Film / Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

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"World's still the same, mate. There's just less in it."
"You know the problem with being the last of anything; by and by there be none left at all."
Barbossa

At World's End (2007) is the third movie in the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise.

The third installment chronicles the adventures of Will, Elizabeth, and a newly resurrected Captain Barbossa in their journey to retrieve Jack from the afterlife. It resolves with the final showdown between the forces of Cutler Beckett (now with Davy Jones and the Flying Dutchman as their flagship), and the assembled pirate forces of the world, with an angry sea goddess thrown into the mix. This installment was the most expensive film ever made at the time, costing $300 million before marketing, a record it held until Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides in 2011 ($378.5 million).


This film provides examples of:

  • Aggressive Negotiations: This is played with. Captain Teague, Jack's father, shoots another for questioning the pirate code. However, nothing really major happens—the dead pirate is a nobody, and none of the assembled pirates really want a fight to break out at their meeting—despite a fight having broken out minutes before over the course of action to be taken in response to Beckett's declaration of war.
  • Altum Videtur: The Latin phrase that Jack quotes, "Res ipsa loquitur, tabula in naufragio". Literally for the first part, "The thing itself speaks", usually taken to mean "The thing speaks for itself" or "The facts speaks for themselves" in contemporary legal matters. Jack is trying to point out that, as difficult as it is for him to accept, Elizabeth's wanting to fight is the best option... for now. The second part means "plank in a shipwreck," and generally means something that will keep you from failing when in a terrible situation.
  • Appeal to Inherent Nature: Calypso justifies her failure to meet Davey Jones after his ten-year sojourn aboard the Dutchman with this trope. She then points out that it was her tempestuous, flighty nature that had led him to fall in love with her in the first place, so he's being a hypocrite to condemn her for not remaining true to that.
  • Arc Words:
    • "The Dutchman must have a captain."
    • "It's just good business."
  • Armour Piercing Question: When Will and Davy Jones meet up, Will manages to shoot down Jone's angry ranting about Calypso (tellingly, Jones doesn't even try responding to the question).
    Davy Jones: She pretended to love me. She betrayed me!
    Will: And after which betrayal did you cut out your heart?
  • Ass Shove: Hinted at with a really big gun in Elizabeth's Trouser Space.
  • Awesome Moment of Crowning: For the King of the Brethren Court, Captain Elizabeth Swann.
  • Aww, Look! They Really Do Love Each Other: For all his selfishness and scheming, you've got to "Awww" at the look on Jack's face when Will gets stabbed.
  • Babies Ever After: The Stinger shows that Elizabeth and Will conceived a son during his one day on shore before he left to captain the Dutchman. She raised the boy and they return to meet him after ten years.
  • Beat Still, My Heart: Davy Jones' heart (and Will's, at the end) continues to beat from inside the Dead Man's Chest.
  • Big Book of War: The Pirate's Code. Amusingly, the actual book itself is apparently only a few pages of actual code—the rest is discussion on what the code should be.
  • Bowel-Breaking Bricks: Pintel and Ragetti each grab a cannonball, planning to drop them on the bodies floating in the water while escaping Davey Jones' Locker. As they're about to, they see Tia Dalma standing there. The camera cuts to their lower bodies, as they drop the cannonballs on the deck.
  • Blatant Lies: A given whenever Jack is involved.
    Barbossa: Isla de Muerta, remember? You shot me.
    Jack: No I didn't.
  • Brick Joke:
    • Jack (and monkey-Jack's) quest for peanuts.
    • Once again, Jack makes a comment about Will and groins - this time angrily referring to him as a "codpiece".
    • The compass which shows you your heart's desire - at the end, it first points to the rum.
  • Brought Down to Normal: The sea goddess Calypso (Tia Dalma) was trapped in mortal form by the first Brethren Court to make it easier for pirates to rule the seas.
  • Can't Kill You, Still Need You: More like, "You can't die, still need you". Barbossa is back, and eventually so is Jack, but they have been resurrected from the dead because they were Pirate Lords when they died, and failed to name a successor before they died. Tia Dalma brings both of them back so they can attend the Brethren Court, otherwise they probably would've stayed dead.
  • Celeb Crush: As part of their Batman Gambit, the pirates must enact a ritual involving words spoken as if to a lover, but the pirates are Large Hams who've never known a love they didn't pay for... except one:
    Ragetti: [whispers tenderly] Calypso... I release you from your human bonds.
  • Chekhov's Skill: Jack escapes from the Dutchman's jail using the same trick that Will used in the first film to free him.
  • Clipped-Wing Angel: Calypso's transformation. She's not completely powerless, summoning a whirlpool on command, but she has no physical body anymore because it turns into a mass of crabs, which promptly fall into the ocean.
  • Continuity Nod: While imprisoned on the Dutchman, Jack and his illusionary counterparts alternate between muttering "think like Will" and "think like the whelp", as Barbossa referred to Will at one point during Curse of the Black Pearl.
  • Cosmopolitan Council: The Court of the Brethren is made up of pirates from around the world, including French, Spanish, Arab, Chinese, and African contingents.
  • Death of the Hypotenuse: Norrington's Death By Unrequited Love.
  • Defiant to the End: The pirates that are to be hung at the beginning of the movie start singing "Hoist the Colours" to call the Brethren Court to rally, but the song is also a warning to Beckett that the way of pirates will never die.
  • Demoted to Dragon: Davy Jones has been coerced into following orders from Lord Cutler Beckett, as Beckett possesses Jones' Soul Jar, delivered to him by Norrington at the end of Dead Man's Chest.
  • Descriptiveville: The Brethren Court meets in the town of Shipwreck, in Shipwreck Cove, on Shipwreck Island. As one might imagine, it's easy for a ship to run aground there, and the town is made up of dozens of foundered ships. Lampshaded:
    Jack: For all that pirates are clever cobs, we are an unimaginative lot when it comes to naming things.
    Gibbs: Aye.
    Jack: I once sailed with a geezer lost both of his arms and part of his eye.
    Gibbs: And what'd you call him?
    Jack: Larry.
  • Did You Actually Believe...?: It appears for a moment that Jack expects Beckett to honor their bargain; Beckett, preparing to attack the Black Pearl, can't believe Sparrow is actually that naïve.
    Beckett: It's Nothing Personal, Jack. It's just good business.
  • Did You Just Flip Off Cthulhu?: James Norrington stabs Davy Jones with his final breath instead of accepting his offer.
  • Dismantled Macguffin: The Nine Pieces of Eight turn out to be the missing ingredients in a spell to free Calypso.
  • Disney Villain Death: After getting stabbed in the heart, Davy Jones falls over the side of the ship and plummets into the maelstrom during the final battle.
  • The Dog Bites Back: Davy Jones moves to regain control of the Flying Dutchman at every possible opportunity, eventually throttling Mercer with his tentacle beard as soon as they're alone.
  • Dragon Lady: Mistress Ching. We do not see much of her dragon ways but additional sources show her to be a formidable and rather vile example.
  • Dynamic Entry: Jack's cannonball stunt, except no one gets hurt in the process and it doubles as a Dynamic Exit.
  • Emergency Transformation: Will Turner becomes the Captain of the Flying Dutchman. Jack gives up his own chance at immortality to save Will by helping him stab Jones' heart. The crew then cuts Will's heart out to replace it.
  • Eureka Moment: Will manages to determine Davy Jones was in love with Calypso when the two are in Beckett's office, and Jones is grumbling about Calypso.
  • Evil Versus Evil: Beckett and Jones clearly do not get along, even with Jones under Beckett's thumb. On the two occasions Jones sees a chance of breaking free, his crew immediately start killing Norrington and Mercer's soldiers.
    • Also the whole conflict of the movie which is between thieving, murdering pirate outlaws and a thieving, murdering Company.
  • Exposed to the Elements: The journey to Davy Jones' Locker features the crew sailing through a frozen ocean. One unnamed Chinese crewmember's foot is frozen through, to the point that he accidentally snaps his big toe off. The rest of the crew are still wearing the same clothes they had in Singapore, yet suffer no ill effects apart from Pintel and Ragetti shivering.
  • Extended Disarming: Elizabeth is stripped of weapons before being allowed into Sao Feng's sanctum. It takes a while. The scene starts with some degree of realism—sure, she's carrying a lot of guns, but that was standard practice in those days because you got only one shot out of each of them, and female clothing of that time period had lots of places to conceal things. Then she pulls out a blunderbuss. The gun's size along with her gestures while taking it out and Barbossa's confused look lend to some rather disturbing theories as to where exactly she was hiding it.
  • Fantastic Racism: Played for Laughs, when Jack's recovering his stuff (and the Heart), and encounters the two incompetent marines again. One of them blames the breakdown of discipline on "the fish people" (rather than the pitched battle going on outside).
    Mullroy: Ohhh, so fish people, by dint of being fish people, automatically aren't as disciplined as non-fish people, is that it?
    Murtogg: Seems contributory, 's all I'm saying.
  • Fascinating Eyebrow: Davy Jones does this when facing off against Jack, Barbossa, and Elizabeth on the sandbar.
  • Five-Second Foreshadowing: Sao Feng threatens to kill a mole (spotted by his fake tattoos) in his hideout, and Barbossa shrugs and tells him to go ahead; he's not with them. But as Will notes, "If he's not with you, and he's not with us... who's he with?" Cue the soldiers of the East India Company smashing down the wall.
  • Flat "What.": Elizabeth, when Jack uses his vote to make her the Pirate King.
  • Freeze-Frame Bonus: The Pirate Lord Diego De Leon, in the "Hoist the Colours" scene, appears to have a flag very reminiscent of Blackbeard's real-life flag. (However, in On Stranger Tides Blackbeard's flag is different.)
  • Gambit Pileup: Comes to a head in the movie. Jack, Will, and Barbossa make and break deals willy-nilly with friend and foe alike in order to accomplish their separate goals.
  • Godzilla Threshold: Implied to be such with the singing of the "Hoist the Colours" song. The way it's treated throughout the movie is that it's sung as a warning to all pirates regardless of allegiance. Lord Beckett is pleased when the threshold is reached, as he knows it means that the Brethren Court will be convened and he can eliminate the last great pirates at a stroke. It's even implied that the song is a magical summons to the Court itself, which can be heard through coins at a distance like through a conch shell, helping it spread.
  • Gondor Calls for Aid: From the Pirate Lords of the Seven Seas, using the Nine Pieces of Eight. Calypso isn't too happy with their request, but since she's even more pissed at Davy Jones, the maelstrom she whips up helps them out more than their foes.
  • Heart in the Wrong Place: When Will Turner reappears after becoming captain of the Flying Dutchman, the scar from his impromptu heart surgery is visible high on the left side of the chest.
  • Historical-Domain Character:
    • You know Pirate Lord Mistress Ching? She's based on pirate Ching Shih, who was an absurdly successful Chinese pirate queen, who commanded the largest pirate fleet in history. She was so good, in fact, that the government allowed her to retire because they couldn't actually beat her. She's in the wrong century, but Rule of Cool.
    • The pirate lord of the Indian Ocean, Sumbhajee, was a real person as well, though he's less time-displaced than Ching.
  • I Just Want My Beloved to Be Happy: Norrington's reason for freeing Elizabeth and committing a Heroic Sacrifice to effect her escape.
  • In the Doldrums: Davey Jones' Locker is a barren wasteland (for a while, anyways). Nothing but perfectly flat, white desert in every direction. It's called "The Doldrums" twice, and it is true to the original definition (It is a sailors hell, after all): no wind to sail on nor even water to sail in; just Jack, his ship, and a bunch of crabs.
  • Ironic Echo:
    • When they first met in The Curse of the Black Pearl, Jack cut a deal that Elizabeth found underhanded and horrifying, especially as how it worked to her personal detriment. She protested, to receive only:
      Jack: Pirate!
    • In this movie, Elizabeth cuts a deal that Jack doesn't approve of. He protests.
      Elizabeth: King!
  • Ironic Hell: For Jack, the Black Pearl has always represented the freedom to go anywhere and do as he pleases. In the Doldrums of Davy Jones' Locker, he has his ship, but there's no sea to sail it on and nowhere to go.
  • Keystone Army: The enormous Imperial Armada Beckett brought with him to annihilate the pirates: they all turn tail and run when the Endeavour is sunk, despite it being heavily implied that they vastly outnumber the entire pirate fleet. This may simply be a case of Lazy Backup, but on the other hand, they are up against the Black Pearl, which is pretty infamous for her actions, as well as the Flying Dutchman, which would probably have made it a Curb-Stomp Battle given how everyone keeps saying "Control the Dutchman, control the seas."
  • Kingmaker Scenario: In the vote for Pirate King, every pirate has voted for themselves when it gets around to Jack. Jack realizes he isn't going to win and having the vote fail works against his interests, so he can essentially make whoever he wants king.
  • Late to the Realization: When Tia Dalma uses her sand crabs to locate and bring Jack back to the crew of the Black Pearl, it takes a while for Witty Jack to figure out that his ship has been suddenly ferried, without effort, across Davy Jones' Locker, after he himself was trying his damnedest to move it with a piece of rope. It takes even longer for him to realize that the ship is moving at breakneck speed, and he will soon be left behind if he does not catch up.
  • Lazy Backup: The final battle. The Black Pearl faces down the Flying Dutchman, and then Beckett's Endeavour, without any help from the pirate armada assembled behind them. Justified because the maelstrom prevents other ships from intervening. And once again, when the Dutchman does its Heel–Face Turn, Beckett's much-larger armada may be scarpering because the situation has just gotten too weird to cope with, or perhaps they just don't care for the man enough to continue fighting after his death.
  • Living Forever Is Awesome: Jack's motive for wanting to stab Davy Jones's heart. Jones is already enjoying the fruits of this trope as the immortal lord of the sea.
  • Loss of Identity:
    • Already a problem for the Flying Dutchman's crew as established in the last film, it kicks into overdrive in this one, with the crew largely reduced to a single-minded hoard, who repeat each other's sentences.
    • After falling past the Despair Event Horizon, Bootstrap's been afflicted as well, merging with the ship, and becoming incapable of remembering things for very long.
  • Love Makes You Evil: Davy Jones. When Calypso broke his heart, he said to hell with all of it and shirked his rightful duties, which led to him and his crew becoming corrupted and inhuman.
  • Magic Map: The charts acquired early in the movie can guide the reader to sites that will never appear on more accurate charts, and also bear vague warnings to aid in overcoming obstacles.
  • Married at Sea: Elizabeth and Will get married by Barbossa in the middle of the climactic battle.
  • Meaningful Echo:
    • Elizabeth quotes Barbossa's speech to the Brethren Court when she's later addressing the crew of the Black Pearl.
    • The Madness Mantra of Bootstrap Bill and the other Dutchman crewmembers. "Part of the crew, part of the ship..."
  • Mexican Standoff: A particularly interesting one, involving five people (one of whom isn't even directly related to the argument and pulls out his guns because everyone else does), each with two guns pointing at two other people. During the course of a conversation, they constantly switch who they are pointing their guns at. The whole thing becomes moot when Jack tries to shoot Barbossa, and the shot is a dud. This prompts everyone else to fire at each other, with the same result. Turns out that all the guns were waterlogged.
  • Misfit Mobilization Moment: One after Elizabeth's Rousing Speech drives all the pirate crews to truly fight for their way of life. They raise their banners and prepare for the fight while most of the captains stand motionless as the colors are raised.
  • Mistaken for Special Guest: When Barbossa details his plan to free Calypso from her mortal form, Sao Feng thinks he's talking about Elizabeth, turning her into a Living MacGuffin for a brief round of pirate negotiations.
  • Mobile Fishbowl: A variation. Negotiations are taking place on a sandbar, but since Davey Jones is cursed to be unable to set foot on land, he's standing in a big wooden bucket of seawater, with several others visible behind him.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!: When Norrington frees Elizabeth and Sao Feng's crew, he leaves the cell unlocked, allowing Bootstrap to get free, resulting in his own death.
  • Non-Indicative Name: The Nine Pieces of Eight—they're actually just bits of junk (a cup, a pince-nez, Ragetti's wooden eye, etc.) the first Brethren Court was carrying, because the were, to a man, flat broke.
    Pintel: Change the name.
    Gibbs: What, to "The Nine Pieces of Whatever We Happened to Have in Our Pockets at the Time"? Ohhh, yes, that sounds very piratey.
  • Nothing Personal: Beckett uses those exact words as he prepares to renege on his agreement with Sparrow.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: The Kraken is killed offscreen, with only a throwaway comment and a scene where they find the body afterward.
  • Orbital Kiss: At the climax, after Will and Elizabeth's Wartime Wedding at Sea while That One Theme plays.
  • Pet the Dog:
    • A quick one for Davy Jones: seeing incoming cannon fire, he throws himself on Mercer to protect him from the blast. The fact that he quickly remembers he hates the man and promptly chokes him to death just reinforces the fact that he would have protected any member of his crew in the same way—or he just wanted the pleasure of personally throttling Mercer.
    • Jack also gets one when he helps the dying Will stab Davy Jones' heart, and thus gives up his chance at immortality (which he had been working for during the entire film) to save Will's life.
  • Pistol-Whipping: Suggested by Pintel after a failed Mexican Standoff between Jack, Will, Elizabeth, and Barbossa. They fire their pistols, but the powder is wet.
    Pintel: We can still use 'em as clubs! [Ragetti bonks him on the head with a pistol]
  • Power High: When Tia Dalma is released from her human form and regains her godly powers by becoming Calypso, she makes a familiar expression that makes her enjoyment very evident.
  • Redemption Equals Death: For poor James Norrington. Rescues Elizabeth from the Flying Dutchman, and gets a wooden spar in the gut for his trouble.
  • Rescued from the Underworld: Barbossa, Will, and Elizabeth (each for their own reasons) lead an expedition to Davy Jones' Locker to rescue Jack Sparrow from his Ironic Hell.
  • Ridiculously Difficult Route: Getting from the normal world to Davy Jones' Locker involves sailing through a frozen sea, into an ice cavern, and straight off the edge of the map. Literally. And getting back is harder.
    Barbosa: We're good and lost now.
    Elizabeth: Lost!?
    Barbosa: For certain ye have to be lost to find a place as can't be found. Elseways everyone would know where it was.
  • Rousing Speech: Barbossa gives one to the Brethren Court about reclaiming their roles as masters of the sea through honest work and not using someone like Davy Jones or Calypso to give them assistance. He really seems to mean it, too, and Elizabeth's repeating his words later convinces him to go all-in with helping. Though her version is the truly moving, awesome one.
    Captain Barbossa: Revenge won't bring your father back, Miss Swann, and it's not something I'm intending to die for.
    Pirate King Captain Elizabeth Swann: You're right... [walks back a few steps towards the crew] Then what shall we die for?
    [beat]
    Elizabeth: You will listen to me... LISTEN! The Brethren will still be looking here to us, to the Black Pearl, to lead. And what will they see? Frightened bilge rats aboard a derelict ship? No... No, they will see free men! And FREEDOM! And what the enemy will see is the flash of our cannons! They will hear the ring of our swords and they will know what WE can do! By the sweat of our brows... And the strength of our backs... And the courage of our hearts! Gentlemen... Hoist the colors.
  • Rule of Cool: Given as the in-universe reason why the Brethren Court calls their "Pieces of Eight" by that name:
    Pintel: Those aren't pieces of eight. They're just pieces of junk!
    Gibbs: Aye, the original plan was to use nine Pieces of Eight to bind Calypso, but when the first court met the Brethren were, to a one, skint broke.
    Pintel: So change the name!
    Gibbs: What, to "Nine Pieces of Whatever We Happen To Have in Our Pockets At The Time"? Oh yes, that sounds very piratey!
  • Saharan Shipwreck: The Black Pearl, and Jack Sparrow with it, have been cast into Davy Jones' Locker, an endless, flat white desert. It's an Ironic Hell for Jack—he has his ship, but no sea to sail it on.
  • Sequel Hook: At the end, Jack sets a course for the Fountain of Youth using Sao Feng's maps.
  • Shaggy Dog Story: Calypso's entire subplot actually adds nothing to the film except to have everybody running around for a while. The filmmakers suggest that the maelstrom scene was designed so that she would "Provide the arena," which pretty clearly translates to, "Yeah, we weren't really sure what she was doing in our script either."
  • She Is the King: Elizabeth Swann, Pirate King. They're just giving the bloody title away! The Nine Pirate Lords themselves have two females among them.
  • Shoot the Messenger: Making the scene where Teague shoots someone at the Pirate Lords' meeting for questioning the Code, it's not even the speaker's idea to question it: he's a mouthpiece for one of the Lords, and was just saying what his boss wanted him to.
  • Shout-Out: The shots of Beckett as the serene centre of the screen as his ship disintegrates around him are extremely similar to shots of Scorpius in a similar situation in the Farscape episode "Into the Lion's Den".
  • Shrunken Head: During a conversation with Captain Teague (his father), Jack asks, "How's Mum?" Teague shows him a shrunken woman's head.
    Jack: She looks great...
  • Slasher Smile: Tia Dalma sports one in Singapore when her booby trap blows up a dozen Mooks.
  • Someone Has to Do It: "The Dutchman must have a captain." And if the position is ever vacant, well, You Kill It, You Bought It.
  • The Stinger: After the credits, a Time Skip of ten years shows Elizabeth and her son awaiting the reappearance of Will from his duties aboard the Dutchman.
  • Surprisingly Sudden Death: Governer Swan is killed off-screen by Beckett's orders, after he learns too much. It even appears to be one in-universe, since when he sees Elizabeth in Davy Jones's locker, he actually seems confused as to whether he's dead.
  • Tension-Cutting Laughter: During the Mexican Standoff mentioned above, after a minute goes by they all start laughing... but then they remember that, yes, they do all have people to threaten.
  • The Unintelligible: Calypso, when in 50 foot giant form, rants unintelligible things at the pirates after they set her free. Word of God says that she's cursing them, and basically telling them to go fuck themselves. This ties into what Jack said; no matter that they've freed her, she was still imprisoned before that, and is not happy about the time she spent confined in a human body. And she's not entirely unintelligible—French speakers get a Bilingual Bonus in the form of two very familiar and vulgar syllables: "Va chier!" (a scatological version of "Go fuck yourself").
  • Vapor Wear:
    • After an Extended Disarming sequence in Singapore, Elizabeth is left wearing only a shirt. Ragetti, who is hiding under the floorboards, gets a peep up her dress and informs Pintel. During the interval, however, Elizabeth has moved forward, resulting in Pintel getting an eyeful of the privates of one of Sao Feng's male group.
    • Unlike Elizabeth's 'corset', this is a rare (probably accidental) bit of authenticity: panties (and male underpants) haven't been invented yet—nobody wore anything under between their undersides and their clothes but a 'shift' (the garment Elizabeth spends most of the first film in) if they were female or a long shirt if they were male (or a cross-dressing female pirate, of course.)
  • Viewers Are Geniuses: Those familiar with ocean weather patterns get an Oh, Crap! moment when two captains facing off both claim the wind is on their side. Cue the maelstrom.
  • Villainous B.S.O.D.: Beckett goes completely lifeless when both the Black Pearl and the Flying Dutchman are preparing to blow him to pieces.
  • Visual Innuendo:
    • Barbossa and Jack, feuding over who is captaining the Black Pearl, both pull out their telescopes. Jack is disappointed when his is significantly smaller. Later, he steps up to the rail with an enormous, sagging spyglass. Barbossa gives him an Aside Glance.
    • At the gathering of the Brethren Court, Barbossa bangs on a table with a chain shot (two cannonballs connected by a chain) for emphasis. Later he stands up and we have a perfectly framed shot of his legs, with the two cannonballs dangling in between.
      Jack: Whose boons? Your boons?
  • Vocal Dissonance: One of the Pirate Lords has his underlings speak for him at the meeting, because his own voice is very high and squeaky.
  • Wartime Wedding: Will and Elizabeth not only get married in the middle of a war, but in the middle of a battle. On a pirate ship.
  • Waterfall into the Abyss: The secret entry to Davy Jones's locker apparently involves sailing right over the edge of the world—once you get to a place where the Earth is no longer round.
  • Wedding Smashers: Inverted—Will and Elizabeth interrupt the battle with their wedding, seeing how they could be about to die.
  • Woman Scorned: If Calypso is released, as Jack points out during the Brethren Court, she would be an incredibly angry god who's just gotten all her powers back. He even mentions the trope by name. Not helping is that just as she is released, Will clues her in on the fact that only Davy Jones could've given the original court the means to betray her.
    Jack: As my learned colleague so naively suggests, we can release Calypso, and we can pray that she will be merciful... I rather doubt it. Can we, in fact, pretend that she is anything other than a woman scorned, like which fury Hell hath no? We cannot.
  • Would Hurt a Child: The opening scene shows that Beckett is willing to execute children for being pirates, in order to draw out his real foes, the Court of the Brethren.
  • "Yes"/"No" Answer Interpretation: Davy Jones likes to ask men about to die whether they fear death, as he can offer them servitude on his ship instead. When he asks Norrington, all he gets is a stab in response. He says he takes that as a 'no'.
  • You Kill It, You Bought It: Whoever kills Davy Jones has to take his place. Cue dilemmas for Will, who swore an oath to kill Davy Jones, and Jack, who thinks Living Forever Is Awesome. But there's a catch—do the job of ferrying souls to the afterlife, or become a Cthulhumanoid like Jones. In the end, Jack helps Will to kill Jones as an Emergency Transformation. Ten years at sea is preferable to immediate death, for both Will and Elizabeth.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd