Film / For a Few Dollars More

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"Where life had no value, death, sometimes, had its price. That is why the bounty killers appeared."
Title Card

For a Few Dollars More (1965) is considered as one of the greatest films of the Spaghetti Western, and a masterpiece of Sergio Leone. It is the second film in the Dollars Trilogy, A Fistful of Dollars being the first and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly being the third. Even That Other Wiki named this film as an Epic Western. And no wonder, in fact, the intro theme, along with The Good, the Bad and the Ugly theme, is the most known and memorable in the Sergio Leone's Western films.

The Man with No Name (nicknamed "Monco" or "Manco", respectively Italian and Spanish slang for "missing one hand", because he does nearly everything with his left hand in order to keep his right hand free to draw and fire) (Clint Eastwood) and Colonel Mortimer (Lee Van Cleef), a skillful Bounty Hunter, are both hunting the famed gang leader El Indio. The Man With No Name is motivated by money; the Colonel, we come to discover, is motivated by revenge. After the two bounty hunters clash, they put aside their differences and team up to capture Indio. As part of their plan, Manco infiltrates Indio's gang by busting one of Indio's friends out of prison. However, the plan does not work out as hoped.

For a Few Dollars More provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Affably Evil: Nino, at least compared with Indio.
  • All Deserts Have Cacti: Averted as the movie was filmed in Spain.
  • Animated Credits Opening: The opening has animated words on a live-action background.
  • Arch-Enemy: El Indio to Colonel Mortimer.
  • Artistic License – History: The film is set during the American Civil War, 1861-65 (as witness the Confederate money in the safe). One of the bandits comments that the safe "weighs three tons and can't be opened with dynamite." Indeed, it cannot - Nobel got his first dynamite patent in 1867.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Col. Mortimer's Buntline Special. Its longer barrel gives Mortimer an edge in distance, meaning he can wait out of a pistol's normal range and line up shots, but that same long barrel also prevents him from quickdrawing it, a disadvantage in some of the situations he finds himself in. He carries a derringer up his sleeve for such emergencies. It was somewhat practical for those who preferred a pistol grip as opposed to the lever action.
  • Ax-Crazy:
    • El Indio is a full-blow insane man, especially when he smokes (presumably) marijuana.
    • Heavily implied with Wild the Hunchback as well (especially given that he's played by Klaus Kinski).
  • Badass Beard: Monco and Indio both sport these.
  • Badass Mustache: Colonel Mortimer.
  • Bad Boss: El Indio. He sets up his own gang to be wiped out by Mortimer and Monco so that he can keep all the money for himself.
  • Baker Street Regular: The kid Manco pays to keep tabs on Mortimer fits the bill.
  • Bandito: El Indio takes the trope Up to Eleven. He is a weed-smoking Mexican baddie.
  • Bang, Bang, BANG: At the beginning of the film, every single one of their shots also sounds like a ricochet, even though they only shoot into the air and the ground.
  • Bank Robbery: El Indio's target is the Bank of El Paso and its disguised safe containing "almost a million dollars".
  • Batman Cold Open: The beginning shows Colonel Mortimer and Manco separately tracking and killing wanted criminals and collecting their bounties.
  • Batman Gambit: Mortimer tells Monco to suggest Indio take his gang north, as it would be a good spot for an ambush. When Indio tells Monco that he is planning to go north anyway, Monco warns him about the possibility of an ambush, and advises him to south instead. Since going west would take them right back where they came from, Indio splits the difference and heads east. Naturally, Mortimer is waiting for them at their destination.
  • Best Served Cold: Col. Mortimer has spent years honing his skills as a bounty hunter, tracking down the bandit who murdered Mortimer's brother-in-law and raped Mortimer's sister until she committed suicide.
  • Big Bad: El Indio, who is also The Heavy. He's robbed enough banks and killed enough people that it attracts a large enough bounty to get Manco's attention, while he raped Mortimer's sister and caused her suicide.
  • Big Damn Heroes: As shown above on the page image, Clint Eastwood's Man With No Name character saves Mortimer by intervening in Indio's unfair Mexican standoff by providing a gun for him to use against the villain. With his gun trained on Indio, satisfied that the odds have now been evened out in his friend's favor, he says "Now we start", and sits down.
  • Boisterous Bruiser: You could argue that El Indio is a deconstruction of this trope. He laughs all the time, hugs his friends a lot, is enthusiastic and boisterous and runs a band of plucky outlaws out to rob an impenetrable bank against all the odds — but he's a depraved child-murdering, stalking rapist and his band are all implied to be similarly bad. His happy laughing face gets on his "Wanted!" Poster, but he also has a much more evil, violent side to him which causes him to turn on his own men. Lastly, his good moods seem almost maniacal, and are probably induced with drugs.
  • Black and Gray Morality: Monco's a ruthless Bounty Hunter, Mortimer a revenge-driven stalker, and El Indio a total headcase. Not much white.
  • Bounty Hunter: Both Monco and his friendly rival/partner Mortimer.
  • Breaking Out the Boss: Indio's gang's first scene is them freeing Indio from prison. He leaps right back into action once he is out of his cell.
  • Butt-Monkey:
    • Wilde. His first prominent scene has Mortimer striking a match on his brace—and he can't challenge him back because the gang can't afford to allow itself to be noticed. The next time he encounters Mortimer, the colonel shrugs off his challenges...which infuriates him even more. And then Mortimer outguns him.
    • Groggy (though he is the smartest of El Indio's gang). He gets pushed around by the rest of the gang, and winds up hurting himself during the No-Holds-Barred Beatdown (there's a shot of him shaking his wrists after punching Mortimer).
  • By the Lights of Their Eyes: When Manco is creeping around the room where El Indio hid the cabinet, this effect is achieved by painting Eastwood's face dark brown, so his eyes glow out.
  • The Chessmaster: Indio's plan for the bank robbery is quite clever. Everything else though doesn't quite work out..
  • Chinese Laborer: The Man With No Name orders one to clear the Colonel's room out and to take his stuff out of town. The Colonel intercedes, and a back-and-forth ensues until the laborer freaks out, drops the baggage and bolts into the hotel.
  • Cloudcuckoolander: The Prophet. And all because of the damn trains!! His memory, however, seems to remain intact.
  • Cold Sniper: Mortimer, who besides carrying a Colt Buntline Special with a 10 inch barrel and attachable stock, has his horse stocked with an impressive array of rifles.
  • Colonel Badass: Mortimer, natch. He's a former Confederate Army colonel who carries a veritable arsenal with him wherever he goes, and has a personal score with El Indio.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Monco uses a saloon's mirror to his advantage in a gunfight.
  • Continuity Nod: The Man's injured hand is the same one he injured when being tortured in A Fistful of Dollars.
  • Cool Guns: Col. Mortimer has a whole case of 'em.
  • Crapsack World: The title card sets the stage by declaring, "Where life had no value, death, sometimes, had its price. That is why the bounty killers appeared." The film was even called Death Had a Pricenote  in Spain.
  • Creator Cameo: The whistling bounty hunter is voiced by Sergio Leone.
  • Curb-Stomp Battle: Manco dishes one out to Red Cavanaugh, with some shades of No-Holds-Barred Beatdown. With one hand.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: Mortimer often dresses in black and is clearly the good guy when compared to El Indio.
  • Decoy Protagonist: Let's face it, this film is more about Col. Mortimer and his quest for vengeance than Manco.
  • Dénouement: The film climaxes with Mortimer shooting El Indio, and the dénouement was Manco figuring out and showing to the audience why Mortimer had wanted Indio dead so badly to begin with. And leaving with the loot.
  • Deuteragonist: Colonel Mortimer is the deuteragonist to Manco's protagonist.
  • Distinguished Gentleman's Pipe: Col. Mortimer smokes a very nice one.
  • The Dragon: Nino, to Indio.
  • The Dreaded: El Indio. Ax-Crazy bandit, and paranoid.
  • Duel to the Death: Unique among the trilogy since the Man with No Name is not an active participant; the duel is between El Indio and Colonel Mortimer.
  • Evil Genius: Indio and Groggy.
  • Evil Laugh: Indio does this a lot.
  • Famous Last Words:
    • "I'll kill you for this." Guy Calloway
    • "Let Red go." Cavanaugh gang member
    • "He's eighteen months now." Tomaso's wife
    • "NO!" Tomaso, as Luke guns down his wife and son
    • "Cuchillo, count to three." Juan Wild
    • "What is it, Nino?" Slim
    • "Indio!" Nino
    • "Go on." Luke
    • "When the chimes end, pick up your gun. Try and shoot me, Colonel. Just try." El Indio
  • Fan Disservice: The flashback scene, as Indio rapes Mortimer's sister and she commits suicide. There's a nice shot of her bare chest... With a bullet hole through one nipple.
  • Faux Affably Evil: Indio.
  • Forced to Watch: El Indio, in one of his first Kick the Dog moments of the movie, forces a guy who took money to place him behind bars to watch as the family that he started with that money (his wife and his little boy) are taken outside and shot to death, while also making him listen to the pocket watch that Indio always carries.
  • For the Evulz: El Indio's reason for being.
  • Freudian Trio: Manco's the Ego, Mortimer the Superego, and El Indio a very crazed Id.
  • Foreshadowing: The duel between Mortimer and El Indio in the film's climax is very similar to the Mexican Standoff in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Both take place in a stonebricked circle in a place filled with corpses.
  • For the Evulz: Much of Indio's actions have no solid motivation and he seems to simply enjoy being evil.
  • Freudian Trio:
    • Ego: Monco — Interested only in the money, but can Pet the Dog on occasion
    • Superego: Colonel Douglas Mortimer (Retired) — Calm, focused, and devoted to gaining revenge on Indio
    • Id: El Indio — Near psychotic bandito; has rapid mood swings, spends most of the film in a drug-induced haze
  • Functional Addict: El Indio may spend most of the film under the influence of opium, but he's still an efficient and threatening villain.
  • Funny Foreground Event: Chickens start walking around in the streets of El Indio's base as Manco drives off with his bounty.
  • Giant Mook: Indio's Dragon, Nino, portrayed by the 6 foot 4, 250 pound Mario Brega. Brega portrayed similar thugs in A Fistful of Dollars, as Chico, and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly as Corporal Wallace.
  • Give Me a Sword: In the climactic duel, Indio has shot the long-barreled revolver out of Colonel Mortimer's hand, and wants an unfair duel: Indio clearing leather versus Mortimer bending over to get his weapon off the ground. Manco intervenes, providing Mortimer with a fast-draw revolver, belt, and holster for a much fairer fight.
  • Good Scars, Evil Scars: Nino has a festering, still bloodied one that covers one side of his face.
  • Good Smoking, Evil Smoking: Col. Mortimer's pipe (incidentally, a gorgeous example) makes him a Distinguished Gentleman Badass. Manco smokes cigarillos, while El Indio smokes marijuana.
  • Good with Numbers: A subtle one: Colonel Mortimer wants $5,000 for opening the stolen safe. Indio's counter offer is only 2 grand, but the Colonel won't lower his fee. Seeing how Mortimer had just killed Wild the Hunchback in a gun duel and the reward for the latter is 3,000, well, you do the math.
  • G-Rated Drug: El Indio smokes what is presumably marijuana, but it's never mentioned exactly what it is. There's a few points where we see him so stoned he falls asleep with his eyes open or ends up giggling uncontrollably, but other than that the film deliberately makes it unclear whether Indio's psychotic behavior is caused by the drugs, or whether he's actually medicating a mental illness with them and without them he'd be even worse. (The fact that he twitchily requests joints from his underlings after killing people for trivial reasons supports this interpretation). Presumably, the intention was to placate Moral Guardians in America, without ending up in the Reefer Madness hysteria school by claiming weed will turn you into a bipolar rapist.
  • The Gunslinger: Manco, Mortimer and El Indio.
  • Hand Cannon: Col. Mortimer wields a Buntline Special that may be cumbersome on the draw, but can pack one hell of a punch with deadly accuracy. He unfolds a pack on his horse to reveal that among his many weapons, he carries an even longer-barreled pistol as well.
  • Hand-or-Object Underwear: A prostitute uses a hand bra after Col. Mortimer interrupts her bath with a fugitive.
  • He Knows Too Much: Indio kills his cellmate, the man who built the safe cabinet. He could have brought the man with him instead, but Indio has no intention of sharing the money.
  • Hell Is That Noise: Indio's watch chime. Every time it plays, you know someone is going to die horribly.
  • Hey, You!: The protagonists settle into a friendly rivalry of sorts, addressing one another as "boy" and "old man", respectively.
  • Honor Before Reason: Manco allows three resting bandits to get to their feet so that they have a fair chance to go for their guns before he dispatches them with his Improbable Aiming Skills. The odd thing is that these men only try to attack him because he just declared his intention to shoot them all, and they otherwise would have continued to regard him as an ally. He planned to kill three non-hostile men in cold blood no matter what happened so why even give them the chance?
  • How the Mighty Have Fallen: Mortimer was a war hero, but now he's just a bounty hunter.
  • Hurting Hero: Monco and Mortimer are both beaten by El Indio's gang when they're captured.
  • I Am Not Left-Handed: Monco performs nearly all actions using only his left hand, to leave free his right hand, with which he draws his weapon.
  • Improbable Aiming Skills: In the hat-shooting contest between Manco and Mortimer. Manco eventually proves he is unable to hit Mortimer's hat after shooting it too far away, but makes up for it by hitting the same spot in the ground at that range two times in a row. Mortimer then one ups him by shooting Manco's hat off his head from even father away, and suspending it in the air with every shot. Done a second time later when Mortimer grazes Manco's neck with a bullet, so he'll have a convincing injury to back up his story when he meets up with Indio again.
  • Infant Immortality: Horribly averted.
  • Invisible Backup Band: The musical pocket watch is accompanied with what sounds like an orchestra and a mariachi band.
  • It's Personal: Unlike Manco, Mortimer's motivation throughout the movie is not the bounty over El Indio and his gang, but vengeance for the death of Mortimer's sister many years before, who killed herself while being raped by Indio.
  • It Works Better with Bullets: invoked; Indio threatens the last remaining prison guard with an unloaded gun, then tells him that he's being left alive so that he can tell everyone else of how dangerous Indio's gang is.
  • Jerkass: El Indio, in spades.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Monco's a bit of a Jerkass to Mortimer the first time they meet, and tries to cut him out of the deal once or twice thereafter, but he warms up to him and even comes to consider him a friend.
  • Kick the Dog: Indio gets a lot of them during the film:
    • When orders his minions to sacrifice the family of a man, and to add a properly sadistic touch, he forces the man to watch this.
    • Gets another when he kills Cuchillo (one of his own minions).
    • Then there's the flashback scene.
  • Knight Errant: Manco.
  • Leitmotif: Manco is represented by a recorder riff, and Mortimer is accompanied by a single twang on a Jew's harp.
  • Let's Fight Like Gentlemen: Averted with Indio, who does everything he can to make certain the odds are always stacked in his favor. Make sure your opponent is outgunned? Check. Put his weapon out of reach? Check. Better yet, just disarm him? Check. This gets turned on its head in the final duel, when he shoots the gun out of Colonel Mortimer's hand. He then starts the chimes on his pocket watch, smirking at the Colonel, whose gun is on the ground several feet away. There's no way Mortimer can get to his gun before getting shot. Indio holds up the watch, saying "When the chimes end, pick up your gun. Go ahead and shoot me, Colonel. Just try." A very tense scene ensues, and Indio is reaching for his gun as the chimes wind down. Cue both of them hearing new chimes, and the Man With No Name enters, holding Mortimer's watch in one hand and a rifle in the other. Covering Indio, he goes to Mortimer and gives him his pistol, negating all of Indio's advantages. Once his friend is re-armed and satisfied that the odds are now even, the Man With No Name looks at Indio and says "Now we start." Indio doesn't say a word throughout all this but the Oh Crap expression on his face speaks volumes. He knows he's a dead man.
  • Light Is Not Good: El Indio. In some scenes he wears with white clothes, but this does not mean that he is a good person. In fact, he is an Ax-Crazy, cold-blooded maniac.
  • Mangst: Col. Mortimer is made of this trope so much that it's not until the Dénouement that Manco figures out that he has any Mangst at all.
  • Manipulative Bastard: Inido's scheme to set Manco and Mortimer against his gang seems foolproof. If Manco and Mortimer win, his gang's dead and he and Nino get all the money. If they kill Manco and Mortimer, no harm and no foul. Unfortunately, he's Out-Gambitted by Groggy who's smart enough to figure out what's going on, and by Manco and Mortimer being even better than he expected.
  • Memento MacGuffin: The musical pocket watch. Mortimer has one. Indio has one, except that it isn't.
  • My Name Is Inigo Montoya: Played straight when Mortimer called out Indio with "Colonel Douglas Mortimer, Indio - does that name mean anything to you!"
  • Neutral Female: The little sister might well have survived if she'd shot El Indio instead of herself, in spite of the feelings of shame and violation felt after the rape, as well as watching her boyfriend being murdered in front of her by El Indio.
  • No-Holds-Barred Beatdown: As is typical of the trilogy. Of course, Manco and Mortimer attempt to fight back, to little avail.
  • No Name Given: The Man With No Name.
  • Nostalgic Music Box: Two pocket watches, one belonging to Mortimer and the other carried by Indio, that play the same tune. The two watches originally belonged to Mortimer's sister and her husband. Indio stole one after killing him and raping her and uses the music to remind himself of the good time he had doing so, or perhaps the woman he was clearly a Stalker With a Crush for...
  • Nothing Up My Sleeve: Colonel Mortimer carries a Derringer in his right sleeve, which he uses against Wild in the bar at Agua Calinte.
  • Oh, Crap!: Manco gets one when, after climbing over a wall from a meeting with Mortimer, he steps on, and wakes up, one of El Indio's thugs. Mortimer follows, and gets one when he realizes Manco's not the one holding him up.
  • Ominous Music Box Tune: El Indio is addicted to a musical pocket watch, which plays Morricone music, and he uses it every time he has a duel, or just kills someone. For the duels, he and his opponent draw when the music ends.
    • As the flashback sequence in throughout the movie keeps extending, showing us more and more of what happened on that rainy night, you realize just how creepy this is, since El Indio got it from a woman whose husband he killed and whom he then raped, driving her to shoot herself. Colonel Mortimer has a matching version because it turns out the woman was his sister.
  • Ominous Pipe Organ: During Indio's showdown with Tomaso, the man who turned Indio in 18 months before.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: The villain is simply known as "El Indio".
  • O.O.C. Is Serious Business: Discussed In-Universe: Colonel Mortimer provokes the Hunchback by striking a match on his hump; the Hunchback's driven to twitchy irritation but leaves the bar without retaliating. The bartender comments that "if the Hunchback didn't kill you, he must have a pretty good reason."
  • Outfit Decoy: The climatic shootout has one of El Indio's henchmen barge into a house and encounters what he thinks is Manco, his hat poking out behind some furniture. After the henchman shoots the hat, Manco quickly turns around in a swivel chair and kills the henchman.
  • Price On Their Head: El Indio and his gang are worth $27 000 in total.
  • Psycho for Hire: Heavily implied with the hunchback.
  • Quick Draw: Indio likes to challenge people he's captured to these; playing the Ominous Music Box Tune with its end as the cue to fire. He also likes to place whoever he's facing at a disadvantage, such as surrounding them with goons or removing their guns from easy access. It's only when Manco steps in at the end that he actually has to fight fairly. Also, Indio's heard the song a thousand times while his opponents have no clue when the music might end. This of course puts him on equal terms with Col. Mortimer.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: Young, bounty hunting, suave Manco, who improvises his solutions and out shoots men in a quick drawing blaze, contrasted with Mortimer, older, revenge seeking, and who carefully plans ahead of time and prefers to snipe his quarry.
  • Red Right Hand: The Hunchback, who is perhaps the most insane of El Indio's men.
  • Refuge in Audacity: When introducing himself to El Indio's gang, Manco says that because of their huge bounties he wants to join them so he could turn them all in later. Indio brushes it off as a joke and accepts him anyway, calling it "the one answer that would prove [Manco's] allright". Except not, he instantly recognizes Manco for who he is, but decides to play along and use him later.
  • Revenge by Proxy: Indio does this early on in the movie to a guy who took money to put him behind bars. The guy had used the money to start a family, and so Indio feels that the family is "partly his." He forces him to watch as his men take the guy's wife and baby boy outside and shoot them both to death, just before sadistically setting up a duel between them using the pocketwatch that he'd made him listen to during the whole thing.
  • Reverse Psychology: Colonel Mortimer, tells Manco to advise the gang to flee north since there's a good place for an ambush, and the two can catch the gang in a cross-fire. However, Manco wants all the money for himself and advises the gang to go south, pointing out that north would be a good place for an ambush. But Indio doesn't know Manco very well and suspects it may be a trap. So he splits the difference and heads east. When they get there, Manco finds Mortimer waiting for him, explaining that he knew Manco would do the exact opposite of what he said and also knew that Indio is suspicious of betrayal. Since they couldn't go west, as that's where they pulled off their heist, east was the only place they could run.
    • Mortimer employs it earlier when he offers to let Manco take the bounty for Indio while he would collect the larger bounty for the rest of the band, knowing that Manco would instead insist on the opposite and allow Mortimer a better chance to personally have his revenge.
  • Riding into the Sunset: How Mortimer makes his exit after getting his revenge.
  • Roaring Rampage of Revenge: Lee Van Cleef played the avenger role in the movie. Here, his target is El Indio, a notorious outlaw who gunned down his sister's lover and then raped her, leading to the sister taking her own life.
  • Sarcastic Confession: Manco's answer to the question why he wants to join El Indio's gang: "Well, with such a big reward being offered on all of you gentlemen, I thought I'll might just tag along on your next robbery, might just turn you in to the law".
  • Sean Connery Is About to Shoot You: In the main poster, Clint Eastwood's imitating his pose in the poster from the first film. Meanwhile, Lee van Cleef is holding his gun sideways and preparing to shoot the guy to your right. It's seen clearer in this alternate poster.
  • Sequel Escalation: Compared with A Fistful of Dollars, this one had had much more action and featured several locations, as well as a larger cast.
  • Shout-Out: The musical pocket watches are an homage to The Bravados with Gregory Peck. Probably not coincidentally, Lee Van Cleef appeared in that film as a villain.
  • Showdown at High Noon: The film climaxes in a showdown between Col. Mortimer and El Indio.
  • Sliding Scale of Gender Inequality: The film has one credited woman who only appears in two brief scenes, and one girl who only appears in a flashback and has no lines.
  • Smoking Is Cool: And totally badass.
  • Smug Snake: Guy Calloway, Mortimer's target in Tucamari. The stationmaster explains that Calloway felt he was worth much more than the $1000 price on his head and added a pair of zeroes onto the wanted poster.
  • The Sociopath: Indio, who else? He is a ruthless psychopath, considered by the authorities in the film to be one of the worst criminals of the times.
  • Sociopathic Hero: Monco is a slight example. He is a ruthless mercenary/murderer in a Crapsack World. What do you expect?
  • The Starscream: Indio's third-in-command Groggy, whose plan to take over the gang is inadvertently foiled by Manco and Mortimer.
  • Steven Ulysses Perhero: "The Man With No Name" is called "Manco", which means "missing one hand".
  • Supporting Protagonist: Clint Eastwood may have got top billing, but this is really Colonel Mortimer's story.
  • Tragic Keepsake: Colonel Mortimer's pocketwatch. It contains a portrait of his sister.
  • Tranquil Fury: Mortimer calmly eats his dinner while sitting across the table from the man who raped his sister and drove her to suicide.
  • Troubled Backstory Flashback: We often cut to flashbacks of Col. Mortimer's sister's ordeal with El Indio.
  • Undying Loyalty: Nino to El Indio.
  • Unorthodox Holstering: While having a cross-draw isn't all that unorthodox, it's how the old man identifies Mortimer and is able to tell Manco who he really is.
  • Wall of Weapons: Mortimer has a collection of firearms strapped to a rolled-up sheet of canvas carried by his horse.
  • "Wanted!" Poster
    • The first villain we see adds two zeros on his own wanted poster, claiming it isn't anywhere near enough.
    • Colonel Mortimer also has a bit of a staring contest with El Indio's wanted poster as he shoots it with his mind.
  • Weapon of Choice:
    • Monco uses a Colt Single Action Army with a 5.5 inch barrel, a.k.a. "Artillery" model with silver rattlesnake grips.
    • Mortimer uses a Buntline Special with an 10 inch barrel as his main weapon. He often attaches a stock to the grip for long distance shots.
    • Indio uses a Buntline Special with an eight inch barrel.
  • Wham Shot: Mortimer's pocket watch has the same woman as in El Indio's pocket watch.
  • Would Hurt a Child: El Indio ordering his men to kill a baby, setting the tone for how depraved he really is.
  • Why Don't You Just Shoot Him?:
    • Subverted, since Indio thought he would have profited from the bounty hunters killing off most of his gang (as he wouldn't have had to split the loot). Of course, it doesn't work out as well as he had planned.
    • Used as a plot point earlier in the movie, when Mortimer intentionally insults the hunchbacked bandit when he's in town. The hunchback is obviously beside himself with rage, and clearly wants to shoot Mortimer in the face, except his compatriots hold him back. "Why would a man have a gun and not use it?" Because they're trying to not catch attention while planning a bank robbery.

Alternative Title(s): For A Few Dollars More

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/ForAFewDollarsMore