock Mafia characters, apparently on the assumption that if Robert DeNiro said it, it must have been in some gangster movie. Trouble is, not only is DeNiro's character in Taxi Driver not in the Mafia, that character isn't even ethnically Italian!
  • Animal Crackers: Groucho Marx's famous line is "One morning, I shot an elephant in my pajamas. How he got in my pajamas I don't know." For whatever reason, the end of the line is frequently quoted as "I'll never know."
  • ...And Justice for All: Pacino doesn't say "I'm out of order? You're out of order! This whole court is out of order!"; it's "You're out of order! You're out of order! The whole trial is out of order! They're out of order!"
  • "Play it again, Sam", (not) from Casablanca. The actual quote is:
    Rick: You know what I want to hear.
    Sam: [lying] No, I don't.
    Rick: You played it for her, you can play it for me!
    Sam: [lying] Well, I don't think I can remember...
    Rick: If she can stand it, I can! Play it!
    • Earlier in the film, Ilsa (Rick's love interest) also entreats him to "Play it, Sam." But so many people remembered it as "Play it again, Sam" that Woody Allen used that phrase as the name of his homage to Bogart and the movie.
  • At no point in The Empire Strikes Back does Darth Vader say "Luke, I Am Your Father." His actual line was:
    Darth Vader: Obi-Wan never told you what happened to your father.
    Luke: He told me enough! He told me you killed him!
    Darth Vader: No — I am your father.
    • In the NPR radio dramatization, however, Vader does indeed say "No, Luke, I am your father."
    • Luke's line is often misquoted as "You Killed My Father"
    • The manner in which Vader says the line and the emphasis on words is usually done wrong in parodies and spoofs. Vader puts emphasis on "I", not "am." He also says the line in a quiet, chilling manner, not the loud and dramatic fashion usually seen in imitations. Also, though Luke does react with a Big "NO!", he doesn't yell it while falling down the shaft (as in the FoxTrot parody of the scene).
    • In the making-of documentary Empire of Dreams: The Story of the Star Wars Trilogy, James Earl Jones himself misquotes his famous line as "Luke, I am your father". It seems "Luke, I am your father" has become so popular that even the guy who said the original line in the movie doesn't remember it correctly.
    • The first title card always reads "A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away...." "Long, long ago" is seen in the inside cover of a few novels, but never in the films.
  • The slaves in Spartacus actually shout "I'm Spartacus!" You can't actually hear anyone saying "I am Spartacus!" or "No I am Spartacus!" despite the fact that one of these misquotes is a Trope Namer.
  • 42nd Street: "But you keep your feet on the ground and your head on those shoulders of yours and go out, and, Sawyer, you're going out a youngster, but you've got to come back a star!'' is misquoted in many ways, e.g. "You're going out (there) a youngster, but you're coming back a star!", "You're going out (on that stage) a nobody, (kid), but you're coming back a star!", or "You're going out a chorus girl, but you're coming back a star!"
    • In the stage version, though, it's "You're going out there a youngster, but you've got to come back a star!", so that technically is a correct quote...
  • It's sometimes claimed that in Bride of the Monster, Bela Lugosi said his manservant Lobo (Tor Johnson) was "as harmless as a kitchen" [sic] as a sign of his diminished faculties and/or Wood's incompetent direction. But actually, he says the line fine: "Don't be afraid of Lobo; he's as gentle as a kitten."
  • Quite possibly, the most famous line from Waterworld is, "Dry land is not a myth, I've seen it!" And yet, the line is never heard anywhere, in any form in the entire movie.
    • It is, however, present in the Universal Studios water show based on the movie, which has been seen by many more people.
    • Actual quote: The Mariner says " Dry land is a myth." She says "I've seen it. It was in a basket we found in No Land. Dirt richer and darker than yours."
  • Bram Stoker's original Dracula never said the line "I vont to suck your blood!", or anything like it. He was much too sophisticated, and had an English accent. It wasn't until Bela Lugosi played Dracula that the accent became forever rooted in our memory, but even then, the line is not spoken.
    • This applies to imitations of many lines Lugosi did say, because Lugosi never pronounced w as a v but rather as wh.
  • Knute Rockne: All-American: Knute Rockne says "And the last thing he said to me, 'Rock,' he said, 'sometime when the team is up against it and the breaks are beating the boys, tell them to go out there with all they got and win just one for the Gipper." Often quoted as "Win one for the Gipper," or "Win this one for the Gipper."
  • Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935): it's "We have ways of making men talk," not "We Have Ways of Making You Talk." However, the latter has become a Stock Phrase, and relatively few people have heard of the movie.
  • Tarzan never said "Me, Tarzan. You, Jane." Johnny Weissmueller, star of a series of Tarzan movies, gave the phrase in an interview as an indication of the kind of dialogue he was being given, but even he didn't say that exact phrase in any of the movies (a fact notable enough to be mentioned in court proceedings regarding the film). This was probably paraphrased from a scene from the 1932 Tarzan, the Ape Man:
    Jane: (pointing to herself) Jane.
    Tarzan: (he points at her) Jane.
    Jane: And you? (she points at him) You?
    Tarzan: (stabbing himself proudly in the chest) Tarzan, Tarzan.
    Jane: (emphasizing his correct response) Tarzan.
    Tarzan: (poking back and forth each time) Jane. Tarzan. Jane. Tarzan?
  • The oft-quoted scene from Crocodile Dundee or rather, oft-misquoted: "That's not a knife/You call that a knife? This is a knife" actually goes:
    Sue: "He's got a knife!"
    Crocodile Dundee: (Laughs) "That's not a knife." (Draws large bowie knife) "That's a knife."
  • The line "My God, it's full of stars" is never said or sort-of said in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. The closest the movie gets to this line is in a moment toward the end when a starfield bursts onto the screen, but not a single word is spoken during this light show (or after it, for that matter). The line does appear in Arthur C. Clarke's novel (part of the same project), and the film version of 2010: The Year We Make Contact.
    • In addition, the very famous and oft-quoted line "I'm afraid I can't let you do that, Dave" never appears in 2001. Rather HAL says "I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that" and later says "I'm afraid, Dave" when being disconnected. And before that, he does say "I'm afraid that's something I cannot allow to happen."
    • And as if there weren't enough misquotations, the line, "Good morning Dave" is never uttered. "Good evening Dave" and "Good afternoon gentlemen" on the other hand are.
    • "Will I dream?" This quote is often misattributed to 2001 (it's actually from the sequel 2010) and/or misquoted as "Dave, will I dream?" or "Will I dream, Dave?" In the movie, HAL addresses this question not to Dave but to Dr. Chandra.
  • John Wayne did not say, "A man's gotta do what a man's gotta do" in Hondo. It's actually, "A man oughta do what he thinks is best".
    • There is a line much closer to this from a classic Western, though not one with John Wayne: Alan Ladd says "A man's gotta be what a man's gotta be" in Shane.
  • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre never featured the line "We don't need no stinking badges!" The actual lines are:
    Bandit: We are federales. You know, the mounted police.
    Dobbs: If you're the police, where are your badges?
    Bandit: Badges? We ain't got no badges. We don't need no badges! I don't have to show you any stinking badges!
    • That said, if someone says, "We don't need no stinking badges!" they are quoting a movie: Blazing Saddles.
    • Another one — Bogart never says "Can you help a fellow American who's down on his luck?" That's from the Bugs Bunny cartoon short 8 Ball Bunny. The actual line is: "Say, mister, care to stake a fellow American to a meal?"
  • In no film did James Cagney ever say "You dirty rat!" This is a misquote of a line from the 1931 film Blonde Crazy, where he refers to another character as "that dirty double-crossing rat".
    • At his AFI lifetime achievement award show in 1974, Cagney set the record straight before quickly proceeding to parody the trope (see "Judy, Judy, Judy" below).
  • Nor did Cary Grant ever say "Judy, Judy, Judy". Apparently, comedian Larry Storch was doing a Cary Grant impersonation in a nightclub when Judy Garland walked in. He greeted her from the stage in character and it somehow became part of the Grant mystique, mystifying even Cary, himself.
    • It may have come from Cary Grant's film Only Angels Have Wings where Rita Hayworth's character is named Judy. Grant never repeats it in a row as in the quote but he says it a lot.
    • In an acceptance speech for the American Film Institute's lifetime achievement award, Cagney ribbed impressionist Frank Gorshin (and poked fun at the often misattributed line) by saying "And, Frank, I never said 'Ooh, you dirty rat.' What I really said was 'Judy, Judy, Judy!'"
  • Tony Curtis never said "Yonda liez da castle of me faddah". In Son of Ali Baba, he said "Yonder lies the valley of the sun and beyond, the castle of my father."
    • He's also quoted, in The Black Shield of Falworth, as saying "We have come ta storm da castle", which is where the line in The Princess Bride comes from.
  • Mae West never said "Come up and see me sometime." The actual line, from the 1933 film She Done Him Wrong, is "Why don't you come up some time, see me?" which mostly just moves words around but really changes the emphasis.
    • Mae West didn't say "Is that a gun in your pocket Or Are You Just Happy to See Me?" in any film. It's sometimes said to be in She Done Him Wrong, but actually she said it in Real Life to a policeman who was escorting her.
    • West did say this in a movie, but not until 1978, when she was 85 years old. She asks "Is that a pistol in your pocket or are you just glad to see me?" in the movie Sextette. You can see it here, with the line around 9:13.
  • It's often said (rather inaccurately) that "Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, except backwards and in high heels." The original quote is from a 1982 Frank And Ernest cartoon:
    Sure he was great, but don't forget that Ginger Rogers did everything he did, backwards... and in high heels.
  • Smith's monologue in The Matrix is often misquoted: "Human beings are a virus," or "Human beings are a disease, and we are the cure." Whether or not this is an example is arguable, however, considering that at least one of the trailers actually did use the latter. The unedited version of the line is:
    Human beings are a disease, a cancer of this planet. You're a plague and we are the cure.
  • Clint Eastwood didn't say "Do you feel lucky, punk?" in Dirty Harry. He said, "You'd better ask yourself one question: 'Do I feel lucky?' Well do you, punk?"
    • And he says it two distinctly different ways, one at the very beginning of the movie, and then again at the very end. The first time, he says it so the gunman will think he has more ammo and will drop his weapon (he's out of bullets). The second time, he states it so the Ax-Crazy villain will try him (he has another bullet left).
    • The line can be heard at the start of Magnum Force.
    • Eastwood did in fact say "Go ahead, make my day!", but that line was uttered in the third sequel, Sudden Impact, and not the original Dirty Harry film, as most believe.
    • Speaking of Eastwood, in High Plains Drifter he doesn't say, "I'm faster than you'll ever live to be." He actually says, "A lot faster than you'll ever live to be."
  • The line from White Heat is not "Top of the world, Ma!"; it's "Made it, Ma! Top of the world!" Lex Luthor misquotes it in the 1st season finale of Lois and Clark, and The Simpsons has done it a few times.
  • Clerks has Randal quoting Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom with "No time for love, Doctor Jones!". But Short Round's actual line was "Hey, Dr. Jones, no time for love."
  • The Maltese Falcon: Bogie says "The stuff that dreams are made of" at the end, not "It's the stuff that dreams are made of".
    • This in turn is a variant of "... such stuff / As dreams are made on," from Shakespeare's The Tempest.
  • Classic Western The Virginian: Gary Cooper's taunting line was not, "Smile when you call me that!" or "When ya call me that, smile!" but "If you wanna call me that, smile." Easy to get confused, because in the original novel, he says "When you call me that — smile!"
  • An inversion: sometimes Greta Garbo's quote "I want to be alone" is said to have never been said, or to have only been used in an interview. But it actually does appear in one of her movies: Grand Hotel.
    • She said "I want to be left alone" (i.e., live a normal life without mobs of fans and paparazzi) in an interview, around the time Grand Hotel was made. Later, she had to clarify the difference between the film and reality.
    • Ginger Rogers, of all people, says "I want to be alone!" on a train with a thick Swedish accent in the film The Major and the Minor. So apparently Billy Wilder heard Greta wrong too.
  • Alfred Hitchcock is supposed to have said, "Actors are cattle." However, as he himself put it, "What I said was that all actors should be treated like cattle." He corrected himself after Carole Lombard, hearing him make the comment on the set of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, set up an actual stable in the middle of the shooting set and put cattle in it with signs around the necks of the animals with the actors names on them.
  • In Batman & Robin, Mr. Freeze utters dozens of ice- and snow-related puns. "Ice to meet you" is not one of them. The line "Ice to see you" was previously used by McBain in a spoof of Arnold Schwarzenegger's action films in The Simpsons. And that line never appeared in the movie itself or the trailer.
  • The Joker as portrayed by Heath Ledger in Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight is often mis-quoted as asking "Do I look like a man with a plan?", when Harvey Dent says that his (Harvey's) disfigurement and the death of Rachel Dawes was part of his (the Joker's) plan, most likely because people associate the rhyming words "man" and "plan". The quote is, however: "Do I really look like a guy with a plan?"
    • Yet another from Nolan's Joker is his famous magic trick. Many seem to think it was "Wanna see a magic trick?" as though he walked into the room full of mob bosses as a living Big Lipped Alligator Moment. Instead it was more of a bizarre response to Gambol's question of "Give me a reason why I shouldn't have my boy pull your head off?" And the Joker's was "How about a magic trick?"
    • His line from the hospital scene is often made into image macros, with the phrase "nobody bats an eye". Although that would have been a neat pun, that is not what he said. This is the actual quote:
    "If, tomorrow, I tell the press that, like, a gang banger will get shot, or a truckload of soldiers will be blown up, nobody panics, because it’s all ‘part of the plan’. But when I say that one little old mayor will die, well then everyone loses their minds!"
  • Neither Jean Gabin in Pepe Le Moko (1937) nor Charles Boyer in Algiers (1938) says "Come with me to the Casbah [...] we'll make beautiful music together...." It comes from a Yosemite Sam/Pepe Le Pew cartoon.
    • No-one in Algiers utters the "Come with me" line, though Hedy Lamarr's Gaby does ask Charles Boyer's Pepe le Moko, "Can't you leave the Casbah?" The "beautiful music" part doesn't even come from the same movie, but from 1936's The General Died At Dawn, in which Gary Cooper says to Madeline Carroll, "We could make beautiful music together."
  • Jules Winnfield's famous hamburger speech from Pulp Fiction is often misquoted (by putting words or phrases in the wrong order) or quoted correctly but used in the wrong context:
    Jules: "What country you from?!"
    Brett: W-what?
    Jules: 'What' ain't no country I ever heard of! They speak English in 'what'?
    Brett: ...what?
    Jules: ENGLISH, MOTHERFUCKER, DO YOU SPEAK IT?!
    • The last line is often misquoted as "English, do you speak it, motherfucker?" Regarding context, Jules is sarcastically demanding that Brett give him a clearer answer than "what," but the line is often used in real life against people who are literally not speaking English well or at all.
      • The Hilarious Outtakes from The Avengers has Clark Gregg hilariously misquoting it as "I said what, motherfucker", just because Samuel L. Jackson was in the movie.
      • That, and there's a line by Samuel L. Jackson in that scene in Pulp Fiction he's making fun of: "SAY WHAT AGAIN, I DARE YA, I DOUBLE DARE YOU!" Well, he said it.
    • Jules has his own Beam Me Up Scotty with the Bible. The entire verse of Ezekiel 25:17 goes, from start to finish, "And I will execute great vengeance upon them with furious rebukes; and they shall know that I am the LORD, when I shall lay my vengeance upon them."
      • While this is indeed an example of this trope, it's not because the passage doesn't match up to the Bible, but because it doesn't match up to the introduction to Sonny Chiba's The Bodyguard, from which this passage (as well as its attribution as Ezekiel 25:17) is lifted almost exactly. The use in The Bodyguard would be a misquote of the Bible, translations and mistranslations aside.
    • In an example that's made its way into a trope name, I Just Shot Marvin in the Face is actually "Aw man... I shot Marvin in the face..." with no "just"
  • In Jaws, the line is "You're gonna need a bigger boat", not "We're gonna need a bigger boat." The presence of Brody (the speaker) on the boat as well undoubtedly contributes to the confusion. And it's not a deadpan remark in response to seeing the size of the shark - it's actually posed as a question, as in "You're gonna need a bigger boat, right?" in response to hearing the plan to catch the shark.
    • Also, the quote "Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water" is sometimes attributed to this movie. In fact, it's the tagline to the sequel, hence the part about going back in the water.
  • No James Bond villain has ever said: "Good evening, Mr. Bond. We've been expecting you." Bits of it, yes, and sometimes they were said by other people, but never the entire quote. For example, one of Dr. No's henchmen shouts "We've been expecting you!" Blofeld says "We've been expecting you" in Diamonds Are Forever, and a minute later says "Good evening, Mr. Bond."
    • Bond doesn't actually say "The name's Bond, James Bond" that often either ("Bond... James Bond" however is in practically every film) and orders vodka martinis rarely too.
      • Although, in some films, he does say "My name is Bond, James Bond"—for example, at the start of Diamonds, while he's questioning the Egyptian's mistress about the whereabouts of Blofeld.
  • Zulu: the line isn't "Zulus. Thousands of 'em.", but "The sentries report Zulus to the south west. Thousands of them." Also, Michael Caine (Lt. Bromhead) doesn't say it; it's Color Sergeant Bourne, played by Nigel Greene.
  • Scarlett O'Hara says "Tomorrow is another day", not "Tomorrow's another day" at the end of Gone with the Wind.
    • Rhett Butler's memorable final line, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn," is sometimes misquoted as "Frankly, Scarlett, I don't give a damn." The misquotation has appeared in several places where the line was used comically, including Clue and an episode of Mama's Family.
    • Used to a great comedic effect in a Sunday comic of Pearls Before Swine.
    • In the actual book, however, the line is simply "My dear, I don't give a damn" (with no "frankly").
    • Not a line quoted particularly often, but "I don't know nothin' about birthin' babies" is sometimes changed to "I don't know nothing about birthin' no baby."
  • The Graduate: "Mrs. Robinson, you're trying to seduce me. [awkward pause] Aren't you?" is misquoted as "Are you trying to seduce me, Mrs. Robinson?"
  • The Lord of the Rings - it's not uncommon for Théoden's pre-charge speeches to be merged when quoted. The line from The Two Towers is "Fell deeds awake. Now for wrath. Now for ruin. And the red dawn!" and the line from The Return of the King is "Ride now, ride now, ride! Ride for ruin and the world's ending!" What you often get is combinations of the two, such as "Ride for wrath, ride for ruin and the red dawn/the world's ending" and "Now for wrath, now for ruin and the world's ending."
    • "Fell deeds awake" is taken from the verses spoken by Théoden at Edoras in The Two Towers:
      Arise now, arise, Riders of Théoden!
      Dire deeds awake, dark is it eastward.
      Let horse be bridled, horn be sounded!
      Forth Eorlingas!
    • "Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red dawn," is taken from the last line of the verses spoken by Éomer in The Return of the King (with "nightfall" changed to "dawn" as was appropriate for Helm's Deep; a lot of people were pissed that this threw off the rhythm, not to mention the all-important alliteration):
      Out of doubt, out of dark to the day's rising
      I came singing in the sun, sword unsheathing.
      To hope's end I rode and to heart's breaking
      Now for wrath, now for ruin and a red nightfall!
    • And the movie version is taken from Théoden's Pelennor Fields speech in the book which is this:
      Arise! Arise, Riders of Théoden!
      Fell deeds awake: fire and slaughter!
      Spear shall be shaken, shield be splintered,
      A sword-day, a red day, ere the sun rises!
      Ride now, ride now! Ride to Gondor!
    • Éomer also shouts, "Ride, ride to ruin and the world's ending!" in the middle of the battle after he goes berserk after seeing his sister dead (or so he thinks) and the Rohirrim cry "Death" as with one voice. The movie moves these lines to the start of the battle.
  • Possibly the most quoted line from Laurel and Hardy is Ollie's "This is another fine mess you've gotten me into, Stanley," (the "Stanley" is often omitted). This line was never spoken in any of their films. The line that was actually frequently used by Ollie was, "This is another nice mess you've gotten me into," and he never added a "Stanley" to the line either. The confusion apparently stems from one of the L shorts entitled "Another Fine Mess."
  • The line "I don't think we're in Kansas anymore!" is a misquote of Dorothy's line in The Wizard of Oz. The actual quote is "Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas anymore."
    • The Wicked Witch says "Fly, fly, fly!", not "Fly, my pretties! Fly!" or "Fly, my monkeys, fly!"
    • Dorothy (nor anyone else) does not say "It's a twister, Auntie Em". One of the farm hands, Hunk (the "real life" counterpart of the Scarecrow) does say "It's a twister! It's a twister!"
      • Although in Airplane!, Stephen Stucker as Johnny says (while tangling himself in phone cords) "Auntie Em! Toto! It's a Twister! It's a Twister!"
    • Speaking of the Scarecrow, some people think it was the Tin Man who misstated the Pythagorean Theorem instead of him. Also, when most people quote said line, they leave out the part where the Scarecrow says "Oh joy! Rapture! I've got a brain! How can I ever thank you enough?".
  • The most famous line from Apocalypse Now is actually much longer than often thought. People tend to quote it as "I love the smell of napalm in the morning. It smells like... victory." The complete quote goes: "Do you smell that? It's napalm, son. Nothing else on the world smells like that. I love the smell of napalm in the morning. Y'know, one time we had a hill bombed....12 hours....and when it was all over I walked up. We didn't find one of them, not one stinking dink body. The smell, y'know that gasoline smell, that whole hill. Smells like... victory."
    • However, the line was quoted just as rendered above by Charlie Sheen in the very last scene of The Chase.
  • The actual line from Howard Beale's rant in Network is "I'm as mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore!" Often misquoted as "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not gonna take it anymore!" Some people shout the latter out of windows, but Beale doesn't.
  • This Is Spinal Tap: often misquoted as "There's a fine line between clever, and stupid", David St. Hubbins actually says "It's such a fine line between stupid, and clever."
  • Sally Field (in)famously gushed "You like me, you really like me!" after her 1985 Oscar win. Except she didn't...
    "I haven't had an orthodox career, and I've wanted more than anything to have your respect. The first time I didn't feel it, but this time I feel it, and I can't deny the fact that you like me, right now, you like me!"
  • Related phenomenon: While M. Bison really did say OF COURSE! in the Street Fighter film the context of the line is frequently mistaken to be something he said after stating his goal to Take Over the World, instead of in response to Sagat pointing out that Guile was alive.
  • Chariots of Fire had plenty of triumphant scenes, some in slow motion, but none using the title music. But parodies only use that tune. (slow motion running with that theme is accurate, though)
  • Sunset Boulevard: Norma's famous line — "All right, Mr. DeMille, I'm ready for my close-up," — is often misquoted as "I'm ready for my close-up, Mr. DeMille."
  • Looking for the iconic Marilyn Monroe shot with the subway wind blowing up her skirt? You won't find it in The Seven Year Itch, it shows only her legs and reaction shots. The full-length picture appears only in publicity and posters. You have The Hays Code to blame for it.
  • People like to quote Ben Stein's character from Ferris Bueller's Day Off as saying, "Anyone? Anyone? Bueller?" but that's not how it happened. When he's taking attendance, he says, "Bueller... Bueller..." Later on, when he's teaching, he asks for audience participation and that's when he says, "Anyone? Anyone?" Ferris is absent, so there's no reason to be calling on him to answer a question in class.
  • The Godfather doesn't say "You come to me, on the day of my daughter's wedding?" He says "You come into my house on the day my daughter is to be married and you ask me to do murder - for money." The phrase "day of your daughter's wedding" is used later, but not by Vito.
    • Also — this is a slightly nitpicky one, but that's what we're here for — at the beginning, Michael tells Kay that "Luca Brasi put a gun to his head, and my father assured him that either his brains or his signature would be on the contract." "Brains" and "signature" are often transposed — presumably people think it packs more of a punch if the horrible option comes last, but that just ain't the way it is.
    • Also, Michael never says "You broke my heart, Fredo, you broke my heart." He actually says "I know it was you Fredo. You broke my heart, you broke my heart."
    • Jack Woltz never yells to Tom Hagen: "And a man in my position can't afford to look ridiculous!!". The correct phrase is: "And a man in my position can't afford to be made to look ridiculous!!"
  • In the original version of The Fly, there's plenty of "Help meeee! Help meeee!" but no "Be afraid. Be very afraid." The David Cronenberg remake is the source of "Be afraid," and has "Help me, please help me."
    • He actually does say "Help me, please help me" in the '58 version. The fact that almost no one knows that is a further example of this trope.
    • Also, an example less of wording and more of intonation: "Help meeee!" is often done high pitched in parodies such as Beetlejuice. In the original movie, however, it was more of a deep, nasal sound, like an insect buzzing.
      • The iconic image of the fly's body with a man's head is not in the original movie either. It comes from Return Of The Fly. The only time the human-headed fly is seen in The Fly is when its body is wrapped in spider silk, revealing only a deformed-looking human head and hand.
  • In Monty Python and the Holy Grail, the Black Knight's most memorable quote is "It's only a flesh wound!" and has even been merchandised as such when he really said "Just a flesh wound." The misquotation is possibly influenced by the scene where the knights first see Camelot and one of the servants remarks "It's only a model." Additionally, the Black Knight does not make the "flesh wound" comment until both of his arms have been cut off and Arthur points it out. What he says after Arthur slices off his first arm is, "'Tis but a scratch."
    • Also, Dennis the peasant says, "Help, help, I'm being repressed!" — not "oppressed."
    • No one ever says "not dead yet." The old man being put in the cart says "I'm not dead!" Later, during the Tale of Sir Launcelot, Concorde twice says "not quite dead" first speaking about himself, and later about Prince Herbert. Also in the same segment, people attending to Princess Lucky's father say "He's not dead." No one ever says "not dead yet," but that phrase is among the most popular MP quotations. An anti-euthanasia group even uses the false quote as their organization's name, intending to refer to the aforementioned cart scene.
  • Discussed in Frost/Nixon. Frost is known for starting his broadcasts by saying "Hello, good evening and welcome," but, according to Frost, "I don't actually say that." In broadcasts shown within the film, he says "Hello. Good Evening." and "Good evening and welcome," but never says all three at once.
  • And, of course, Forrest Gump never said "I love you Jenny". But he did say (after trying to rescue her from the guys grabbing her on stage) "I can't help it. I love you".
  • In Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory Gene Wilder says "Good day, sir!" and "I said 'Good day'!" but never "I said 'Good day, sir!'"
  • In Anatomy of a Murder, Jimmy Stewart's character defense attorney Paul "Polly" Biegler did not say "now I'm no big city lawyer" or "I'm just a Simple Country Lawyer". What he said was, "I'm just a humble country lawyer doing the best I can against the brilliant prosecutor from the big city of Lansing". Also he was using Obfuscating Stupidity to allow a surprise witness when he said that, he was a very accomplished lawyer and politician who know how to play to the jury by positioning himself as the local underdog. Lansing, Michigan is not a very big city but by calling it one he shows just what a small town guy he is.
  • The most infamous quote from Mommie Dearest is often rendered as "No more wire hangers!" when in reality the quote is a very hammy "No wire hangers EVAAAAR!!!" (or simply "No...more... HANGEEERS!!!")
  • Ellen Ripley never says "nuke it from orbit" in Aliens. The actual line is "I say we take off and nuke the entire site from orbit. It's the only way to be sure."
    • And it's often attributed only to Corporal Hicks, who repeated it in concurrence with Ripley.
    • Also, "Game over man" didn't appear until well after "We're screwed!". And it's "Get away from her, you bitch", not "Stay away", that mistake was popularized by Scream 2 where they correct the right line with the wrong.
  • Not once in The Silence of the Lambs does Hannibal Lecter say "Hello, Clarice." What he actually says is "Good evening, Clarice."
    • He does say in Hannibal, "Is this Clarice? Well, hello Clarice."
      • And without the comma between "Hello" and "Clarice," the intonation is different. A pedantic point, but this is a pedantic article.
    • Subverted with Buffalo Bill. He does indeed say "It puts the lotion in the basket," but most people quote the line in some kind of creepy voice, when the actual delivery is deadpan.
  • Although the "WE HAVE TO GO DEEPER" meme has spread like wildfire, that line's never actually said in Inception.
  • A case of intonation, rather than actual words: In The Ten Commandments, God, speaking through the Burning Bush, does call out Moses's name twice. However, it is not prolonged, with a descending pitch. Just "Moses...Moses...." in a flat monotone. The pharaoh does but with rising intonation.
  • Napoleon Dynamite advises Pedro, "just listen to your heart," not, "just follow your heart."
  • The famous line from Field of Dreams is "If you build it, he will come," not, as is often misquoted, "If you build it, they will come."
  • Jake Gyllenhaal's line from Brokeback Mountain is actually "I wish I knew how to quit you," not "I wish I could quit you" or "I can't quit you".
  • Lethal Weapon: Roger Murtaugh is not getting too old for this shit, he already is.
    • But to be fair, he does say it that way in both the second and third movie, ("I'm getting too old for this shit!")
  • Alexander Nevsky: A variation of the phrase "all who draw the sword will die by the sword", tends to be attributed to Alexander since it appears in the movie. In reality, there is no mention of him ever saying it in public, and the phrase is actually attributed to Jesus.
  • Another Star Trek example: Some people mistakenly think that "KHAAAAAN!" was a Skyward Scream, when Kirk actually just yelled it facing forward into his communicator, which was followed by an exterior shot of the planet.
    • Also, as far as intent, people often portray it as a classic example of how hammy William Shatner is, when in fact Kirk (the character) was purposely hamming it up, to make Khan think he had outsmarted Kirk.
    • Similarly, the line is often quoted as a long shout ("KHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAN!"). As performed, the line is just slightly longer than it would be if simply spoken.
  • In The Room, Johnny's "What a story, Mark" sometimes gets remembered as "What a funny story, Mark" or "Crazy story, Mark".
  • Contrary to what South Park fans may think, Jaime Escalante doesn't say "How do I reach these kids?" in Stand and Deliver.
  • In Tropic Thunder, Kirk Lazarus is often misattributed as saying "N***, you just went full retard." The actual conversation went as follows:
    Lazarus: Everybody knows you never go full retard.
    Tugg: What do you mean?
    Lazarus: Check it out. Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man, look retarded, act retarded, not retarded. Count toothpicks to your cards. Autistic, sure. Not retarded. Then you got Tom Hanks, Forrest Gump. Slow yes, retarded maybe, braces on his legs, but he charmed the pants off Nixon and won a ping-pong competition? That ain’t retarded. He's a goddamned war hero, you know any retarded war heroes?
    Tugg: *Pauses, then shakes his head*
    Lazarus: You went full retard, man. Never go full retard. You don't buy that? Ask Sean Penn. 2001, I Am Sam? Remember? Went full retard, went home empty-handed.
  • Will Smith's character in Independence Day never said "Welcome to Earf!", despite what the Internet would like you to believe. He actually said the word "Earth" correctly.
  • Speaking of Will Smith, the film adaption of I Am Legend spawned a minor internet meme called "Goddamnit Frank!", which references a scene in which Neville freaks out after seeing a mannequin in the middle of the road and begins incoherently screaming at it. The mannequin's name was actually Fred.
    • Also, he doesn't say 'goddammit', either. The line is "Dammit, Fred! Dammit!"
  • Minor example: Will Ferrell's character in Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy is often quoted as saying "Well, that escalated quickly" when the correct quote is "Boy, that escalated quickly." Also, he sounded genuinely surprised when he said it, though people often say the line in a deadpan voice for comedic effect.
  • In Happy Gilmore, Bob Barker is attributed to say "The price is wrong, bitch!" It's Happy (Adam Sandler) who exclaims this line. Bob later says "Now you've had enough... bitch."
  • Jerry Maguire: The infamous "You had me at hello" line is not spoken by the title character, but rather by Dorothy Boyd, played by Renée Zellweger.
  • Biff Tannen in Back to the Future doesn't ever actually say "Hello McFly", instead he repeats "Hello, hello, anybody in there? Think McFly, think." A child character misquoting this line in the later movie Jack is to blame for this.
  • The final line in Planet of the Apes is "YOU MANIACS! YOU BLEW IT UP! OH, DAMN YOU! GODDAMN YOU ALL TO HELL!" Most recitations of the line leave out "God" in the last sentence.
  • Many people associate the phrase "ladies and germs" with the movie Osmosis Jones. This was never said in the movie itself. (Not to mention, the term was around ''long'' before 2001.)
    • In fact, Hawkeye Pierce says it a couple of times in M*A*S*H, and he probably thinks he is quoting Milton Berle. Berle probably got it from old vaudeville routines.
  • Many people think Zoozie of The Oogieloves in the Big Balloon Adventure said "This is the greatest movie ever!" before the movie started. She actually said "This is the most amazing movie ever!"
    • Also, many people quote the movie's Phrase Catcher as "Goofy Toofie, pull up your pants!" rather than "Goofy Toofie, pick up your pants!", the way it was actually said in the film.
  • In the wake of the tremendous success of Tim Burton's Beetlejuice in 1988, the phrase "Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice!" became a well-known Memetic Mutation. Problem is, while a number of characters in the movie do say "Beetlejuice" three times (or at least attempt to), on only one occasion is the name said three consecutive times; more often the speakers pause for a relatively long time before completing the triad, because a part of them really doesn't want Beetlejuice to show up.
    • However, Lydia normally said it without an interrupting pause on the animated series.
  • People quoting the Georgie scene from Stephen King's It always say "Everything floats down here", which he doesn't even come close to saying. True he says the line "They all float down here", but that's much later in the film.
  • Though Removing the Head or Destroying the Brain is attributed to Night of the Living Dead and even credits it as its Trope Namer, the line was actually first spoken in Shaun of the Dead. The 1985 horror comedy Return of the Living Dead comes close, but it only mentions that in Night, they killed the zombies by "[destroying] the brain", and here, removing the head only comes after destroying the brain proves to be unsuccessful (not that it was any more so). The actual quote from Night goes "Kill the brain, and you kill the ghoul." The closest any of George Romero's films gets to using the line is in Dawn of the Dead, where, during a news report early on, an expert on the subject of zombie survival says, "A dead body must be exterminated either by destroying the brain or severing the brain from the rest of the body."
  • Flash Gordon: Vultan's line GORDON'S ALIVE!!! is regularly quoted as a triumphant cry, and has become a Catch Phrase of BRIAN BLESSED himself. In the actual movie, however, Vultan expresses the line with (for Brian Blessed) quiet incredulity.
  • In Duck Soup, Rufus T. Firefly is often quoted as saying "A child of five could understand this. Send somebody to fetch a child of five". However, the actual line is "Why, a four-year-old child could understand this report! Run out and find me a four-year-old child, I can't make head or tail of it!"
  • In Austin Powers, it's "I want sharks with laser beams on their frickin' heads", not "Beware of laser sharks" or "Beware of sharks with Frickin' Laser Beams on their heads".
  • The censorship of The Cannonball Run for its initial video release isn't quite as severe as some people make it out to be; sure, "ass", "shit" and "Goddamn" are censored, but the most common claim, "hell" becoming "heck" and "damn" on its own becoming "darn", isn't true at all.
  • In Wall Street, Gordon Gekko didn't utter the exact phrase "greed is good". He said, "greed, for lack of a better word, is good". The trailer did shorten it to "greed is good" though. Also, in the sequel, he quotes himself as having said "greed is good" in the previous film.
    • In an episode of The Daily Show, John Hodgman answers a question by quoting the speech. Perhaps to get around the contradiction between the original and remembered quote, he begins by saying "The answer, for lack of a better word, is greed." Except that instead of "greed", he says "greeb".
  • People often quote Rocket Raccoon in Guardians of the Galaxy as saying "I'm gonna need that guy's leg." or some other paraphrase of the actual quote, which is "That dude there. I need his prosthetic leg."

    Beam Me Up, Scotty!Literature

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